Page 1

i s h c o m p u b l i c at i o n s s i n c e 19 8 6

O

N

T

A

R

I

O

estaurant News R August 2013 Vol. 28 No. 7

BRAND CULTURE - Bunge Corporate Ads *9770 BUNGE Team Focus Ad-Ontario Rest News_r1 N A T I O N A L Sept. 9, 2014

C O V E R A G E

R E G I O N A L

Type Safety Area: .25" all around Trim $ Size: 5 . 10.75" 9 5 x 7.75" Bleed width only: 11" x 7.75"

F O C U S

OILS

When you buy Bunge you get more than just oil. Bunge is Canada’s largest and most trusted manufacturer of edible oil products and oilseed processor, transforming commodity oils into value-added food ingredients for restaurants, bakeries and food producers. Our culture is built on a set of core values that define and reflect our commitment to delivering superior quality products and outstanding service. Our TEAM of Oil Experts take pride in building lasting relationships with YOU, our valued customer.

Benefit from the Bunge

TEAM Advantages:

Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40010152Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement NO. 40010152

• Dependable, consistent, personal customer service • Long-standing, dedicated, Oil Experts providing valuable knowledge in Technical Foodservice & Bakery segments: - markets and trends - product safety - products - government regulations - customer requirements and solutions

• An award winning Quality Assurance Team • Technical team constantly exploring ways to improve products and processes • Research and Development continually searching for healthy solutions based on emerging trends in diet and lifestyle

At Bunge our strength is in

our TEAM of people.

Trust the Oil Experts, Trust Bunge

TM

APPROVAL REQUIRED

The enclosed proof is sent for your approval. We will not proceed with the job until the proof is returned.

DO NOT GIVE VERBAL INSTRUCTIONS. CHECK CAREFULLY!

For more information please contact your local Distributor, or Bunge at 1-800-361-3043 Beyond this point we cannot accept responsibility for any errors. Alterations (other than typographical errors) will be charged extra. Mark proof “OK” or “OK with corrections” as the case may be, signing your name so we may know that the proof reached the proper authority.

SIGNATURE OF APPROVAL

DATE

JOIN THE

CONVERT YOUR RESTAURANT

TO A BOSTON PIZZA. WINNING TEAM IT’S WORTH A CALL. IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK. CALL US NOW.

Felix DeCata Chantal D’Aoust

905.361.3608 905.361.4836

DeCataF@BostonPizza.com DAoustC@BostonPizza.com The 50 Years of Boston Pizza design, Boston Pizza and the Boston Pizza roundel are registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under licence. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2014.

NAME:

RestaurantNews_AD_SEP2014-BP

SIZE:

10" × 2.875"

DATE:

SEP - 2014

JOB NO:

14-623

INK:

CYAN

MAGENTA

YELLOW

BLACK


Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40010152

Breakfast and Lunch 816_INT14_SL_Ann-Four_Fondation_ANG_V4.indd 1

2014-09-18 2:42 PM


i s h c o m p u b l i c at i o n s s i n c e 19 8 6

O

N

T

A

R

I

O

estaurant News R October 2014 Vol. 29 No. 9

N A T I O N A L

C O V E R A G E

R E G I O N A L

F O C U S

5

B. GOOD COMES TO CANADA

Shant Mardirosian.

Confessions of a Burger’s Priest NIAGARA WINE AND GRAPE FESTIVAL

21

2014

Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40010152

FRANCHISE

REPORT How to plan for successful succession, franchise contact information and more.

15

FEATURE: Navigating the waters of sustainable seafood.

12

By Jonathan Zettel, assistant editor TORONTO—A Toronto-based burger chain is seeking burger redemption in Guelph, ON, with the opening of the company’s seventh location in late August. The Burger’s Priest owner Shant Mardirosian—who launched the concept four years ago with a modest 344-square-foot location on Queen Street East in Toronto—said he is happy with the company’s growing notoriety.

“I’m really surprised so many people knew about Burger’s Priest so far away. We had a huge line on our first day,” California-native Mardirosian told ORN about the opening at 435 Stone Rd. Over the summer, locations in Etobicoke, ON, and Mississauga, ON, also opened, and Mardirosian said there are plans for more locations in the Greater Toronto Area, one in Western Ontario and a location in Edmonton, which is slated to open in January 2015.

Mardirosian said Edmonton is “a great burger market,” and the operation will act as an outpost for western expansion. “One of the good things is that as we are growing and as we’re building momentum, landlords are now calling us,” Mardirosian said. “So as we grow, the opportunities for growth present themselves.” At the heart of the operation is a four-ounce burger patty ground in-house daily, which Mardirosian said is a mix between a Californiastyle burger and a meatier New York

$ 5 . 9 5

burger. The Burger’s Priest uses the griddle smash method, where the beef is rolled into a ball and pressed onto the griddle to create the Maillard reaction, which caramelizes the protein. “The more surface area that’s crusting, the more flavour there is,” Mardirosian said, adding the source of the company’s beef is not shared. The fast casual chain uses traditional white buns, American cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion and pickles. It also offers The Option, a vegetarian portabello mushroom burger, which is breaded and deep-fried. Customers can order items such as The Priest, a combination of The Option and a cheeseburger; The Vatican City, a double cheeseburger between two grilled cheese buns; and Noah’s Ark, The Option topped with chili and cheese. Many of the items available for order are on the chain’s not-so-secret secret menu, which is listed on the company’s website. “I’m working on one secret menu item that I can’t talk about yet,” Mardirosian said, adding the company is about to launch an orange creamsicle, a blend of soda and ice cream. The Guelph location is about 2,200 square feet with seating available for customers. According to Mardirosian, the footprint of future locations is mainly real estate driven. “We try to walk this line between creating a space that’s hip and has a good vibe and is busy but we also want people to be comfortable,” he said. Continued on page 5

Cold Stone makes Canadian comeback plans By Kristen Smith, assistant editor, digital content SCOTTSDALE, AZ—After its Canadian partnership with master franchisee Tim Hortons ended, Cold Stone Creamery is getting ready to re-enter the market with plans for 150 units across four years. During the five-year partnership, 168 co-branded stores were opened in Canada and most were closed between February and May this year. Seven Tim Hortons/Cold Stone units remain open. “They tended to be the franchisees that were doing better with the Cold Stone stores and were adamant that they wanted to maintain it,” Michael Serruya, chairman and chief executive officer of Kahala Brands, parent company of Cold Stone Creamery, told ORN. The Serruya family purchased 75 per cent of Kahala in August 2013 and

the remaining stake about six months later. Serruya said Tim Horton’s decision to pull Cold Stone counters from its stores was “unfortunate”. “Having said that, I think it opens up an opportunity to come back into the marketplace with our traditional freestanding stores as opposed to being within another retailer,” he said, adding limited space meant a limited product line. “I’m actually really excited about the future for Cold Stone in Canada. Being Canadian, I really want to bring the brand here in a meaningful way,” said Serruya. “The idea is to focus on the traditional type stores that have been so successful in the U.S. and internationally.” For the 150 units, Serruya said they plan on franchising and are also considering future foodservice partnership. “We’re in discussion with a number of large food operators who

have expressed an interest in bringing in Cold Stone as a co-branding partner to represent their frozen dessert category.” Serruya said the company is “on the cusp” of signing a dozen leases for traditional units—which include kiosks and 1,500-square-foot stores— with hopes of them being signed by year’s end. He expects some of those locations to be operating by January with the balance opening in the first quarter of 2015. “I think you’re going to see us start to open initially in Ontario; the majority of the deal flow we’re seeing right now and the opportunities that are availing themselves are in Ontario. From there, the objective is out West, call it Alberta, B.C., Saskatchewan,” said Serruya. “In some markets, we have discussions going on with prospective master franchisees and in other markets, we’re talking directly to franchisees who have expressed

an interest in opening a freestanding store.” The mix-in ice cream concept, which prepares its product in store daily, has a 25-year history with more than 1,400 locations operating in 25 countries. In Canada, new stores will open in quick succession, said Serruya who is also the co-founder of Yogen Früz and Yogurty’s, noting this represents a successful track record. “We have the experience and hopefully the skill sets in the space to execute on the Cold Stone brand the way we think it needs to be. We don’t believe that 150 stores is a far stretch by any means,” he said. “The silver lining is [Tim] Hortons spent millions and millions of dollars, actually tens of millions of dollars, introducing the brand to Canada … as I see it, we have all that good will and consumer brand awareness,” said Serruya.


When your hot water stops flowing, so can your revenue. Protect your bottom line with the Reliance Commercial Solutions™ water heater rental program today. Lots of things can go wrong in the food services and hospitality business, but few can compare to a water heater breakdown, and having to close your doors to customers. That’s where Reliance™ comes in. A leading provider of worry-free water heating solutions for over 30 years, we’re proud to guarantee outstanding service: • Four-hour service response guarantee, 24/7/365

• No upfront equipment replacement costs*

• No repair bills*

• One predictable monthly payment

• Customized solutions

Plus, if you own a water heater that’s less than 6 years old, or a boiler that’s less than 8 years old, you can benefit from our exclusive Buy-Back Program and earn $3,000 to $9,000 to invest in your business.

To find out if you qualify for our Buy-Back Program and learn more about our customized water heating solutions, call 1-866-326-9392 today.

™ “Reliance”, “Reliance Commercial Solutions”, and the Reliance Commercial Solutions logo are trademarks of Reliance Comfort Limited Partnership. * Subject to standard rental program terms and conditions. Some additional charges relating to installation (e.g. code required venting) may be applicable. Call for details.

Receive up to $9,000 through our exclusive Buy-Back Program.


U.S. chain b.good comes to Ontario TORONTO—A Boston-based fast casual chain is set to launch in Ontario, using local suppliers for what it calls “real food, fast.” With its first location set to open in Toronto in mid-October and another to follow in Oakville, ON, by the end of the year, b.good is set to bring its local food restaurant chain to the province. “Our whole mission is serving what we call ‘real food’,” b.good Canada president Todd Brooks told ORN. “Food made by people and not factories.” The menu will offer three main platforms: kale and quinoa bowls in three flavours; six salads based on seasonal vegetables; and in-house ground hamburgers and fries. Brooks said the company had to create its own supply chain to match its philosophy of providing local food. Beef will be sourced from Enright Cattle Co. in Tweed, ON, bacon from Leadbetter Foods in Orillia, ON, and bread from Silverstein’s in Toronto. “We really see ourselves as part of that connection to the local food movement,” Brooks said. “When a customer comes into a b.good restaurant, they make that connection right back to the farmer.” Entering the Canadian market, Brooks said it was important to connect with people in the local food movement and build lasting relationships. He said after a conversation with Nick Saul, president and chief executive officer of Community Food Centres Canada, the company was directed to cheese maven Ruth Klahsen of Monforte Dairy. Klahsen then di-

Ground Beef Pizza Crumble topping

Perfect portion sizing on pizzas

Famous Pepperoni, Salami, Donair and Gyros products.

TTS Sales 905-677-2900 www.chrisbrothers.ca FEDERALLY INSPECTED

Outside the b.good location at 100 Front St. E., Toronto.

rected the group to Bright Cheese and Butter in Bright, ON, which will supply the Ontario locations. “One of the beautiful things about Canada that we’ve found is the willingness of people to connect you to other people and open up their networks to you,” Brooks said. The Toronto location, located at 100 Front St., will be 1,500 square feet, smaller than the company’s ideal footprint of 2,500 square feet; however, Brooks said the location is prime. “We’re trying to prove what we’ve built in Boston is transferrable to other markets,” Brooks said.

Bareburger to land in Canada TORONTO—A New York-based full service franchise is set to launch its organic menu in Ontario with potential expansion plans for the rest of the country. Scott Grandin, president of Dynamic Franchising Group Inc., and area developer for Bareburger in Ontario, said the brand’s first location will open at the southwest corner of Bay Street and Dundas Avenue in Toronto by the end of November. “As a launch location, that’s going to be a flagship for us,” Grandin told ORN. Grandin said Bareburger is committed to opening 20 locations in Ontario and is looking at sites from London to Ottawa and as far north as Barrie. He said there are plans to have at least three or four restaurants operating in 2015 with plans to move outside the province. “I’ve had landlords approach me now, which is a good thing,” Grandin said. Currently there are more than 20 locations in New York and Ohio with operations scheduled for California, Chicago, New Jersey, Connectitcut, Florida and Germany. The franchise fee is $50,000 with a six per

| 5

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014

cent royalty fee and a one per cent marketing fee which goes toward marketing local operations. The first Toronto location will be 2,500 square feet with 50 seats. The interior of each site contains repurposed and recycled materials from chandeliers made of utensils to recycled vinyl seating. Bareburger offers local and organic options, with a variety of proteins, fries, salads, milkshakes and a children’s menu. Ostrich, elk, bison, boar and beef vendors all have to be sourced locally, as well as most produce. “Logistically, it was a little bit of a challenge,” Grandin said. The restaurant is also fully licensed, serving organic beer, wine and liquor. According to Grandin, despite sourcing organic food, pricing will remain competitive. “The pricing is going to be in line with the pricing that is market value right now, so as we grow, our vendors have agreed to start looking at pricing structures,” he said. Average checks for lunch are $28 and $45 for dinner.

Bareburger location in Astonia, NY. Photo by Mark Turner.

There are currently 14 locations open south of the border with another two likely to open there prior to the Toronto opening. According to Brooks, the company will have a total of 21 units by year’s end. “The key is: if you are going out and sourcing locally, which is just better from a food standpoint anyway, and then you are celebrating those local partners in the store and you keep that local connection. It’s still b.good systems and b.good recipes, but the connection back to the local markets is really through the supply chain and celebrating those farmers,” Brooks said.

SUBSCRIBE TO ONTARIO RESTAURANT NEWS AT

Burger’s Priest expands Continued from cover

In line with the chain’s overall theme, each location is closed on Sundays and has scripture painted on the walls. Mardirosian, who had entered the seminary to become a priest, said it is impossible for him to separate the sacred from the secular. “I don’t know how you can read the bible and divorce yourself from culture. It is a story from creation to new creation; it’s a story that deals with humanity being kings and priests to other people, mediating God to the world and the world to God and everything we do, so it’s very hard for me as a Christian to divorce those two things and say I’m a Christian here, and I’m not a Christian here,” Mardirosian said. “I’m happy to see where God is going to take me.” According to Mardirosian, Crave It Restaurant Group—the group that was behind Extreme Brandz, which sold to MTY Group for $45 million in 2013—is helping with expansion. “Right now, we are focused on corporate growth,” Mardirosian said, adding he has not ruled out a franchise system in the future. Mardirosian noted the quick growth of the fast casual market. “It’s this desire for people to have really good quality food, but they don’t necessarily want to pay the high end prices, have a waiter, have to tip or have to do all that kind of stuff, so I just see it as something that’s just going to keep going. It’s not going to stop,” he said. As for the competition, Mardirosian said he’s not even paying attention and couldn’t name the brand’s three or four top contenders. “We do our own thing,” he said. “Some people say that’s bad business, but not for me. I just wake up every morning and say ‘How can we do the best possible job we can do today?’”

