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ISB Policy Manual FOREWORD The aim of the Policy Manual is to provide all members of staff at ISB with a brief guide to procedures and policies of the school. This guide should be used in conjunction with the school staff handbook. The Policy Manual is reviewed annually to keep it updated.

Sos Gara Catelu

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1R Sector 3 032991


INDEX A:

POLICIES RELATED TO PHILOSPOHY AND OBJECTIVES 

B:

ISB ADMISSIONS POLICY

5.

POLICIES RELATED TO CURRICULUM GENERAL       

ISB ASSESMENT POLICY PRIMARY ISB ASSESSMENT POLICY SECONDARY ISB HOMEWORK POLICY PRIMARY ISB HOMEWORK POLICY SECONDARY ISB READING POLICY ISB TEACHING AND LEARNING POLICY ISB USE OF DICTIONARY POLICY

9. 14. 16. 18. 20. 22. 26.

SUBJECT POLICIES                     2

ISB ART POLICY PRIMARY ISB ART POLICY SECONDARY ISB BIOLOGY POLICY SECONDARY ISB BUSINESS STUDIES POLICY SECONDARY ISB CHEMISTRY POLICY SECONDARY ISB DRAMA POLICY SECONDARY ISB ECONOMICS POLICY SECONDARY ISB ENGLISH LITERATURE POLICY SECONDARY ISB ENGLISH POLICY WHOLE SCHOOL ISB FRENCH POLICY SECONDARY ISB GENERAL SCIENCE POLICY PRIMARY ISB GENERAL SCIENCE POLICY SECONDARY ISB GEOGRAPHY POLICY PRIMARY ISB GEOGRAPHY POLICY SECONDARY ISB HISTORY POLICY PRIMARY ISB HISTORY POLICY SECONDARY ISB ICT POLICY PRIMARY ISB ICT POLICY SECONDARY ISB MATHEMATICS POLICY PRIMARY ISB MATHEMATICS POLICY SECONDARY

27. 31. 35. 39. 41. 49. 52. 57. 60. 71. 81. 87. 90. 97. 105. 112. 118. 124. 132. 137.


            

C:

ISB ATTENDANCE POLICY PRIMARY ISB ATTENDANCE POLICY SECONDARY ISB CANTEEN POLICY ISB CHILD PROTECTION POLICY ISB CLEANING POLICY ISB ENGLISH LANGUAGE USAGE POLICY ISB HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY ISB HOME SCHOOL BUS SAFETY POLICY ISB ICT USAGE POLICY ISB SCHOOL INTERNET ACCESS POLICY ISB INSET AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY ISB MAINTANANCE POLICY ISB MEDICATION POLICY ISB PARENTS/GUARDIANS IN SCHOOL POLICY ISB RECRUITMENT POLICY ISB SICK CHILDREN POLICY ISB WELFARE AND SAFETY POLICY SECONDARY

187. 191. 194. 196. 216. 222. 223. 251. 254. 260. 262. 266. 269. 272. 273. 274. 275.

POLICIES REALTED TO STAFF       

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142. 146. 152. 155. 157. 160. 163. 164. 168. 170. 175. 181. 183.

POLICIES REALTED TO GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT                 

D:

ISB MUSIC POLICY WHOLE SCHOOL ISB PHYSICAL EDUCATION POLICY WHOLE SCHOOL ISB PHYSICS POLICY SECONDARY ISB PSHE POLICY ISB RE POLICY SECONDARY ISB ROMANIAN POLICY PRIMARY ISB ROMANIAN AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE POLICY ISB ROMANIAN POLICY SECONDARY ISB SOCIOLOGY POLICY SECONDARY ISB SPANISH POLICY SECONDARY ISB TRAVEL AND TOURISM POLICY ISB TURKISH LANGUAGE POLICY – PRIMARY ISB TURKISH LANGUAGE POLICY SECONDARY

ISB APPRAISAL POLICY ISB DISPLAY POLICY ISB MARKING POLICY PRIMARY ISB SMOKING POLICY ISB STAFF DRESS CODE POLICY ISB STAFF DUTY ROTA : DEFINITION OF RESPONSIBILITIES AND ROLES POLICY ISB INDIVIDUAL TUTORING OUTSIDE SCHOOL POLICY

277. 281. 283. 286. 287. 288. 290.


E:

POLICIES RELATED TO STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES   

F:

ISB LIBRARY POLICY

300.

POLICIES REALTED TO STUDENT AND COMMUNITY LIFE      

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291. 294. 297.

POLICIES RELATED TO RESOURCES 

G:

ISB EAL POLICY PRIMARY ISB ENGLISH PREP POLICY SECONDARY ISB SPECIAL NEEDS POLICY

ISB ANTI-BULLYING POLICY ISB BEHAVIOUR POLICIY PRIMARY ISB BEHAVIOUR POLICY SECONDARY ISB DISCIPLINE POLICY SECONDARY ISB GREEN CARD POLICY SECONDARY ISB SCHOOL TRIPS POLICY

302. 306. 313. 317. 321. 322.


A:

POLICIES RELATED TO PHILOSPOHY AND OBJECTIVES

ISB ADMISSIONS POLICY Parents must agree to the ISB Admissions Policy before enrolment. By signing your application for admission you agree to the terms and conditions stated below. The application forms, documents and fees need to be received by the Admissions Office. Whom do we serve? The International School Bucharest (ISB) serves the educational needs of the international community in Bucharest, in particular the children of foreign nationals here on temporary assignment for which the local Romanian education system is not a viable option. We also welcome children from incoming and resident Romanian bicultural families committed to and able to access an international educational curriculum in English, as well as children of Romanian nationals who have been educated exclusively or primarily in nonRomanian schools overseas or at other accredited international schools in Romania. We are a non-sectarian, coeducational institution and welcome boys and girls of all races, religions and cultures. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Language English is the language of instruction. The ability to successfully access the curriculum within a reasonable time and to thrive in our English-language learning environment is the guiding principle for admission to the school. In early ages, immersion in the English language curriculum is usually sufficient for children to quickly develop proficient English language skills. On this basis, children may be admitted to our Primary School regardless of their level of English proficiency. ISB teachers are trained to support language acquisition and learning by nonnative English speakers. However we offer a separate ESL programme within our academic programme for KS2 level. Students entering Secondary School (Year 7 – 9) are expected to have sufficient competency in English in order to benefit from our academic programmes. Should we have some concern regarding an applicant’s ability to access the curriculum, we test applicants’ level of English, and if necessary ask them to attend an ESL Programme in our school before joining the mainstream classes.

At the Secondary School level (Year 10 - 13), we offer a challenging academic programme geared toward students who are planning to go on to college or university in Europe, North America and other areas of the world. At this level, students must have a fairly high degree of competency in English. All students applying to ISB High School must provide school records for the previous two academic years and/or other documentation regarding their level of English language proficiency. They may also be asked to take an academic assessment test. Provided academic ability is evidenced, the School will consider options which would allow the student to study a year ESL programme and then join the appropriate mainstream class.

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OTHER ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Special Needs –Applicants with mild social/emotional issues, learning difficulties or other special needs are referred to our Special Needs Coordinator for evaluation. The decision to admit the child will be made by the relevant Principal based on the recommendation of the Special Needs Coordinator. If it is determined that the school is unable to accommodate a candidate’s special needs, we will endeavour to direct parents to a more suitable option. However, parents should be aware that there are unfortunately very few English languagebased resources to support children with special needs in Bucharest. Academic Achievement – Although ISB offers a stimulating and challenging educational programme, we accommodate students with a range of academic abilities, provided they are able to adequately access and benefit from our curriculum. We make this determination primarily by reviewing applicants’ school records and in Secondary School also sitting academic assessment tests in English and Mathematics. Residence – ISB is a day school and does not have boarding facilities. Students must therefore reside with their parent(s) or other legal guardian in a location within commuting distance to the school. Parent Communication – English and Romanian are the primary languages for communicating with parents. At least one parent or guardian should be able to communicate comfortably with school personnel in English or Romanian. Early Years Foundation Stage – All EYFS students must be toilet-trained. Wheel Chair Users- Unfortunately the school does not cater for wheelchair-users for 2010-2011. CLASS ORGANISATION As a coeducational international school, we try our best to maintain a balance of genders, abilities and nationalities in each of our grade years and classes. Our classes are limited to 18 pupils in Nursery, 22 pupils in Reception or upward. When these numbers are reached a waiting list system will apply. AGE PLACEMENT Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) – There are two levels within the EYFS. Nursery is for children who have turned 3 years of age by September 1st in the year of entry; Reception is for children who have turned 4 years of age by September 1st. Students who turn 3 after September 1st are eligible to enter into Nursery with the understanding that they may, at the EYFS Coordinator’s recommendation, be required to repeat the same year level the following school year.

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Primary School – Placement in all years is strictly determined by age as of September 1st in the academic year of entry as follows: Entering Year Group Age by Sep 1 Year 1

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Year 2

6

Year 3

7

Year 4

8

Year 5

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Year 6 10 Students come to ISB from many different countries with varying school calendars and enrolment age practices. Our September 1st cut-off date and age placement policy reflects what we believe to be the most appropriate classification for the social, emotional and academic wellbeing of children attending the school. Therefore, while we recognize that some parents may wish to have their children placed in years reflecting their home country systems, to ensure the most appropriate learning environment for all students in the Primary School, we do not allow exceptions to the above age placement policy. Secondary School – Age placement for Years 7 – 13 is likewise made according to the September 1st cut-off date. The age and grade placement categories are as follows: Entering Year Group Age by Sep 1 Year 7

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Year 8

12

Year 9

13

Year 10

14

Year 11

15

Year 12

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Year 13 17 For the same reasons mentioned above, age placement for Secondary School is almost always according to the above protocol. At the discretion of the Secondary School Principal, exceptions may be made if a student is already established in an equivalent class in another school system (for example, students transferring from schools in the Southern Hemisphere) and is considered able to access the relevant ISB curriculum for the year group. EXCEPTIONAL ADMISSIONS The child’s birthday falls within a month either side of 1st September If parents feel their child would benefit from being placed out of age, the School will assess the child and talk to the child’s parents to ascertain the best position. The appropriate decision is then made by the School regarding the final placement.

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A student in Year 7 upward, who does not have a high enough level of English to complete the IGCSE and A Level programme Provided there is proper evidence of academic ability, the School will consider options which would allow the student an additional year to focus on English skills to allow them to join the appropriate programme at a later age. APPLICATION TIMELINE Most students enrol at the beginning of the school year or at the start of the second term in early January. A student may be admitted to the School at any time during the school year (if places are available). SCREENING AND INTERVIEWS Early Years Foundation Stage – All children applying for admission are asked to come in to the school for an informal play session and interview before formal acceptance can be offered.( If application for admission is during the summer months, the first day in the school will be considered as informal play session and interview. The formal acceptance will be offered accordingly.) The play session/interview, which enables applicants and teachers to meet and interact with each other in the actual school environment, helps to identify any issues that may affect the applicant’s ability to comfortably access the programme, while also serving as an informal orientation for the children who are accepted to the EYFS. Primary School – Children applying for admission to Year 1- 6 are not required to have a formal interview, although we encourage families to visit the school and meet the Primary School Principal and/or Admissions Officer if possible. In reviewing an applicant’s eligibility we look at current/prior school records. If pupil cannot provide previous school records a formal interview is required. Without obligation, we may also invite applicants to attend school on a trial basis to assess their ability to access the curriculum. Secondary School – Children applying for admission to Year 7-9 are required to have a formal interview, and we encourage families to visit the school and meet the Secondary School Principal and/or Admissions Officer if possible. In reviewing an applicant’s eligibility we look at his/her school records In instances in which we have some question regarding the applicant’s ability to access the curriculum, we may also require the applicant to take tests in English and Mathematics and/or attend school on a trial basis. Secondary School – We encourage all children applying for admission to Year 10 – 13 to visit the school and meet with the Secondary School Principal, and we require an interview with the principal. In addition, all applicants must take an assessment test. To ensure that candidates will be able to meet academic requirements for graduation from ISB, they may also be referred to our Examinations Officer/Deputy Principal. In reviewing an applicant’s eligibility we look at his/her school records and assessment tests in English and Mathematics. Student Records from Other Schools The School requires student records in English or translated into English from the applicant's previous school before any student is accepted. These records may include reports, transcripts, and results of standardized tests, any reports by a counsellor or psychologist and recommendation letters from English teacher or Principal. The School reserves the right to contact the applicant's previous school prior to acceptance.

