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A F R I C A N

2017/18

YOUR OFFICIAL INDUSTRY EXPORT GUIDE INTO AFRICA


Editor: Adri Viviers Tel: +27 (0)11 883 4627 | Cell: 084 261 1805 E-mail: sajewellerynews@isikhova.co.za

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Africa retains leading role as global rough diamond supplier Despite the growing rough diamond output by major non-African producer states such as Russia and Canada, Africa remains by far the most important source of diamonds

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AFRICAN Odyssey is published by: Isikhova Publishing & Communications CC, PO Box 651793, Benmore, 2010, Johannesburg, South Africa. 27 Panners Lane, Riverclub, Sandton, South Africa. Chief Executive Officer: Andrew Meyer E-mail: andrewm@isikhova.co.za

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A culture-rich tradition for jewellery Influencing the materials used in the production of African jewellery are cultural differences and resource availability, with jewellery appreciated for its material properties, patterns or inherent symbolism

Competing in the mainstream of international trading

Chief Financial Officer: Imraan Mahomed E-mail: imraanm@isikhova.co.za Website: www.isikhova.co.za Printing: Typo Content Images: www.123rf.com

AFRICAN Odyssey is a renowned publication that seeks to showcase the continent’s growth and trade potential. It is an essential reference guide for exporting to the continent and will definitely inspire you in your business endeavours. It contains informative and fundamental information and is updated annually.

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AFRICAN Odyssey is published in conjunction with the Jewellery Council of South Africa. The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the owners and the Diamond and Jewellery Federation of South Africa, its members, the publisher or its agents. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of its contents, neither the owners and the Diamond and Jewellery Federation of South Africa, the editor nor the publisher can be held responsible for any omissions or errors; or for any misfortune, injury or damages which may arise therefrom. The same applies to all advertising. AFRICAN Odyssey 2017/2018. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage retrieval system, without prior written permission from the publishers.

CONTENTS

AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 03

Meeting the ever-changing demands of the industry is proving to be quite challenging and not many secrets are being shared on how to access new markets and how small and medium-sized businesses could find themselves competing with global traders

Adding significant value to SA’s precious metals

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Established in 1920, Rand Refinery has grown to become the largest integrated single-site precious metals refining and smelting complex in the world

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Map of Africa & list of African countries and territories

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SA: the training hub of Africa Anna-Mart Rossouw, owner of Paramount Consulting, the official training partner of the Jewellery Council of SA, describes the riches our country has to offer

Showcasing Africa’s best under one roof Jewellex Africa attracts exhibitors and buyers from within SA, African states and international countries and offers an environment for B2B linkages that results in significant business growth

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Exporting jewellery to Africa: Is there a way forward? With some government intervention, much research, better infrastructure and a bit of luck, the South African jewellery and diamond industry can realise the profits of exporting to the rest of the continent in the near future


ISIKHOVA/SAJN/AUG2017

Finest Gemstones & Beads Cape Town: 021 422 4677 or 021 424 0063 or 076 162 3741 Email: info@ajanta.co.za or gems@ajanta.co.za www.ajantaafrika.com


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 05

AFRICA RETAINS LEADING ROLE AS GLOBAL ROUGH DIAMOND SUPPLIER Despite the growing rough diamond output by major non-African producer states such as Russia and Canada, Africa remains by far the most important source of diamonds, producing around 65% of rough stones, says Ernie Blom, President of the World Federation of Diamond Bourses. Within Africa, Botswana is the largest producer, with around 20,5 million carats with a value of US$2,85 billion mined in 2016, according to Kimberley Process statistics. Botswana is followed by SA, with output of 8,3 million carats with a value of US$1,25 billion. Angola produced more than 9 million carats with a value of US$1,08 billion,

while Namibia’s output was 1,7 million carats worth US$915 million. Zimbabwe produced 2,1 million carats with a value of US$105 million. The Democratic Republic of Congo produced more than 23 million carats with a value of US$246 million because the country’s stones are mostly industrialquality goods. Other African producer states include Lesotho, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, the Ivory Coast and Ghana. The most significant developments in relation to African diamond-producing countries in recent years have been in Botswana and Namibia, which have both made moves to beneficiate their diamonds.

The concept of beneficiation originally began in SA. Botswana and Namibia have both signed deals with De Beers which allow them to market a proportion of their stones independently, thus enabling them to bring their populations higher income for their goods. Meanwhile, polishing plants have been established in their countries, which create extra work opportunities. These countries also hope to create diamond-set jewellery, thus further boosting the value of their diamonds. Of all the southern African countries that have started along the path to beneficiation, Botswana has made the most progress.


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Given that it is the world’s largest diamond producer by value, that does not come as a surprise. The Jwaneng mine produces the world’s highest-value stones, as part of Debswana, the jointly held De Beers-Botswana government company, which mines most of the country’s diamonds. Diamonds have brought great benefits to the country, which was previously one of the poorest nations on the planet, accounting for about one-third of its gross domestic product (GDP), 45% of government revenue and 75% of its foreign currency earnings. Since the discovery of diamonds in Botswana in 1966, the GDP annual growth rate has averaged 7%. Debswana is the largest corporate responsibility contributor to the socio-economic development of Botswana. The country now has one of the fastest-growing economies in the world. Without its legitimate diamond trade, it would lose approximately US$3 billion in revenue per year. This loss would impact everything, from spending on social programmes to government investments in the country’s infrastructure. De Beers and the Botswana government jointly established a sorting plant in the capital of Gaborone at a cost to the diamond mining giant of US$83 million, where aggregation of its goods takes place and with a capacity to sort 45 million carats a year as part of its 10-year diamond sales agreement signed in 2011. Botswana DTC is responsible for the sorting of goods, rather than sending them to the DTC’s main global office in London, as was the case for around 80 years prior to the transfer to Gaborone. The move was aimed at creating more than 3 000 jobs. The revenues generated from the diamond trade have helped build the countries they are in. For example, in 1966, there were only 4,8 km of tarred roads in Botswana. Today there are nearly 4 000, as well as a public transportation system. There is also a country-wide digital telephone network, consisting of several thousand kilometres of fibre-optic cable. Now that travel and communications have improved, Botswana’s citizens have access to better employment opportunities, healthcare facilities, schools and cities. These improvements to the country’s infrastructure

also pave the way for continued economic opportunity and development. The revenue from diamonds has also been critical in the fight against HIV/Aids. The diamond mining agreement signed by De Beers and Botswana six years ago was widely seen as a landmark decision – and its implications were well noted in Namibia. which demanded similar provisions in its 10-year diamond sales and marketing agreement with the mining giant signed in 2015. Diamonds are a major foreign exchange-earner, generating 30% of Namibia’s export earnings. Approximately 10% of GDP, 40% of export revenue and 7% of the government’s annual revenue come from them. Namdeb, a diamond company in Namibia, is the largest corporate social responsibility contributor to the socio-economic development of that country. The Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) continues to sort and value all of Namdeb Holdings’ production, while De Beers continues to support the domestic cutting and polishing industry in Namibia and increased its commitment by making more diamonds available for manufacturing businesses operating in the country. The agreement provides for an independent sales outlet for Namibia for 15% of Namdeb Holdings’ run-ofmine production, per annum, over the duration of the sales agreement. The deal is similar to that in which Botswana now sells 15% of the diamonds mined by the jointly-owned Debswana via the Okavango Diamond Company.

The most significant developments in relation to African diamond-producing countries in recent years took place in Botswana and Namibia, which have both made moves to beneficiate their diamonds.

In southern Africa, tens of thousands of people are directly employed by the diamond industry. In Botswana, that sector is the country’s second-largest employer, while in SA, 28 000 people are employed in mining, sorting, valuing, cutting, polishing, jewellery retail and manufacture. These employment opportunities allow thousands of Africans to earn a salary, obtain healthcare, create a better home environment and provide education for their children. These jobs also supply subsequent indirect employment, expanding the communities around whom diamonds are found and offering them broader opportunities. In SA, corporate social development projects receive millions of dollars of investments from diamond mining companies. Meanwhile, in West Africa, diamond mining has been revived, following the conflicts that took place at the end of the last century and the beginning of the current one. The KP figures show that in 2016, Sierra Leone produced 549 000ct, with a value of US$159 million, Guinea’s output was 113 000ct, with a value of US$22 million, while Liberia produced 104 000ct, with a value of US$50 million. The diamond revenues are helping to rebuild its infrastructure, health services and education systems. Of course, there is still more that can be done to improve the lives of diamond industry workers and their families in Africa, but it is also clear that these precious stones are bringing benefits to the continent.