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com/sub


6 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

RestaurantNews

Com m e n t

The additive effect

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Leslie Wu ext. 227 · lwu@canadianrestaurantnews.com SENIOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Colleen Isherwood ext. 231 · cisherwood@canadianrestaurantnews.com ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jonathan Zettel ext. 226 · jzettel@canadianrestaurantnews.com ASSISTANT EDITOR, DIGITAL CONTENT

Kristen Smith ext. 238 · ksmith@canadianrestaurantnews.com SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER

Debbie McGilvray ext. 233 · dmcgilvray@canadianrestaurantnews.com ACCOUNT MANAGER

Kim Kerr ext. 229 · kkerr@canadianrestaurantnews.com PRODUCTION

Stephanie Giammarco ext. 0 · sgiammarco@canadianrestaurantnews.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

Don Trimm ext. 228 · dtrimm@canadianrestaurantnews.com CONTROLLER

Tammy Turgeon ext. 237 · tammy@canadianrestaurantnews.com

How to reach us: Tel. (905) 206-0150

PUBLISHER

Steven Isherwood ext. 236 sisherwood@canadianrestaurantnews.com

EDITORIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL Mickey Cherevaty Consultant, Moyer Diebel Limited Marvin Greenberg Consultant Jack Battersby President, Summit Food Service Distributors Inc. Barney Strassburger Jr. President, TwinCorp Paul LeClerc Partner, Serve-Canada Food Equipment Ltd. Paul Mancini Director of Retail, Inventory and Wholesale, LCBO Jorge Soares Director Food and Beverage Operations, Woodbine Entertainment Group Adam Colquhoun President, Oyster Boy John Crawford Director of Sales-Canada, Lamb Weston Tina Chiu Chief Operating Officer, Mandarin Restaurant Franchise Corporation Martin Kouprie Chef/Owner, Pangaea Restaurant Joel Sisson Founder and president of Crush Strategy Inc. Leslie Wilson Vice-president of Business Excellence, Compass Group Canada Chris Jeens Partner, W. D. Colledge Co. Ltd. Ontario Restaurant News Volume 29 · No. 9 · October 2014 Ontario Restaurant News (www.ontariorestaurantnews.com) is published 12 times a year by Ishcom Publications Ltd., 2065 Dundas Street East, Suite 201, Mississauga, Ont. L4X 2W1 T: (905) 206-0150 · F: (905) 206-9972 · Toll Free: 1(800)201-8596 Other publications include the Canadian Chains and Buyers’ Directory as well as:

Subscriptions: Canada: $52.33/year or $78.57/2 years, $102.67/ 3 years; U.S.A.: $58.85/year or $84.85/2 years, $108.70/ 3 years. Single copy: $5.95 (Plus taxes where applicable) Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to circulation department, 2065 Dundas Street East, Suite 201, Mississauga, Ontario L4X 2W1 Publication Mail Agreement No. 40010152 ISSN 0834-0404 GST number R102533890

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

A

pop up restaurant in Britain is offering diners a chance to choose their fish options—fresh from a can. Tincan restaurant, which operates without a chef or a kitchen, serves high-end artisan fish products such as Icelandic smoked cod livers and Galician urchin caviar. Based on similar concepts in Spain, founder Maximilano Arrocet told The Guardian, he aims to “elevate the tin to an object of desire.” For those of us weaned on late British author Enid Blyton’s books of post war British rationing and the exotic joys of tinned peaches at a picnic, the concept seems intriguing, but a bit odd. At a time where an awareness of hyperlocal and seasonality is growing among diners and chefs, we’re also seeing a conscious return to some elements that recent generations eschewed. Big box companies are marketing themselves as real food and distancing themselves from chemical additives, while small operators are experimenting with nitrous oxide, soy lecithin and other elements. The irony is that many additives—designed to mimic natural flavours and properties—are now being added back into these selfsame ingredients even when the real thing is available. Items such as MSG have found

their way back, not just onto menus but, as in the case of Danny Bowien’s Mission Chinese in San Francisco, purportedly onto the table itself in a salt-shaker format for diners to add to meals themselves. It’s an inimitable equation: at the same time additives are being used to enhance flavours in food, some chefs are subtracting major parts of their menus in favour of promoting their connection to nature. Famed French chef Alain Ducasse made headlines in early September by paring down most proteins from one of his restaurants in Paris, a move that was seen as a warning shot across the bow of both traditional French cuisine and meat production in general. “The planet’s resources are rare, we must consume more ethically and equitably,” said Ducasse to Agence France-Presse. Turning toward more fish and vegetable options on his menu, Ducasse wanted to promote what he calls “naturalness” in cooking and ingredients. Here in Canada, chefs are tackling these ethical consumption issues in their own ways, driven not only by the desire to do right but also benefitting by getting the best ingredients. “My personal definition of sustainable starts with purchasing what’s on my door-

Bi t s Yogurty’s acquires Alberta chain EDMONTON—The Yogurty’s chain, which recently opened locations in Ottawa and Montreal, made its first foray into Western Canada with the purchase of Edmonton’s Twisted Yogurt chain. A total of eight new stores opened in the province—including six rebranded Twisted Yogurts and a Calgary and Grande Prairie, AB, location. The six former Twisted Yogurt locations include two in Edmonton, two in Sherwood Park and units in Spruce Grove and St. Albert. Famoso Neapolitan Pizzeria co-founders Justin Lussier and Christian Bullock are Yogurty’s master franchisees for the province. Karen Sterling, vice-president of marketing, said the company is looking for franchisees for its Alberta locations. “[The acquisition] has been such a great experience for us, that we have several other acquisitions pending right now,” she told ORN, adding the company is also looking for sites for new stores. Justin Derush, who works with Yogurty’s Alberta operations, said the companies are at the tail end of negotiations with brands in Saskatchewan. The first Saskatchewan location, co-branded by a Quiznos franchisee, is opening in Melville, SK. The Ontario-based chain was founded by Aaron and Michael Serruya less than three years ago with the first location opening in May 2012. The chain has about 75 locations open or in development.

Diamond and Kirkwood merge NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE, ON—Diamond Estates and The Kirkwood Group announced in September the companies have merged operations to form Kirkwood Diamond Canada.

a nd

The merger was expected to conclude on Oct. 1. Diamond Estates will consolidate the partnership’s financial results into its quarterly and annual results. The Kirkwood Group is a privately held company specializing in the marketing, sales and distribution of leading beverage alcohol brands within the Canadian market. They are based in Oakville, ON, with sales representation in all markets of the country. Diamond Estates Wines and Spirits is a domestic producer of VQA wines and an importer and distributor of international beverage alcohol brands. The organization has offices in Niagara-on-the-Lake and Toronto. “This merged organization will combine the best features of two great companies and will create one of the largest marketing and sales organizations in Canada,” Gord Haist, chief operating officer of The Kirkwood Group, said in a release. Murray Souter, Diamond Estates Wines and Spirits chief executive officer, said the partnership will double business and allow the companies to combine efficiencies. “An organization of this size gives us the ability to invest in our suppliers’ business, helping them achieve accelerated growth and better results within the Canadian market,” said Souter. Kirkwood Diamond Canada will be headquartered in Oakville, ON, and the Diamond Estates Winery will continue to operate independently of the partnership and will be headquartered in Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON.

Icon buys Free House VANCOUVER—Icon Fine Wine & Spirits acquired Free House Wine + Spirits Ltd. in October, combining the two boutique wine and spirits import companies and increas-

step,” Mallard Cottage chef Todd Perrin told assistant editor Kristen Smith in this month’s sustainable seafood story (turn to page 12 for more.) “Cooking a piece of fish that’s super fresh is the easiest piece of cooking that you’ll ever do,” Perrin says. By placing restraints on the fish they receive and adhering to sustainable standards, chefs can use their purchasing decisions to add to the overall quality of the final dish. How, then, do we balance this equation between the addition of artificial and fresh elements when it seems as if the culinary world is heading in two opposite directions? Perhaps the solution lies in the current bounty of choice spread before us. Due to the availability of fresh ingredients on a level that was previously inaccessible to past generations, today’s chefs feel free to play with additives in a way that their forefathers may have been required to in order to mask substandard items. As a result, these chefs have the unfettered ability to choose to use tinned fish or chemical substitutes without worrying about opening a culinary can of worms. Leslie Wu Editorial Director

Bi t e s ing Icon’s portfolio to over 100 brands. “Our partnership with Free House is a natural progression of Icon’s strategy to deepen its Western Canada roots and better seize the opportunities presented by a rapidly changing marketplace,” said Jay Garnett, chief executive officer of Icon, in a release. Garnett will continue as Icon’s CEO and oversee the back-of-house and strategic operations. Ted Latimer, who originally founded Free House in 1994, will be president of Icon and manage front-of-house and sales operations. Both companies are based in Vancouver, although Free House also has an office in Toronto.

Toronto’s Mr. Greenjeans closes after 34 years TORONTO—Mr. Greenjeans has shuttered after 34 years in Toronto’s Eaton Centre. The restaurant—known for its milkshake menu and large portions of buffalo chips—occupied the north-end upper level of the shopping mecca. “We look forward to announcing our plans for the space at a later date,” mall owners Cadillac Fairview said in an email statement. Mr. Greenjeans owner Maury Kalen told the Toronto Star the closure wasn’t planned and noted the restaurant was busy right up until the end. “Mr. Greenjeans is beyond special. We’re very proud of what we’ve done here,” Kalen said, adding he may reopen another location in Toronto, “sooner than you think.” The original Mr. Greenjeans opened in 1975 on Adelaide St. E. and moved into the Eaton Centre in 1980. According to the Toronto Star, Kalen said the eatery employed more than 5,000 staff and served more than 20 million people over the years.


Legends aren’t created with the occasional presentation of excellence –– they come about by delivering excellence, time after time. The legendary quality of Sterling Silver® Premium Beef is no different. Hand selected from top-tier AAA and Prime grade beef, it’s always highly marbled for rich flavour, and aged to perfection to ensure that every dish you put on the table is one for the books.

U N M AT C H E D Q UA L I T Y ° U N PA R A L L E L E D F L AVO U R

Request a complimentary Sterling Silver information pack & find out what chefs, like Nick Unangst, are saying about Sterling Silver. visit

r n . s t e r l i n g s i lv e r s t o r i e s . c om

SterlingSilverMeats.com | 800.757.2079 | © 2014 Cargill Limited. All Rights Reserved.


8 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

1

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

How German chefs and winemakers are interpreting terroir.

2

By Leslie Wu

5

3

A

lthough German cuisine—like the food in many European countries—is intensely regional, a common misconception categorizes everything in terms of heavily sauced and breaded schnitzel, sauerbraten and sausages. “I find that my customers will come in expecting Oktoberfest: sausage, sauerkraut and swine,” laughs Ruthie Cummings, chef/owner of Toronto’s Das Gasthaus. “When German restaurants open here, they tend to cater to public perception. I want to challenge that with my place.” A good part of the difficulty in translating German cuisine to the Canadian diner is the portion size and a perception of heaviness, says Cummings. At Das Gasthaus, they choose not to serve heavy brown sauces, in-

4

stead garnishing traditional German/ Austrian dishes such as schnitzel with jagersauce (mushroom sauce) with lemon, dill and caper compound butters in the summer to lighten it up. A simultaneous thought process is occurring across the pond, with German chefs looking at lighter ingredients and modern techniques in terms of cooking, plating and wine pairing. Internationally renowned chefs such as Mario Lohninger at Restaurant Lohninger and Gregor Novak at Heimat restaurant in Frankfurt play with Asian ingredients such as shiso, watermelon broths and tomato waters, and at Michelin-starred restaurant Freundstück at the Ketschauer Hof in Deidesheim, Daniel Schimkowitsch uses molecular technique for dishes such as nordseekrabben (a brown

1. Smoked eel, blackcurrant and cucumber at Freundstück at the Ketschauer Hof in Deidesheim. 2. Hilde Mailahn demonstrates dessert at Fachwerk im Eulengarten restaurant. 3. Martin Korrell, a sixth generation winemaker at Weingut Korrell. 4. Salmon dish at Frankfurt’s Heimat restaurant. 5. Part of the gardens at Fachwerk im Eulengarten. 6. Chef Markus Buchholz at Der Kaiserhof. Next page: 7. Apfelwine at Frankfurt’s Apfelweinwirtschaft Wagner restaurant.

shrimp), with carrots and lemon and ginger emulsion to elevate traditional and sturdy ingredients to a delicate form. Meanwhile, local restaurants and cooking schools are striving to infuse traditional dishes with modern sensibilities. In 1975, when Hilde Mailahn and her husband purchased Fachwerk im Eulengarten, an inn and restaurant, there was no electricity or hot water and the roof leaked. The couple opened a cooking school on the property in 2004, which offers students the chance to create modern interpretations of what Mailahn calls “rheinhassen tapas”: small plates reflecting the local Rheinhassen region. In terms of the evolution of German cuisine, she regards change as occurring on a higher-end dining level, 1 2

1. Red elderberries and its flowers, as well as other fruits are used in yogurt and cordial drinks, such as this dessert from Fachwerk im Eulengarten. 2. Saumagen: A pork stuffing encased in a pig’s stomach, similar in texture to a coarse sausage. A dish often served throughout the Palatinate region of southwestern Germany. 3. Handkäse mit musik: The lyrically named “Hand cheese with music” is a regional specialty of the Frankfurt area. A low fat, handmade cheese is served with chopped onions and caraway, sometimes accompanied by vinegar and oil. At Fachwerk im Eulengarten, guests add butter to pureed handkase, which is served as a spread with onions on whole rye toast rounds. 4. Bread: Germany has a rich baking tradition, with hundreds of brown breads produced within the country. Visitors to Kleinsägmühlerhof can work with a master baker to learn the effects of local rye and water on texture, crumb and crust.

3

4

much more so than local and regional restaurants, which are still very traditional. “German food is very much lighter than it used to be, with more locally grown food being used in restaurants,” she said. “There are less heavy sauces with flour, cream and butter, and we’re moving away from the freezer.” Mailahn sees German proteins, produce and traditional cheeses being used with international twists, such as influences from Chinese and Korean cuisines. Chef Markus Buchholz runs Der Kaiserhof in Guldental, a hotel, restaurant and cooking school using local and seasonal ingredients. From housemade wild garlic spaetzle to beef broth from local beef with liver dumplings and ravioli, Buchholz and his team coach visitors to appreciate the food and wines of the region. Guests are invited to record their thoughts on a plaster wall in the dining room after the meal and try Mirabelle schnapps made by Buchholz’s father. The restaurant offers wine from family-owned vineyards processed by winery Königswingert. For those looking to explore the Rheinheissen terrain more closely, “herb witches” Karin Mannsdorfer, Christine Moebus and Martina Schmitt from restaurant and foraging company Siefersheimer Kräuterhexen take the connection to the land one step further by ushering visitors out into the field for herb walks, where they describe culinary and medicinal uses for regional fauna. Goosefoot, an herb native to Germany, was used in place of flour during periods of famine in households, as well as a source of livestock feed, says Moebus. The sisters, who all live on the property, host “Witches’ nights” celebrating Celtic culture at the beginning of summer. “It’s a combination of old knowledge with new things,” says Moebus. Christine and Michael Moebus also run Moebus Winery, which produces dornfelders, rieslings, spatburgunders, and others, offered at the winery tasting room daily. Taste of place is also manifesting itself in terms of a growing organic movement in Germany. At biodynamic farm Kleinsägmühlerhof in

Altleiningen, on the northern edge of the Palatinate Forest, a community of people with intellectual disabilities and their caretakers work in agriculture, an onsite bakery and dairy and the farm shop, which supplies restaurants in the region with baked goods, eggs and milk. More than 30 employees, 15 of whom live in a dorm on the farm, are raising livestock and working toward cultivating about 100 hectares of grassland and arable land. The farm uses solar energy and firewood for heating, and is working toward complete self-sustainability. Kleinsägmühlerhof is part of the international organization Demeter, which oversees and supports biodynamic agriculture. “If restaurants want to be part of the Demeter organization, they must have 60 per cent Demeter products and the other 40 per cent organic,” says Friedemann Wecker, supply chain manager from Demeter. “Chefs should be with the product from the slaughter to the kitchen. It’s all about mindset, which is really important.” In the certified-organic Hofgut Ruppertsberg restaurant, chef JeanPhilipe Aiguier oversees locally produced goat cheese from nearby village Erdesbach, as well as specialty varieties of turnips, tomatoes, cucumbers and other organic produce. The restaurant also offers a number of organic wines. “If you look at 20 years ago, organic wine growing was something unusual,” says Wecker. “Now, the younger generation is coming back to the winery from university and immediately changing over to organic and biodynamic.”