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B:

POLICIES RELATED TO CURRICULUM : GENERAL

ISB ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING POLICY - PRIMARY ISB believes that assessment is for finding children’s current level of achievement, which, in turn, will allow us to plan channels of effective progression, therefore maximising the future development potential and attainment level for each individual child. Assessment is both formative and summative and is part of the teaching and learning process Assessments are made for diagnostic purposes, to assess the effectiveness of teaching and learning, to inform and improve planning of the curriculum and to inform parents and teachers. Teacher Assessment The National Curriculum requires continuous teacher assessment. This should:    

cover all areas of the curriculum, but focus particularly on Numeracy, Literacy, Science and ICT inform the teacher about each child's progress throughout the key stage guide planning and coverage of the National Curriculum subjects enable the teacher to write Individual Education Plans (IEPs)

Teacher Assessment will be made through:    

interventions (listening and response) marking setting targets knowledge of children

How these teacher assessments are recorded is outlined under Record Keeping. Evidence is needed to support the teacher's assessment but not to question their professional judgement. If lesson planning and evaluation is sufficiently detailed and provides the right information, then it can provide the necessary evidence. A lot of evidence will be in the children's books but assessment jottings may be kept in a notebook to be transferred to the Pupil Record in the Profile. This Profile is updated and reviewed at least termly, with specific and personal information about achievements and targets, rather than a summative comment about work covered. Assessment through Marking Each piece of work that the child does should be marked (following the school marking policy).  

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Marking should be done in red. Marking should be based on the learning objective/s for the lesson.


Write a comment that is positive and/or constructive about what the child has achieved. If you write ‘good’ add a comment to explain why you think this. Follow this with a short term target that informs the child and helps with their future attainment/identifying the next step. (The target for English and maths might be linked to the targets taken from the core objectives for Literacy and Numeracy and written on the target sheets at the front of the book-(see below) Target Setting (English and Maths) For the teaching of English and maths target sheets should be placed inside the front cover of each child’s exercise book. Targets should be set using the core year group objectives for each subject taken from the New Primary Framework for Literacy and the National Numeracy Strategy. The targets should be differentiated for each child. (A Year 4 child that is not capable of achieving Year 4 key objectives would naturally be set targets from Year 3/Year 2 as/if appropriate.) Confirming a target has been achieved is the sole responsibility of the teacher. It also needs to be confirmed beyond reasonable doubt through teacher assessment and recorded by the teacher. The target should be signed and dated in the child’s book and the next target/s identified and set. The core targets are part of the school’s continuous assessment policy. The Key Objectives Record of Achievement sheets should be kept in the teacher’s planning file and updated by the teacher signing and dating when a target has been achieved. These records will be transferred to the pupil profiles which will be handed over to the child’s new teacher the following year and follow the child through the school. Target Setting (Foundation Subjects and Science) ISB follows the National Curriculum for England and Wales. The QCA Unit Schemes of Work for the Foundation subjects and Science have clearly stated differentiated attainment target/expectations that the children are expected to achieve. At the end of each unit the teacher will make a teacher based assessment and record each child’s name against one of the three attainment target levels for that unit on an assessment record sheet. (For Years 3-6 science should be recorded after an end of unit/half term written test.) A copy of these assessments should be handed to the Assessment and Reporting Officer after the completion of each unit. Curriculum Evaluation and Management Centre (CEM), University of Durham InCAS/PIPS (Online Assessment) ISB wishes to promote fully independent and accountable yearly assessment procedures which give clear evidence to the attainment and progress of each child. These assessments will also inform the reporting progress. Therefore InCAS/PIPS online assessments will take place at the appropriate time.

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The criteria for these assessments are: Performance Indicators in Primary Schools (PIPS) (Standardised against national and international samples) This will be applied as baseline assessment for new nursery and foundation aged children entering the school as well as start and end of year assessment for all children in the Early Years/Foundation unit. Areas of assessment are reading and maths. Interactive Computerised Assessment System (InCAS) (Standardised against national and international age related samples) This will be used as yearly assessment for Years 1-6. The principle aim of the tests is to look at several blocks of learning to find in more detail the strengths and weaknesses of each child. Specific areas of assessment are picture vocabulary, word decoding, word recognition, non verbal reasoning, comprehension, spelling, general maths (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) and mental maths. Assessment and evaluation of the tests are carried out at the University of Durham and will be returned to the school within 48 hours. Results will be used by the school to evaluate the child’s progress and to inform the future planning and teaching process of the child in their new class. The results will also be used to inform the end of year reporting progress. Half Termly Assessments English Writing will be assessed three times yearly (Years 1-6.) This will be in the form of an unaided piece of fiction writing following the Rising Stars Assessment Programme. All work will be levelled by the Examination and Assessment Officer. Moderation will be done by the Literacy Coordinator. Copies will be returned to the teacher highlighting achievement and informing the target setting process for writing. The school can then track the National Curriculum levels as the children move through the school. Mathematics Half termly tests will take place using the Rising Stars Assessment Programme. The test will be done during the last week before half term. Teachers should mark the test and fill in a result sheet and hand it to the Examination and Assessment Officer. The school can then track the National Curriculum levels of the children as they move through the school. Levels will be passed back to the teacher. Twice Yearly Written Report A written report will be sent to parents twice yearly at the end of the first and third terms (December and June respectively).

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The report should present a positive summary of the student's achievements for each individual National Curriculum subject along with a mark for effort (A=Good, B=Average, C=Poor). Other factors which should be commented on are out-of-school activities, personal attributes and skills and the most recent National Curriculum Assessment levels for English and Maths. The following should be considered before the production of the report:     

Teacher records, IEPs, teacher and school assessments. The writer should give an objective picture of the student's personal and social achievements based on evidence. The report should concentrate on highlighting progress made. The commentary will be word processed and expressed in continuous prose. Targets for future progress should be set for English, Maths and Science.

Reporting Through Parent Meetings Parents are invited to meet their child’s teacher to discuss their progress three times a year (November, March and June). This gives the opportunity to discuss the child's progress and any concerns the parent or teacher might have. The June meeting is held in the form of an open day on the first Monday after the end of the school year, allowing parents to discuss the child’s end of year report. The teachers are available to make an appointment and meet the parents if further discussion is required at any time through the school year. In addition to this in September parents are invited to a general Key Stage meeting to meet their children’s teachers and hear about the plans for the coming year. Year 6 parents will be invited to a SATs information evening in March to inform and explain how best to help their children with revision. Relevant documentation will be supplied. New Children Teacher assessment will be made on entry to the school to assess ability in English and maths. Foundation Profile An assessment is made for children during their first six weeks in the Nursery and a settling in report is written. During the course of their time in Nursery and Reception the Foundation Stage Profile is completed. Pupil Profile The pupil profile is an ongoing development and is a major focus for the SMT this term. Clear guidelines will be set by the end of the autumn term. Special Educational Needs (SEN) When a teacher identifies a special educational need an initial assessment should be recorded by the teacher and submitted and discussed with the SEN Coordinator (SENCO). The school assessment sheet should be used. Following this the SENCO will carry out a full and thorough investigation. 12


English as an Additional Language (EAL) On entry to the school each new child will be assessed on their level of English. Within the first few days the class teacher will make a more detailed evaluation of the child’s ability. This will be recorded on a school evaluation sheet which will then be passed to the EAL Coordinator. At the end of the year all children receiving EAL lessons will take an end of year written and oral assessment.

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ISB ASSESSMENT POLICY : SECONDARY

Continuous assessment form an important part of the curriculum taught in the Secondary Department. Students are assessed in 4 ways : 1:

Tests

2:

Assignments

3:

Class work

4:

Effort

TESTS Head’s of the different departments decide with their staff how many tests are required. Tests are entered on the electronic system and form an important part of the final grade awarded to a student. Tests include longer, formal tests as well as quizzes and unannounced drop-quizzes. ASSIGNMENTS Staff are encouraged to give students assignments on relevant topics. Students have to do research and improve their knowledge on a specific topic. Classes can use the Smart Room to have internet access. Assignments form an important part of the assessment process. CLASS WORK Students need to understand that it important to pay attention during lessons and complete assigned work. EFFORT Students need to work hard and try their best. Not everybody can get an A but everybody should work to his/her full potential. STUDENT ASSESSMENT ISB believes that assessment is for finding students’ current level of achievement which in turn will allow us to plan channels of effective progression, therefore maximising the future development potential and attainment level for each individual child. Assessment is both formative and summative and is part of the teaching and learning process. Assessments are made for diagnostic purposes, to assess the effectiveness of teaching and learning, to inform and improve planning of the curriculum and to inform parents and teachers.

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PROGRESS REPORTS For the purposes of student reporting, the year is divided into three terms. Formal written progress reports on each subject area are sent home to the parents in December and June. A parent conference will take place in the fall and spring terms. GRADE TRANSCRIPTS When requested students returning to their home country or applying to schools worldwide will be provided with the necessary transcripts. EXAMINATIONS Check Point Exams are written by Year 9 students. IGCSE and A level programme are followed in upper years. A period of revision, as appropriate, is provided by the teachers prior to the examination period. Following this an examination schedule is distributed. Subsequently examination results are sent home. Parents are invited to discuss results with each teacher.

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ISB HOMEWORK POLICY - PRIMARY The International School of Bucharest believes that homework plays an important role in the furtherance of the quality, all round educational experience that the school provides. Specifically, homework serves the following purposes: a)

To reinforce and enhance the learning that takes place in school.

b)

To create additional time for structured learning.

c)

To allow parents direct involvement in their child's learning.

In Early Years Foundation Stage the following timetables should be observed: NURSERY Monday

Song / Nursery Rhyme

Tuesday / Friday

Phonic Letters

Thursday (after October Half-Term)

Reading

RECEPTION Monday / Wednesday / Friday

Reading Books

Tuesday

Literacy

Wednesday

Numeracy

Nursery and Reception children should normally spend 15 minutes each night on their homework. KEY STAGE ONE & TWO The setting of tasks to be undertaken at home will be normal practice for all year groups at Key Stage One and Two. The frequency and length of tasks will vary according to the age and needs of the child. Tasks set will vary in their nature and will not necessarily be of a formal pencil and paper procedure.

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English, maths and science homework should be set proportionately following on from the lessons of the day as appropriate. The following is a guide to the time that pupils should normally spend on homework: Years 1 and 2

15-30 minutes per night

Years 3 and 4

30-45 minutes per night

Years 5 and 6

45-60 minutes per night

A proportion of this time should be allocated for daily reading. A weekly spelling test based on the Collins Spelling programme will be administered. If a parent feels that particular circumstances (e.g. prolonged absence from school) warrant additional homework, this should be discussed with the class teacher. Additional homework should not be set simply because a child is being taken out of school for a family holiday. However, teachers may recommend books that parents could use with their children. Homework should be set for clearly defined purposes (normally related to that days teaching) and not for its own sake. Homework set should be followed up in class and it should be made clear to children that, unless clearly specified, homework tasks are not optional. Failure to complete a homework task should be treated in the same way as failure to complete a piece of class work.