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PAGE 08 | AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18

Influencing the materials used in the production of African jewellery are cultural differences and resource availability, with jewellery appreciated for its material properties, patterns or inherent symbolism. Many African cultures emphasise appearance and therefore jewellery. A married woman may accumulate beaded necklaces as she ages, with each new piece reflecting her culture through its shape, patterns and colours. Within other societies, a woman’s age, marital status or even whether she has borne a son can be ascertained by observing her beaded jewellery. However, in all cultures, jewellery is also loved for the way it beautifies its wearer. Jewellery was the earliest trade medium between Africa and Asia, with cowrie shells used as money. The shape of these shells caused them to be associated with a woman’s spirituality and fertility, and belts and necklaces produced with the shells were used in religious ceremonies. Tribal jewellery has been an integral part of African culture through the ages and is used in dancing, religious rituals, as a sign of wealth and status, as a form of currency, as burial offerings and for personal adornment. In this regard, ancient Egyptian royalty wore ostrich shell necklaces to symbolise their status, while a Ghanaian groom traditionally gives his bride a beaded belt on their wedding day which she continues wearing afterwards to denote her marital status. In a piece written for the Yale-Newhaven Teachers’ Institute, educator Lucille Camera stated that African jewellery is not

just ornamental, as in each ethnic group, rituals and religion play a major role. Pieces are worn for reasons ranging from aesthetics to identification within the society and culture, while climate has a significant role in dictating the materials used in ther jewellery’s production. “African culture places great emphasis on appearance and, in turn, jewellery, with Africans having long utilised whatever materials are at hand to create pieces of decoration. Beaded jewellery can show the unique identity of each culture, while the patterns and colours of jewellery provide a window into the various African cultures and traditions,” writes Camera. This is evident in the individual and diverse patterns and shapes of the beaded jewellery worn by the East African Maasai and Samburu communities, who use basic materials of tiny glass or porcelain beads. Camera says most of the beadwork and beaded jewellery

A CULTURE-RICH TRADITION F in eastern and southern Africa is worn by all social ranks. However, in the Yoruba culture of Nigeria and Cameroon, wearing beadwork is reserved for royalty. In the kingdom of Benin in the southern Nigerian tropical rainforests, the oba or king rules over the life and death of his subjects, while members of his household mark special occasions by wearing hip ornaments made of brass. For the Yoruba, ornaments are worn as protection against evil spirits. Camera says the community still believes the buried ancient glass beads that belonged to the chiefs and kings of the region grow like plants on the ground and are worth their weight in gold – a belief that prompted 14th-century blacksmiths to create their own clay beads, of which replicas are still produced. In Mali, the Dogon live in the Bandiagara escarpment, a row of cliffs running parallel to the Niger River and reaching more than 600 m. Their habitat protects this farming community from attack and, according to

Camera, their tradition is presented as a network of man-made objects and beliefs linked to the powers of mythology. Simple jewellery pieces constructed from iron and copper alloy each hold significance to real and mystical ancestors – a dugo necklace comprises a series of rings and spirals, each having connection to the wearer’s identity, family and group. The infertile Sahara Desert is reflected in the jewellery produced by the nomadic Tuareg tribe and the Moors, both descendants of the Berbers, the indigenous people of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. Fiercely independent, the Tuareg are renowned for gold and silver jewellery design that is geometric, bold and symmetrical. However, the tribe prefer creating from silver, which is understood as the Holy Prophet’s metal. Their jewellery is used in trade for food and cloth, while rings are exchanged between the sexes as a sign of affection. Camera writes that the Tuareg Cross, in


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 09

FOR JEWELLERY particular, which is handed down from father to son at puberty, is made up of silver and represents the four corners of the world. “Because one does not know where or when one will die, it is important to be wearing this cross at all times,” she explains. Jewellery is also handed down from mother to daughter as part of a dowry. Unlike the Tuareg, the Moors intermarried with people from the west Savannah and later the Arabs, widening the design diversity and creating a larger variety of jewellery in the Sahara Desert. Camera writes that jewellery represents capital to the desert-dwellers and is vital for the salt trade from Arabia and Europe. Annually the nomads unite to allow their camels to graze on the salt which surfaces on the grass after the August and September rains – and during this time the communities trade jewellery. Young women wear anklets to attract young men and the Moorish girls wear these so-called jabo until their first child is born.

Large numbers of these beads are still found in modern-day Ghana and have become highly-prized pieces of African jewellery. Ghana, formerly referred to as the Gold Coast, has used this precious metal in its jewellery design and culture for decades – with legend even claiming that the king’s clothes were sprinkled with gold dust. The Bida in northern Nigeria produce unique necklaces, bracelets and rings from predominantly recycled glass that originally entered the commercial world as soft drink or beer bottles. Melted in a mud furnace, the molten glass is wrapped around an iron rod to create large, irregularlyshaped beads. “The rich tradition of African jewellery is embedded in the culture of traditional life. It is not simply to enhance one’s appearance,” says African Collection MD Louise Littlewood on the company website, www.africancollection.com.au. However, while acknowledging that these traditions date to the Stone Age, given the discovery of jewellery and other similar objects in graves and household sites from that era, Littlewood says African beadwork and beaded jewellery have relatively recent origins. They developed with the access to imported European beads and curios as trade items and since then, bead-making and working into beaded jewellery have become “vital components of African life and cultures by enhancing rituals and ceremonial dress”.

Beadwork creates employment for many women and greater independence for their families, but more informally, African bead workshops provide women in their communities with the opportunity to discuss their social expectations, the value of education, family planning and HIV/ Aids prevention.

“Without these traditions today, African costume jewellery and beadwork might not exist, which would be a great loss. Beadwork creates employment for many women and greater independence for their families, but more informally, African bead workshops provide women in their communities with the opportunity to discuss their social expectations, the value of education, family planning and HIV/Aids prevention,” she says. Put differently, according to the Kenyan permanent mission to the United Nations (www.kenyamission.ch), each piece of African jewellery is “an imaginary journey through the rituals and culture of an African tribe – these unique items capture the mystery and fashion of Africa”. Within Kenyan society, the Maasai use decorative beading and jewellery to emphasise social status; the Samburu place significance on physical beauty and adornment, especially among their warriors, who take great care of their physical appearance, using hairstyling and ochre body painting, while the Turkana people are meticulous about decorating their bodies and personal objects, including ostrich egg water-holders, wrist knives and clubs. Other northern Kenyan nomadic tribes such as the Boran, Oromo and Gabbra extensively decorate functional items such as water gourds, stools and neck pillows. “Owning a piece of jewellery is akin to owning a world of culture and history in its own beautiful form. Even though there’s history and meaning behind each piece, it’s the art in the jewellery that grabs the attention of most collectors,” says Littlewood. Modern African jewellery designs remain true to their historic values and meanings with both old and new pieces displaying common themes, namely a couple, a woman and child, a male with either a weapon or an animal and an outsider or a stranger. Historians indicate that these themes represent different elements of African culture and reveal the importance of each piece of jewellery, which in turn contributes to its inherent value and the sense of individualism sought by art-lovers and collectors. “Owning one of these pieces provides hope, wisdom and well-being for its owner,” says Littlewood.