Changing the conversation about German wine “Consumers that are engaging with wine will want to know about Germany,” says Ted Kalaboukis of Wines of Germany Canada. “It’s approachable because of the low alcohol, and high in acidity, but not astringent, which makes it very good to pair with food. Due to the low alcohol, people don’t feel that after one glass, they should stop, which is an upsell opportunity for the restaurateur.”


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014

| 9

Top 10 most popular brands of German wine in the LCBO:

White Wines

Riesling Müller-Thurgau Silvaner Kerner Bacchus Scheurebe Grauburgunder (Pinot Gris) Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc) Gutedel Elbling Gewürztraminer (Roter Traminer) Chardonnay Sauvignon Blanc

Red Wines

Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) Portugieser Trollinger Schwarzriesling Lemberger Dornfelder Regent Saint Laurent Source: Wines of Germany USA.

Rank Brand Share 01 Henkell Troken 16.5% 02 Deinhard 10.4% 03 Dr Loosen 9.1% 04 Piesporter Michelsberg 9.1% 05 St Urbans-Hof 6.1% 06 Gunderloch 2.4% 07 Johann Wolf 2.4% 08 Lingenfelder Bird 2.4% 09 Balthasar Ress 1.8% 10 Black Tower 1.8% Source: Wines of Germany Canada. 7

6

The organization has just concluded its annual 31 Days of Riesling promotion and contest with 60 Canadian restaurants, which encourages operators to spread the word about riesling. This year’s winner was sommelier Lorie O’Sullivan of One Room at the Fifth, and currently with TOCA restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel and the Air Canada Centre’s Platinum Club. Kalaboukis recommends that operators use German wines as aperitif opportunities or to pair with small plates. “It’s not just riesling: pinot noir, pinot blanc and pinot gris are very important varietals in Germany,” he says. At Weingut Korrell, a small, family-owned winery with 25 hectares of grapes in the Nahe region, 65 per cent of the wine goes to German restaurants in Hamburg. Martin and Britta Korrell—the winemaker/manager couple that run the winery—are the sixth generation to do so, dating back to 1830. The winery’s local philosophy extends to a regional caraway, poppyseed, wine and bacon bread resembling a winemaking stamp, that is made for the winery from local bakery Heintz, located 100 metres away. At Das Gasthaus, where German varietals are part of the regular wine list, Cummings finds that approaching the customer directly is an important part of engaging them with German wine. “It really is a hand sell,” she says. “If people are pairing their wine with their meal and ordering a rich entrée, I tell them they’re better off to go with the sweeter riesling, which is a very traditional pairing in Germany with dishes such as schnitzel if you want something light and fresh.” Although she notes that it is hard to source a wide variety of German reds, she has a range of pinot noirs that range from “light and fruity to Burgundian, with a lot of mushroom and earth in the nose, which is a great pairing with venison.” Lighter-style German pinot noirs can be paired with schnitzel or, in the case of spätburgunders, are a natural match to fish. In many cases, Cummings needs to challenge a customer’s preconceived notions of German wine. “The first thing that people know is Black Tower, which is very sweet and appealed to a different customer,” she says. The Winechangers, a group of 12 young vintners from villages near Neudstadt Weinstrasse, are hoping to change that image of German wine. “It’s not new winemaking, it’s a new attitude for wine. It’s a lifestyle product, but it should be a quality lifestyle product,” says Michael Braun, winemaker at Braun Winery in Meckenheim. Winemaker Laura Julier from Pfarrgut Deidesheim Winery—which was gifted to a group of young winemakers by parish priest Bernhard Braun—sees her peer group as more experimental in their wine choices, and with a different perspective in choosing wine. “More and more people want to be entertained with wine,” she says. “You need a story and an interesting name when you want to sell product.” This trip was sponsored by Wines of Germany Canada.


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

10 |

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

Winter is coming

De coDing t h e D ata

How operators can warm up to soup

A

t summer’s end, thoughts turn to comfort foods and soup gets considerable attention. Fall and winter are the seasons when we are most likely to hear consumers talk about various types of soup they will either make at home or purchase at a restaurant, and with good reason. The warming comfort food helps consumers cope with the shift to shorter days and colder temperatures. Not only does a hearty bowl help warm us up as the mercury drops, but as we move into the fall season, there’s an abundance of vegetables that have been growing all summer and are ready to go into the soup pot. Viewing NPD CREST data, we can better understand the seasonality of soup. As shown, the interest in ordering soup starts to increase in the fall and then ramps up into winter, to the point that it is ordered 18 per cent more often than the annual average. Comparing that to the seasonality of comfort foods as a whole, we find a similar seasonality trend, however, soup skews even more to these winter months than the total category.

Popular soups in Canada According to NPD CREST, the top soups being ordered in restaurants in Ontario, and Canada as a whole, are those considered to be more traditional varieties. In Ontario chicken noodle accounts for 16 per cent of all soup orders

and only 11 per cent in the rest of the country. Meanwhile, other varieties are underdeveloped in Ontario. This suggests that restaurant operators in Ontario have an opportunity to increase soup sales by differentiating and offering more varieties beyond the traditional chicken noodle. Canadians are certainly fond of their soups. As a point of reference, CREST Canada reports that 3.9 per cent of all meals ordered at restaurants in Canada include soup. In Ontario, that number is slightly lower at 3.4 per cent. Again, this suggests an opportunity to offer up other varieties to increase that number within an underdeveloped region.

gains came from three-item meals. This indicates that consumers are showing a demand for soup, and they are primarily buying it as a side in a larger meal.

Now is the time

from this and provide consumers with exciting dishes that will resonate with the seasonality of winter? Leveraging soup as a warming, hearty twist on a meal can help increase customer satisfaction and provided added excitement to the dining experience.

As the market becomes more dependent on menu innovation to keep consumers coming back, soup provides a perfect opportunity to introduce interesting flavour profiles to a meal as a side dish, while simultaneously supporting eater cheques. QSRs have demonstrated success in the soup category by creating combined meals, so how can the rest of the market learn

Scott Stewart is an account manager, Foodservice Canada for The NPD Group. The NPD Group has more than 25 years of experience providing consumer-based market information to leaders in the foodservice industry. For more information, visit www.npd.com or contact him at scott.stewart@npd.com.

Consumer soup ordering habits In Ontario, soup has trended to the less developed portions of the category, specifically, males and the QSR segment. The heaviest consumers of soup have historically been women, accounting for 55 per cent of servings. However, CREST data shows that men have increased their demand for soup, growing by five per cent in Ontario last year and shifting from 43 per cent to 45 per cent share of servings. Beyond demographic trends, orders of soup are increasing at QSR venues in Ontario, which account for 46 per cent of total market soup orders in the province, compared to 70 per cent of total traffic visits. While the total soup market has remained flat, QSR increased its Ontario soup servings by seven per cent over last year. Of particular note, almost 60 per cent of those

Seasonality of Soup vs. Comfort Foods Incidence Indexed vs. Annual Average

Incidence Index

By Scott Stewart

130

Soup

120

Comfort Foods

110 100

Average consumption rate

90 80 70 SPRING

SUMMER

FALL

WINTER

Source: The NPD Group/CREST Canada – YE May 2010 - 2014

It’s a proud 45 year history and a bright future you can be a part of. Welcome to Mary Brown’s Famous Chicken & Taters! We’re poised to double the number of stores over the next few years. Our unprecedented growth is a direct result of dedicated people, a proprietary cooking method that makes our menu unique in the market, loyal guests who love the experience, and a down home brand that’s warm and welcoming.

Over 100 stores and growing! We’ve got one for you.

We’ve enjoyed same store sales growth for the past 11 years and our sales volumes are currently the highest in our history. You see, when you make the plumpest, juiciest chicken from only fresh ingredients, and hand cut your taters and spice them just right, people come back for more. It’s that kind of dedication to a great customer experience that makes our brand so appealing to people looking for a fresh franchise opportunity. If that’s you, why not give us a call. We’d love to talk to you.

Contact Peter Rakovalis | 905 513 0044 x 249 franchising@marybrowns.com


O C TO B E R 2 014

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

Tab application kills bill

Making the most of Yelp By Jeff Quipp

Y

elp, dubbed the “online urban guide and business review website”, has become a leader in the review world. Users have provided tens of millions of critiques since the site launched 10 years ago, many of which are about the foodservice industry. In the crowded and competitive digital world, a decade is a significant milestone. It’s not surprising a recent Neilson study showed 82 per cent of users visited Yelp when preparing to spend money on a product or service. What is a bit unexpected, is the number of businesses that still have not claimed their Yelp listings—which can be one of the top search results—all while having active Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn accounts. By not claiming the pages, businesses may be leaving out key information and demonstrating a lack of customer engagement to both positive and negative reviews. Ultimately, this can factor into a consumer’s decision to visit an establishment. For those who haven’t claimed their Yelp listings, here are four simple steps to succeed on this platform.

| 11

Tab application.

TORONTO—An app from Toronto startup Tab allows customers to walk out on their bill. Tab co-founder Adam Epstein said restaurant customers can download the app, provide a valid credit card and eliminate waiting on the check at the end of service. “The dining experience is actually the same,” Epstein told ORN. “Only at the end, the customer will just get up and leave.” According the Epstein, customers sign in via the app, let their server know they will be paying via Tab and the bill will be charged to the credit card.

Servers use provided mini-iPads—in place of a traditional credit card terminal— to accept payment. Currently there is no cost for the iPads, however, in the near future, Epstein said there will be a monthly charge “comparable to industry standards” for terminal rentals. Tab also takes a percentage per bill. Customers are able to rate their service and the data is stored in password protected manager panel. On the restaurant end, information including the customer’s name, picture and how often they have visited the restaurant is made available.

Make a business profile (in 10 minutes). At the very minimum, this should include address, hours of operation and product information, including photos (Yelp has found that consumers spend more than double the amount of time on a listing with visuals than those without). You likely have the photos on other social media platforms already, so it’s simply a matter of ensuring they’re on Yelp as well.

Tonight, serve an evening they’ll remember forever...

Tell your story.

Only Mirabel offers the consistent and exacting quality

Many companies neglect the “From the business” section, which falls just below the customer reviews and allows owners to talk about the history of the business, its best attributes and a little about themselves. Keep it short and use keywords to optimize search engine capabilities.

Promote your profile. Showcase your Yelp profile on your social media platforms. Encourage your clients to comment about their experience on your Yelp page and add the profile link to your email signature. It’s important your customers genuinely share what kind of experience they had.

Consider and respond to criticism. Comments and reviews come in all points of view. Don’t be fearful of receiving bad comments—no business is immune to them. People who are too shy to complain in person often turn to the Internet. Yelp is where you can address their issue. Actively responding to negative reviews makes dissatisfied customers feel better, clarifies the situation and shows other customers you’re a businessperson who wants to continually improve. Yelp has recently added features. Yelp Videos allow reviewers to showcase the amenities or ambiance through three to 12 second videos. This may allow customers to better convey their experience, but it also presents some areas of newly required vigilance on the part of the business owner. For example, think about the potential impact related to staff policies and employment contracts if they are captured on video. You should also decide if there is a need for specific staff training or if there is a need to post specific policies about video, as some customers may have privacy concerns. Another newly developed tool is Yelp Trends, which allows businesses to see how often key words—such as “kale”, “bacon-wrapped” or “craft beer”—show up when compared to the millions of reviews on the site. This feature could help a business ride a wave of growing popularity by highlighting particular offerings that are currently popular. Yelp has come a long way in the last decade. As more and more consumers and businesses come to rely on and utilize Yelp, it will be intriguing to see what the next type of innovation will be. Jeff Quipp is an expert on digital marketing. He is the founder and chief executive officer of Search Engine People Inc. (SEP), a Canadian digital marketing firm.

Tonight they are yours. To enchant. To delight. To wow. shrimp you demand from sustainable sources worldwide. Bring them back with a meal they’ll remember. 1.800.387.7422 highlinerfoodservice.com


12 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

E H T G N I T NAVIG A F O S R E T A W E L B A N I A T S SU D N A G N I H FI S . G N I M R FA

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

BY

Kris t e n S m i th

K

nown in the foodservice community as a passionate supporter of sustainable seafood, Ned Bell cycled across Canada this summer, reaching out to local champions across the country and holding 24 events to bolster awareness. The executive chef for the Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver’s YEW Restaurant kicked off the ten-week tour in St. John’s in July, travelling more than 8,700 kilometres to Vancouver. The idea for the non-profit organization Chefs for Oceans was born at a Canadian Culinary Federation (CCFCC) annual conference in Halifax three years ago. Bell notes that West Coast and East Coast chefs are often highlighted in conversations about sustainable seafood because of their proximity to the oceans. “But what I recognized is that we were having similar conversations across the country about healthy lakes, rivers and oceans, all of us,” says Bell. “We just weren’t having these conversations on a national scale.” He says each event was unique but the message was always the same. “My very audacious goal is to have sustainable seafood accessible to every Canadian within the next decade and, while doing that, we’re trying to launch a sustainable seafood day on March 18,” says Bell. “I learned Canadians really do concern themselves with where their food comes from,” he says. “I live in Vancouver, where maybe it’s a highlighted conversation, but people are curious coast to coast to coast.”

From the source According to Ocean Wise, the Vancouver Aquarium’s sustainable seafood program, overfishing is the greatest threat to our waters today. It is estimated that 90 per cent of the ocean’s predatory fish is already gone. A 2006 study in the journal Science predicted the world’s fisheries would collapse by 2048 if fishing rates continue apace. Martin Kouprie, chef and co-owner of Pangaea restaurant in Toronto, spends a great deal of time scuba diving in oceans and lakes. With so much life underwater, Kouprie says it’s hard for him to ignore that there was a time when there was even more marine life. Kouprie says chefs go through a metamorphosis in their career, first learning how to work with ingredients, then asking questions about the ingredients themselves: where did it come from, who harvested it? “You have to look for the story behind the ingredient, whether it’s seafood or a vegetable, and if the story isn’t good, or you can’t get the story, then you know it’s not a product that anybody takes any pride in whatsoever and you don’t want to serve it,” he says. Kouprie sources Pangaea’s seafood through

Ocean Wise, which he says removes the guesswork for restaurants while sourcing. “We buy local first before we buy organic and it’s the same with seafood,” says Kouprie, who always has trout, pickerel and Lake Erie whitefish on the menu when in season. Kouprie is on the Ocean Wise advisory board and says the program has opened the foodservice industry up to new, interesting and tasty species, such as lingcod, sablefish, spot prawns, lake whitefish and sustainable trout fisheries. “There are some new fish that we’re more aware of than we were ten years ago or twenty years ago, and there are some fish that we’re very comfortable with eating that are being farmed better,” he says. At Mallard Cottage in Quidi Vidi, NL, chef and owner Todd Perrin uses a lot of seafood, including Atlantic cod, halibut, scallops, turbot, farmed mussels, mackerel and herring when available, capelin and, of course, lobster. “The long-term viability of the restaurant is directly linked to the sustainability of the ingredients that we use,” he says. “As good fisheries live or die, so do restaurants.” Perrin gets his fish through a broker from

small-scale fishermen, and for him, sustainable must start with local. “Our basic premise is we try to go as direct to the source as we can,” he says. “We deal with guys who are in 45-foot vessels who are catching a variety of species though the broker that we deal with.” As it stands, Newfoundlanders cannot buy directly off the fishing boat, but NL Fisheries Minister Keith Hutchings is considering allowing people to buy directly from fishermen, which was recommended in a 2010 report. At press time, no cabinet decision had been made.