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ISB HOMEWORK POLICY : SECONDARY

Homework Whilst homework does not take the place of effective teaching, it contributes to the progress of students by reinforcing, extending, and enriching the curriculum. Homework promotes three important keys for student success: academic learning, character development, and family involvement. Homework refers to any assignment relating to school work that students do at home. Homework is not necessarily written work. It is any task that a child is asked to complete at home. It may consist of reading, learning by heart and reinforcement of class work, research and project work or further practice of skills learnt in class. Assignments will be clearly explained to the student with respect to their length and the time required for their completion. Depending on their age and year group, most students spend a minimum of 15 minutes to one hour each evening on their private study. All students are expected to complete homework assignments on time. Homework Recording Students should maintain a homework assignment notebook that lists: subject, homework, date the homework was assigned and deadline for the homework. Time Requirements The following are suggested time allocations per day for teacher-directed homework assignments by grade level: Years 7 & 8 - 90 minutes per day* Years 9 & 10 - 120 minutes per day* Grade 11 - 130 minutes per day* Grade 12& 13 - 140 minutes per day* *Total across all subjects

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Assessing Homework The teacher will correct problems on practice homework. For preparation homework, teachers may choose not to assess the work formally. For extension and integrative assignments, teachers will provide criteria that form the basis of an overall grade. Occasionally a family circumstance may prevent a child from completing an assignment. In such a case, a parent can send a note to the teacher explaining the circumstances and requesting that the student have an extra day to complete the assignment. Sanctions Homework arrangements, including sanctions for non-completion it, will be consistently applied across the school so that all students see the arrangements as fair. Homework detentions will operate in all Curriculum Areas and should be of an appropriate length as an initial sanction. Persistent failure to complete homework should be recorded following the Behaviour Log processes (refer to Behaviour Policy). Homework for absent students Absent students will receive make-up assignments for all essential practice assignments, including both homework and class assignments. Students absent for 1 or 2 days will receive an extension of 1 to 2 days for work that was due during the absences. This work will be assessed without any deduction in grade. Students who are absent for more than 2 days will have one week to complete the work unless the teacher sets up special arrangements. Teachers will determine the requirements for making up assignments on a case by case situation. If parents know that a student will be absent for more than a week, they should contact the office 1 week in advance. If the student is able to complete some work, teachers will prepare a school work package that parents can pick up during the absence. These assignments are due upon the student’s return to school. If the office does not receive notice 1 week before the absence, no assignments will be collected. Students who have an unexcused absence will not receive any make-up assignments.

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ISB READING POLICY – PRIMARY AND SECONDARY

Rationale Children grow up in an environment full of print. When they begin school, they already have some experience and understanding of the use of print in a limited range of contexts. At ISB, we believe we must ensure that children become independent readers and continue to develop their interest in print, its purpose and meaning. Reading gives children access to knowledge, tradition and information about the wider world and provides them with the tools for later life. It also helps them to understand how others feel and think. Purpose 1. To enable children to develop their reading skills, when they are ready. 2. To teach children how to ‘de-code’ words they are unfamiliar with, by learning a variety of methods:

Phonic – sounds & spelling

Knowledge of Context TEXT

Grammatical knowledge

Word recognition and graphic knowledge

3. To enable children to read a wide variety of texts with understanding. 4. To ensure children read thoughtfully and respond confidently to a range of text, including questioning the content and ideas expressed. To help children understand that literacy is used for a variety of purposes. To teach children about authors and illustrators. To give children the skill to be able to discover information and knowledge that they need. To encourage the support and involvement of parents in helping their children to read. Staff to use Homework Diary/Reading Records as means of communication with parents on children’s reading at home. 9. To enable children to experience the pleasure that literature gives. 10. To enable children to have maximum confidence when reading in a variety of situations.

5. 6. 7. 8.

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At ISB we believe that children learn in different ways and develop at different rates. Children need to be taught reading by using a range of strategies. Some of our ESL children have a limited vocabulary of English words so in this case a strong emphasis is put on the teaching of phonics. We have high expectation of every child and we strive for the children to reach specific targets. Guidelines 1. Children are first taught pre-reading skills, for example  Learning the direction of the print  Understanding that a spoken word is a written word  Learning ‘how books work’  Sequencing pictures and developing speaking and listening skills  Recognising the patterns words make e.g. their names 2. Children are given the opportunities to experience a wide variety of literacy, including rhymes and poems. 3. Children are taught to recognise and say all letter sounds and name – both upper and lower case. 4. Children are shown that understanding of words gives meaning, and that words are built by putting sounds together. 5. Children are taught to recognise blends and grammatical cues. 6. Children are given the opportunity to respond to texts. 7. Children are introduced to authors and illustrators and will be helped to identify books by the same authors and illustrators. Children will develop their own tastes for authors and be given the opportunity to use the library for free choice of books to take home. 8. Children are taught in a class or group reading session each day. This may have a variety of forms and emphasis e.g.  demonstration writing  discussions about texts  word, phonic games  text level work  sentence level work  word level work 9. Children spend time on individual reading every day e.g. quiet reading, or when children are encouraged to prepare texts that they are taking home. 10. Children are taught to read ahead and attempt unfamiliar words. 11. Children carry their own books and these to become part of their reading material.

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ISB TEACHING AND LEARNING POLICY Rationale Good teaching can only take place when learning takes place. It is understood that there can be “good teaching” but that children may not be learning because of the mismatch between teaching methods and the needs of the pupils. Good teaching is based on a measure of progress made in the lesson or series of lessons, a measure of what pupils can do at the end of the lesson that they were unable to at the beginning.

Effective learning and teaching take place when:       

Teachers have a thorough knowledge of their pupil’s previous achievements and results. Teachers are secure in having detailed knowledge of their subject. Planning is appropriate to the learning activity. Planning contains aims and objectives of learning. The development of tasks are matched to pupil’s ability. Assessment can measure the success of the learning experience. Students are grouped flexibly to secure the best learning opportunities.

Teaching Styles

 

Teaching styles should be both effective and varied to allow pupils to experience the styles through which they learn best. The learning style should be appropriate to the aims and objectives of the lesson.

Good Teaching Is:

          

22

Having a secure understanding of the subjects to be taught Setting high expectations and challenging pupils to deepen knowledge and understanding. Planning effectively Appropriately pacing the learning to the pupils’ needs. Using methods which suit the task Grouping students in such a way that learning is maximised. Using time and resources effectively Assessing pupils’ work thoroughly and constructively and using assessment to inform future teaching. Engaging pupils during the lesson. Using homework to reinforce and to extend learning. Recognising and rewarding achievement.


Pupil Response This is measured when pupils       

Behave well and show respect for others, their property and the school Are well-prepared for the lesson, show interest in their work and remain on task throughout. Develop their capacity for personal study and work towards becoming independent learners. Form constructive relationships with others and are able to work collaboratively when required to do so. Show initiative Listen and follow instructions Participate and co-operate.

Good practice is indicated by : Teacher who : • • •

Show good subject knowledge in the way that they present and discuss their subject Are technically competent in the way that they teach phonics and other basic skills. Plan effectively setting clear objectives which are made known to the class at the beginning of the lesson. • Challenge and inspire students expecting the most of them. • Use methods which enable students to learn effectively • Insist on high standards of behaviour • Use time, resources (especially ICT) effectively • Assess students’ work thoroughly and use findings to help students overcome difficulties • Use homework effectively to reinforce learning. Students who : • • • • •

Acquire new knowledge and skills, develop ideas and increase understanding Apply intellectual, physical and creative effort in their work Are productive and work at a good pace Show interest, sustain concentration and think and learn for themselves Understand what they are doing, how well they are doing and how they can improve

Unsatisfactory practice is indicated by : • • • • • • •

23

Teachers whose subject knowledge is not good enough to promote demanding work Basic skills are not taught effectively A significant minority of students are not engaged in the lesson Poor planning and time wasted Poor class control Students do not know what they are doing Students are not making progress


Good teaching of secondary language students is indicated by teachers who : • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Encourage class discussion and participation by all Adapt vocabulary when speaking (simple, accurate English) Speak clearly, with expression, engage students, repeat instructions. Highlight the positive, use praise Control students’ language, use translators where necessary Stimulate learning through planned, differentiated activities Use pairs/ groups to enhance learning Check understanding – students repeat question Limit teacher – talk time Reinforce through repetition and drill Identify key words – make target language clear – use the board Label vocabulary – Nn, Adj Write clearly on the board (non-capitals, well spaced, use of colour) Assess students’ work thoroughly and use findings to help students overcome difficulties

If one of the stated outcomes of the monitoring and evaluation process is the raising of standards then we must always keep in mind that we are looking for evidence of progress. Each lesson has aims – progress can be assessed in terms of these aims.                       24

NQT Status Criteria (for reference) Planning, Teaching and Class Management – for HoD, Subject Co-ord So W identify teaching objectives and specify how they will be taught and assessed Adopt demanding expectations for learning, motivation and presentation of work Ensure coverage of relevant exam syllabuses. Planning, Teaching and Class Management – for ‘Critical Friend’ Set tasks appropriate to whole class, group/individual, including homework Set clear targets for student learning Address the needs of individuals including ESL, SEN, gifted students Establish and maintain purposeful working atmosphere Set high expectations of student behaviour Encourage students to develop independence Clear presentation, questioning, leading class discussion Create stimulating environment through varied classroom display Use of appropriate resources – textbooks, AV, ICT in range of teaching methods Evaluate own teaching critically to improve personal effectiveness Monitoring, Assessment, Recording, Reporting and Accountability Quality of marking of class/homework, constructive feedback and target setting Use of assessment to inform planning and teaching. Maintain good record-keeping to monitor individual achievement Ability to present informative reports to parents Recognise levels of students achievement for each attainment target


        

Prepare range of assessments including exams, continuous assessment, end of KS Other Professional Requirements Relationships with children Relationships with colleagues, understand the value of collaborative work Effectiveness in pastoral responsibilities Ability to meet deadlines Commitment to own professional development Punctuality to classes/ activities/ meetings Understand the need to liaise effectively with parents and other carers.

Knowledge and Understanding

      

Detailed knowledge of NC Programmes of Study Etailed knowledge of NC level descriptions and end of KS descriptions Knowledge of BIST modifications of NC where applicable Understanding of how pupils develop and learn in their subject area/KS Understanding of the scope for use of ICT in their subject area Knowledge of subject specific health and safety requirements. Knowledge of student’s common misconceptions and mistakes in your subject.

Learning Objectives 

What pupils will learn as a result of the lesson/s for example MFL – the implications of having two words for “you” History – that religion was an important issue in sixteenth century England

Lesson activity 

What is done during the lesson MFL – pupils put questions to people of different status - friends, parents, and teachers History – Tell the story of Edmund Campion and discuss why someone who professed loyalty to Elizabeth was executed. Discuss why religion was so important. Make a class list of reasons.

Learning Outcomes 

What pupils will learn to do in the lesson/s ^ MFL – know when to ask “Quel age^as-tu?” or “Quel age avez-vous ?” History – infer from the sources and narratives that religious beliefs were important in the sixteenth century

25


ISB USE OF DICTIONARIES POLICY

Any kind of dictionary supports learning. Dictionaries may be used ‘receptively’, to support reading and listening, or ‘productively’, to support writing and speaking. Studies of dictionary use indicate that many 2nd language learners prefer to use bilingual dictionaries, but do not use dictionaries as effectively as they could, so training in the strategies of dictionary use could have benefits. This should be done in English/ESL lessons.