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Meeting the ever-changing demands of the industry is proving to be quite challenging and not many secrets are being shared on how to access new markets and how small and medium-sized businesses could find themselves competing with global traders. With mobile phones and telecommunications today, it is possible to enter areas that you might not have considered in the past, allowing you to expand your customer range faster than any analogue means which your competitors may be using. Exporting products to areas in northern, southern and central Africa is now possible, as the Internet and mobile communications have become the backbone of businesses based in those areas. By following a few simple steps, you can have an impressive online presence in a very short time. This will be your new office space. How much will it cost? Not a lot – no matter what the size of your business. In order to do this, you will need a website. There are many places where you can have one designed. However, with technology today, you can also do it yourself utilising template-based systems. It is very important to get input from various people regarding the look and feel of your website in order to cater for a wide variety of customers. Also ensure that it functions as you intended. It is essential to make it as easy as possible for potential customers to contact

you for information about your products. An e-mail address and telephone number on the website might not be sufficient. Jewellery is generally a discussion item, which makes voice communication fundamental. E-mailing can follow after you have given your customers the opportunity to speak through mediums such as WhatsApp, Skype or ooVoo, no matter where they are based. Having an online presence is like having an actual store, but with a number of additional benefits, such as not having to

COMPETING IN THE MAINSTREAM OF INTERNATIONAL TRADING By following a few simple steps, you can have an impressive online presence in a very short time. This will be your new office space. How much will it cost? Not a lot – no matter what the size of your business.

be in the store seven days a week. However, just as with a bricks-and-mortar outlet, you want to be aware when someone enters your “store” so that you can answer any questions or offer advice. There are many sites which provide live chat software. This can be linked to mobile phones, which means you do not need to be near your computer, as any enquiry will come through straight to your phone. Having set up an online presence and your communication platforms, you are now able to do live showcasing of your products by having online webinars or even business-to-business meetings. This is a very powerful tool as it allows you to meet customers in their timeframes, without them having to leave their offices, making it easier to get your sales pitch across. You will also need to set up a few social network links, such as a Facebook account for your business. Start by looking for groups on Facebook in the areas in which you specialise and network by inviting people to see your site or like your page. Be sure to link this to your website so that if a potential customer likes your products, they can see your online store or catalogue. Once they are on your site, you will be notified that someone has “entered your store”, so that you can discuss your products with them or offer suggestions. You could also invite them to a live demo, making the whole sales experience unique. To ensure you get the results and returns you desire, you will need to put in extra work, as your online presence will not be sufficient for customers to find your business online. Much like a physical store, you will need to market yourself by contacting potential customers through their websites or sending an e-mail to them introducing yourself. Be careful with your wording, as you don’t want to be seen as spamming them. Do some cross-banner linking with other websites by putting your link on their sites in exchange for their link on yours. Finally, being proactive and getting your brand and company out there with the correct tools makes a tremendous difference. It does not cost a fortune to grow your business on an international level: all it takes is savvy strategy.


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 11

Established in 1920, Rand Refinery has become the largest integrated single-site precious metals refining and smelting complex in the world. Over almost 100 years, Rand Refinery has refined almost 100% of South African mined gold. Such is Rand Refinery’s pervasive influence on the sector that it is the only London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) referee in the Southern Hemisphere and one of only five LBMA referees worldwide. Rand Refinery played a leading role in assisting the LBMA in developing the Responsible Gold Guidance. The refinery produces a range of gold items including kilo bars, gold minted bars in various sizes and designs and, in partnership with the SA Mint, Krugerrands. The latter, particularly, has been one of the refinery’s most globally revered products. Fifty years since it was first introduced in 1967, the Krugerrand has built an indisputable legacy as one of the leaders in the global gold bullion investment industry. Since its launch, more than 53 million ounces of gold (over 60 million pieces) have been sold in the form of Krugerrands, more than the Canadian Maple Leaf and the US Eagle. The global appetite for the yellow metal pushed investment in the Krugerrands to a record high last year when more than 1,1 million ounces of gold bullion Krugerrands were sold, making it the world’s most traded coin. Currently the Krugerrand holds 26% market share of the global gold bullion coin market. Gold, a safe-haven investment, has become more attractive to investors in recent times due to low interest rates and global volatility, among other geopolitical consequences stemming from events like Brexit. “A good hedge against inflation, a gold bullion Krugerrand bought in 1967 for US$35 could return well over US$1 200 today,” explains Richard Collocott, Executive Head of Marketing at Rand Refinery. The Krugerrand’s face value is denominated in ounces of pure gold, while other gold bullion coins have a face value significantly below the value of gold. This means that with a Krugerrand, the SA Reserve Bank (SARB) guarantees the purchase of any Krugerrand tendered for the ruling

ADDING SIGNIFICANT VALUE TO SA’S PRECIOUS METALS In 1978, more than 6 million Krugerrands were sold, representing approximately 50% of gold produced in SA. Even today, over 20% of the gold is beneficiated in the form of Krugerrands. The success of the Krugerrand shows it’s possible to add significant value to our precious metals if we develop local capabilities and channel resources towards achieving that goal.

gold price on the day, whereas with other coins, the issuing government only guarantees the nominal face value. The Krugerrand is issued under the authority of the SARB and jointly produced by the SA Mint, a subsidiary of the SARB and Rand Refinery. “For South Africans, the Krugerrand presents a unique opportunity to acquire gold without any hindrance and exchange control approvals. Moreover, given its legal tender status, it doesn’t attract Value-Added Tax. A truly democratic coin, it’s available in 1 oz, ½ oz, ¼ oz and 1/10 oz sizes, allowing people of different economic levels to effectively and efficiently invest in gold,” adds Collocott. With the contentious debate surrounding SA’s beneficiation strategy becoming vocal during this decade, Collocott says that the main purpose of launching the Krugerrand way back in the 1960s was to add value to South African gold. “In 1978, more than 6 million Krugerrands were sold, representing approximately 50% of gold produced in SA. Even today, over 20% of the gold is beneficiated in the form of Krugerrands. The success of the Krugerrand shows it’s possible to add value to our precious metals if we develop local capabilities and channel resources towards achieving that goal. “Rand Refinery has been an original purveyor of the beneficiation narrative and, in fact, led the development of global industry around beneficiation,” he says.


PAGE 12 | AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18

MAP OF AFRICA

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

South Africa Lesotho Swaziland Namibia Botswana Zimbabwe Mozambique Madagascar Mauritius Tanzania Malawi Zambia Angola Republic of the Congo

15. São Tomé and Príncipe 16. Réunion 17. Democratic Republic of the Congo 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27.

Burundi Rwanda Uganda Kenya Somalia Ethiopia Djibouti Eritrea Sudan Central African Republic

28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41.

Gabon Equatorial Guinea Cameroon Nigeria Chad Egypt Libya Niger Tunisia Algeria Mali Burkina Faso Benin Togo

42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

Ghana Côte d’Ivoire Liberia Sierra Leone Guinea Guinea-Bissau Senegal Gambia Western Sahara Morocco Mauritania Comoros Seychelles Mayotte


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 13

LIST OF AFRICAN COUNTRIES AND TERRITORIES This is a list of African countries and territories, including the respective capitals, currencies, population, GDP per capita, gross national income per capita and imports. Dependencies and disputed territories are listed with a blue background.

AFRICAN COUNTRY

POPULATION (THOUSANDS)

LAND AREA (THOUSANDS OF KM2)

POPULATION DENSITY (POP. / KM2)

GDP BASED ON PPP VALUATION (US$ MILLION)

GDP PER CAPITA ( PPP VALUATION, US$)

ANNUAL REAL GDP GROWTH (AVERAGE OVER 2008-2016)

Algeria

40 376

2 382

17

609 394

15 093

3,2

Angola

25 831

1 247

21

187 257

7 249

4,3

Benin

11 167

115

97

24 312

2 177

4,7

Botswana

2 304

582

4

36 505

15 846

3,8

Burkina Faso

18 634

274

68

32 985

1 770

6,4

Burundi

11 553

28

415

7 892

683

3,0

Cabo Verde

527

4

131

3 583

6 799

2,5

Cameroon

23 924

475

50

77 237

3 228

4,3

Central African Republic

4 998

623

8

3 206

641

-0,1

Chad

14 497

1 284

11

30 587

2 110

4,1

Comoros

807

2

434

1 259

1 560

2,3

Congo

4 741

342

14

30 272

6 385

3,8

Congo, Dem. Rep.

79 723

2 345

34

66 014

828

6,1

Côte d’Ivoire

23 254

322

72

87 120

3 746

5,9

Djibouti

900

23

39

3 345

3 718

5,5

Egypt*

93 384

1 001

93

1 105 039

11 833

3,8

Equatorial Guinea

870

28

31

31 769

36 533

-0,4

The traditional cloth of the Ghanaian people is the bright and colorful kente cloth. In the north, the men wear loose flowing clothes made of darker cloth.

CÔTE D’IVOIRE: The world’s leading producer of cocoa beans, supplying 33 per cent of the total.


PAGE 14 | AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18

Burkina Faso is Africa’s largest producer of cotton. Local farmers call it their ‘white gold’. Cotton is the mainstay of the country’s economy, earning over 200 million dollars in revenue each year.