Different words, same message Perrin notes some people would say some of the species Mallard Cottage serves aren’t sustainable, but it’s not that cut and dry. “It’s a bit more complicated than just saying sustainable or not sustainable, I think,” he says. “It’s not sustainably caught by everyone who is catching it, but there are people out there who are catching it line-caught or trapping who leave as small a footprint on the species as possible, while still harvesting a legitimate quota,” says Perrin, adding he prefers the word “stewardship” over “sustainable”. “My personal definition of sustainable

starts with purchasing what’s on my doorstep,” he says. Perrin says the way Mallard Cottage defines sustainable and properly stewarded, often also means the best quality fish available. “Cooking a piece of fish that’s super-fresh is the easiest piece of cooking that you’ll ever do,” Perrin says. Ocean Wise’s species recommendations are based on four criteria: abundant and resilient to fishing pressures; well managed with a comprehensive management plan based on current research; harvested in a method that ensures limited bycatch on non-target and endangered species; and harvested in ways that limit damage to marine or aquatic habitats and negative interactions with other species. “Examples of species that are considered abundant are sardines or mackerel, which have relatively short life spans and reproduce quickly,” says Theodora Geach, Ocean Wise account representative for Western Canada. Geach says she often gets asked, “What’s stopping us from decimating the population of recommended species? “That’s where management plays a really important role; we want to make sure that


regulations are in place,” says Geach, adding this includes total allowable catch for the year, observing fishing seasons when species are more plentiful and not spawning and types of gear which limit bycatch and preserve habitat. “Depending on the type of fishing gear you’re using, you can have varying amounts of impact on the surrounding habitat,” says Geach. “If you’re fishing with some line or pole, rod and reel, you’re just catching an individual fish at a time and you’re really not impacting the surrounding habitat,” says Geach. High Liner Foods adopted the United Nation’s Brundtland Report definition: “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” High Liner Foods corporate director of sustainability Bill DiMento says, “Sustainable supply has increased substantially over the last four years.” The company made a commitment to source all of its seafood from certified and responsibly and sustainably sourced fisheries and aquaculture in 2009. Last year, it hit 99 per cent of its goal. The company purchases from Marine Stewardship Council certified fisheries, but also from those in the process of assessment or involved in credible fishery or aquaculture improvement projects. “We learned early on that High Liner shouldn’t be out there red-listing suppliers. What we needed to do was engage suppliers and the best way to engage suppliers is to continue buying from them as long as they made a commitment to help drive the improvements needed to move toward using best practice and ultimately move towards being certified and being sustainable,” says DiMento.

Seasonally speaking Shaun Strobel, co-founder and fisherman for Skipper Otto’s community supported fishery (CSF) in Vancouver, grew up fishing with his father and has seen the industry change. He and his wife were inspired by farm shares and applied the notion to the fishing season. “It was a new way of doing things in fishing, but it wasn’t a new idea to consumers,” says Strobel, who launched the CSF for the 2009 season. It has grown since then from 40 people to more than 1,000. The fishing season gets started in May with spot prawns for six to eight weeks, then moves into salmon in June through October. Tuna shows up in Canadian waters around September and many fishermen catch halibut around their other fishery. “Part of our mission is to get people to understand the seasonality of things more,” says Strobel. He says sustainability is dependent on species and is complicated; it comes down to knowing how fish are harvested and when. For example, Pacific salmon is harvested near the end of the life cycle, which is marked by spawning and if there aren’t many spawners, know to hold back in four years. Halibut are fished mid-lifecycle and are on a quota. “What we really like to do is inform people about how different types of fish are caught and what might be a better choice,” says Strobel. “For example, people really like shrimp and I try to, even though the cost is higher, steer people towards B.C. spot prawns or some of the humpback shrimp, which are caught

| 13

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014

during our short trap season as opposed to some of the other shrimp, where they drag the bottom.”

Consumer interest Ron Walters, director of marketing for High Liner Foods’ foodservice division says the company’s research tells them consumers have a good or very good understanding of the term local, but consumers are less familiar with the term sustainable, with less than one third of respondents confident in their understanding of the term. “Local isn’t necessarily sustainable,” says Walters. “We work in a globally traded industry; if people want something like warm water shrimp, that just doesn’t grow in Canada.” He says many clients are asking for both local and sustainable products, which for seafood may mean from Canada and options include scallops, sole, mussels, lobster, crab, fresh water pickerel and cold water shrimp. “Seafood is different than other proteins; people really like to go out for seafood. It’s often, our research shows, a special occasion when seafood is in the mix. It’s not a convenience choice. People will drive by other restaurants to get to their favourite, craveable seafood dish,” Walters says.

Farmed: Not a four-letter word Walters sees aquaculture as a big area of growth in the global industry. He expects wild capture to remain steady at about 100 million metric tons annually, but with better managed and healthier fish stocks. Aquaculture accounts for about 40 per cent of the overall mix, according to Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations statistics. “In the next 10 to 20 years, I expect aquaculture will actually outpace wild capture species as a food source,” says Walters. Geach says the take home message when it comes to aquaculture is that farmed doesn’t necessarily mean unsustainable. “Especially on the West Coast, it’s kind of become the culinary f-word because of farmed

1

salmon,” she notes. “It really depends on what you’re farming and how you’re farming it. In some cases, farmed seafood is far better than its wild counterpart. Shellfish, for example, are really great farmed options,” says Geach. “When it comes to finned fish, that’s when we want to see these farms come onto land. We want to see land-based, closed containment systems for finned fish, such as arctic char, trout, salmon,” says Geach. “By bringing these farms on land, you’re eliminating a lot of the risk associated with open net pen farming.” Kuterra, a closed-containment on-land fish farm owned by ‘Namgis First Nation near Alert Bay, BC, on Vancouver Island, brought its commercial salmon to market this year. Josephine Mrozewski, Kuterra communications director, says with a large number of fish farms on their territory, the ‘Namgis asked the question: “How do you grow aquaculture sustainably?” and took on the task of trying to raise land-based Atlantic salmon in a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). “There was a lot of discussion about whether the ‘Namgis would be growing Atlantic salmon on the Pacific Coast, and the decision was made because—if we want to compare this technology to the existing Atlantic salmon aquaculture—we have to be comparing apples to apples,” she says. “If we’re trying to present a sustainable way to grow aquaculture and a sustainable aquaculture alternative, we have to do it with the species that’s the dominant species on the market.” The $9-million project received funding from Tides Canada Aquaculture Innovation fund and Sustainable Development Technology Canada. “We have a mandate to share our information,” says Mrozewski.

Cooking outside the box Kouprie says there are as many ways of presenting fish on the plate as preparing vegetables, noting one of his cooks at Pangaea has smoked lingcod, turning it into bacon. “It just takes a little bit of imagination like that to get the full potential out of these fish,”

says Kouprie. “The one thing about sustainable seafood is it sometimes costs more, marginally more, but at the same time, you’ve got a fish that’s being handled better. It’s not being brutalized by rolling around in nets. It’s being hand caught and taken off the hook by hand,” Kouprie says, adding the flesh is not pulpy. “Even though you pay a little more, you actually get a better yield and a longer shelf life.” Geach says there are a number of inexpensive sustainable options, such as mussels, sardines and mackerel, and some items operators should expect to pay more for, such as halibut and salmon. “I don’t think we should be devaluing our seafood; we expect to get a lot of food really cheap, but I don’t think that should be the case because it does take a lot more effort. I think once people realize why they are paying a little bit more, they are willing to pay a little bit extra for a sustainable seafood option,” she says. David Adler, manager of Off the Hook CSF, in Digby County, NS, says if small fishermen are beholden to market price, they often can’t cover their expenses. The CSF puts price-setting in the hands of the fishers, but Adler notes it’s a unique customer who values the product enough to pay more with less convenience. Through the CSF, fishermen are given the same price per pound regardless of species and members get what is caught, which eliminates pressure to top-grade. “Canadians interact with seafood in restaurants more than any other place unless you live in a fishing village. Chefs have a really important role to play in terms of telling the story, knowing what types of species are available in Canada, the seasons they are available, the way that they are harvested,” he says. Photos: 1. Martin Kouprie, chef and co-owner of Pangaea in Toronto. 2. Ned Bell, executive chef for the Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver’s YEW Restaurant. 3. Todd Perrin, chef and owner of Mallard Cottage. 4. Salmon dish. Photo by Kuterra. 5.Pacific halibut dish. Photo courtesy of Ocean Wise.

2

3

4

5


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

14 |

Pub group set to expand Crossings brand

Inside Crossings Pub, Lambeth, ON.

LONDON, ON—The Fairway Pub Group has opened the company’s third restaurant and is gearing up to expand the Crossings Pub and Eatery brand. The group opened their flagship operation at 1269 Hyde Park Rd. in London, ON, in 2010 and a second Crossings location opened in late September in Lambeth, ON. “We wanted to make sure we knew what we were doing and have an identity and get stable there before expanding,” restaurant operations manager Paul Ouimet told ORN. “We’re pretty confident in our brand.” Ouimet said the company plans to open one Crossings restaurant a year in smaller markets across southwestern Ontario, adding there has been some interest from franchising groups, which would accelerate growth. The company’s third restaurant Henry’s

Public House opened this summer in London, ON, but Ouimet said the focus for expansion will be on the Crossings brand. The newest Crossings location in Lambeth has 140 seats inside with a 50-seat patio. The menu is identical to the brand’s Hyde Park location, offering pub fare including shepherd’s pie, fish and chips, pizza, hamburgers, pasta and steak. Ouimet said all of the brand’s bread comes from London-based Strano’s Bakery. There are 20 draft taps available, with several craft beer selections. “Everyone likes not only the local aspect of it, but also the flavour,” Ouimet said. “People are becoming a little bit more experimental with beers.” The bar also has a focus on whiskies from around the world, including single malt scotch,

Canadian rye whisky and American bourbons. Every Monday night, the pub hosts PubStumpers trivia and has live music on Saturdays. On Sundays, brunch and a prime rib dinner are offered. Both Crossings locations have a semi-divide between the pub and the dining area with completely separate corporate rooms with audio/video equipment. According to Ouimet, the restaurants host special events periodically including wine/ scotch tastings, a beerfest showcasing 70 different beers, and an annual golf tournament. “We also sponsor a lot of the sports teams in the area,” Ouimet said. 2300 Wharncliffe Rd. S. (519) 652-4020, www.crossingsgrill.ca.

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

supply

li ne s

Colabor acquires Marcotte BOUCHERVILLE, QC—Foodservice wholesaler and distributor Colabor Group Inc. announced on Sept. 11 that it has acquired a majority of the assets of Marcotte Alimentation, a Trois-Rivières, QC-based distributor of food and non-food products. According to a release, the acquisition raises Colabor’s profile as a distributor in the Mauricie and Centre du Québec regions while securing the sales volume of the corporation’s wholesale segment. Founded in 1930 and a Colabor-affiliated distributor since 1987, Marcotte supplies its foodservice and retail customers with a range of fresh (including meat), dry, frozen and packaging products. According to the release, Marcotte has annual sales of about $50 million and its net contribution to Colabor’s sales should be about $25 million. Colabor president and chief executive officer Claude Gariépy said Marcotte’s management team, led by Mr. Jean-Guy Ladrière, will remain in place. Colabor also announced a multi-year contract to supply the Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen restaurant chain’s 76 units in Ontario, which is expected to generate $23 million in annual sales, as well as the long-term renewal of a supply agreement with Ben Deshaies inc. “Popeyes has an aggressive expansion plan for Ontario,” Gariépy said. Colabor is a wholesaler and distributor of food and non-food products serving the foodservice market in Quebec, Ontario and the Atlantic provinces, as well as the retail market.

ADVERTORIAL

Introducing Grand River Foods — Good Food Made Better Grand River Foods is a 400-person-strong enGrand River Foods is a 400-person-strong entrepreneurial food solution company that mantrepreneurial food solution company that manufactures ufactures over 200 private food label products. over 200 private food label products. Right now their business is evenly divided between Foodservice and Retail, but they are always looking to expand their Foodservice business. Almost 10 years old, Grand River Foods is no stranger to restaurants and grocers, as their client base includes major Canadian Foodservice and Retail clients. Grand River Foods was named 2013 Supplier of the Year by both Prime Restaurants and Loblaw, in addition to receiving “Canada’s Best Managed Companies” awards for five straight years. In its first decade of operation, Grand River Foods has expanded its facilities three times, and now has more than 100,000 square feet of state-of-the-art manufacturing capacity in Cambridge, ON. They are well equipped to meet your needs for beef, pork, poultry, seafood and vegan proteins using their six modular production lines. Products range from raw to par-fried to fully-cooked, from whole muscle to formed (burgers, meatballs, nuggets, strips), from natural to coated (breaded, sauced, glazed), and from vac-packed to flow-wrapped to bulkpacked. According to company president Dean Cebulski, “Innovation is our culture and is present in every aspect of our business, including custom-designed product development, procurement, manufacturing and technology.” He adds, “We are constantly working to be more sustainable by using biodegradable materials and resealable bags rather than pressed cardboard. We also strive to use healthier and humanely-raised ingredients, while creating the smaller product portions demanded by the industry.”

TIM EATON Director of Foodservice • 519-653-3577 X 2106 • teaton@grandriverfoods.com

“Your Complete Protein Meat Solution”

WWW.GRANDRIVERFOODS.COM


www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014

| 15

WHAT FRANCHISORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PASSING ALONG THEIR BUSINESSES. BY EDWARD LEVITT

S

uccession is inevitable, but like death, it is hard to talk about in our society. The vast majority of business owners, whether they be franchisors or franchisees, expect to pass their company on to family members. Why is such an important matter so often neglected? In part, it is often the founder who is not willing to let go. Operators ready to retire often have a barrage of concerns running through their heads about why they want to continue with the business, such as: • “Too many people die soon after retiring or act like they are dead.” • “Without me, the business is nothing,” or “Without the business, I am nothing.” • “I need someplace to go every day.” • “The kids will change what I have built.” • “I don’t think I have enough to retire on.” • “Nobody can run the business as well as I can.” • “They may run it better than I did.” On the other hand, thinking about the issues and planning for succession, rather than reacting when health or other issues force a business transition, will preserve

the value of the business, foster family harmony and bring personal satisfaction. An added advantage to planning ahead is it opens up the possibility of reducing the tax consequences of the business transition. What can be done?