Dictionaries in exams Students should be made aware that electronic dictionaries are not allowed in any exams – internal as well as external. 2nd language students are allowed to use paper simple translation dictionaries in exams, where the syllabus does not specify that dictionaries cannot be used. This means that the dictionary can only give the word in the second language, not an explanation of the word. All 2nd language students in years 10 and 11 should be encouraged to buy a dictionary of this type and learn how to use it effectively in exams. (We will be advised by the exam board as to the correct type). They need to be aware that equipment cannot be borrowed in exams and if they want to use a dictionary they have to have their own. 2nd language students in years 7,8 and 9 should also be made aware that they can use a paper simple translation dictionary in all internal exams apart from English.

Dictionaries in class Dictionaries should not be used whilst the teacher is talking. Students should be allowed to check meanings in bilingual dictionaries, if necessary, when working on written material or reading during a set task. When students first arrive at The ISB, electronic dictionaries should be discouraged in favour of paper dictionaries – bilingual or monolingual. After 2 years of studying English at ISB, all students should be encouraged to use a monolingual English dictionary, unless the circumstances are particularly difficult and need translating.

26


SUBJECT POLICIES ISB ART & DESIGN POLICY - PRIMARY The Art Policy of The International School of Bucharest follows whole school guidance on the curriculum and how it is managed, organized, delivered, assessed and evaluated. It also reflects agreed approaches to the whole school issues, i.e. teaching and learning strategies, differentiation, behaviour and discipline, special educational needs and equal opportunities. 'Art' should be interpreted as 'art, craft and design' and artists should be interpreted as artists, crafts people and designers throughout all documentation. Subject Aims The aims of Art and Design Have their entitlement to a broad, balanced, and enriching curriculum.         

Enjoy an active involvement in art, craft and design. Have the confidence and skills, to communicate their ideas through their artwork. Have the opportunities to experience a broad and balanced range of art activities and show progression within these experiences. Have the confidence as well as the skills and experience necessary to communicate their own ideas through their own artwork. To stimulate children's creativity and imagination by providing visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a unique way of understanding and responding to the world; To develop children's understanding of colour, form, texture, pattern and their ability to use materials and processes to communicate ideas, feelings and meanings; To explore with children ideas and meanings in the work of artists, craftspeople and designers, and help them learn about their different roles and about the functions of art, craft and design in their own lives and in different times and cultures; To help children to learn how to make thoughtful judgments and aesthetic and practical decisions and become actively involved in shaping environments. All pupils will be given equal access to the experience of art regardless of gender, race or ability.

The Aims for Key Stage 1 For pupils to have the experience of enabling them:  

27

To explore the visual, tactile and sensory qualities of materials and processes and begin to understand and use colour, shape and space, and pattern and texture to represent their own ideas and feelings; To focus on the work of artists, crafts people and designers by asking and answering questions like: 'What is it like?' 'What is it made from?' 'How is it made?' 'What do I think and feel about it?'


      

To explore colour, texture, shape, form and space in natural and made objects, including resources from different cultures, and in their environment; To be stimulated to think about and respond to what they see, touch and feel, in different ways; To use their imagination and express their ideas, thoughts and feelings through the use of a wide range of materials and suitable tools for designing and making; To be imaginative and creative and making connections between one area of learning and another. exploring ideas about the starting points for their work; asking and answering questions about source materials and how these help them to develop their ideas, including recording ideas and annotating work in their sketchbooks; To find out about art, craft and design by extracting information from sources such as reference books, CD-ROMs, e-mails and the internet; To discuss and compare their own and others' work and explaining their own views.

The Aims for Key Stage 2 For pupils to have the experience of enabling them:  

    

To improve their control of materials, tools and techniques and become more confident in using visual and tactile elements, materials and processes to communicate what they see, feel and think; To increase their critical awareness of the roles and purposes of art in different times and cultures by commenting on works and asking questions like: 'What is this work about?' 'Why was it made - for what purpose?' 'What visual and tactile elements are used?' 'How are they combined and organized?' 'What materials and processes were used to make it?' 'How are these matched to the purpose of the work?' 'When and where was it made?' 'What do I think and feel about it?' To consider their own attitudes and values in relation to images and artefacts and learn to challenge assumptions, stereotypes and prejudice in visual and other forms; To develop respect for their own and others' work and learn how to offer and receive constructive feedback and praise; To work with others, listening to and respecting each other's ideas and learning to value different strengths and interests within the group; To develop a respect for the materials and resources that they use in their work and learn to evaluate critically their own and others' use of these; To value the natural and made environment, including the distinctiveness of their locality, and learn to evaluate critically the role and function of art and design within it.

Key stage 1 During key stage 1, art and design is about developing children's creativity and imagination through providing art, craft and design activities that relate to children's own identity and experiences, the natural and made objects and materials with which they are familiar and the locality in which they live. Key stage 2 During key stage 2, art and design is about developing children's creativity and imagination by building on their knowledge, skills and understanding of materials and processes through providing more complex activities. 28


Children's experiences help them to develop their understanding of the diverse roles and functions of art and design in the locality and in the wider world. Curriculum The curriculum covers four areas: Painting Textiles Sculpture Digital media Assessment, Recording and Reporting Assessment is carried out at the end of each QCA Unit of Work. The teacher will gather the evidence for making these judgments through discussion and observation of the pupil during the lesson and by the child`s recording of activities. All levels are based upon teacher assessment. Medium and short term planning sheets will provide evidence of coverage of programs of study (See School Policy for Assessment and Reporting). A new assessment method is in progress this year and it will provide the pupils with a clearer assessment system. Resources and Accommodation The current specialist materials are stored centrally in the Art and Design storeroom. Staff use local exhibitions , national collections and the internet. Resources and materials will be targeted at the requirements of the schemes of work and the development needs of the children concerned. Evaluation The art and design evaluation plan is reviewed with the SMT and recommendations for development are recorded as part of the on-going school self evaluation program. ART staff supervise and evaluate the curriculum provision made for Art and Design in order that pupils make the best possible progress. Also with all evaluation the Heads of School has overall responsibility for this work. Evaluation Focuses on:    

29

Assessing pupils achievements Reviewing the Programs of Study coverage Analyzing teacher and year group planning Staff discussion


Ye ar

Term1

Term2

Term 3

1stHalf

2ndHalf

1stHalf

2ndHalf

1stHalf

2ndHalf

Y1

Painting

Sculpture

Textiles

Structure(DT)

Mechanism(DT)

Structure

Y2

Textiles

Textiles

Mechanism(DT)

Mechanism/Structure (DT)

Sculpture

Y3

Painting

Structure

Textiles

Structure(DT)

Mechanism/Control (DT)

Sculpture

Y4

Digital Media

Structure

Sculpture

Control/Electrical

Mechanism/Control (DT)

Mixed Media

Y5

Painting

Structure

Textiles

Structure

Sculpture

Mechanism/Cont rol

Y6

Textiles/Struct ure(DT)

Painting

Digital Media

Mixed Media

Mechanism/Control ( DT)

30


ISB ART AND DESIGN POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject

In key stage 3 pupils develop creativity and imagination and build on practical and critical skills. They work in many areas of art, craft and design, including both fine art and applied practices (such as textiles, jewellery and work-related areas). The main purpose of this course is developing creativity. 2:

Main Text Books Used

Student Handbook - Art and Design, by Richard Hickman GCSE - Jeff Orgee Art Matters - Jeff Orgee 3:

Aims

1. Exploring and developing ideas - assess visual and other information, including images and artefacts from different historical, social and cultural contexts; use this information to develop their ideas, taking account of purpose and audience 2. Investigating and making art, craft and design - manipulate materials and processes and analyze outcomes; interpret visual and tactile qualities to communicate ideas and meanings and realize their intentions 3. Evaluating and developing work - analyze and comment on how ideas and meanings are conveyed in their own and others' work; explain how their understanding of the context affects their views and practice 4. Knowledge and understanding - visual and tactile qualities and how these can be manipulated and matched to ideas, purpose and audiences; codes and conventions in art, craft and design and how these are used to represent ideas, beliefs and values. Key Stage 4 and 5 Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE

Grade 12

AS

Grade 13

A2

Year 10 and 11 - IGCSE.

31


The IGCSE Art and Design syllabus aims to encourage a personal response by stimulating imagination, sensitivity, conceptual thinking, powers of observation and analytical ability. Students gain confidence and enthusiasm as they develop technical skills in two and three dimensional form and composition, and are able to identify and solve problems in visual and tactile forms. Students also learn how to develop ideas from initial attempts to final solutions. An ideal foundation for further study, IGCSE Art and Design also develops a greater awareness of the role played by the visual arts in society and in history, broadening cultural horizons and individual experience. 4:

Main Curriculum Content Key Stage 3 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9

Topics: The study of art, craft and design should include: - work in, and across, the areas of fine art, craft and design, including both applied and fine art practices - exploration of media, processes and techniques in 2D, 3D and new technologies • study of a range of artefacts from contemporary, historical, personal and cultural contexts •understanding of art, craft and design processes, associated equipment and safe working practices Key Stage 4 and 5 Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE

Grade 12

AS

Grade 13

A2

Topics The study of art, craft (this includes craft as a contemporary and traditional form across cultures) and design should include: a.

32

work in, and across, the areas of fine art, craft and design, including both applied (this refers to areas of art, craft and design such as textiles and jewellery, as well as to those that are work-related. Examples of work-related practice include working collaboratively on projects and taking on roles


within the design and production stages. This could involve working to externally set briefs and within time constraints, and using new technologies that reflect those used in professional environments.) and fine art practices b.

exploration of media, processes and techniques in 2D (this includes painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, ICT and surface pattern), 3D (this includes constructed textiles, sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, puppetry and installations) and new technologies( this could include work with animation, film, video, or web-based products, and may present alternatives to traditional practices) study of a range of artefacts: pupils should consider images alongside a broad range of artefacts from the world of art, craft and design, investigating their function in relation to the setting and users’ needs) from contemporary, historical, personal and cultural contexts

c.

understanding of art, craft and design processes, associated equipment and safe working practices.

5:

Assessment - KS 3 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grading weights updated 2010-2011 KS3    

20% for class work and participation (works or projects done during the lesson) 50% for test (practical and theoretical) – at the end of each unit 15% for effort (this mark is designed to reward the effort) 15% for assignments (special projects)

Testing 50% for test (practical and theoretical) – at the end of each unit There are no final exams at the end of the year for KS3 (students are tested regularly) Assessment- KS 4 and KS 5 For KS 4 the assessment is both internal and external. For year 11 the assessment is both internal and external as follows: - the internal assessment is following the marking scheme established - the external assessment - exam students (candidates) are assessed by University of Cambridge

33


International Examinations The International School of Bucharest is using a virtual catalogue for the internal assessment. In awarding a mark, the development of the project as a whole is taken into consideration. The marks are added according to the marking scheme which was established by the department. Grading weights updated 2010-2011 KS4- KS5    

10% for class work and participation (works or projects done during the lesson) 70% for test (practical and theoretical) – at the end of each unit 10% for effort (this mark is designed to reward the effort) 10% for assignments (special project)

Testing 70% for test (practical and theoretical) – at the end of each unit There are no final exams at the end of the year for KS4 and KS5 (students are tested regularly) Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE

Grade 12

AS

Grade 13

A2

Shortly give a description on how assessment will take place and how the final grade will be calculated. Key Stage 3

Key Stage 4&5

34

Class work

20%

Tests

50%

Assignments

15%

Effort

15%

Class work

10%

Tests

70%

Assignments

10%

Effort

10%


ISB BIOLOGY POLICY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Biology should develop the skills and abilities that are relevant to the study and practice of Biology and are useful in everyday life. It should provide the necessary ground for the basic understanding of the life processes and concepts in the world around us. Students will be expected to demonstrate: knowledge with understanding, application of scientific knowledge to explain everyday occurrences, knowledge of practical procedures, ability to present and process data, ability to perform simple calculations, correct use of scientific vocabulary and terminology.