The Katse Dam in Lesotho is the highest dam in Africa (the surface reaches 2050 metres when at 100% full) and with 185 metres is the second largest dam wall in Africa.

AFRICAN COUNTRY

POPULATION (THOUSANDS)

LAND AREA (THOUSANDS OF KM2)

POPULATION DENSITY (POP. / KM2)

GDP BASED ON PPP VALUATION (US$ MILLION)

GDP PER CAPITA ( PPP VALUATION, US$)

ANNUAL REAL GDP GROWTH (AVERAGE OVER 2008-2016)

Eritrea

5 352

118

46

9 169

1 713

3,2

Ethiopia*

101 853

1 104

92

174 742

1 716

9,7

Gabon

1 763

268

7

36 218

20 542

4,5

Gambia

2 055

11

182

3 387

1 648

3,6

Ghana

28 033

239

118

120 786

4 309

6,6

Guinea

12 947

246

53

16 084

1 242

3,0

Guinea-Bissau

1 888

36

52

2 851

1 510

3,9

Kenya

47 251

580

81

152 735

3 232

5,3

Lesotho

2 160

30

71

6 019

2 786

4,4

Liberia

4 615

111

41

3 881

841

4,7

Libya

6 330

1 760

4

90 892

14 359

-2,3

Madagascar

24 916

587

42

37 491

1 505

2,7

Malawi

17 750

118

150

21 227

1 196

5,2

Mali

18 135

1 240

15

38 085

2 100

4,4

Mauritania

4 166

1 031

4

16 710

4 010

3,6

Mauritius

1 277

2

626

25 849

20 235

3,7

Morocco

34 817

447

78

282 784

8 122

3,9

Mozambique

28 751

799

36

35 313

1 228

6,6

Namibia

2 514

824

3

27 035

10 754

4,0


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 15

AFRICAN COUNTRY

POPULATION (THOUSANDS)

LAND AREA (THOUSANDS OF KM2)

POPULATION DENSITY (POP. / KM2)

GDP BASED ON PPP VALUATION (US$ MILLION)

GDP PER CAPITA ( PPP VALUATION, US$)

ANNUAL REAL GDP GROWTH (AVERAGE OVER 2008-2016)

Niger

20 715

1 267

16

20 266

978

5,9

Nigeria

186 988

924

202

1 088 938

5 824

4,8

Rwanda

11 883

26

451

21 970

1 849

7,2

Sao Tome and Principe

194

1

202

694

3 573

5,0

Senegal

15 589

197

79

39 717

2 548

4,7

Seychelles

97

0,460

211

2 608

26 877

4,1

Sierra Leone

6 592

72

91

10 636

1 613

5,0

Somalia

11 079

638

17

...

...

...

South Africa

54 979

1 219

45

736 325

13 393

1,7

South Sudan

12 733

620

21

20 884

1 640

-6,0

Sudan

41 176

1 886

22

176 304

4 282

3,6

Swaziland

1 304

17

75

11 061

8 482

1,5

Tanzania

55 155

947

58

150 633

2 731

6,6

Togo

7 497

57

132

11 609

1 548

4,5

Tunisia

11 375

164

70

130 831

11 501

2,2

Uganda

40 323

242

167

84 925

2 106

6,0

Zambia

16 717

753

22

65 174

3 899

5,9

Zimbabwe

15 967

391

41

28 326

1 774

3,1

Note: * For Egypt and Ethiopia, fiscal year July (n-1)/June (n). Sources: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, World Population Prospects, The 2015 Revision. AfDB Statistics Department, various domestic authorities and AfDB estimates.

The Karoo region in the Western Cape, South Africa is home to some of the best fossils of early dinosaurs. In fact, it is estimated that some 80% of the mammalian fossils found to date were found in the Karoo.

Tanzania is the home of the coconut crab, the largest in the world, and can be found on Chumbe Island of Zanzibar.


PAGE 16 | AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18

SA: THE TRAINING HUB OF AFRICA Anna-Mart Rossouw, owner of Paramount Consulting, the official training partner of the Jewellery Council of SA, describes the riches our country has to offer the continent. Who is SA on the business stage of the world? The answer might depend on who you ask. To some, we are merely a prop, at best, in the play for success and power, on a stage that is dominated by the powerhouses of the world. Others still see us as a part of “Darkest Africa”. More generous individuals might credit us with “raw potential” as the export hub for unfinished products – precious metals and breathtaking gems that inspire the world to create masterpieces. Unfortunately, people who only saw Act One, Scene One of SA’s story, view us simply as a struggling Third World country with economic and political issues. Such views are only perceptions of snippets taken from the extravaganza SA is putting on for the world. If you look closely, with a keen eye for detail, a heart that feels the pulse of Africa and a mind that appreciates the brilliance of the South African “playwrights”, then you’ll be left inspired and in awe. As an African, I feel a responsibility to “educate” the critics and, with a bold, uniquely South African voice, tell our story in a way that’s wholly honest and showcases our identity as the business hub of Africa. We have a plethora of raw materials that we


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 17

export to the rest of the world, which forms part of our business identity, but is only a measure of our proud contribution to the global jewellery industry. You see, the story does not end there. SA houses some of the world’s most talented designers and craftsmen who entice, captivate and entertain the world with their majestic creations. The pieces conceptualised by the hearts of visionaries who know what it means to be African and created by their hands are worthy of a place on any global stage. So we export not only “raw materials”, but pieces that are true reflections of who we are – with sophistication, charm, magic and rustic, yet refined beauty that leaves the world breathless. Yet the story continues, as we have yet to discover the grand finale of the play. If we are indeed “Darkest Africa”, then I will embrace this identity only in conjunction with inspiration drawn from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: “Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night – like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear.” SA – the rich jewel in “Darkest Africa”… I

SA is home to some of the most knowledgeable training and development professionals in the world, who – apart from their expertise in international trends and consumer behaviour – are passionate about the African business environment and familiar with the challenges it faces.

can live with that. We are indeed “rich”. We are also ready and willing to share our riches with the rest of Africa. Although we can certainly compete on any stage in the world, our heart beats first and foremost for the African continent. The wealth we are most keen to share, and which is least appreciated in SA, is our abundant business knowledge. They say that knowledge is power – and they are right. The complexities of the business world – the ever-changing consumer, the jewellery industry as an evolving organism and the continuous organic transformation of style, boldness and understated elegance – are just some of the aspects business-owners need to understand in today’s economy. SA is home to some of the most knowledgeable training and development professionals in the world, who – apart from their expertise in international trends and consumer behaviour – are passionate about the African business environment and familiar with the challenges it faces. The African culture is unlike any other. It is at once bold and humble, trendsetting and modest, deeply affected by fluctuations in the economy, yet robust and extravagantly opulent. If knowledge is power, then SA is the powerhouse of Africa and by tapping into this wealth of developing business acumen that our country is able to offer its neighbours, Africa’s story has only just begun.


Image courtesy Geoffrey Flint

PAGE 18 | AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18

Jewellex Africa offers the buyer a wide variety in terms of merchandise and services available. The Jewellex Committee is a subcommittee of the Jewellery Council of SA (JCSA) board and comprises JCSA members representing various stakeholders of the local jewellery industry. The three-day event has established a reputation for being the premier showcase for South African manufacturers and distributors. By growing Jewellex into Jewel lex Africa, the JCSA is aiming to expand its offering to include neighbouring countries and international exhibitors, acknowledging that SA is part of a global market. The core purpose of this vision is to assist the South African jewellery industry to grow and create jobs, as well as earn foreign exchange. Lorna Lloyd, CEO of the Jewellery Council of the JCSA, says there are several interesting factors that make Jewellex Africa different. Firstly, it aims to provide a platform where key players in the local market can exhibit their creations under one roof, over one weekend a year, as well as do business and network, thus creating a “jewellery community”. Additionally, Jewellex Africa is one of the longest-running expos in the country, having started some 40 years ago at the former Kine Centre in downtown Johannesburg, where manufacturers and whole-

SHOWCASING AFRICA’S BEST UNDER ONE ROOF salers exhibited their wares on trestle tables. As the event has grown in size and reputation over the years, numerous venues have been used. The main aim of the event is to showcase new merchandise lines and the most exclusive and extensive product ranges of watches, clocks, fine jewellery, pearls and precious stones, jewellery packaging, machinery, accessories and services available to the local and international retail and wholesale jewellery industry. The event attracts around 2 000 trade visitors. “One of the main objectives of Jewellex is to become the trading hub of Africa, giving other countries an opportunity to see what the continent has to offer in one space,” says Lloyd. “It also aims to provide a secure trading platform for product distribution into and out of Africa.”