A good starting point is educating yourself, your staff and your possible successors about succession issues and the planning process. For the sake of harmony, it is best to include family members who will likely (and those who will not likely) work in the business after succession, as well as key non-family management. Audit your system to discover which franchisees are likely to retire in the near future and when that might happen. Find out their goals and aspirations around succession and educate them about the need for and how to effectively plan for succession. Now would be the right time to crank up the franchise development plans to find new franchisees to buy existing units from franchisees who will not or cannot transition their businesses to a family member. Alternatively, this may be the right time to revisit franchising as a distribution strategy and move more towards corporate stores, if that is an attractive direction for the company. Consider the impact and opportunities of a higher level of

new franchisees in the system. It may present a new and exciting chance to reignite the energy the system had when it was new and vibrant. the planning process

A viable succession plan is not prepared overnight. It can take more than a year to create and implementation may take several years. The planning process may be as important as the end result, if the various stakeholders are consulted and feel they have an impact on decisions. The starting position is to know what everyone values and desires and how they see the future for themselves, the family and the company. Often this can best be achieved by third party interviewers and then family meetings. Remarkably, sometimes this results in some very revealing and honest assessments and revelations, including the conclusion that succession within the family is not the preferred option and the business should be readied, over time, to be sold to an outside party. Assuming capable and motivated family members are identified, the next step is deciding who does what and who gets what. This could mean making some hard decisions about roles within the company and

ARE YOU THINKING ABOUT THE SUCCESSION PLANS FOR YOUR BUSINESS? IF NOT, HERE ARE SOME STATISTICS THAT MAY CHANGE YOUR MIND:

**USED IN: 2012 CANADIAN FRANCHISE ASSOCIATION WEBINAR: "EVERYONE RETIRES SOMETIMES: WHAT EVERY FRANCHISOR NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT BUSINESS SUCCESSION PLANNING."

division of ownership, perhaps with balance being achieved with family assets outside of the business. After those decisions are made, it is key to address any tax planning opportunities and assess what decisions have to be made and tasks undertaken to minimize tax consequences without sacrificing harmony and security for the next generation. Finally, the tough question for the founder of the enterprise about when to start giving up control (both legal and practical) must be confronted and resolved. This can be a very complex, personal and emotional decision, but it can also have a profound and lasting impact on the next generation’s ability to become effective stewards of the business into the future. If there is more than one member of the next generation to be involved in the business, this is also the time to hammer out sensible and effective power sharing arrangements and exit mechanisms should one or another of them decide in the future to change direction for themselves and/or the company.

tant franchisees need to be brought into the process, as they will be asked to be loyal to a new regime. This part of the process often needs to be done gradually, as the next generation assumes more significant roles within the system and becomes more visible to the franchisees. lessons for your franchisees

Of course, the lessons learned by franchisors doing their own succession planning can be invaluable to their franchisees. It is much more likely the franchisor will have success in getting its franchisees to think about succession and make a plan, if the franchisor has already gone through the process. Moreover, like other aspects of franchising, sharing knowledge and group purchasing power can deliver great results, and be very cost effective for the franchisees. Succession planning is not and should not be a scary proposition. In fact, careful and timely succession planning can and is often required to achieve the very goals that the founders set for themselves and their families at the beginning of their journey.

the implementation stage

The succession plan needs to be written down, in detail, with all elements clearly set out. Often, this is a process assisted by outside professionals with the necessary expertise. Any number of matters will be dealt with through the written document, including how the transition is funded, taking into account the financial needs of the retiring founder, the business and the next generation. All foundational documents, such shareholder agreements, purchase agreements, employment agreements, etcetera, need to finalized and signed. For franchisors, the all-impor-

Edward (Ned) Levitt is a certified franchise executive, a partner at Dickinson Wright LLP, Toronto, and provides legal services to Canadian and international clients on all aspects of Canadian franchise law. He was general counsel to the Canadian Franchise Association (2000-2007) and is a member of the American Bar Association forum on franchising, the International Bar Association and the International Franchise Association. He can be reached at (416) 646-3842 or nlevitt@dickinsonwright.com.


16 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

Franchise Report ANNUAL LIST OF FRANCHISE PROPERTIES. RESEARCHED BY: PETER ELLIOTT DESIGNED BY: STEPHANIE GIAMMARCO

� 123 �

1 for 1 Pizza

TEL: 613-234-6060 FAX: 613-234-0444 URL: www.1for1pizza.com UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Aras Tahir

241 Pizza (Chairman’s Brand Corp) TEL: 416-646-0987 FAX: 416-646-2204 URL: www.241pizza.com UNITS (ON): 76 UNITS (CAN): 85 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, chicken wings, potato wedges. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Chris Ioannu

�A�

a&W food ServiceS of canada inc.

TEL: 604-988-2141 FAX: 604-988-5531 URL: www.aw.ca UNITS (ON): 202 UNITS (CAN): 802 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers, chicken, fries, onion rings, A&W root beer. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Brent Todd

angel’S diner TEL: 416-679-9980 FAX: 416-679-9907 URL: www.angelsdiner.ca UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Varied. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Peter Kakridas

aPPlebee’S neighbourhood bar & grill TEL: 647-533-3333 FAX: 913-890-9116 URL: www.applebeescanada.com UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Ribs, steak, chicken, fajitas, fish, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Kenney Goldman

arby’S of canada TEL: 678-514-4219 URL: www.arbys.ca UNITS (ON): 31 UNITS (CAN): 84 MENU ITEMS: Roast beef, chicken sandwiches, deli sandwiches, french fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: George Condos

aroma eSPreSSo coffee barS TEL: 416-481-3322 FAX: 416-322-3355 URL: www.aroma.ca UNITS (ON): 21 UNITS (CAN): 21 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, pastries, salads, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, Take-out.

au vieux duluth exPreSS (mTY Group) TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.auvieuxduluth.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 34 MENU ITEMS: Souvlaki, gyros. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

�B�

bagel StoP,the

TEL: 416-398-5538 FAX: 416-398-2792 URL: www.thebagelstop.com UNITS (ON): 21 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Bagels, bagel sandwiches, coffee, beverages. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Felix Zonenberg

barburritoS TEL: 416-549-8002 FAX: 416-733-0086 URL: www.barburrito.ca UNITS (ON): 12 UNITS (CAN): 12 MENU ITEMS: Mexican food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Alex Shtein

baSkin robbinS (dunkin’ Brands Canada inC.) TEL: 800-859-5339 FAX: 781-737-4518 URL: www.baskinrobbins.ca UNITS (ON): 97 UNITS (CAN): 117 MENU ITEMS: Full ice cream parlour menu, beverages, pastries, cakes. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Russell Pagan

baton rouge (imvesCor) TEL: 514-341-5544 FAX: 514-341-5635 URL: www.batonrougerestaurants. com UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 29 MENU ITEMS: Baby back ribs, steaks, chicken, seafood. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Craig Shannon

beaver tailS canada inc. TEL: 514-392-2222 FAX: 514-392-2223 URL: www.beavertailsinc.com UNITS (ON): 12

UNITS (CAN): 88 MENU ITEMS: Pastry treats. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Pino Ioia

bier markt (prime resTauranTs) TEL: 905-568-0000 FAX: 905-568-0080 URL: www.thebiermarkt.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 6 MENU ITEMS: European pub fare, veal, wurst, schnitzel. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: John Rothschild

big bone bbQ TEL: 905-853-9888 URL: www.bigbonebbq.ca UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 7 MENU ITEMS: Southern barbecue. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Tim Rombos

booSter Juice TEL: 780-440-6770 FAX: 780-461-7161 URL: www.boosterjuice.com UNITS (ON): 122 UNITS (CAN): 308 MENU ITEMS: Smoothies, juices, panini and wraps, tea and blended yogurts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Tim Hengel

boSton Pizza international inc. TEL: 604-270-1108 FAX: 604-270-4168 URL: www.bostonpizza.com UNITS (ON): 110 UNITS (CAN): 359 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, ribs, salads, appetizers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Brian Novosel

bourbon Street grill (irG) FAX: 416-498-9876 URL: www.irg168.com UNITS (ON): 27 UNITS (CAN): 37 MENU ITEMS: Cajun and creole cuisine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: P. Huang

broWn dog coffee ShoPPe TEL: 519-414-0122 URL: www.browndogcoffeeshoppe. com UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 7 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, muffins. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Curtis Chandler

broWn’S SocialhouSe

charley’S Philly SteakS & grilled SubS

TEL: 604-630-0885 FAX: 604-630-0887 URL: www.brownssocialhouse.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 31 MENU ITEMS: Pub fare. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bruce Fox

TEL: 614-923-4700 FAX: 614-923-4701 URL: www.charleys.com UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 3 MENU ITEMS: Sandwiches, steak, chicken, Philly cheese steaks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bob Wright

buffalo Wild WingS TEL: 952-253-0731 URL: www.buffalowildwings.com UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 12 MENU ITEMS: Chicken. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Sally Smith

burger king reStaurantS of canada inc. TEL: 416-626-6464 FAX: 416-626-6691 URL: www.burgerking.ca UNITS (ON): 122 UNITS (CAN): 278 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, chicken, salads, fries, breakfast and soft drinks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Jacqui McGregor

�C�

caPri Pizzeria

chicken chef canada ltd. TEL: 204-694-1984 FAX: 204-694-1964 URL: www.chickenchef.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 34 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, pizza, seafood, soups, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Darren Thorgilsson

chicken delight TEL: 204-885-7570 FAX: 204-831-6176 URL: www.chickendelight.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, wings, pizza, ribs, fries, finger foods. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Jim Cartman

chili’S grill & bar

TEL: 519-969-6851 FAX: 519-245-5241 URL: www.capripizza.ca UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Pizza. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Kevork Kalaydjian

TEL: 780-413-8225 FAX: 780-413-8230 URL: www.chilis.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Steaks, fajitas, burgers, salads, ribs, margaritas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Gerry Inglis

caPt. Sub (Grinner’s Food sYsTems)

chuck e cheeSe’S (CeC enTerTainmenT)

TEL: 902-893-4141 FAX: 902-895-7635 URL: www.captsub.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 40 MENU ITEMS: Toasted sub sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: David Crane

TEL: 972-258-5413 FAX: 972-258-5619 URL: www.chuckecheese.com UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, sandwiches, salads, appetizers, buffalo wings, bread sticks, mozzarella sticks and fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Tiffany Kice

caPtain george’S fiSh & chiPS

church’S chicken

TEL: 905-424-2641 URL: www.captngeorges.com UNITS (ON): 17 UNITS (CAN): 17 MENU ITEMS: Fish and chips. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: George Lazakis

TEL: 770-350-3881 FAX: 770-512-3920 URL: www.churchs.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, potatoes, french fries, corn, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Pedro Voyer

carole’S cheeSecake comPany ltd.

cinnabon canada

TEL: 416-256-0000 FAX: 416-256-0001 URL: www.carolescheesecake.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 2 MENU ITEMS: Soups, salads, sandwiches, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Edison Carbajal

carl’S Jr. reStaurantS TEL: 805-745-7587 URL: www.carlsjr.ca UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, fries, shakes. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Jeff Branton

caSey’S grill & bar (prime/Cara) TEL: 905-568-0000 FAX: 905-568-0080 URL: www.caseysbarandgrill.com UNITS (ON): 20 UNITS (CAN): 26 MENU ITEMS: Classic grill. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out.

TEL: 519-622-3188 FAX: 519-622-3877 URL: www.cinnabon.ca UNITS (ON): 21 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Cinnamon buns, desserts, pastries, coffees. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mona Benson

coffee culture cafe & eatery (oBsidian Group) TEL: 905-814-8030 FAX: 905-814-8272 URL: www.coffeeculturecafe.com UNITS (ON): 49 UNITS (CAN): 53 MENU ITEMS: Coffees, desserts, sandwiches, soups and catering. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: George Karamountzos

coffee time donutS inc. (Chairman’s Brand Corp) TEL: 416-288-8515 FAX: 416-288-8895 URL: www.coffeetime.ca UNITS (ON): 118 UNITS (CAN): 118 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, muffins, doughnuts, sandwiches, salads,

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S soups. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Steve Michalopoulos

cora franchiSe grouP inc. TEL: 905-673-2672 FAX: 905-673-8271 URL: www.chezcora.com UNITS (ON): 43 UNITS (CAN): 129 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, lunch, panini, crepe, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Rainer Mueller

country Style (mTY Group) TEL: 905-764-7066 FAX: 905-764-8426 URL: www.countrystyle.com UNITS (ON): 427 UNITS (CAN): 443 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, deli, muffins, pastries, soups, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Jonathan Czerwinski

crabby Joe’S taP & grill (oBsidian Group) TEL: 905-814-8030 FAX: 905-814-8272 URL: www.crabbyjoes.com UNITS (ON): 38 UNITS (CAN): 38 MENU ITEMS: Fajitas, pasta, burgers, steaks, ribs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: George Karamountzos

crePe de liciouS TEL: 905-326-2969 FAX: 905-326-9305 URL: www.crepedelicious.com UNITS (ON): 12 UNITS (CAN): 17 MENU ITEMS: Crepes. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Elik Farin

cultureS (mTY Group) TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.cultures-restaurants. com UNITS (ON): 17 UNITS (CAN): 58 MENU ITEMS: Salads, soups, sandwiches, smoothies. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

�D�

dairy Queen canada

TEL: 905-639-1492 URL: www.dairyqueen.com UNITS (ON): 212 UNITS (CAN): 643 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, fries, ice cream. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Fiona Bottoms

dave and buSter’S TEL: 905-760-7600 FAX: 905-760-7610 URL: www.daveandbusters.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 1 MENU ITEMS: Seafood, steak, pasta, ribs, pizza, burgers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Kertes

dave’S chicken & Seafood TEL: 905-507-0010 FAX: 905-507-0030 URL: www. daveschickenandseafood.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 4 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, fish & chips, shrimp, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mushtaq Raja

dixie lee food SyStemS ltd. TEL: 613-650-5494 FAX: 613-650-5489

URL: www.dixieleechicken.com UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 45 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, pizza, seafood. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Joe Murano

domino’S Pizza TEL: 519-326-5280 FAX: 519-326-3362 URL: www.dominos.ca UNITS (ON): 135 UNITS (CAN): 310 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, wings, bread sticks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Michael Curran

don cherry’S SPortS grill inc. TEL: 866-821-0468 FAX: 705-746-9587 URL: www.DonCherrysSportsGrill. com UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 17 MENU ITEMS: Wings, steaks, pasta, ribs, burgers, salads and sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Chris Painter

dooly’S inc. TEL: 506-857-8050 FAX: 506-858-7039 URL: www.doolys.ca UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 61 MENU ITEMS: Finger foods, pizza, simple entrees. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Pierre Lariviere

double double Pizza and chicken TEL: 416-241-0088 FAX: 416-241-0001 URL: www.doubledouble.ca UNITS (ON): 31 UNITS (CAN): 31 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, chicken pieces, chicken wings, ribs, burgers, fish & chips, potato wedges, pasta and salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Arman Jalili

druxy’S inc. TEL: 416-385-9500 FAX: 416-385-9501 URL: www.druxys.com UNITS (ON): 37 UNITS (CAN): 37 MENU ITEMS: Sandwiches, salads, soup, bagels and coffee. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Peter Druxerman

�E�

earlS reStaurantS

TEL: 604-984-4606 FAX: 604-984-2263 URL: www.earls.ca UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 59 MENU ITEMS: Globally inspired, salads, pizzas, pastas, chicken, steaks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Kathy Humphrey

eaSt Side mario’S (prime/ Cara) TEL: 905-568-0000 FAX: 905-568-0080 URL: www.franchise. primerestaurants.com UNITS (ON): 57 UNITS (CAN): 80 MENU ITEMS: Casual family fare, pasta, pizza. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Andrew Berzins

edo international food inc. TEL: 403-215-8827 FAX: 403-215-8801 URL: www.edojapan.com UNITS (ON): 6


UNITS (CAN): 96 MENU ITEMS: Teriyaki chicken, sukiyaki beef, udon soup, yakisoba noodle dishes, and sushi. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Terry Foster

chili dogs, steak fries, fresh cut onion rings, lemonade, hand-scooped ice cream shakes. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Frank Di Benedetto

Eggsmart Corp. (Chairman Brands)

Firkin group oF pubs, thE

TEL: 416-288-8377 FAX: 416-288-8895 URL: www.eggsmart.ca UNITS (ON): 30 UNITS (CAN): 52 MENU ITEMS: Bacon, eggs, steak, omelettes, pancakes, waffles, wraps, breakfast. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Tom Michalopoulos

TEL: 905-305-9792 FAX: 905-305-9719 URL: www.firkinpubs.com UNITS (ON): 31 UNITS (CAN): 31 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, fish, pastas, burgers, wings, salads and wraps. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Paul Saraiva

EggspECtation Canada inC

Fit For liFE

TEL: 514-282-0677 FAX: 514-282-8115 URL: www.eggspectation.com UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 9 MENU ITEMS: Eggs, omelettes, pancakes, burgers, salads, sandwiches, crepes, chicken, fish, breakfast. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Enzo Renda