2:

Main Text Books Used • • • • • • • •

3:

Complete Biology for IGCSE textbook- Ron Pickering Biology for you textbook- Gareth Williams Biology for you pack- Gareth Williams IGCSE Study Guide for Biology- Dave Haiway AS Level Biology, Mary Jones, Richard Fosbery, Dennis Taylor, Jennifer Gregory AS Level Biology, Phil Bradfield, John Dodds, Judy Dodds AS Biology Resource pack, Chris Lea, Pauline Lowrie, Siobhan Mcguigan A2 Biology for AQA, Mickael Kent

Aims Key Stage 4  

Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2

Become familiar with biology as a science, be able to explain the basic characteristics of living things, explain the differences between animal and plant cells, understand tissues, organs and systems, understand the basic mechanisms of cellular transport: osmosis, diffusion, plasmolysis, active transport, understand the role of enzymes and how they work, become familiar with all the categories of nutrients, understand the main parts of the digestive system and be able to explain each ones role, understand breathing and respiration, become familiar with the structure of respiratory system, lungs and alveoli, understanding the negative effects of smoking on the respiratory system, understand the three types of blood vessels and their characteristics, understand the structure of the heart and its function, understand the two main types of blood cells, understanding homeostasis, understanding how the skin controls the temperature, understanding the structure of kidneys and their function, understanding the structure of neurons, become familiar with reflex arcs, understanding the brain and its functions, understanding the sensory organs and their functions, understanding the differences between endoskeletons and exoskeletons, understanding the bone structure and becoming familiar with the main types of bones, understanding the muscle structure and their functions. 35


Key Stage 5  

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

Students should be able to interpret drawings and photographs of plant and animal cells, understand the meaning of resolution and classification, understand the functions of organelles in a cell, explain the differences between plant and animal cells, describe the basic structure of biological molecules, describe the roles of biological molecules with reference to examples, describe the crucial role of water in maintaining life on Earth, explain what is the function of enzymes and how they act in the body, describe examples of enzymes-catalysed reactions, discuss the way in which temperature, pH and concentration affects the enzyme activity, describe the fluid mosaic model of membrane structure, outline the roles of the major elements forming the cell membrane, describe and understand the basic mechanisms of cell transport across membranes, describe the effects on animal and plant cells of immersion in solutions of different water potential, describe the structures of DNA and RNA, explain how DNA replicates semi-conservatively during interphase, know that a gene is a part of a DNA molecule, describe how translation and transcription happens, distinguish between diploid and haploid cells, name and explain the main stages of mitosis, explain how cancers are a result of uncontrolled cell division, define terms specific to ecology, describe how energy is transferred through food chains and food webs, describe how nitrogen is recycled within an ecosystem, describe the structure of the main blood vessels, describe the function of tissue fluid, describe the function of lymph, describe the composition of blood, describe the effect of oxygen and carbon dioxide on haemoglobin, describe the external and internal structure of the human heart, understand the cardiac cycle, explain the role of sino-atrial node in initiating the heart beat and the action coordination, describe the way in which water is absorbed in a root, stems and leaves, define transpiration and explain the effects of environment on the process, explain how translocation of organic materials occurs, relate the structures to their functions, describe the distribution of alveoli and blood vessels in a lung tissue, describe the function of cilia and goblet cells, understand tidal volume and vital capacity, explain how to measure a person’s pulse rate, describe the symptoms of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, describe the effects of tar and carcinogens in tobacco smoke, describe the effects of nicotine and carbon monoxide in tobacco smoke, understand the coronary heart disease, explain what is meant by infectious disease, describe the causes of cholera, malaria, AIDS and TB, explain how this diseases are transmitted, outline the role of antibiotics in the treatment of infectious disease, describe the structure, origin and maturation of phagocytes and lymphocytes, explain how they function, explain the role of memory cells in long term immunity, explain how vaccination can control disease.

36


4:

Main Curriculum Content

Key Stage 4 and 5 Grade 10 - IGCSE 1 • Characteristics and classification of living organisms • Cells and cell transport • Enzymes • Nutrition and the digestive system • The circulatory system • Respiration and the breathing system • Homeostasis • The nervous system • Receptors – the eye • Bones and muscles • Plant reproduction • Human reproduction • Grade 11 – IGCSE 2 • • • • • • • •

Photosynthesis Variation and inheritance Generic engineering Variation and natural selection Ecology and ecosystems Nutrient cycles Pollution Conservation

Grade 12 - AS • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

37

Cell structure Biological molecules Enzymes Cell membranes and transport Genetic control of protein structure and function Nuclear division Energy and ecosystems The mammalian transport system The mammalian heart Transport in multi-cellular plants Gaseous exchange Smoking and disease Infectious diseases Immunity


Grade 13 - A2 • • • • • • • • • •

5:

Energy and respiration Photosynthesis Meiosis, genetics and gene control Selection and evolution Control and homeostasis Biodiversity and conservation Gene technology Biotechnology Crop plants Aspects of human reproduction

Assessment The internal score is recorded by number grades on a scale of 10 to 100. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as: quizzes, tests, homework, class work, class participation, project work, presentations, research, and laboratory investigations. The final score for both key stage 4 and 5 is calculated using the following algorithm:

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments Effort

38

:

: 10% : 10%


ISB BUSINESS STUDIES - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Business Studies students gain lifelong skills which are equally valid in the world of academia and further study as they are in the world of work. This is a living subject that evolves constantly and quickly to reflect the changing world that we live in today – always remembering the lessons from the past whilst facing the challenges and uncertainties of the future.

2:

Main Text Books Used Business Studies for IGCSE: Ian Chambers, Linda Hall, Susan Squires AS Level and A Level Peter Stimpson

3:

Aims IGCSE The aims, which are not listed in order of priority, are to enable candidates to: 1 make effective use of relevant terminology, concepts and methods and recognise the strengths and limitations of the ideas used; 2 apply their knowledge and critical understanding to current issues and problems in a wide range of appropriate contexts; 3 distinguish between facts and opinions, and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data in order to help build arguments and make informed judgements; 4 appreciate the perspectives of a range of stakeholders in relation to the environment, individuals, society, government and enterprise; 5 develop knowledge and understanding of the major groups and organisations within and outside business and consider ways in which they are able to influence objectives, decisions and activities; 6 develop knowledge and understanding of how the main types of businesses and commercial institutions are organised, financed and operated and how their relations with other organisations, consumers, employees, owners and society are regulated; 7 develop skills of numeracy, literacy, enquiry, selection and employment of relevant sources of information, presentation and interpretation; 8 develop an awareness of the nature and significance of innovation and change within the context of business activities. o o

39

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2


The syllabus is intended to encourage candidates to: 1. Understand and appreciate the nature and scope of business, and the role of business in society. 2. Develop critical understanding of organisations, the markets they serve and the process of adding value. This should involve consideration of the internal workings and management of organisations and, in particular, the process of decision-making in a dynamic external environment. 3. Be aware that business behaviour can be studied from the perspective of a range of stakeholders including customer, manager, creditor, owner/shareholder and employee. 4. Be aware of the economic, environmental, ethical, governmental, legal, social and technological issues associated with business activity. 5. Develop skills in: • decision-making and problem solving in the light of evaluation; • the quantification and management of information, where appropriate; • effective communication.

4:

Main Curriculum Content o

IGCSE

Unit 1: Business Activity Unit 2: Marketing Unit 3: Human Resources Unit 4: Production Unit 5: Financere, organisation and c o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

Unit 1: Business and its environment Unit 2: People in organisations Unit 3: Marketing Unit 4: Operations and project management 40


Unit 5: Finance and accounting Unit 6: Strategic management 5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

o o

41

Grade 12 Grade 13

IGCSE

AS A2


Key Stage 4&5 Class work

42

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB CHEMISTRY POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Chemistry provides a worthwhile educational experience for all students, through well-designed studies of experimental and practical science, whether or not they go on to study science beyond this level. It enables students to acquire sufficient understanding and knowledge to •

become confident citizens in a technological world, able to take an informed interest in scientific matters

recognize both the usefulness and the limitations of scientific method, and appreciate its applicability in other disciplines and in everyday life

be suitably prepared for studies beyond IGCSE in pure sciences, in applied sciences or in science dependent vocational courses.

Chemistry develops abilities and skills that are relevant to the study and practice of Chemistry, are useful in everyday life, encourage efficient and safe practice, encourage effective communication. It develops attitudes relevant to Chemistry such as concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative, inventiveness. It stimulates interest in the environment and caring for it. It promotes awareness that

2:

scientific theories and methods have developed, and continue to do so, as a result of cooperative activities of groups and individuals

the study and practice of science are subject to social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural influences and limitations

the applications of science may be both beneficial and detrimental to the individual, the community and the environment

science transcends national boundaries and that the language of science, correctly and rigorously applied, is universal.

Main Text Books Used IGCSE: “Complete Chemistry for IGCSE” – RoseMarie Gallagher, Paul Ingram – Oxford University Press “IGCSE Chemistry” – B. Earl, L.D.R. Wilford – Hodder Murray

43


“New Chemistry for you” – Lawrie Ryan – Nelson Thornes “Cambridge IGCSE Chemistry” – Sam Goodman, Chris Sunley – Collins Education “Chemistry” – Richard Harwood – Cambridge University Press “IGCSE Chemistry” – Jim Clark - Pearson Longman “Chemistry – Laboratory Experiments” – Ayhan Nazli – Zambak Publications

AS/A2 level: “AS level and A level Chemistry” – Brian Ratcliff, Helen Eccles – Cambridge University Press “Advanced Chemistry for you” – Lawrie Ryan – Nelson Thornes “Chemistry – Laboratory experiments” – Ayhan, Nazli – Zambak Publications “Edexcel AS Chemistry” – Pearson Education “A2 Chemistry for AQA” – Nigel Saunders, Angela Saunders – Oxford University Press “Chemical Ideas” – G. Burton, J. Holman, J. Lazonby – Heinemann “Practice in Chemistry” – Benfield, Hillman, McCarty – Hodder & Stoughton

3:

Aims 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o o o o

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Grade 13

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2 AS A2

IGCSE: Students will be expected to demonstrate: A. Knowledge with understanding: students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in relation to 1. scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts and theories 2. scientific vocabulary, terminology and conventions (including symbols, quantities and units) 3. scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety 4. scientific quantities and their determination 44


5. scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications. B. Handling information and problem solving: students should be able, in words or using other written forms of presentation (i.e. symbolic, graphical and numerical), to 1. locate, select, organize and present information from a variety of sources 2. translate information from one form to another 3. manipulate numerical and other data 4. use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences 5. present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships 6. make predictions and hypotheses 7. solve problems, including some of a quantitative nature. C Experimental skills and investigations: sstudents should be able to 1. know how to use techniques, apparatus and materials (including following a sequence of instructions where appropriate) 2. make and record observations, measurements and estimates 3. interpret and evaluate experimental observations and data 4. plan investigations, evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements (including the selection of techniques, apparatus and materials). AS/A2 level: Students will be expected to demonstrate: Knowledge with understanding Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge with understanding in relation to: • scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts, theories • scientific vocabulary, terminology, conventions (including symbols, quantities and units) • scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety • scientific quantities and their determination • scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications • present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships. 45


B Handling, applying and evaluating information Candidates should be able – in words or by using symbolic, graphical and numerical forms of presentation – to: • locate, select, organize and present information from a variety of sources • handle information, distinguishing the relevant from the extraneous • manipulate numerical and other data and translate information from one form to another • analyze and evaluate information so as to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences • construct arguments to support hypotheses or to justify a course of action • apply knowledge, including principles, to new situations • evaluate information and hypotheses. C Experimental skills and investigations Students should be able to: • plan investigations • use techniques, apparatus and materials • make and record observations, measurements and estimates • interpret and evaluate observations and experimental results • select techniques, apparatus and materials • evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements

4:

Main Curriculum Content  

46

Key Stage 4 and 5 o o

Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2

o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2


IGCSE: States of matter, the atom, chemical bonding, the Periodic table, stoichiometry, chemical equations, redox reactions, acids and bases, electricity and chemical changes, rates of reaction, energy changes, reversible reactions, the behaviour of metals, making use of metals, air and water, nonmetals, organic chemistry, polymers.