Image courtesy Geoffrey Flint

Jewellex Africa attracts exhibitors and buyers from within SA, African states and international countries. It offers an environment for B2B linkages that resulted in significant business growth and the integration of new industry participants.

One of the main objectives of Jewellex is to become the trading hub of Africa, giving other countries an opportunity to see what the continent has to offer in one space.


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 19

EXPORTING JEWELLERY TO AFRICA: IS THERE A WAY FORWARD? There are several reasons why jewellery exports to the continent have not yet been successful. These include a lack of local knowledge, poor infrastructure, inefficient capacity and/or technology to service or replace jewellery pieces, corrupt and inept officials and bureaucracy. While South African exports of jewellery and diamonds to the continent still account for a fraction of our total exports, Africa has been a very lucrative investment for certain local companies. One would think that with these countries on our doorstep, exports would be higher. But there are a number of reasons why South African companies do

not export more diamonds and jewellery to the continent. In terms of location, Africa is still largely unknown to many South African jewellery and diamond companies. Unlike the developed world, local knowledge and partnerships are hard to come by, yet these are essential to any export operation. Many South African companies which have done well on the continent have piggy-backed on the distribution networks, contacts and even branding of established businesses in order to gain a foothold in regions, usually buying controlling interests. Another challenge in exporting diamonds and jewellery to Africa lies in poor infrastructure, particularly the lack of availability and high costs of transport on the continent. Other infrastructural challenges include the fact that many African

With some government intervention, much research, better infrastructure and a bit of luck, the South African jewellery and diamond industry can realise the profits of exporting to the rest of the continent in the near future.

countries do not yet have the necessary support logistics in place for the jewellery and diamond industry, such as the capacity and/or technology to service or replace jewellery pieces. Banking and security are also lacking in certain countries on the continent, while corrupt or inept officials are another hurdle. One of the most significant challenges in exporting jewellery and diamonds to the continent lies in bureaucracy. A significant amount of paperwork must be completed for export of any goods from SA and for smaller enterprises, including entrepreneurs, the process can be confounding and plain onerous. Is there a way forward? While the Department of Trade & Industry offers export programmes and incentives, including for the jewellery and diamond industries, industry players want government to take a stronger line with their African counterparts on issues such as levies and duties. And although not yet a strong presence, many in the local industry are keen to begin exporting to the continent, where the infrastructure is well established. With some government intervention, much research, better infrastructure and a bit of luck, the South African jewellery and diamond industry can realise the profits of exporting to the rest of the continent in the near future.


AFRICAN ODYSSEY 2017/18 | PAGE 20

JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA BORN IN AFRICA JEWELLERY COLLECTIONS 2017

Well entrenched in the Kimberley Process with a strong

South Africa is recognised around the world as the land

legislative framework and controls, the product is manu-

of gold, platinum and diamonds. From the historical

factured in an ethical business and socially responsible

town of Barberton in Mpumalanga, where the first gold

manner, giving the buyer peace of mind and added value to

was discovered, to the Merensky Reef – the largest

the conscientious consumer.

deposits of platinum in the world – and the fabled diamonds from Kimberley and Cullinan mines, our

SHOWCASE COLLECTION

mining history is well known and respected.

Born in Africa was launched in 2010 and features South African manufacturing jewellers listed alphabetically.

With the discoveries made at the Cradle of Humankind,

This listing, which forms part of the AFRICAN Odyssey

our country is linked to the birth of the human race in all

publication, should once again be considered a meeting

its celebrated diversity. Similarly, the culture of adornment

point between South African jewellery production and

in precious metals in South Africa dates back over 1 000

its distribution around the world.

years when, from a place called Mapungubwe in Limpopo Province, one of the largest kingdoms in South Africa had

THE JEWELLERY

a thriving international trade in ivory and gold with Egypt,

All jewellery is manufactured by members of the

China and India.

Jewellery Council of South Africa who abide by the Council’s Code of Ethics and Conduct.

The brand “Born in Africa” celebrates jewellery designed and manufactured in South Africa and created from the

BIA

mineral wealth our country has to offer. The ranges of

The “Born in Africa” brand forms part of the Jewellery

jewellery, manufactured from virgin metals, reflect the

Council’s vision to establish South Africa as the

diversity of our cultures born of the common origin of the

jewellery trading hub of Africa and actively encourages

South African soil.

the development of new entrants into the industry in a responsible, supportive manner.

THE INDUSTRY Our well-established jewellery industry has built a

Colin Campbell

reputation for quality at a fair price. Its ability to service

Chairman

market needs through adaptability and a high level

Jewellery Manufacturers’ Association of SA

of service are its distinguishing traits. Ranging from technologically advanced mass producers to niche market specialists and hand-crafted pieces, South Africa offers a range of jewellery manufacturers able to cater to any variety of buyers' needs.


BORN IN AFRICA

TAKE NOTE: For those outside South Africa, use the dialling code +27. ADELE’S MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 082 595 3868 E-mail: adele@amj.co.za Website: www.zadeljewellerystudio.com AKAPO JEWELS Tel no: 011 038 3130 E-mail: wumba@akapo.co.za; labi@akapo.co.za Website: www.akapojewels.co.za ALEX DJOKO SIMO E-mail: alex_djoko@yahoo.com ALTIN JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 998 0141 E-mail: info@altin.co.za; hesti.prinsloo@gmail.com Website: www.altin.co.za AMILE DIAMONDS Tel no: 011 051 8808 E-mail: amilediamonds@gmail.com; amilestudio@gmail.com Website: www.amilediamonds.com ANABELLA RESOURCES CC Tel no: 011 334 1317 E-mail: info@anabellaresources.com ANACZYNSKI JEWELLERY E-mail: anaczynski@gmail.com Website: www.anaczynski.co.za ANASTASIA JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 507 5561 E-mail: anastasiaj@mweb.co.za Website: www.anastastasiajewellers.co.za ANDREAS SALVER MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 706 6828 E-mail: salver@iafrica.com Website: www.andreassalver.com

BASIKWA TRADING (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 414 1640 E-mail: moses@basikwa.com Website: www.basikwa.com BEAUDELL DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 082 885 8303 E-mail: esther@beaudell.co.za Website: www.beaudell.co.za BEN & CO DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 072 056 2156 E-mail: bheki@ben-codesigns.com; info@ben-codesigns.com Website: www.ben-codesigns.com BERNARDS JEWELLERY DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE Tel no: 032 586 0889 E-mail: bernard@bernardsjewellery.co.za BIJOU EXQUISITE JEWELLERY (PTY) LTD Tel no: 041 450 4320 E-mail: marnic@bijoujewellery.international BLACK BETTY DESIGN (PTY) LTD Tel no: 072 803 9456 E-mail: kristin@blackbettydesign.com Website: www.blackbettydesign.com BOEZAART BAUERMEISTER JEWELLERY & DESIGN Tel no: 021 883 2193 E-mail: kim@boezaart.com Website: www.boezaartbauermeister.com BRADLEY MANUFACTURING T/A VARGA MANUFACTURING Tel no: 011 327 7926 E-mail: bradjew@mweb.co.za; martin@varga.co.za BRETTLANDS FINE JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 562 8009 E-mail: bretland@iafrica.com Website: www.brettlands.co.za BRIAN BOSMAN GOLDSMITH STUDIO Tel no: 011 616 5328 E-mail: divagoldsmith@yahoo.com

CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY FREE STATE - WELKOM Tel no: 057 910 3500/1 E-mail: eholmes@cut.ac.za; nmphore@cut.ac.za Website: www.cut.ac.za CHANDLERS MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 781 0303 E-mail: mcjewel@netactive.co.za CHARL DE BEER Tel no: 012 4407693 E-mail: leatherw@mweb.co.za; charldebeer@hotmail.com CHATEAU D’OR CC Tel no: 011 728 3741/3723 E-mail: denlincoln@mweb.co.za Website: www.chateaudorjewellers.com COLLEGE OF CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 464 3821 E-mail: calbrechts@cct.edu.za; eoosthuizen@cct.edu.za Website: www.cct.co.za CORNERSTONE CREATIONS (PTY) LTD E-mail: cornerstonelof@gmail.com Website: www.paulspurgeondesign.co.uk/ page/cornerstone CAPE PRECIOUS METALS - CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 551 2066 E-mail: sharon@capepreciousmetals.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CAPE PRECIOUS METALS - DURBAN Tel no: 031 303 5402 E-mail: malcolm@capepreciousmetals.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za CAPE PRECIOUS METALS - JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 334 6263 E-mail: sharon@capepreciousmetals.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za