ExprEssions (UdG) TEL: 416-967-9671 FAX: 416-967-9679 URL: www.lavazzaexpression.ca UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 3 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Todd Sherman

ExtrEmE pita (mTY-ExTrEmE Brandz) TEL: 905-820-7887 FAX: 905-820-8448 URL: www.extremepita.com UNITS (ON): 57 UNITS (CAN): 179 MENU ITEMS: Pita pizza, pita sandwiches with grilled fillings, smoothies. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Vince Morano

�F�

Famoso nEapolitan pizzEria

TEL: 604-356-9737 URL: www.famoso.ca UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 23 MENU ITEMS: Appetizers, pizza, salads, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Justin Lussier

Fast EddiE’s TEL: 519-758-0111 FAX: 519-758-1393 URL: www.fasteddies.ca UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 9 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, fries, pop, shakes, sliders. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Mike Gorski

Fat albErt’s & ralph’s TEL: 613-745-2222 FAX: 613-745-1858 URL: www.fatalberts.ca UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 6 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, ribs, subs, sandwiches, appetizers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ralph Tannis

FatburgEr-FrankiE’s burgEr EntErprisEs TEL: 604-637-7272 FAX: 604-637-8874 URL: www.fatburgercanada.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 38 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers, chili,

| 17

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014

TEL: 905-826-0862 FAX: 905-826-2105 URL: www.fitforlifefood.com UNITS (ON): 19 UNITS (CAN): 20 MENU ITEMS: Sandwiches, soups, and salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Angela Bennett

Fox and FiddlE Corporation TEL: 416-385-7705 FAX: 416-385-1718 URL: www.foxandfiddle.com UNITS (ON): 16 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Nachos, wings, steaks, pub fare. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Terry Tsianos

Franx suprEmE (mTY GroUp) TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.mtygroup.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 17 MENU ITEMS: Hot dogs, burgers, poutine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

FrEsh sliCE pizza TEL: 604-251-7444 FAX: 604-251-6727 URL: www.freshslice. com UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 57 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, omelettes, salad. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Frank Alexander

FrEshii TEL: 416-666-8474 FAX: 888-682-3514 URL: www.freshii. com UNITS (ON): 26 UNITS (CAN): 32 MENU ITEMS: Salads made from more than 70 ingredients. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Matthew Corrin

FrEshly squEEzEd FranChisE JuiCE Corporation TEL: 905-695-2614 FAX: 888-886-5856 URL: www. freshlysqueezed.ca UNITS (ON): 44 UNITS (CAN): 48 MENU ITEMS: Juices. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Talal Samadi

�G�

gabby’s rEstaurants (UdG) TEL: 416-967-9671 FAX: 416-967-9679 URL: www.gabbys.ca UNITS (ON): 12 UNITS (CAN): 12 MENU ITEMS: Pub fare. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Todd Sherman

gabriEl pizza TEL: 613-748-0845 FAX: 613-744-4930 URL: www.gabrielpizza.com UNITS (ON): 26 UNITS (CAN): 29 MENU ITEMS: Pizza. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Cory Boast

gilligan’s FirE grill TEL: 519-566-2412 URL: www.gilligans.ca UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Burgers and sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Michael Di Meo

gino’s pizza inC. TEL: 416-235-0000 FAX: 905-864-1587 URL: www.ginospizza.ca UNITS (ON): 88 UNITS (CAN): 88 MENU ITEMS: Traditional & gourmet pizza, Italian sandwiches, wings, salads, garlic bread, panzerotti and pasta. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Vito Gangar

goldEn griddlE inC. TEL: 905-985-8100 FAX: 905-985-8105 URL: www.goldengriddleinc.com UNITS (ON): 16

UNITS (CAN): 16 MENU ITEMS: Pancakes, eggs, waffles, steak, chicken, crepes, burgers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: James Moyer

UNITS (ON): 185 UNITS (CAN): 260 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, chicken, salads, fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Ryan Lloyd

gondola pizza inComparablE Canada (1981) ltd.

hEro CErtiFiEd burgErs

TEL: 204-661-2851 FAX: 204-661-9036 URL: www.gondola-pizza.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 13 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, ribs, wings, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Viktor Loewen

grEat Canadian bagEl, ltd.,thE TEL: 905-566-1903 FAX: 905-566-1402 URL: www.greatcanadianbagel. com UNITS (ON): 17 UNITS (CAN): 26 MENU ITEMS: Bagels, salads, soups, sandwiches, coffee and desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Ed Kwiatkowski

grECo pizza (GrinnEr’s Food sYsTEms) TEL: 902-893-4141 FAX: 902-895-7635 URL: www.greco.ca UNITS (ON): 15 UNITS (CAN): 141 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, wings, donairs, subs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: David Crane

�H�

harvEy’s (Cara)

TEL: 905-760-2244 URL: www.harveys.ca

TEL: 416-740-2304 FAX: 416-740-5398 URL: www.heroburgers.com UNITS (ON): 58 UNITS (CAN): 58 MENU ITEMS: Burgers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jocelyn Attwood

holE-E burgEr bar TEL: 905-857-9777 URL: www.holeeburger.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 2 MENU ITEMS: Burgers and french fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Justin Lebofsky

hootErs rEstaurants TEL: 770-799-2249 FAX: 770-980-2452 URL: www.hooters.com UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Wings, burgers, seafood. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Mark Whittle

houston avEnuE bar & grill TEL: 450-688-3793 FAX: 450-688-7632 URL: www.houstonresto.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Ribs, steaks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Yvan Piquette

�I�

il FornEllo rEstaurants

TEL: 416-920-9410 FAX: 416-920-0474 URL: www.ilfornello.com UNITS (ON): 8 UNITS (CAN): 8 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Sean Fleming

intErnational housE oF panCakEs TEL: 604-273-3411 FAX: 604-263-2297 URL: www.ihop.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 19 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast menu, pancakes, sandwiches, salads, steaks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ed Jeske

iron ChEF ExprEss TEL: 647-791-0118 FAX: NA URL: www.ironchefexpress.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 4 MENU ITEMS: Asian food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out.

�J�

Jamba JuiCE

TEL: 905-307-3953 FAX: 905-479-9346 URL: www.jambajuice.ca UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 8 MENU ITEMS: Juices. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Derek Wong

Java JoE’s inC. TEL: 416-769-0008 FAX: 416-762-3218

URL: www.javajoes.ca UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Cappuccino, latte, espresso, smoothies, pastries, baked goods, sandwiches, soups, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Peter Kiriakopoulos

Jimmy thE grEEk TEL: 416-214-9237 FAX: 416-362-0827 URL: www.jimmythegreek.ca UNITS (ON): 37 UNITS (CAN): 46 MENU ITEMS: Greek food, souvlaki, gyro, spinach pie, greek salad, moussaka. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jim Antonopoulos

JoEy’s only FranChising ltd. TEL: 403-243-4584 FAX: 403-243-8989 URL: www.joeys.ca UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 62 MENU ITEMS: Fish and chips, seafood, ribs, salads, fish tacos, poutines. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Rob Hilditch

Johnny roCkEts TEL: 949-643-6100 FAX: 866-209-9523 URL: www.johnnyrockets.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 4 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers, fries, milk shakes. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Scott Choma

Jugo JuiCE (mTY GroUp) TEL: 877-377-5846 FAX: 403-207-5875 URL: www.jugojuice.com UNITS (ON): 15 UNITS (CAN): 127 MENU ITEMS: Smoothies, protein


18 | shakes, wraps. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

�K�

Keg RestauRants Ltd. TEL: 604-276-0242 FAX: 604-276-0138 URL: www.kegsteakhouse.com UNITS (ON): 41 UNITS (CAN): 90 MENU ITEMS: Steak, prime rib, seafood. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: James Henderson

KeLsey’s RestauRants (Cara) TEL: 905-760-2244 URL: www.kelseys.ca UNITS (ON): 72 UNITS (CAN): 73 MENU ITEMS: Varied. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Ryan Lloyd

KeRneLs PoPcoRn Ltd. TEL: 416-487-4194 FAX: 416-487-3920 URL: www.kernelspopcorn.com UNITS (ON): 37 UNITS (CAN): 71 MENU ITEMS: Gourmet popcorn, soft drinks, seasonings, microwave corn. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bernice Sinopoli

KFc canada (Yum! restaurants InternatIonal (Canada)) TEL: 416-664-5200 FAX: 905-265-7505 URL: www.kfc.com UNITS (ON): 295 UNITS (CAN): 663 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, sandwiches, snackables, salads, fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Douglas Heinrich

Kojax souFLaKi TEL: 514-693-8889 FAX: 514-693-5112 URL: www.kojaxsouflaki.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Greek food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Joseph Iacino

Koya jaPan inc. (mtY Group) TEL: 888-569-2872 FAX: 204-783-1749 URL: www.koyajapan.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Japanese cuisine; teriyaki meals, noodles, soups, sushi. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

KRisPy KReme doughnuts TEL: 905-474-2435 FAX: 647-346-3885 URL: www.krispykreme.com UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Doughnuts and coffee. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Chris Lindsay

�L�

La cRemieRe (mtY Group)

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.lacremiere.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 62 MENU ITEMS: Ice cream, yogurt. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

La PReP TEL: 514-510-5001

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com FAX: 877-516-0074 URL: www.laprep.com UNITS (ON): 24 UNITS (CAN): 54 MENU ITEMS: Gourmet salads, sandwiches, coffees, pastries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: John Essaris

LettieRi caFe TEL: 416-740-2304 FAX: 416-740-5398 URL: www.lettiericafe.com UNITS (ON): 8 UNITS (CAN): 8 MENU ITEMS: Espresso-based drinks, coffee, organic teas, juice, smoothies, panini, salads, soups, pizza, pasta, pastries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jocelyn Attwood

LicK’s FRanchising inc. TEL: 416-362-5425 FAX: 416-690-0504 URL: www.lickshomeburgers.com UNITS (ON): 12 UNITS (CAN): 12 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, ice cream. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Denise Meehan

LittLe caesaRs oF canada inc. TEL: 905-822-7899 FAX: 905-822-9808 URL: www.littlecaesars.ca UNITS (ON): 91 UNITS (CAN): 193 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, wings, bread, wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Dianne Clark

LoRenzo’s RestauRant TEL: 613-737-3737 FAX: 613-737-0432 URL: www.lorenzos.ca UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 4 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pastas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Khalil Salem

�M�

mamma’s Pizza

TEL: 416-784-0329 FAX: 416-784-9744 URL: www.mammaspizza.com UNITS (ON): 16 UNITS (CAN): 16 MENU ITEMS: Pizzas, pasta, calzone, salads, wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Mauro Galli

manchu WoK TEL: 905-946-7200 FAX: 905-946-8630 URL: www.manchuwok.com UNITS (ON): 44 UNITS (CAN): 75 MENU ITEMS: Asian fast food cuisine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Mariellen Clark

mandaRin RestauRant FRanchise coRPoRation TEL: 905-451-4100 FAX: 905-456-3411 URL: www.mandarinbuffet.com UNITS (ON): 22 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Chinese and Canadian food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Diana Chiu

manna FRanchise coRP. TEL: 416-861-9673 FAX: 476-214-4765 URL: www.piazzamanna.com UNITS (ON): 13

UNITS (CAN): 13 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, panini, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Paul Manna

pastas, donairs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Talaal Baroudi

maRbLe sLab cReameRy

TEL: 905-482-7300 FAX: 905-482-7330 URL: www.mmmuffins.com UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 16 MENU ITEMS: Muffins, coffee, cookies, pastries, cold drinks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ian MacDougall

TEL: 403-287-7633 FAX: 403-283-7698 URL: www.marbleslab.ca UNITS (ON): 30 UNITS (CAN): 82 MENU ITEMS: Ice cream , ice cream cakes, cupcakes, shakes and smoothies. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Lien Trac

maRy bRoWn’s inc. TEL: 905-513-0044 FAX: 905-513-0050 URL: www.marybrowns.com UNITS (ON): 34 UNITS (CAN): 105 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, potatoes, sandwiches, wraps, salads, nonalcoholic beverages. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Peter Rakovalis

mcdonaLd’s RestauRants oF canada Ltd. TEL: 416-443-1000 FAX: 416-446-3420 URL: www.mcdonalds.ca UNITS (ON): 453 UNITS (CAN): 1404 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, lunch and dinner menu items, fries, milkshakes, salads, coffee. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: James Dallas Dawson

meLt gRiLLed cheese TEL: 647-344-5555 URL: www.meltgrilledcheese.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Grilled cheese sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery.

menchie’s FRozen yoguRt TEL: 647-723-5169 FAX: 647-723-5178 URL: www.menchies.ca UNITS (ON): 38 UNITS (CAN): 84 MENU ITEMS: Self service pay by the weight frozen yogurt. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: David Shneer

micheL’s baKeRy caFe (threeCaf Brands Canada InC.) TEL: 905-482-7300 FAX: 905-482-7330 URL: www.michelsbakerycafe.com UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Baked products, salads, sandwiches, coffees, teas, cold drinks, breakfast items. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ian MacDougall

miKe’s RestauRants inc. (ImvesCor InC) TEL: 514-341-5544 FAX: 514-341-6236 URL: www.mikes.ca UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 78 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, hot subs, salads, sandwiches, steak, barbecue chicken, veal, salmon, seafoods. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Peter Tsafoulias

miLano PizzeRia TEL: 613-729-9738 FAX: 613-729-2921 URL: www.milanopizzeria.ca UNITS (ON): 26 UNITS (CAN): 26 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, submarines,

mmmuFFins (threeCaf Brands Canada InC.)

moLLy bLooms iRish Pubs inc. TEL: 519-575-7397 FAX: 519-575-7398 URL: www.mollyblooms.ca UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 6 MENU ITEMS: Alcoholic beverages, casual comfort food, pub grub. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Brian Watson

montana’s (Cara) TEL: 905-760-2244 URL: www.montanas.ca UNITS (ON): 52 UNITS (CAN): 92 MENU ITEMS: Varied. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Ryan Lloyd

moxie’s RestauRants L.P. (nor) TEL: 403-543-2600 FAX: 403-543-2646 URL: www.moxies.com UNITS (ON): 26 UNITS (CAN): 66 MENU ITEMS: Salads, classic entrees, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Laurids Skaarup

mR. gReeK RestauRants inc. TEL: 416-444-3266 FAX: 416-444-3484 URL: www.mrgreek.com UNITS (ON): 20 UNITS (CAN): 20 MENU ITEMS: Grilled proteins, Greek salads, Mediterranean. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Vicki Raios-Tranos

mR. sub (mtY Group) TEL: 416-225-5545 FAX: 416-245-5536 URL: www.mrsub.ca UNITS (ON): 255 UNITS (CAN): 313 MENU ITEMS: Submarine sandwiches, wraps, salads, soups, desserts, smoothies. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Ken Monteith

mRs. FieLds oRiginaL cooKies TEL: 905-426-2551 FAX: 905-426-2826 URL: www.mrsfields.ca UNITS (ON): 12 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Cookies, pretzels, yogurt. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Walter Jusenchuk

mucho buRRito (mtY-extreme Brandz) TEL: 905-764-7066 FAX: 905-764-0476 URL: www.muchoburrito.com UNITS (ON): 33 UNITS (CAN): 64 MENU ITEMS: Burritos, quesadillas, tacos. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Norman Pickering

muFFin PLus & caFe dePot TEL: 514-281-2067 FAX: 514-281-6405 URL: www.cafedepot.ca UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 90 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, specialty coffees, salads, sandwiches, muffins, pastries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Tony Elisii

�N�

nando’s FLame gRiLLed chicKen

TEL: 905-564-1118 FAX: 905-564-3118 URL: www.nandos.ca UNITS (ON): 8 UNITS (CAN): 29 MENU ITEMS: Portuguese-style flame-grilled chicken, salads and sides. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Paul Dean

naPLes PizzeRia TEL: 519-252-3492 FAX: 519-252-0461 URL: www.naplespizza.com UNITS (ON): 19 UNITS (CAN): 19 MENU ITEMS: Pizza and submarine sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Tony Bahcheli

neW oRLeans Pizza (ChaIrman’s Brand Corp) TEL: 416-288-8515 FAX: 416-288-8895 URL: www.neworleanspizza.ca UNITS (ON): 56 UNITS (CAN): 56 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, submarines, panzerotti, wings, garlic strips, salads, bruschetta. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Parul Puri

neW yoRK FRies TEL: 416-963-5005 FAX: 416-963-4920 URL: www.newyorkfries.com UNITS (ON): 62 UNITS (CAN): 129 MENU ITEMS: Fries, poutines, hot dogs, soft drinks and toppings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Safiah Arooz

�O�

oLd sPaghetti FactoRy canada Ltd. TEL: 604-684-1287 FAX: 604-684-8035 URL: www.oldspaghettifactory.ca UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 14 MENU ITEMS: Pasta, chicken, veal, steak, ribs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ken Lobson

oPa! oF gReece TEL: 403-245-0033 FAX: 403-271-4236 URL: www.opasouvlaki.ca UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 87 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, lamb and pork souvlaki, gyros, Greek salad. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Dave Jensen

oRange juLius (daIrY Queen Canada InC.) TEL: 905-639-1492 FAX: 905-681-3623 URL: www.orangejulius.com UNITS (ON): 45 UNITS (CAN): 126 MENU ITEMS: Blended fruit drinks, nutrified smoothies, fresh fruit and vegetable juices. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Fiona Bottoms

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S

�P�

Panago Pizza inc.