These topics will be approached through practical work and related to everyday experience. These topics are taught over a period of two years and in each year over both semesters as follows: a number of four lessons (of 45 minutes each) per week and 35 weeks in total. AS level: Atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, structures, states of matter, chemical energetics, electrochemistry, equilibriums, reaction kinetics, chemical periodicity, group II, group VII, nitrogen and sulphur, organic chemistry: alkanes, alkenes, fuels, halogenoalkanes, alcohols, carbon compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives, polymers. A2 level: Chemical energetics, electrochemistry, equilibriums, reaction kinetics, group II, group IV, transition elements, organic chemistry: arenes, phenols, carboxylic acids and derivatives, nitrogen compounds, polymers, applications of chemistry. These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: a number of six lessons (of 45 minutes each) per week and 29 weeks in total.

5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o o

Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2

o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

This course offers on-going assessment in line with the IGCSE/A level Curriculum. The scores are recorded as percentage on a scale of 1 to 100. These marks are registered in the paper/virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written and oral assessments for individual and group work divided into four categories: tests (includes quizzes, tests, exams), assignments (includes homework, projects, lab reports, research), class work and effort. The student in year 11, 12, 13 also take Cambridge exams at the end of the year.

47


Key Stage 4&5 Class work

: 10%

Tests Assignments Effort

: 70% : 10% : 10%

At the end of Year 11, the end of Year 12 and the end of Year 13, besides the internal assessment students may choose to be assessed externally by University of Cambridge International Examinations (UCIE).

48


ISB DRAMA POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject

Drama is an integrated subject. Students study plays, they devise original drama and, most importantly, they take part in performing pieces of drama. In some instances this work takes place individually, at other times it takes place as part of a group. Whether they take place singly or in groups, the three activities of studying plays, devising drama and performing are inter-related and if the study of drama is to be meaningful to the student, each of these three aspects needs to be balanced against the other. It is the Drama Departments goal to include as many students as possible to extracurricular activities and competitions in order to raise the awareness of the importance of drama across the whole school. 2:

Aims:      

3:

To develop candidates’ understanding of Drama through practical and theoretical study. To enable candidates to realise the performance possibilities of text and other stimuli. To encourage the use of dramatic forms and structures to communicate feelings and ideas to an audience. To foster the acquisition and development of skills in Drama, both individually and in groups. To develop understanding of the processes leading to performance and the elements involved in creating a performance and to develop evaluative ability across the various stages of performance work. To stimulate an enjoyment of drama.

Objectives UNDERSTANDING Candidates should be able to demonstrate understanding of the performance possibilities of text and other stimuli and the differing roles of actor, director, stage manager and technician in their realisation. DEVISING Candidates should be able to demonstrate the ability to devise dramatic material and reflect on its effectiveness. PERFORMING SKILLS Candidates should be able to demonstrate performing skills in Drama.

49


4:

Assessment Key Stage 3 Students are assessed according to three strands: Narrative Structure, Audience Awareness, and Character Development. Ares covered within these strands are intention, conflict, plot, effect, arc, impact, staging, tension, and physical. Students are given both a mix of quizzes, exams and practical work to display understanding of the above mentioned topics. IGCSE Assessment There are two forms of assessment: 1 Written examination paper. There will be three sections. The paper will require responses to a prerelease text and three stimuli, and provide opportunity for reflection on, and evaluation of, the practical work. And 2 Coursework. This consists of three pieces of practical work, based on the guidance provided by CIE and continuously assessed during the course. This will provide flexibility to suit different approaches to Drama.

AS Level Edexcel Drama Assessment Unit One Content summary: This unit introduces students to the content of plays written for the theatre. They will learn how to analyse plays in a variety of ways so that they become familiar with the way written plays can be interpreted for realisation in performance. Assessment: This internally assessed unit requires students to explore two contrasting play texts, chosen by the centre, in a practical and active way. At least one of the plays must be explored in the light of a recognised theatre practitioner. A video/DVD of one session of the practical work must be made available for use in moderation. A set of Exploration Notes must be submitted. 50


Students are also required to experience a live theatre performance and submit an evaluation. Unit Two Content summary: This unit offers students the chance to demonstrate skills in a performance environment. The knowledge and understanding gained during the study of two plays in Unit 1 can now be applied with a view to delivering a performance to an audience. Assessment: This is an externally assessed unit. The first section requires students to offer either a monologue or duologue. The second section requires students to contribute to a performance of a professionally published play by a known writer. Students may offer either acting or a design form and

51


ISB ECONOMICS POLICY - SECONDARY

1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Economics Economics focuses on issues pertaining to the allocation of resources, processes shaping the economy at macro and micro levels as well as the macro- level. Gives students a clear understanding of not only events which affects markets and national economies but gives insight into social and political issues as well. Economics provides students with a wide variety of analytical and critical skills which can be valuable in any academic or professional field.

2:

Main Text Books Used IGCSE Moynihan, D. et al.

Economics

2000

Oxford

0199134137

AS/A level Anderton, AG Bamford, Colin

Economics AS Level Economics International

2004 2002

Causeway Cambridge

1902796128 052100781X

AS and A 3:

Aims

Grade 10/Grade11

IGCSE

The course aims to develop candidates’ knowledge and understanding of economic terminology and principles, introduce economic theory. Another key aspect is to enhance candidate’s skills in economical analysis and their ability to handle simple data including graphs and diagrams. At GCSE level a particular emphasis will be placed on showing candidates how to identify and discriminate between differing sources of information and how to distinguish between facts and value judgments in economic issues. Grade 12

AS

Grade 13

A2

The course focuses on enabling students to understand and appreciate the nature of economic activity, and its role in society. Specifically, the course enables students to develop a basis of factual knowledge of economics. The students gain a facility for self-expression, not only in writing but also in using additional aids such as statistics and diagrams where appropriate. Students develop the habit of using works of reference as sources of data specific to economics; the habit of reading critically to gain information about the changing economy in 52


which we live; and an appreciation of the methods of study used by the economist and of the most effective ways in which economic data may be analyzed, correlated, discussed and presented. 4:

Main Curriculum Content 

      

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE

Unit 1: Basic economic problem: choice and the allocation of resources Unit 2: The allocation of resources: how the market works; market failure works; market failure Unit 3: Production Unit 4: The private firm as producer and employer Unit 5: Role of government in an economy Unit 6: Economic Indicators Unit 7: Developed and Developing Economies o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

A Level Key candidate will study and be assessed on the following sections: Unit 2: Basic Economic Ideas  Unit 1: Basic Economic Ideas  Unit 2:The Price System (including the Theory of the Firm for A2 level)  Unit 3: The Price System (including the Theory of the Firm for A2 level)  Unit4: Government Intervention in the Price System  Unit 5: International Trade (not covered in the A2 level)  Unit 6:Measurement in the Macro economy (includes as well theory in the A2 level)  Unit 7: Macroeconomic Problem  Unit 8: Macroeconomic Policies  Typically the AS level topics are covered in Year 12 and the A2 level topics in Year 13. 5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE

Internal Assessment The internal score is recorded as a percentage. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as, including tests, assignments, class work and effort. 53


Tests: include mid-unit tests and end-of-unit tests. They also include mid-term exams and final exams. Assignments: include case studies, projects, research activity, essays and homework. Assignments can be due by the next class (in which case they will be brief and need to be allocated a maximum of 20 minutes), or can be allocated a longer period for research or project work. Class work: includes all in-class marked activities such as, problem-solving, case-studies and Q&A. Effort: At the end of each semester students will receive a mark for their effort in class activity and promptness in completion of assignments and class work. This mark will also reflect students’ classroom behaviour and the level of interest shown towards the subject. Grading weights Internal assessment comprises: Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Class work

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Testing Students will have two tests per unit, half-way through the unit and at the completion of the unit respectively. There will be a total of 12 such tests throughout the year. A mid-term exam (mocks) will be given at the end of the first semester. A final exam (mocks) will be given at the end of the school year External Assessment Students are assessed by University of Cambridge International Examinations (UCIE) as follows Paper

Type

Duration

Number of Questions

Maximum mark

1

Multiple Choice

45 min

30

20%

2

Structured questions

2 hours

4

50%

3

Analysis and critical evaluation

1 hour 30 min

3

30%

o o 54

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2


Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. Students are assessed both internally and externally. Internal Assessment The internal score is recorded as a percentage. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as, including tests, assignments, class work and effort. Tests: include mid-unit tests and end-of-unit tests. They also include mid-term exams and final exams. Assignments: include case studies, projects, research activity, essays and homework. Assignments can be due by the next class (in which case they will be brief and need to be allocated a maximum of 20 minutes), or can be allocated a longer period for research or project work. Class work: includes all in-class marked activities such as, problem-solving, case-studies and Q&A. Effort: At the end of each semester students will receive a mark for their effort in class activity and promptness in completion of assignments and class work. This mark will also reflect students’ classroom behaviour and the level of interest shown towards the subject. Grading weights Internal assessment comprises: Internal assessment comprises: Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Class work

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Testing Students will have two tests per unit, half-way through the unit and at the completion of the unit respectively. There will be a total of 12 such tests throughout the year. A mid-term exam (mocks) will be given at the end of the first semester. A final exam (mocks) will be given at the end of the school year.

55


External Assessment Students are assessed by University of Cambridge International Examinations (UCIE) as follows: Paper Type 1

Multiple Choice

Duration Number of Questions 1h 30

Maximum AS Mark Level 20 40%

20%

1h

1

20

15%

30

30

1 from choice of 3

20

2

(a) Data Response (Core)

3

30 mins Multiple Choice 1h (b) Structured Essay (Core) (Supplement)

(a)

4

Data Response (Supplement)

2h

30%

A Level

15% 30%

15%

20

10%

50

25%

1

15 mins (b)

Essay (Supplement)

2 from choice of 6

Total

100%

The AS in Economics is awarded on the successful completion of Papers 1 and 2. The A Level in Economics is awarded on the successful completion of Papers 1, 2, 3 and 4.

56

100%


ISB ENGLISH LITERATURE POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject English Literature is an optional subject in KS4 and KS5. KS4 Policy for Cambridge IGCSE English Literature This is a 2 year course leading to a public examination. Students study texts from three different literary genres. Final assessment takes the form of a public examination consisting of 2, closed book, papers. This course complements the IGCSE English language course.

2:

Main text books used These will vary from year to year as the examination board changes the choices available. Also, individual teachers may choose from the prescribed list. Texts must be chosen from the 3 genres of prose, poetry and drama.

3:

Aims To encourage and develop candidates’ ability to:      

4:

Main Curriculum Content       

57

enjoy the experience of reading literature; understand and respond to literary texts in different forms and from different periods and cultures; communicate an informed personal response appropriately and effectively; appreciate different ways in which writers achieve their effects; experience literature’s contribution to aesthetic, imaginative and intellectual growth; explore the contribution of literature to an understanding of areas of human concern

analysis of prose analysis of poetry analysis of drama the language of critical appreciation writing essays about literary texts answering context questions revising for literature examinations


5:

Assessment    

class work tests assignments effort

20% 70% 10% 10%

Assessment will consist of essays, responses to context questions, short answer questions, and empathetic assignments, e.g. diary entries, letters. KS5: Policy for Cambridge AS level English Literature 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject This is a one year course leading to a public examination. Students may, if successful in the AS level, progress to the A level course the following year. Final assessment for both the AS and A level takes the form of a public examination consisting of 2, closed book, papers. This course is a natural choice for students who achieve C or above in the Cambridge IGCSE English Literature. The AS English Literature will develop students’ English language skills to an advanced level.