BRIDETODAY (PTY) LTD E-mail: hello@bridetoday.com

CAPE PRECIOUS METALS - PORT ELIZABETH Tel no: 041 365 1890 E-mail: Renee@capepreciousmetals.co.za Website: www.capepreciousmetals.co.za

ANTONICORNELLIS JEWELLERY ENTERPRISE Tel no: 073 589 0835/074 758 1014 E-mail: antonicornellius.nhlapo@gmail.com

BRONSKI JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 852 7891 E-mail: seanscrase@hotmail.com

CREATIVE DESIGN MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 031 563 3987 E-mail: goldlink@iafrica.com

ASHLEY HEATHER JEWELLERY Tel no: 082 563 5086 E-mail: info@ashleyheather.co.za Website: www.ashleyheather.co.za

BROWNS THE DIAMOND STORE - WORKSHOP Tel no: 011 438 7920 E-mail: albert@brownsjewellers.com; larry@brownsjewellers.com Website: www.brownsjewellers.com

DABERON MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 334 8841 E-mail: daberon1@gmail.com

ANDRONIKIS MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 046 622 5579 E-mail: stergiou@procomp.co.za

ASIMI JEWELS INTERNATIONAL Tel no: 011 453 4775 E-mail: ellassa@iafrica.com AU TRADERS AND REFINERS Tel no: 011 334 7607/8 E-mail: barend@autraders.co.za; jacqui@autraders.co.za Website: www.autraders.co.za AURUM DESIGN Tel no: 021 423 6590 E-mail: aurum@worldonline.co.za; adela@aurumdesign.co.za Website: www.aurumdesign.co.za AZTEC JEWELLERS Tel no: 013 757 0827 E-mail: ron@aztecjewellers.com; kyle@aztecjewellers.com Website: www.aztecjewellers.com

CAPE DIAMONDS Tel no: 021 421 5364 E-mail: joelgraham@capediamonds.co.za Website: www.capediamonds.co.za CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 021 460 3635 E-mail: konstandakellisv@cput.ac.za; camerondowl@cput.ac.za Website: www.cput.ac.za CARESS JEWELLERS UITENHAGE CC Tel no: 041 992 4421 E-mail: eben-caress@mweb.co.za CARI-MARI Tel no: 012 346 5761 E-mail: cmg@lantic.net Website: www.cari-mari-jewellery.com

DALEEN BRUWER JEWELLERY DESIGN AND GOLDSMITH Tel no: 023 342 7808 E-mail: db@xsinet.co.za DAVID BOLDING - GOLDSMITH Tel no: 021 418 1049/1612 E-mail: david@dbgold.co.za; marele@dbgold.co.za Website: www.freerangejewels.co.za DC JEWELLERS Tel no: 044 691 3692 E-mail: dcjewel@mweb.co.za DEGLON FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 851 3182 E-mail: waynedeglon@telkomsa.net Website: www.waynedeglondesign.withtank.com DIAMONDS4EVER Tel no: 082 786 7677


BORN IN AFRICA

E-mail: info@diamonds4ever.co.za Website: www.diamonds4ever.co.za DIDIDESIGN Tel no: 011 784 0369 E-mail: didi@dididesign.co.za Website: www.dididesign.co.za DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 031 373 6673/6 E-mail: chrisdb@dut.ac.za; samanthav@dut.ac.za Website: www.dut.ac.za E-DESIGN Tel no: 082 445 8295 E-mail: cornenaude@e-design.co.za Website: www.e-design.co.za EKURHULENI JEWELLERY PROJECT Tel no: 011 825 5822 E-mail: colin@ejewellery.org.za; business@ejewellery.org.za Website: www.ejewellery.org.za ELEMENTAL STUDIO E-mail: lezamcleod@icloud.com Website: www.elementalstudio.co.za EON HOON JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 083 578 7447 E-mail: hello@eonhoon.com    Website: www.eonhoon.com ERICA DU PLESSIS (ERICA STRAUSS) Tel no: 021 851 8120 E-mail: artwear@telkomsa.net ETERNITY ENTERPRISE Tel no: 018 290 5722/3 E-mail: eternity@eternityenterprise.com Website: www.eternityenterprise.com EVERTRADE 142 PTY LTD T/A D’OURO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 615 3402 E-mail: dourojhb@vodamail.co.za; a.veloso@dourojewellers.co.za Website: www.dourojewellers.co.za FEMKE KLEISEN DESIGNS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 012 332 2246 E-mail: femkekleisen@webafrica.org.za Website: www.femkekleisen.co.za FERROS JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 363 1881 E-mail: alex@ferrosjewellers.com Website: www.ferrosjewellers.com FINEGOLD LABORATORY SERVICES Tel no: 021 511 6237 E-mail: admin@finegold.co.za Website: www.finegold.co.za FOREVER JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS Tel no: 031 564 9006 E-mail: fj@3i.co.za

GLOBAL JEWELLERY ACADEMY E-mail: 0823376428@vodamail.co.za Website: www.globaljewelleryacademy.co.za

JAGGATH JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 307 7790 E-mail: navinjagath372@gmail.com

GOLDFASHION JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 939 8819 E-mail: mhendricks@wsnet.co.za; goldfashion@telkomsa.net

JANINE BINNEMAN JEWELLERY DESIGNS Tel no: 021 715 6178 E-mail: info@jbjd.co.za Website: www.jbjd.co.za

GOLDMASTER JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 423 5812 E-mail: graham@goldmaster.co.za Website: www.goldmaster.co.za

JETHRO JEWELLERS E-mail: jethrokhumalo@gmail.com

GOODWINS GOLDSMITHS Tel no: 041 585 5957 E-mail: rodney@goodwin.co.za Website: www.goodwin.co.za GOUDSMID TEHILA VAN ENGELENHOVEN Tel no: 082 674 4410 E-mail: tehila@absamail.co.za; falstaff@absamail.co.za GRAM O GOLD Tel no: 044 871 4433 E-mail: Leon@gramogold.co.za HARRIS JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 555 1437 E-mail: harrisjewellers@telkomsa.net Website: www.harrisjewellers.net HAVILAH GOLD CREATIONS Tel no: 041 581 1942 E-mail: design@havilah.co.za; carol@havilah.co.za Website: www.havilah.co.za ICKINGER JEWELLERS Tel no: 015 307 4448 E-mail: Jacques@ickinger.co.za Website: www.ickinger.co.za IMFUNDISO SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Tel no: 012 734 0245 E-mail: imfundiso@mweb.co.za Website: www.imfundiso.com IMPILO COLLECTION Tel no: 011 642 3086 E-mail: impilo.collection@gmail.com Website: www.facebook.com/impilocollection INFACET Tel no: 021 674 1220 E-mail: francois@infacet.co.za; bridgette@infacet.co.za Website: www.infacet.co.za INGE SCHOLTZ JEWELLERY DESIGNER AND MANUFACTURER Tel no: 073 271 3789 E-mail: inge.scholtz@hotmail.com ISABELLA JEWELLERS & REFINERS CC Tel no: 011 334 5919 E-mail: isabellakbl@gmail.com Website: www.isabella-refiners.co.za

FRANKLI WILD Tel no: 011 483 2620 E-mail: Sa@frankliwild.com Website: www.frankliwild.com

ISIS DESIGNER GOLDSMITH Tel no: 084 609 6499 E-mail: isisdesignergoldsmith@gmail.com; ingrid.eckstein@gmail.com Website: www.isisdesignergoldsmith.co.za

GAETANO COSTA MANUFACTURING JEWELLERY (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 326 7919 E-mail: admin@thediamondring.co.za

J HIND JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 306 1330 E-mail: jhindrajesh@gmail.com Website: www.jhhindjewellers.com