TEL: 877-731-0310 FAX: 604-755-6014 URL: www.panago.com UNITS (ON): 16 UNITS (CAN): 181 MENU ITEMS: Pizzas, salads, breadsticks and wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Todd Wylie

PaPa john’s TEL: 502-261-7272 FAX: 502-261-4324 URL: www.papajohnspizza.ca UNITS (ON): 13 UNITS (CAN): 77 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mike Prentice

PeRKins’ RestauRant & baKeRy TEL: 901-766-6400 FAX: 901-766-6482 URL: www.perkinsrestaurant.com UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 17 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and bakery items. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jay Trungale

Pita Land TEL: 416-496-1758 FAX: 416-496-8440 URL: www.pitaland.ca UNITS (ON): 18 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Pitas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mehdi Fahmi

Pita nutso inc. TEL: 416-235-0203 FAX: 416-235-0204 URL: www.pitanutso.com UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 7 MENU ITEMS: Shawarma, hummus, bab ganoush, tabouleh. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Rick Taddeo

Pita Pit TEL: 855-PITA-PIT FAX: 613-546-1436 URL: www.pitapit.com UNITS (ON): 113 UNITS (CAN): 182 MENU ITEMS: Pitas, salad, smoothies,soups, snacks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Kevin Pressburger

Pizza deLight (ImvesCor InC) TEL: 506-853-0990 FAX: 506-853-4131 URL: www.pizzadelight.com UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 85 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, pasta, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Craig Shannon

Pizza hut canada (Yum! restaurants InternatIonal (Canada) CompanY)** TEL: 416-664-5200 FAX: 905-265-7505 URL: www.pizzahut.ca UNITS (ON): 146 UNITS (CAN): 345 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, salads, pasta, wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Douglas Heinrich

Pizza nova TEL: 416-439-0051 FAX: 416-299-3558 URL: www.pizzanova.com UNITS (ON): 131 UNITS (CAN): 131 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, chicken

wings, fresh salads, panzerotti, lasagna, toasted sandwiches, baby back ribs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Sam Primucci

Pizza Pizza Limited TEL: 416-967-1010 FAX: 416-967-9865 URL: www.pizzapizza.ca UNITS (ON): 545 UNITS (CAN): 629 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, chicken, sandwiches, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Sebastian Fuschini

PizzaviLLe inc. TEL: 905-850-0070 FAX: 905-850-0339 URL: www.pizzaville.ca UNITS (ON): 71 UNITS (CAN): 71 MENU ITEMS: Pizza, panzerotto, chicken wings, pasta. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Alan Serrecchia

PoPeyes Louisiana Kitchen TEL: 404-459-4450 FAX: 404-459-4475 URL: www.popeyesfranchising. com UNITS (ON): 76 UNITS (CAN): 76 MENU ITEMS: Cajun fried chicken, seafood dishes, cajun fries, red beans and rice. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Todd Sattler

PResse caFe TEL: 514-935-5553 URL: www.pressecafe.com UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 53 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Xavier Chambon

PRetzeL maKeR canada TEL: 905-426-2551 FAX: 905-426-2826 URL: www.pretzelmaker.ca UNITS (ON): 17 UNITS (CAN): 53 MENU ITEMS: Pretzels. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Walter Jusenchuk

PRime Pubs (Cara) TEL: 905-760-2044 FAX: 866-300-3552 URL: www.primepubs.com UNITS (ON): 23 UNITS (CAN): 27 MENU ITEMS: Pub grub. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Andrew Berzins

PumPeRnicKeLs Ltd. TEL: 905-669-9176 FAX: 905-669-9183 URL: www.pumpernickels.ca UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Deli sandwiches, salads, hot daily specials, hamburgers, french fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Shlomo Ziv

�Q�

Qdoba mexican gRiLL TEL: 720-898-2300 FAX: 720-898-2396 URL: www.qdoba.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 4 MENU ITEMS: Mexican food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Grant Krietzer

Quesada FRanchising oF canada coRP TEL: 416-849-2323


FAX: 416-849-2257 URL: www.quesada.ca UNITS (ON): 24 UNITS (CAN): 29 MENU ITEMS: Burritos, quesadillas and tacos. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Tom O’Neill

Quiznos Canada RestauRant CoRp TEL: 647-259-0333 FAX: 647-259-0341 URL: www.quiznos.ca UNITS (ON): 128 UNITS (CAN): 332 MENU ITEMS: Oven-toasted sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Marc Choy

�R�

RiCky’s all day GRill (FDF RestauRant BRanDz) TEL: 604-637-7272 FAX: 604-637-8874 URL: www.gotorickys.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 73 MENU ITEMS: Ribs, chicken, pastas, steaks, burgers and homestyle favourites. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Stacey Hansson

Robin’s (ChaiRman’s BRanD CoRp) TEL: 416-646-0987 FAX: 416-646-2204 URL: www.robinsdonuts.com UNITS (ON): 28 UNITS (CAN): 113 MENU ITEMS: Donuts, coffee, deli items, sandwiches, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Tom Michalopoulos

Roma Ribs ltd. TEL: 204-944-0792 FAX: 204-943-3298 URL: www.tonyromas.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 27 MENU ITEMS: Steak, ribs, chicken, shrimp, sandwiches, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Alan Jozwiak

RotisseRie mom’s expRess TEL: 905-366-2500 FAX: 905-361-5999 URL: www.rotisseriemoms.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 9 MENU ITEMS: Chicken. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Sebastien Clermont

Ruby thai kitChen (iRG) TEL: 416-498-9880 FAX: 416-498-9876 URL: www.irg168.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Thai food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: P. Huang

�S�

sandwiCh boaRd,the TEL: 416-471-6031 FAX: 416-913-1587 URL: www.thesandwichboard.ca UNITS (ON): 7 UNITS (CAN): 7 MENU ITEMS: Soup, salad, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Albert Mirzakhanian

sandwiCh tRee (Rest-Con manaGement systems LtD.) TEL: 604-220-4566 FAX: 604-463-2955 URL: www.sandwichtree.ca UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 16

| 19

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

O C TO B E R 2 014 MENU ITEMS: Soups, sandwiches, salads, pastries, baked goods. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Tony Cardarelli

sbaRRo TEL: 516-715-4148 FAX: 516-715-4197 URL: www.sbarro.com UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Italian food. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Randy Jones

sCoRes (imvesCoR inC) TEL: 514-341-5544 FAX: 514-341-6236 URL: www.scores.ca UNITS (ON): 3 UNITS (CAN): 46 MENU ITEMS: Chicken and ribs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Craig Shannon

seCond Cup ltd. TEL: 905-362-1818 FAX: 905-362-1121 URL: www.secondcup.com UNITS (ON): 186 UNITS (CAN): 363 MENU ITEMS: Coffees, specialty coffees, teas, juices, cakes, pastries, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Wayne Vanderhorst

seleCt Food seRviCes inC. TEL: 416-391-1244 FAX: 416-391-5244 URL: www.selectsandwich.com UNITS (ON): 16 UNITS (CAN): 16 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, sandwiches, salads, coffee, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Brian Kahn

shaRk Club (noR) TEL: 403-543-2600 FAX: 403-543-2646 URL: www.sharkclubs.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 11 TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Mellanie Nimchand

shoeless Joe’s spoRts GRill TEL: 905-760-1295 FAX: 905-760-1296 URL: www.shoelessjoes.ca UNITS (ON): 38 UNITS (CAN): 40 MENU ITEMS: Steak, ribs, wings, burgers, sandwiches, pizzas, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Danny Grammenopoulos

smitty’s Canada ltd. TEL: 403-229-3838 FAX: 403-229-3899 URL: www.smittys.ca UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 96 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, pancakes, waffles, hamburgers, sandwiches, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Chris Chan

smoke’s poutineRie TEL: 905-427-4444 FAX: 905-427-9944 URL: www.smokespoutinerie.com UNITS (ON): 23 UNITS (CAN): 35 MENU ITEMS: Poutine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mike Graham

south st. buRGeR Co. TEL: 416-963-5005 FAX: 416-963-4920 URL: www.southstburger.com UNITS (ON): 19 UNITS (CAN): 22 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers, french fries and poutine.

TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Thomas McNaughtan

souvlaki hut TEL: 905-822-1900 FAX: 905-822-1909 URL: www.souvlakihut.com UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Souvlaki. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Nick Tsangaris

sQuaRe boy pizza & subs TEL: 905-434-4445 FAX: 905-433-1111 URL: www.squareboypizza.ca UNITS (ON): 18 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Pizza. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ted Crandall

st. louis FRanChise limited TEL: 416-485-1094 FAX: 416-485-1512 URL: www.stlouiswings.com UNITS (ON): 40 UNITS (CAN): 41 MENU ITEMS: Wings and ribs, sandwiches, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Steve Drexler

stiR FRy 88 (iRG) TEL: 416-358-3582 FAX: 416-498-9876 URL: www.irg168.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 1 MENU ITEMS: Chinese food TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: P. Huang

subs plus inC. TEL: 905-641-4404 FAX: 905-641-3696 URL: www.subsplus.ca UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 2 MENU ITEMS: Sandwiches, cakes and pastries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Robert Dumas

subway FRanChise systems oF Canada ltd. TEL: 800-888-4848 FAX: 203-876-6674 URL: www.subway.com UNITS (ON): 1201 UNITS (CAN): 3063 MENU ITEMS: Submarine sandwiches and salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Kathleen Bell

sukiyaki (mty GRoup) TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.mtygroup.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 25 MENU ITEMS: Japanese cuisine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

sunnyside GRill TEL: 905-844-2665 FAX: 416-604-8632 URL: www.sunnysidegrill.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Jeff Parisi

sunset GRill RestauRants ltd. TEL: 905-286-5833 FAX: 905-829-1142 URL: www.sunsetgrill.ca UNITS (ON): 45 UNITS (CAN): 45 MENU ITEMS: Omelettes, waffles, pancakes, burgers, soup, sandwiches, and salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out.

PERSONNEL NAME: Angelo Christou

taste oF mediteRRanean

drinks. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Andrew Diveky

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.sushishop.com UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 115 MENU ITEMS: Sushi. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

TEL: 416-821-5561 FAX: 866-735-1045 URL: www.tasteofmediterranean. ca UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Shawarma, gyro, pizza, chicken, Greek salad, pitas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Sam Hussein

sushiGo (mty GRoup)

tCby Canada (mty GRoup)

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.sushigoexpress.ca UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Sushi, meal soup, salads. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.tcbycanada.com UNITS (ON): 34 UNITS (CAN): 100 MENU ITEMS: Frozen yogurt, ice cream. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

sushi-Q

teRiyaki expeRienCe

TEL: 416-335-1700 FAX: 416-335-1800 URL: www.thesushi-q.com UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 7 MENU ITEMS: Sushi, soup. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Shun Lee

TEL: 905-337-7777 FAX: 905-337-0331 URL: www.teriyakiexperience.com UNITS (ON): 83 UNITS (CAN): 110 MENU ITEMS: Teriyaki rice and noodle meals, noodle soup bowls, wraps, salad, sushi. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Nik Jurkovic

sushi shop (mty GRoup)

swiss Chalet (CaRa) TEL: 905-760-2244 URL: www.swisschalet.ca UNITS (ON): 168 UNITS (CAN): 224 MENU ITEMS: Chicken, ribs. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Ryan Lloyd

symposium CaFe inC. TEL: 416-449-3611 FAX: 416-449-6722 URL: www.symposiumcafe.com UNITS (ON): 16 UNITS (CAN): 16 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, steaks, pasta, seafood, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ron Ansett

�T�

taCo bell oF Canada (yum! RestauRants inteRnationaL (CanaDa) Company TEL: 416-664-5200 FAX: 905-265-8204 URL: www.tacobell.ca UNITS (ON): 109 UNITS (CAN): 182 MENU ITEMS: Tacos, burritos, nachos, fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Douglas Heinrich

taCo del maR TEL: 855-425-0868 FAX: 206-624-7065 URL: www.tacodelmar.com UNITS (ON): 14 UNITS (CAN): 43 MENU ITEMS: Burritos, tacos, quesadillas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Sherry Ann Walters

taCo time (mty GRoup) TEL: 403-543-3490 FAX: 403-543-3499 URL: www.tacotimecanada.com UNITS (ON): 6 UNITS (CAN): 127 MENU ITEMS: Tacos, burritos, fajitas, salads, enchiladas. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Steve Nickerson

tandoRi (mty GRoup) TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.tandori.ca UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 23 MENU ITEMS: Indian Cuisine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jennifer Ma

tim hoRtons TEL: 905-845-6511 FAX: 905-845-1536 URL: www.timhortons.com UNITS (ON): 1790 UNITS (CAN): 3578 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, tea, donuts, muffins, cookies, soup, sandwiches, chili, wraps. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Victoria Lynch

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.villamadina.com UNITS (ON): 27 UNITS (CAN): 43 MENU ITEMS: Pitas, salads, entrees, desserts. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

TEL: 613-563-4073 FAX: 613-562-1982 URL: www.treats.com UNITS (ON): 33 UNITS (CAN): 62 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, baked goods, sandwiches, soups. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Amanda Milette

�W�

tutti FRutti (mty GRoup)

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.thaiexpress.ca UNITS (ON): 60 UNITS (CAN): 197 MENU ITEMS: Pad thai, pad sew. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Dennis Ng

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.tikiming.com UNITS (ON): 8 UNITS (CAN): 46 MENU ITEMS: Chinese Cuisine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

villa madina (mty GRoup)

tReats Canada CoRpoRation

thai expRess (mty GRoup)

tiki minG (mty GRoup)

burgers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in. PERSONNEL NAME: Gerald Tritt

TEL: 514-336-8885 FAX: 514-336-9222 URL: www.tuttifruttidejeuners.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 41 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, lunch, eggs, sausages, toast, coffee. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

�U�

union buRGeRs (oBsiDian GRoup)

TEL: 905-726-2205 FAX: 905-726-2203 URL: www.wildwingrestaurants. com UNITS (ON): 87 UNITS (CAN): 96 MENU ITEMS: Chicken wings, salads, appetizers, ribs, wraps, sandwiches. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Rick Smiciklas

�V�

williams FResh CaFe inC.

vanelli’s RestauRants limited (mty GRoup) TEL: 905-764-7066 FAX: 905-764-8426 URL: www.vanellisrestaurants.com UNITS (ON): 18 UNITS (CAN): 43 MENU ITEMS: Pizza and pasta. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bill Hamam

TEL: 604-683-8372 FAX: 604-683-8372 URL: www.verasburgershack.com UNITS (ON): 1 UNITS (CAN): 18 MENU ITEMS: Homemade

Project1:Layout 1 8/11/2014

TEL: 905-849-7685 FAX: 905-849-5545 URL: www.wendys.ca UNITS (ON): 193 UNITS (CAN): 369 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers, chicken sandwiches, salads, french fries, chili, baked potato, poutine. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Jane Dann

wild winG CoRp.