2:

Main text books used These will vary from year to year as the examination board changes the choices available. Also, individual teachers may choose from the prescribed list. Texts must be chosen from the 3 genres of prose, poetry and drama.

3:

Aims To develop the candidate’s :    

58

appreciation of and informed response to literature in English in a range of texts in different forms and from different periods and cultures interdependent skills of reading, analysis and communication effective and appropriate communication wider reading and an understanding of how it may contribute to personal development


4:

Main Curriculum Content       

5:

analysis of prose analysis of poetry analysis of drama the language of critical appreciation writing essays about literary texts answering context questions revising for literature exams

Assessment    

Class work Tests Assignments Effort

20% 70% 10% 10%

Assessment will consist of essays, responses to context questions, short answer questions, oral presentations, and empathetic assignments, e.g., diary entries, letters.

59


ISB WHOLE SCHOOL ENGLISH POLICY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject English is the language used throughout the school to develop the children’s ability to read, write, study and communicate. For the majority of the children it is not their first language. In teaching, the school follows the National Curriculum for England and Wales and all classes are taught in English. Children are also encouraged to use English in their social development and recreation times. All staff is required to communicate in English both in the classrooms and recreational areas of the school, giving the children maximum potential to develop their language skills. Even if a child speaks in their native language the member of staff should try to respond in English (as long as the child is not in distress for some reason).

2:

General Aims: 

to encourage all pupils to develop their understanding of the English language through reading, writing, speaking and listening

to give all pupils access to clear written language and spoken words

to encourage reading and writing in the English language for pleasure and study purposes

to develop pupils’ ability to communicate effectively in the English language in all aspects of school life

3:

to prepare for external exams, University and future study, as well as the future work place

Curriculum: All Primary classes are taught following the New Primary Framework for Literacy. All Secondary classes are taught following the Secondary Framework All aspects of English will be covered though a series of teaching units. Each unit will incorporate:

60

Reading

Writing

Speaking

Listening

Phonics / Spelling

Handwriting


4:

Drama

Literature and Non Fiction

Use of ICT and multi media

Early Years Our Early Years classes follow the Foundation Stages programme of Study, which develop pupil’s learning and competence in communicating, speaking and listening, being read to and beginning to read and write. These activities are supported and extended, through a range of opportunities and they are encouraged to use their skills in a range of situations and a for a range of purposes,. They are supported in developing their own confidence and disposition to do so. Phonics: In the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 children are taught the skills of segmenting and blending the sounds which make words, using the Jolly Phonics Programme and an adaptation of the Letters and Sounds programme. ‘Letters and Sounds’ covers 6 phases from the nursery classes to the end of Year 2 as follows: 

Phase 1 – activities are included to develop oral blending and segmenting of the sounds of spoken words (these activities run alongside all other phases)

Each phase then builds: 1. knowledge of grapheme-phoneme* correspondences (GPCs) 2. skills of blending and segmenting 3. high frequency words containing GPCs not yet taught 

Phase 2 – 19 letter sounds of the alphabet, blend sounds into words (reading) and segment whole words into sounds (spelling)

Phase 3 – blend and segment sounds of single letters and graphemes of more than one letter including longer words, 7 more alphabet letters, blend to read sentences

Phase 4 – blend and segment words with adjacent consonants

Phase 5 (Year 1) – more graphemes for the 40+ phonemes already taught, blend and segment sounds represented by all GPCs taught so far, alternative pronunciations for graphemes that sound wrong on the first attempt

Phase 6 (Year 2) – word-specific spellings (when words can be spelt in more than one way), more fluent sounding and blending of words when reading, increasingly accurate spelling of more unusual GPCs

61


* A grapheme is a letter or group of letters representing a sound. A phoneme is the smallest unit of sound in a word 5:

Primary English Within both key stage 1 and 2 we follow the New Literacy Frame work from the English National Curriculum. This offers our pupils a range of speaking, listening, reading and writing opportunities as we explore both fiction and non-fiction texts. Key Stage1 Reading - Oxford Reading Tree: The Oxford Reading Tree scheme is introduced to the pupils in Reception classes (or earlier if they are ready for it). It is a staged set of fiction and non-fiction books covering the whole primary range. Pupils should be given the books appropriate to their level of ability, making sure they have a good understanding of the text and can discuss the book freely before moving onto the next one in the series. Each book should be read with the child in school every day and at home with an adult. Every child from will have a reading diary to keep track of the books they read. Discussion and writing activities liked to the scheme are available to use for all stages. Teachers should record the books read by pupils on the appropriate recording sheets kept in a class file and on the school server. Pupils in Key Stage 1 also take part in Guided Reading (see below for details) Writing – In Key Stage 1 spelling is taught alongside and as part of the phonics programme. At this stage children should be starting to learn a number of specific spelling words each week which are then tested regularly by the teacher. Handwriting is taught in a separate weekly lesson following the Nelson Handwriting Scheme. Teachers and teaching assistant’s model good examples of handwriting on the board and any written work within the pupils work books, extra practice sheets and copy- masters are available for extra homework sheets. Speaking and Listening Throughout Key Stage 1 pupils are given plenty of opportunity to speak, share ideas discuss and listen to others. The Primary framework places a strong emphasis on Speaking and Listening as it is the building block of all other aspects of Literacy (e.g. reading and writing). Pupils are encourages to speak clearly, confidently to different people. Pupils are taught to listen, understand and respond appropriately to others. To share their ideas and take turns when working within a discussion group. Key Stage 2 Reading - Pupils continue to read from the Oxford Reading Tree scheme, once they have completed the scheme ( stage 16) they become ‘Free readers’ and use the library to chose their own reading

62


books. They still must continue to read every night with their parents and write comments about the books they are reading in their reading journals. Guided Reading: There are daily Guided Reading sessions for each class. These sessions are to allow for individual and group reading activities lead by the teacher (and /or the Teacher Assistant) and for books to be read aloud. Pupils should be encouraged to read and discuss books and their content in order to: 

develop their knowledge of authors and titles

develop their personal reading skills and strategies for reading

help motivate others to read new or different books and texts

develop a life-long interest in books and reading

These Guided Reading sessions should also be used to hear pupils read and to teach new skills as appropriate. Activity sheets linked to the Oxford Reading Tree scheme are available to develop comprehension skills. Varied activities each session will help to keep the pupils motivated and develop enthusiastic readers (role-play, character studies, letters of appreciation/concern to authors, book reviews and posters, etc). Writing In Key Stage 2 all classes will follow the Collins spelling programme of differentiated spelling activities with a focus on key spelling patterns to be learned in each year group. All Key Stage 2 children should have a weekly list of spellings to learn which will be tested regularly by the teacher. Creative Writing: In Key Stage 2 all pupils will have a weekly writing session to explore and develop their creative writing style and ability. This time will be for the development of writing; exploring the process of developing ideas from speaking and listening and group discussion activities, to mapping and planning ideas and then to the activity of writing. Pupils will be encouraged to understand the process of drafting and redrafting their work to make improvements, with skills taught and/or modelled as appropriate. This time will also involve some peer assessment of pupils work as well as beginning to show appreciation of others work. Handwriting A progressive programme to develop standard handwriting skills is used throughout the school. Nelson Handwriting provides a differentiated structure of activities from Key Stage 1 up to Year 6. NB This programme is to serve as a guide to good handwriting. No pupil who is already writing in a clear style in Key Stage 2 should be made to change that style. Speaking and Listening Building upon the work in Key Stage 1, within Key Stage 2 pupils beginning to hold debates and arguments over issues, present their work to others and ask questions clearly when speaking. When 63


listening t to other they beginning to respond with questions and following on from the ideas of others appropriately. Most lessons will involve some elements of group work and discussion when pupils will take turns, share ideas and consider others viewpoints as well as their own within their answers. Use of ICT and Multi Media: ICT facilities should be used whenever possible to allow pupils to develop a variety of skills linked to language learning. (These might include: story writing, poetry, book reviews, illustrated articles, newspaper reports, letters etc.) They should also be encouraged to produce final drafts of their work for presentation and display purposes. Teachers should book ICT facilities ahead of time as necessary when planning lessons. Within Key Stage 2 pupils are encourage to present their work on appropriate media – either using a word document, power-point presentation or video movie clip. Drama: Drama lessons should form an integral part of literacy lessons for every class and be incorporated into the planning of each unit of work. This may be on a weekly basis or less frequently according to the unit of work. Drama activities can take place effectively within a classroom space or in a larger space if required. Teachers should plan the space available ahead of time as necessary. The development of dramatic skills for each pupil should: 

enhance their ability to communicate in English

allow them to express deeper feelings and emotions

allow pupils a different medium to explore themes and ideas from the text

encourage them to work collectively

build their confidence in ‘performing’ in front of an audience

There will be three productions each year; the first in Term 2 for Key Stage 1, the second also in Term 2 for Years 3, 4, and 5 and the final one at the end of Term 3 for the Year 6 leavers. Planning: All planning must be completed by the class teachers in their Year groups and placed in the year group Literacy Folder located on the z drive. Planning should be up to date and finished by the planning meeting the week before it is taught. Copies of long, medium and short term unit plans should then be kept in the teachers’ planning file. Time will be allocated each term for teachers to do their long and medium term planning in year groups. Short term unit plans should be written by each class teacher according to the needs and abilities of their class. Pro formas of all documents are available on the school server under 'Literacy’.

64


Assessment: Teacher assessments, in line with the school’s Assessment and Reporting Policy, will be undertaken continually and reflect the teacher’s professional judgement of each child’s ability in written and spoken English. Unaided writing tests will be carried out each term which will be marked and levelled independently of the class teacher. National Curriculum levels for each child will be passed back to the teacher and recorded in the pupil profile. Baseline assessments for Reception classes will be undertaken within the first term using the Performance Indicators for Primary Schools online assessment (PIPS). End of year Assessments will cover Writing and Reading Assessments. Annual Events linked to Literacy:    

6:

February –Key Stage 1 Production March – Book Week for the whole school March Year 3, 4, 5 Production June – Year 6 Production

SECONDARY ENGLISH The overall aim of the secondary English Curriculum is to meet the needs of all pupils, including those who need to make faster progress to reach the expected level for their age, and those who require learning support in English language. The course provides a stimulating learning environment for both EAL students and native English speakers in an international setting. The curriculum is designed to develop the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of the pupils and to enable them to function successfully in an English medium school. Pupils will develop the skills attained in KS2, and continue to follow the National Curriculum for England. The curriculum is based on the Secondary Framework for England as laid down by the QCA, with adaptations for the international background of the pupils. The Framework for English identifies annual learning objectives that encourage ambition and provide challenge for all pupils, showing progression in the subject. The objectives will ensure full coverage of the programme of study at Key Stage 3 and prepare students for progression to Key Stages 4 and 5 whilst establishing a minimum expectation for the progression of most pupils.

The components of the Secondary English Department are:    

65

KS3 English /KS4 and KS5 English Language (compulsory subject) KS4 and KS5 English Literature (optional subject) Drama (core subject in KS3, optional subject KS4 and KS5) Prep, (an intensive ESL programme for new students who join the school without a satisfactory level of English to join the mainstream classes).