GATTOO JEWELLERY DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 011 852 2046 E-mail: gattoosdesign@gmail.com

J.P.P.E LAPIDARY Tel no: 021 424 7764 E-mail: kylegilson@mweb.co.za

JEWEL CRAFT - BRANDHOF Tel no: 051 444 3449 E-mail: rean.p@mweb.co.za Website: www.jewelcraft.co.za JEWELCOR CC Tel no: 011 896 4584 E-mail: rayest@mweb.co.za JEWELLERY CONNECTION Tel no: 011 728 6800 E-mail: vmagnes@netactive.co.za Website: www.thejeweller.co.za JEWELLERY CONSULTANCY E-mail: md.jewelleryconsultancy@gmail.com Website: www.jewelleryconsultancy.co.za JEWELRY STUDIO Tel no: 013 752 5325 E-mail: jewelry@polka.co.za JOHANNA VAN ZYL Tel no: 011 794 1555 E-mail: jo@johannavanzyl.co.za Website: www.johannavanzyl.co.za JOHN STEDMAN T/A ELEMENTAL DESIGN Tel no: 031 572 2902 E-mail: john@elementaldesign.co.za Website: www.elementaldesign.co.za JOHREN MANUFACTURING CC T/A THE JEWELLERY SHOP Tel no: 046 624 3748 E-mail: johren@telkomsa.net JOY JEWELLERY MANUFACTURE & DESIGN Tel no: 012 662 2861 E-mail: joy@joymassyn.co.za K2 DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 031 940 1274 E-mail: khanyisile@k2designstudio.co.za Website: www.k2designstudio.co.za KAI SCHMIDT MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 484 7777/80 E-mail: info@kaischmidt.co.za; kai@kaischmidt.co.za Website: www.kaischmidt.co.za KARLSEN JEWELLERY CO Tel no: 033 386 7872 E-mail: karlsen@jewelleryco.co.za KAYRO JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 585 4842 E-mail: slaide.kayro@mweb.co.za KEITH WHITE DESIGN (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 334 2212 E-mail: kwd@telkomsa.net Website: www.keithwhite.co.za KHOLO’S JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING CC Tel no: 015 291 3926 E-mail: info@kgjewels.co.za Website: www.kgjewels.co.za


BORN IN AFRICA

LADY PECULIAR Tel no: 021 886 8868 E-mail: info@ladypeculiar.co.za Website: www.ladypeculiar.co.za

METAL CONCENTRATORS SA (PTY) LTD - CPT Tel no: 021 510 0770 E-mail: info@metcon.co.za; fay@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

LALI SILVER JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 646 8358 E-mail: jc_tilman@yahoo.com Website: www.lalisilver.co.za

METAL CONCENTRATORS SA (PTY) LTD PRETORIA Tel no: 012 000 4440 E-mail: michaelv@metcon.co.za; grant.crosse@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

L’AUTRICHE FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 883 4021 E-mail: ernst@lebijoux.co.za Website: www.lautrichesj.co.za LEGA D’ORO CC Tel no: 011 450 3233 E-mail: legadoro@global.co.za; diamondafric@telkomsa.net Website: www.legadoro.co.za LEUVEN METALS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 426 4140 E-mail: kvessen@oroafrica.com; andrev@oroafrica.com Website: www.leuvenmetals.co.za LILLY FRIEDLAENDER CC Tel no: 021 887 1655 E-mail: lilly.f@wol.co.za LORIEN MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 967 1700 E-mail: heather@allanybrink.co.za LOVI JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 011 882 3272 E-mail: lovijewellery@gmail.com M G IVORY Tel no: 011 788 1018 E-mail: mgivory@netactive.co.za MAGMA METAL RECOVERIES Tel no: 031 702 4422 E-mail: edwards@astronet.co.za

METAL IMAGE Tel no: 021 447 6600 E-mail: mi_greg@iafrica.com; mi_accounts@iafrica.com Website: www.metalimage.co.za MICHAEL J SOLOMON MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS (MJS) Tel no: 011 792 5292 E-mail: ms@absamail.co.za MICHL CONTEMPORARY FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 913 3944 E-mail: michelleliaosa@gmail.com Website: www.michljewellery.com MIRKO JEWELLERY Tel no: 021 886 8296 E-mail: mirinda@mirkojewels.co.za MIZANE JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 485 3784 E-mail: mizane@ananzi.co.za Website: www.mizanejewellery.co.za NEWMAN JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 012 329 9600 E-mail: nina@newmandesign.co.za; dave@newmandesign.co.za NOVUS DESIGN STUDIO Tel no: 012 332 5850 E-mail: info@novusdesign.co.za

E-mail: firstassay@mweb.co.za PHILIP ZETLER JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 423 2771 E-mail: pzetler@mweb.co.za Website: www.philipzetlerjewellers.co.za PHOENIX MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 549 4966 E-mail: jack@phoenixjewellers.co.za Website: www.phoenixjewellers.co.za PIERO G MANUFACTURING T/A PICO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 483 3442 E-mail: pico1@global.co.za Website: www.picojewellery.com PIYUVE JEWELLERS CC Tel no: 031 301 3963 E-mail: aroon@piyuvejewelers.co.za PNEUMA JEWELLERS CC Tel no: 011 702 1462 E-mail: pneuma015@gmail.com Website: www.pneumajewellers.co.za POLART JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 021 422 3848 E-mail: info@polart.co.za; polart@telkomsa.net POPULAR DIAMOND JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING CC Tel no: 011 484 7044 E-mail: pop@tiscali.co.za PRECISION SETTERS Tel no: 011 484 7803/4 E-mail: psetters@tiscali.co.za PRETTY FOUND THINGS E-mail: lynne@prettyfoundthings.co.za; prettyfoundthings@gmail.com Website: www.prettyfoundthings.co.za

NQ JEWELLERY DESIGN SERVICES E-mail: nq2jewel@gmail.com Website: www.nqjewellery.co.za

PRINS & PRINS DIAMONDS Tel no: 021 422 1090 E-mail: petre@prinsandprins.com; riana@prinsandprins.com Website: www.prinsandprins.com

MARINUS DES TOMBE Tel no: 011 469 0063 E-mail: riendestombe@yahoo.com

NV DESIGN COMPANY Tel no: 021 883 3856 E-mail: nanette@bynanette.com Website: www.bynanette.com

PS GEMS & MINERALS T/A FACETS GEMS Tel no: 013 755 4994 E-mail: trevlynnesapire@gmail.com

MARION’S JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 041 368 4582/3 E-mail: marionsstudio@mweb.co.za

OH VOILA E-mail: barbara@ohvoila.com Website: www.ohvoila.com

QUALITY MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 461 6623 E-mail: shafiek.orrie@gmail.com

MARIUS NEL JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 791 4627 E-mail: mariusneljewellers@gmail.com Website: http://mariusnel.blogspot.com

ORO AFRICA - CAPE TOWN Tel no: 021 480 9860 E-mail: gnathan@oroafrica.com; chantal@oroafrica.com Website: www.oroafrica.com

QUICKSET JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 468-9236 E-mail: qsjewel@telkomsa.net; osjewel@telkomsa.net Website: www.quicksetjewellers.co.za

MARINE GOLD CC Tel no: 021 424 0077 E-mail: stephen@marinegold.co.za

MARK WHITEHORN GOLDSMITH Tel no: 011 325 5145 E-mail: whitehor@mweb.co.za MASELESELE JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 734 0245 E-mail: imfundiso@mweb.co.za; imfundisojewellers@mweb.co.za Website: www.imfundiso.com MD INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED HANDCRAFTED JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 465 6446 E-mail: accounts@michaelsdesigns.co.za Website: www.michaeldesigns.co.za METAL CONCENTRATORS - DURBAN E-mail: info@metcon.co.za Website: www.metcon.co.za

ORO AFRICA - JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 645 9260 E-mail: acrowther@oroafrica.com Website: www.oroafrica.com OSMONDS Tel no: 021 559 8277 E-mail: osmond@telkomsa.net PAUL GALLIAS E-mail: pgallias@hotmail.com PEARL AND DIAMONDS STUDIO Tel no: 011 678 0595/6 E-mail: pearldiamond@mweb.co.za PETER STANLEY ASSAYS (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 616 7210