TEL: 905-814-8030 FAX: 905-814-8272 URL: www.ubburger.com UNITS (ON): 10 UNITS (CAN): 10 MENU ITEMS: Hamburgers. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: George Karamountzos

veRa’s buRGeR shaCk

wendy’s RestauRants oF Canada inC.

TEL: 519-752-4850 FAX: 519-752-2671 URL: www.williamsfreshcafe.com UNITS (ON): 35 UNITS (CAN): 35 MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, soups, salads and sandwiches, desserts, specialty coffees. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, drive-thru. PERSONNEL NAME: Evan Livermore

wimpy’s dineR RestauRant TEL: 416-269-4679 FAX: 416-269-8484 URL: www.wimpysdiner.ca UNITS (ON): 44 (CAN):144 3:37 UNITS PM Page

timothy’s woRld CoFFeethReeCaF bRands Canada inC. TEL: 905-482-7300 FAX: 905-482-7330 URL: www. timothyscafes.com UNITS (ON): 65 UNITS (CAN): 77 MENU ITEMS: Coffee, lattes, tea, hot chocolate, frappés, bottled drinks, pastries, cookies, muffins and croissants. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Ian McDougall

toppeR’s pizza Canada TEL: 705-735-2127 FAX: 705-735-4821 URL: www. toppersfranchise.ca UNITS (ON): 36 UNITS (CAN): 36 MENU ITEMS: Pizzas, wings, salads, bread sticks, desserts and

Chicken Perfected. The Broaster Company® offers foodservice operators all they need to strengthen their businesses and build their profits. When you become a Genuine Broaster Chicken® Licensed Trademark Operator, you gain access to Broaster foodservice equipment, products and accessories. And you’ll find that what we exclude is just as beneficial: • No development fee. • No royalty payments. • No franchise fee. • No need to separate sales.

905-887-5822 • 888-887-9923 kendaleproducts@sympatico.ca broaster.com


20 |

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

MENU ITEMS: Breakfast, lunch and dinner, full menu. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Jim Daikos

Wings Up! TEL: 289-400-9464 FAX: 905-618-0417 URL: www.wingsup.com UNITS (ON): 9 UNITS (CAN): 9 MENU ITEMS: Chicken wings. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Joel Friedman

Wok Box Fresh AsiAn kitchen TEL: 778-571-4200 FAX: 778-571-4400 URL: www.wokbox.ca UNITS (ON): 4 UNITS (CAN): 46 MENU ITEMS: Stirfrys, Rice Bowls, Soups. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out, delivery. PERSONNEL NAME: Lawrence Eade

Works goUrmet BUrger Bistro,the TEL: 855-799-6757

FAX: 855-699-6757 URL: www.worksburger.com UNITS (ON): 27 UNITS (CAN): 28 MENU ITEMS: Burgers, fries. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Bruce Miller

�Y�

Ye olde sqUires pUBs TEL: 905-333-6627 URL: www.yeoldesquire.com UNITS (ON): 2 UNITS (CAN): 2 MENU ITEMS: Pub grub.

TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Mark Wilson

Yogen FrUz cAnAdA inc. (MTY Group) TEL: 905-479-8762 FAX: 905-479-5235 URL: www.yogenfruz.com UNITS (ON): 90 UNITS (CAN): 129 MENU ITEMS: Frozen yogurt, soft serve yogurt, smoothies and ice cream. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Sarah Kulbatski

YogUrtY’s TEL: 905-479-5040 URL: www.yogurtys.com UNITS (ON): 50 UNITS (CAN): 59 MENU ITEMS: Yogurt. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Aaron Serruya

YoYo’s YogUrt cAFe TEL: 519-452-0046 FAX: 519-452-1318 URL: www.yoyosyogurtcafe.com UNITS (ON): 11 UNITS (CAN): 11 MENU ITEMS: Yogurt. TYPE OF SERVICE: Take-out.

O N TA R I O R E S TAU R A N T N E W S PERSONNEL NAME: Dave Coultis

�Z�

zoUp! Fresh soUp

TEL: 800-940-9687 URL: www.zoupco.com UNITS (ON): 5 UNITS (CAN): 5 MENU ITEMS: Soup, salad & sandwich. TYPE OF SERVICE: Dine-in, take-out. PERSONNEL NAME: Richard Simtob

Please email any changes to data for our online listings or next year’s report to LwU@

CANAdIANRESTAURANTNEwS. COM,

subject line: FRANChISE REPORT 2014 ChANgES.

The Marketplace

1-303-447-3334

DOES YOUR KITCHEN MAKE MONEY? OURS DOES... New High Volume location for FAST CASUAL restaurant franchise, contact CAROL KAHN at: ckahn@selectfoodservices.com or 416-709-1222

urbankitchen.com Min. cash required $200,000.00

MOBILE KNIFE SHARPENING WE COME TO YOUR PLACE. NO KNIFE RENTAL. MONTHLY PROGRAM. YOUR CHOICE. SERVING RESTAURANTS FROM KITCHENER TO OAKVILLE AND THE NIAGARA PENINSULA

MOBILE:

905.931.3513

minimum stop charge $45.00, per knife charge $4.35

Opportunity really is knocking

$179,000

Here's your opportunity to own your very own 80 seat restaurant. This turn key business is LCBO licensed and fully equipped with everything you need. Located in the downtown core of Fort Frances and across from the future beautiful market square. The amazing potential that lies within is just waiting for you. The existing business is operating as a fine dining establishment. There is also a spacious 3 bedroom suite on the second level which could provide an extra income boost or will give you a beautiful place to call home. This is a must see opportunity. CONTACT ACHOUR AT LAFLAMBEE@SYMPATICO.CA FOR MORE INFORMATION


O C TO B E R 2 014

www.ontariorestaurantnews.com

Wine festival a boon for Niagara ST. CATHARINES, ON—The 63rd annual Nienough confidence as an industry that we can agara Wine Festival took place in St. Cathainvite everybody to participate.” rines, ON, in September with more than forty Fred Di Profio, a winemaker with Pondwineries showcasing local vintages from the view Estate Winery, said the festival plays an region. important role for the region’s wineries. Kimberly Hundertmark, executive director “It’s huge,” Di Profio said. “We’re attracting of the festival, said this year’s support has been people from further afield, a lot of Americans “overwhelming,” as the annual event continues and people from Toronto … it’s really elevatto grow. ing Niagara’s image in wine.” “The economic impact is really significant,” Although the Canadian industry is relaHundertmark told ORN on Sept. 13. “This tively new compared to European countries, weekend in St. Catharines, you can’t get a hotel Di Profio said the country is really starting to and next week will be the same and then the make its mark on the world stage. spin off from that for retail and dining is really “Every vintage is different, it’s not as easy as impressive.” hot years and cold years. It’s the vintner’s job Hundertmark said the festival continues to respond appropriately to maintain a consisto grow alongside the Ontario winemaking tency in the bottle,” he said. “We are achieving industry. this consistency, we’re producing award win“From a personal perspective, I’ve been in ning reds every year.” the industry since 1992 and, when I started At the 2014 Decanter Awards, Pondview out, it was in Niagara-on-the-Lake and it was brought home two bronze medals for its Bella the group of seven plus one and now there’s Terra Meritage and its vidal icewine, alongwell over forty wineries just in Niagara-onside being commended for its 2011 Bella Terra the-Lake,” she said. Cabernet Sauvignon. Hundertmark also pointed to consumer’s Wine on tap desire for a more locally-sourced experience. “The whole go-local movement and thinkDave Gimbel, LCBO sales manager for Vineing about a 100-mile diet has been a game land Estates, was serving wine on tap at the changer and also the fact that people are recfestival and said the company has been selling ognizing the economic upswing that buying wine in the keg for two years and since then local has,” she said. “it’s just mushroomed.” While there are currently no craft breweries Currently, he said, more than 100 restauor micro-distilleries involved with the festival, rants across Ontario serve wine from a keg. Hundertmark said that could change in the Gimbel sees more operations picking up on future. the trend, which is already popular in B.C. and “In the next couple years, we might see in New York. 17218 Dr FAM CAN Restaurant Ad MECH:Layout 1 9/16/14 3:38 PM Page 1 the introduction of aOntario craft brewery or a News place Half PG“We don’t have enough product to service like Dillion’s Gin,” she said. “I feel like we have this because it’s growing, so we have to bring

| 21

Kimberly Hundertmark pours a glass of the region’s white wine. Below: Grapes for the annual Mayor’s Invitational Grape Stomp.

wineries into the program,” Gimbel said. Operators can retrofit existing beer lines to pour wine on tap but the setup uses different keg coupling and different gas. Gimbel said restaurants can serve by the ounce with counter systems attached to the taps.

According to Gimbel, the quality of the product isn’t sacrificed and the process eliminates the use of glass and cardboard. Each pony keg contains the equivalent of 26 bottles of wine. “The wine is good for up to six months,” Gimbel said. “It’s actually very easy to set up.”


P E OP L E

Top: (From left) Bronze medallist Jhao-Rong Fu, Taiwan; gold medallist Peter Lex, Germany; silver medallist Rupert Garcia, Canada. Bottom, left: Grant Ford. Photo by Kimberly Vogel. Bottom, right: Andrew Farrell.

Foodservice veteran Frank Hennessey is Imvescor Restaurant Group’s new president and chief executive officer, in a move announced Sept. 8. “Imvescor has some very iconic brands in the province of Quebec and the Atlantic Maritimes. Regardless of restaurant concept, you have to continually evolve and find ways to drive value and drive guest counts,” he told ORN in mid-September. “Imvescor is heavily franchised and establishing good relationships with them is critical.” Hennessey will be based out of the Montreal office, spending his first 30 days “running a diagnostic, looking at the restaurants and talking to the people involved,” he said. Hennessey was most recently president and CEO of Markham, ON-based Bento Nouveau, a 400unit sushi chain with locations throughout North America. He led the sale of that company the last seven months he was at the company from a private equity firm back to the original owner of the chain; a deal that concluded in May. Before that, Hennessey was at Cara Operations Limited for 11 years, as president of Harvey’s Restaurants and senior vice-president

Would your kitchen pass the Clean test?

of guest experience, as well as an 11year stint at Darden Restaurants. Rupert Garcia, chef de partie of the Calgary Golf and Country Club, took second place as the Canadian representative at the 38th Concours International des Jeunes Chefs Rôtisseurs Competition held in Durban, South Africa on Sept. 5. Twenty young chefs, chosen through selection competitions held in their respective countries, were given four hours to compose a menu and prepare a three-course meal for four people using ingredients presented in a black box, which included a whole Cape salmon, a whole chicken, ostrich filet and pawpaw. A graduate of Bishop McNally High School and the Southern Alberta Institution of Technology (SAIT) Professional Cooking Program in 2012, Garcia currently works under the guidance of Calgary Golf and Country Club executive chef Vincent Parkinson. McCain Foods Limited announced in late September the appointment of Shai Altman as president, Canada, effective Oct. 20. Altman will assume full responsibility for the Canadian retail and food-

service business. Altman joins McCain from Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, where he has held increasingly senior roles since 1997. He started his career in sales, moved through key account management and customer marketing, and then went on to lead the consumer marketing team. He worked as general manager of Wrigley in Israel and India from 2002 until 2009, then as position Wrigley Canada president. Grant Ford has celebrated 40 years at the helm of several McDonald’s franchises in Guelph, ON. The entrepreneur opened the first McDonald’s franchise in Guelph in the summer of 1974 with no previous restaurant experience, according to the Guelph Mercury. Chef Andrew Farrell of Halifax’s 2 Doors Down was named Master of the Mac & Cheese at the 2014 Grate Canadian Cheese Cook-Off at Toronto’s Canadian National Exhibition. The other participants were Food Network host and cookbook author Bal Arneson, David Bohati, executive chef at Market Restaurant in Calgary, and Kevin Durkee, owner of Cheesewerks in Toronto.

THEY CAN FORGIVE

AN OVERCOOKED STEAK,

Train your kitchen staff on: Preventing Sanitation and Food Safety risks Maintaining a pest-free kitchen environment Being ready for your next kitchen inspection

Order your CleanSAFE Program today! A $50 value FREE when you call 888-210-7050 or email cleansafe@abellgroup.com

BUT NEVER A DIRTY PLATE. Research shows that consumers will forgive bad food faster than dirty dishes. That won’t be an issue if you have a Champion in your dishroom. Our exclusive dual rinse technology provides double the sanitation and offers a quieter, cooler dishroom through insulated, hinged doors. This keeps the heat where you want it and offers easier access to the clean you need. Regardless of the size of your operation, problems in the dishroom, or the number of covers per day...

We can take that off your plate.

AN

NIV

ER S A

RY

Visit CleanSafeKitchen.ca or call 888-210-7050

@championind

facebook.com/championind.warewashing

800.263.5798 championindustries.com/canada


Canadian Brie or Camembert

Your guests are looking for new and interesting burger toppings. Offer your gourmet burger aficionados a real great taste experience. By offering a variety of LOCAL Specialty Cheeses made from 100% Canadian Milk, as a topping. Adding Canadian Specialty Cheese is cost effective way to create a gourmet cheeseburger that delivers a real great taste experience. Specialty cheeses create a higher perceived cheeseburger value that you can charge a premium price for. Add Canadian specialty cheese and watch them come back for more!

Natural Aged 2 yr Old Canadian Chedda r Cheese

Hot Chilli Pepper Canadian Jack Cheese

adian d Can Smoke arella or Mozz heese lone C Provo

Smoked Canadian Cheddar Cheese

Canadian Blue Cheese

Just Add Locally Produced Canadian Specialty Cheese MADE FROM 100% CANADIAN MILK.


SERVE UP

GREAT ENTERTAINMENT The right audio/visual experience is just good business

To keep your guests coming back, we’ll help you create that perfect vibe with the right HDTV, sound system, projector and digital menu boards – all from top brands like LG. We’ll leave the kitchen to you.

SPECIALIZED TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS TVs – Wall or ceiling mounting – Calibration

BEST BUY FOR BUSINESS OFFERS A BROAD RANGE OF TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS, INCLUDING • Digital menu boards • Background and zone audio systems • Indoor/outdoor audio/visual systems

• Complete customized audio/visual design layout • Professional installation

• Commercial grade systems

PROJECTORS – Mounting – Screen install (fixed/manual/motorized) AUDIO – Design and install of ceiling or wall speaker systems VIDEO DISTRIBUTION – Installation and programming of sources (cable boxes, blu-ray etc.) – Panel wiring across floors – Wire concealment VIDEO WALL – Design and install of multi-panels

WE’RE HERE TO HELP BY PHONE

BY EMAIL

ONLINE

Phone: 1.877.423.3429 Email: forbusiness@BestBuyCanada.ca Online: BestBuy.ca/BBFB

AT YOUR LOCATION

Ontario Restaurant News - October 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you