RAND REFINERY LIMITED Tel no: 011 418 9011 E-mail: nicolab@gold.co.za Website: www.randrefinery.com RARE EARTH CREATIONS Tel no: 011 326 1727 E-mail: Andrew@rarearth.co.za; svetla@rarearth.co.za RASIFIWA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 422 1350 E-mail: rssa@rasifiwa.com; jacqui@rasifiwa.com Website: www.rasifiwa.com RICHLINE SA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 418 1600 E-mail: johan@richlinesa.co.za; marco@richlinesa.co.za Website: www.richlinegroup.co.za


BORN IN AFRICA

RITCO MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 041 374 2101 E-mail: sales@ritco.co.za Website: www.ritco.co.za ROHAN CHERRY DESIGNS E-mail: info@rcdesigns.co.za Website: www.rcdesign.co.za ROMANCING THE STONE Tel no: 012 662 0618 E-mail: info@romancingthestone.co.za Website: www.romancingthetone.co.za RONALD’S JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 031 701 5154 E-mail: ronaldcbr262@gmail.com ROUX DU PREEZ DESIGNS Tel no: 084 207 3876 E-mail: info@preezdesigns.co.za Website: www.preezdesigs.co.za RUTH PROWSE SCHOOL OF ART Tel no: 021 447 2492 E-mail: admin@ruthprowse.co.za Website: www.ruthprowse.co.za S.L. HERMAN MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 012 460 6771 E-mail: slhj@telkomsa.net; online2638822@telkomsa.net SATHKAAR JEWELLERS C.C Tel no: 031 306 4921 E-mail: sathkaar@gmail.com SCANT DESIGN Tel no: 072 339 1885 E-mail: as@scant.co.za Website: www.scant.co.za SCARAB JEWELLERY STUDIO CC Tel no: 021 683 4646 E-mail: janine@scarabjewellery.co.za; Tanya@scarabjewellery.co.za Website: www.scarabjewellery.co.za SCHWARTZ JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 783 1717 E-mail: rls@schwartzjewellers.com Website: www.schwartzjewellers.com

SILVER MYST - JULIANA RED Tel no: 021 797 3246 E-mail: jbroad@mweb.co.za; pa@julsofafrica.com SIMON EFUNE MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 334 4529 E-mail: simon.efune@mweb.co.za

UNCUT JEWELLERS Tel no: 083 225 8221 E-mail: mark@uncutjewellers.co.za Website: www.uncutjewellers.co.za

SIRKEL JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 726 2365 E-mail: info@sirkeljewellery.co.za Website: www.sirkeljewellery.co.za

UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG Tel no: 011 559 1129/1125 E-mail: fnazier@uj.ac.za Website: www.uj.ac.za

SMITH JEWELLERY E-mail: info@smith-jewellery.com Website: www.smith-jewellery.com

CREATIVE JEWELLERY AND METAL DESIGN DIVISION, VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT (STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY) Tel no: 021 808 3052 E-mail: ct@sun.ac.za; Joani@sun.ac.za Website: http://www.sun.ac.za/english/faculty/arts/ visual-arts/

SOFFIA FINE JEWELLERY Tel no: 031 303 2370 E-mail: sonny@soffia.co.za; z.patel@live.co.za Website: www.soffia.co.za STUDIO 39 JEWELLERY DESIGN Tel no: 031 764 3000 E-mail: studio39@telkomsa.net Website: www.studio39.co.za STUDIO C MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 642 7826 E-mail: chris@studioc.co.za; peggy@studioc.co.za Website: www.studioc.co.za SUSAN ROOS JUWELE Tel no: 028 754 2949 E-mail: susanroos@vodamail.co.za Website: www.roosjuwele.co.za TARQUIN’S EXCLUSIVE JEWELLERY/PRECIOUS METALSMITHS Tel no: 031 763 1389 E-mail: preciousmetalsmith@live.co.za Website: www.tarquin.co.za TCHALIEU JEWELLERY Tel no: 011 453 0492 E-mail: siphokazi.tchalieu@gmail.com THE HOUSE OF HECTOR Tel no: 021 782 5434 E-mail: paula@thehouseofhector.co.za Website: www.houseofegoli.com

SEDA PLATINUM INCUBATOR Tel no: 014 597 0736 E-mail: sibongile@spi.org.za Website: www.spi.org.za

THE JEWEL BOX MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 609 8405 E-mail: thejewelbox@mweb.co.za Website: www.jewelboxmanufacturing.co.za

SERAFINI DESIGN WORKSHOP Tel no: 021 780 1617 E-mail: serafinidesign@mweb.co.za

TIP TOP JEWELLERS Tel no: 044 873 3048 E-mail: tiptop@lantic.net

SERAGLIO JEWELLERS Tel no: 011 783 8301 E-mail: rolling.albert@yahoo.com Website: www.seragliojewellers.com

TRILOGY JEWELLERS Tel no: 0823712481 E-mail: susan@africangold.co.za Website: www.triologyjewellers.co.za

SHADOW JEWELLERS E-mail: shadrackmogoane@yahoo.com

TRIMALCHIO Tel no: 012 346 6874 E-mail: casanra@mweb.co.za

SIBAHLE JEWELLERY (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 049 3933 E-mail: nthabiseng@sibahlejewellery.co.za Website: www.sibahlejewellery.co.za SILK ROUTE GOLD (PTY) LTD Tel no: 011 450 3192 E-mail: info@silkroutegold.com Website: www.silkroutegold.com SILPLAT (PTY) LTD Tel no: 021 461 5344 E-mail: alberto@silplat.co.za; yianni@silplat.co.za Website: www.silplat.co.za

susan@umjindijewellery.co.za Website: www.umjindijewellery.co.za

TRISLO (PTY) LTD Tel no: 012 259 0100 E-mail: info@trislo.co.za Website: www.trislo.co.za TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Tel no: 012 382 6007 E-mail: newmand@tut.ac.za Website: www.tut.ac.za UMJINDI JEWELLERY Tel no: 013 712 5807 E-mail: evert@umjindijewellery.co.za;

URBANATIVE FINE JEWELS Tel no: 021 761 0156 E-mail: idieh@mweb.co.za Website: www.heidiliebenberg.co.za VALLABHJEE’S JEWELLERY SHOP Tel no: 032 944 1657 E-mail: hemval1@yahoo.co.uk VAN DER BANK JEWELLERS SOUTH AFRICA Tel no: 012 663 4304 E-mail: sales@vdbj.co.za; gerda@vdbj.co.za Website: www.vdbj.co.za VAWDA GOLD GEM JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 208 9142/3 E-mail: info@vawdagoldgem.co.za Website: www.vawdagoldgem.co.za VIJAY SHAH JEWELLERS Tel no: 031 564 2948 E-mail: vijayshah@telkomsa.net Website: www.vijayshahjewellers.co.za VJS JEWELLERS Tel no: 051 813 8651 E-mail: velile@ntelecom.co.za Website: www.vjsjewellers.co.za VUKANI UBUNTU COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS Tel no: 012 342 1385/8099 E-mail: demos@vukani.org; info@vukani.org Website: www.vukani.org WAINWRIGHT JEWELLERS Tel no: 021 554 1169 E-mail: info@wainwrightjewel.co.za Website: www.wainwrightjewel.co.za WHITE DIAMOND JEWELLERS Tel no: 035 789 5550 E-mail: whitediamondjewellers@telkomsa.net Website: www.telkomsa.net WOOSH DESIGNS JEWELLERY STUDIO Tel no: 011 318 1340 E-mail: woosh@vodamail.co.za Website: www.wooshjewellery.co.za WORLD OF DIAMONDS Tel no: 011 964 8119 E-mail: ian@worldofdiamonds.co.za; yolandi@worldofdiamonds.co.za Website: www.worldofdiamonds.co.za ZUREL BROTHERS SA (PTY) LTD Tel no: 015 293 2306/58 E-mail: zurelpolokwane@telkomsa.net; zurelqms@gmail.com Website: www.zurel.co.za

All JMASA member details were correct at the time of going to print. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of contents, neither the JMASA nor the publishers can be held responsible for any omissions or errors, or any misfortune, injury, consequences or damages which may arise therefrom.


Tel: +27 11 418-1600 • Fax: +27 11 825-4043 • Cell: +27 82 556-7316 • E-mail: info@richlinesa.co.za • Website: www.richlinesa.co.za

African Odyssey 2017/2018  
African Odyssey 2017/2018