Use of ICT and Multi Media All of the secondary English classrooms have a computer with either a projector or flat screen TV to facilitate multimedia lessons, and the enrichment of the curriculum with audio visual materials appropriate to the course. In addition, the department has access to IWB ( Interactive White Board) and networked computers. Textbooks The core textbooks used in KS3 are:  

Oxford English; An International Approach, Books 1-3: OUP Checkpoint English 1-3 – Sue Hackman, Alan Howe: CUP

In addition, a wide range of contemporary and classic literature: novels; poetry and plays are read throughout this key stage and pupils are encouraged to develop their personal reading skills. In KS4/5 Cambridge University International Examinations Board endorsed textbooks are used and are supplemented with a wide range of nonfiction and fiction texts. The pupils are encouraged to use dictionaries and thesauruses, which are available in every English classroom.

Planning The teaching team responsible for each year group produces Annual Plans and Unit Plans for each stage of study. This is recorded on the school CISAS system. Assessment Students are assessed in terms of class work, assignments, end of unit tests and end of semester examinations. The assessments include oral, practical and written tests; a wide range of projects, group work and individual written projects. Students also sit Cambridge International IGCSE, AS and A level examinations in KS4 and KS5. IELTS examinations are also offered in KS5 via the British Council. KS3 English Organisation 1. Y7&8: Pupils are placed in one of 4 English groups  English Support. A group of approximately 10 students who require basic English support  English 2. A mixed ability group of approximately 15 students who are capable of the challenges of the KS3 curriculum, but who still require some ESL support

66


English 1A/1B. Two parallel groups of students consisting of native speakers and strong EAL students.

Y9 Pupils are grouped as above, but with 3 groups instead of 4, due to lower overall numbers Curriculum The KS3 curriculum is based on the QCA Secondary framework for English and incorporates: Reading Reading for meaning: understanding and responding to print, electronic and multi-modal texts   

Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in texts Reading and engaging with a wide and varied range of texts

Understanding the author's craft   

Relating texts to the social, historical and cultural contexts in which they were written Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation

Writing Composition: generating ideas, planning and drafting  

Generating ideas, planning and drafting Using and adapting the conventions and forms of texts on paper and on screen

Composition: shaping and constructing language for expression and effect      

Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas Varying sentences and punctuation for clarity and effect Improving vocabulary for precision and impact Developing varied linguistic and literary techniques Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of forms on paper and on screen Developing and using editing and proofreading skills on paper and on screen

Conventions: drawing on conventions and structures   

Using the conventions of standard English Using grammar accurately and appropriately Reviewing spelling and increasing knowledge of word derivations, patterns and families

Speaking and Listening Listening and responding 67


 

Developing active listening skills and strategies Understanding and responding to what speakers say in formal and informal contexts

Speaking and presenting  

Developing and adapting speaking skills and strategies in formal and informal contexts Using and adapting the conventions and forms of spoken texts

Group discussion and interaction  

Developing and adapting discussion skills and strategies in formal and informal contexts Taking roles in group discussion

Language application Exploring and analysing language  

Exploring English language variation and development according to time, place, culture, society and technology Commenting on English language use

KS3 Drama (see also separate Drama policy) Curriculum and Organisation The students study Drama as part of the KS3 curriculum. There are 45 minute periods of Drama each week, for each form group. In addition to preparing short plays, the KS3 Drama curriculum supports the English programme by developing the speaking and listening skills of the students. Students also have the opportunity to take part in school productions.

KS4 English Language This subject is compulsory for all students. In Year 10, the students commence a two year programme of study which culminates in the IGCSE examinations at the end of Y11. Students either study for IGCSE English as a First Language or IGCSE English as a Second Language, based on their level of achievement at the end of KS3. The syllabus for these courses is provided by CIE (Cambridge International Examinations).

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KS4 English Literature (see also separate English Literature policy) At the beginning of KS4, students may opt to study CIE IGCSE English Literature. This two year course is ideal for First language and strong second language students and incorporates a range of modern and classical texts.

KS5 English Language In KS5, English is compulsory, comprising four separate classes. All students attend one of the following: 1. AS/A level English Literature. This is an advanced English programme, for students who have achieved a Grade C or above in their IGCSE English Language examinations. Students may use this CIE qualification to apply to Universities worldwide. 2. AS level English Language. This is also suitable for students who have already achieved Grade C or above at IGCSE. This course cannot be taken to A level. 3. IELTS: for students wishing to study in English speaking countries, who do not wish to study English at advanced level. 4. IGCSE retakes: for those students wishing to improve on their grades in Y11, or for students joining the school without IGCSE English qualifications. KS5 English Literature (see also separate English Literature policy) After successfully completing the CIE IGCSE English Literature course, students may opt to continue this study to AS and A level. It is a strongly recommended subject for students planning to go on to study Law, Politics or Diplomacy as well as those who wish to pursue a career in the Arts.

KS4 Drama (see also separate Drama policy) From September 2010, students will have the option of following a two year IGCSE Drama course. This includes textual analysis as well as performance and stage management skills. Students who opt for this course will also be part of extracurricular Drama activities, including plays and other productions. KS5 Drama (see also separate Drama policy) For students who have a confident and creative outlook, Drama will also be offered at KS5 for the first time in September 2010.These students will play an active role in the school productions and extracurricular Arts activities.

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Prep The Prep programme at ISB operates to serve the needs of those students who do not have an adequate level of English to join the main secondary school programme. On arrival at the school students are tested, and if they require extra help, they join the Prep group. The English part of Prep classes is taught by members of the English department and focus intensively on the acquisition of Basic English skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. The classes incorporate a wide range of stimulating activities, including multimedia, games, role play, films, audio, and writing tasks. In addition Prep students attend ICT, Art, Mathematics and P.E. classes. When a student is judged to be ready to move to the main programme, they are tested and a recommendation is made to the parents as to the progress of their child. Students in the Prep programme will be tested at the end of each semester, and a recommendation made with consultation with all of the Prep teachers, whether to remain in Prep or move to the main programme. ELS Students who leave Prep still needing extra English support, and students who are identified as needing extra English on arrival at the secondary school, will be given intensive lessons during the normal timetable. In order to develop the necessary skills in English, these pupils may be withdrawn from MFL/Romanian/Turkish or Humanities. The ELS programme also forms part of the secondary special needs provision, and is run in close partnership with the SENCO. Events     

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Winter and End of year Drama Productions Book Week World Book Day Visits by Authors Theatre Visits


ISB FRENCH POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject The French language is the only language (with English) spoken on all five continents. A total of 250 million people speak it as either a first or as a second language. Moreover, roughly 110 million people learn French as a second or third language. French speaking communities are present in 57 countries and territories. Although it is mainly spoken in Europe and North America, it is also widely used in Africa or Oceania.

2:

Main Text Books Used      

Tricolore 1 Tricolore 2 Tricolore 3 Tricolore 4 Elan 1 Elan 2

Grammaire Progressive du Français Débutant/Intermédiaire/Avancé Vocabulaire Progressif du français Débutant/Intermédiaire/Avancé

3:

Aims 

71

Key Stage 3 o

Grade 7: Set up a solid basis in French – Grammar/Vocabulary/Culture

o

Grade 8: Set up and reinforce a solid basis in French

o

Grade 9: Reinforce a solid basis in French


Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10: Develop communicative skills with roles plays based on everyday situations and presentations – Curb inaccuracies

o Grade 11 IGCSE Develop communicative skills with roles plays based on everyday situations and presentations - Curb Inaccuracies - Exam preparation

o Grade 12 AS Be able to debate in French and express opinions in French in a natural, spontaneous way. Be able to discuss (in writing or orally) various topics, issues and current affairs. Be able to read for gist and specific information. Use accurate grammar and develop the range of vocabulary. Use more complex expressions and structures. Exam preparation

o Grade 13 A2 Be able to debate in French and express opinions in French in a natural, spontaneous way. Be able to discuss (in writing or orally) various topics, issues and current affairs. Be able to read for gist and specific information. Get accurate grammar and develop the range of vocabulary. Use more complex expressions and structures. Be able to read and understand French Literature and more complex vocabulary in context.

Exam preparation 4:

Main Curriculum Content 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7       

72

Unité 1 - Nouvelle Edition Bonjour!, Comment t'appelles-tu?, Quel âge as-tu? Chiffres 1 - 20, Accessories de Classe Unité 2 - Nouvelle Edition Où habites-tu?, Pays de l'Europe, Accessoires de Classe Unité 3 - Nouvelle Edition Famille, Maison, Jours de la Semaine, Chiffres 20-70 Unité 4 - Nouvelle Edition


            

Animaux à la maison, Couleurs, Adjectifs, Aimer/Adorer/Détester Unité 5 - Nouvelle Edition Les Mois, ETRE, l'année en France, Vêtements, les adjectifs (singulier et pluriel), AVOIR Unité 6 - Nouvelle Edition Le Temps, Directions (Vent), Saisons, Sports, Loisirs, Verbes en -ER Unité 7 - Nouvelle Edition En ville - Directions/Questions, ALLER, Office de tourisme, Prépositions Unité 8 - Nouvelle Edition New Quelle heure est-il?, ma Routine, ma Journée au Collège, les Matières, Mon, ma, mes, Ton, ta, tes, Son, sa, ses, les Opinions Unité 9 - Nouvelle Edition Repas, Nourriture, Boissons, Petit Déjeuner, Fruits, Légumes, PRENDRE, MANGER, Conversation à Table, Le Négatif Unité 10 - Nouvelle Edition Sports avec jouer, Sports avec faire, FAIRE, Instruments de musique, JOUER DE, Loisirs avec faire, Tâches ménagères, Verbe + Infinitif, Possessive adjectives

o Grade 8 Topics  

Les magasins en Ville On fait du shopping

Grammar Units                  

73

The Present Tense -ER Verbs for Beginners The Perfect Tense for Beginners The Perfect Tense The Perfect Tense 2 Perfect Infinitive The Imperfect Tense Using the Perfect and Imperfect Le Futur Proche - Aller + Infinitif The Future Tense The Conditional Tense Reflexive Verbs Using Negatives Adjectives Time Phrases and Verb Tenses Attention à l'accent! Various Tenses Practice Various Grammar Points


Vocabulary Units

74

   

Environnement Ma Chambre La Ville où j'habite Noël

o

Grade 9

       

De jeunes francophones Bienvenue à Paris Ça me passionne Au travail Une visite à Planète Futuroscope En forme Vive les vacances Notre monde

Key Stage 4 and 5 o

Grade 10

    

Jeunes sans frontières En ville et à la campagne Bon voyage Un séjour en France Une semaine typique

o

Grade 11

     

Bon appétit Ça m’intéresse Nouveaux horizons À votre santé Projets d’avenir Révisions générales

IGCSE


5:

o

Grade 12

       

Relative Pronouns - Qui, Que, Dont, Où The Passive The Subjunctive The Conditional Object Pronouns Grammar Extension Vocabulary Extension Preceding Direct Object Agreements

o

Grade 13

        

Relative Pronouns - Qui, Que, Dont, Où The Passive The Subjunctive The Conditional Object Pronouns Preceding Direct Object Agreements Grammar Extension Vocabulary Extension Literature Program – 3 books following the actual Cambridge A2 Specifications

AS

A2

Assessment 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort - Projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Tricolore copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Tricolore pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four parts per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There is also a differentiated endof-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage.

75


Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

o Grade 8 Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort – Projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Tricolore copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Tricolore pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four parts per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There is also a differentiated endof-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage. Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. 76


o Grade 9 Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort – Projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Tricolore copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Tricolore pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four parts per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There is also a differentiated endof-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage. Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester.

Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort - Projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Tricolore copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Tricolore pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four parts per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There is also a differentiated endof-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage.

77


Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. There will be some mock exams.

Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. o

Grade 11

IGCSE

Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort – Projects Past papers Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Tricolore copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Tricolore pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four parts per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. There is also a differentiated endof-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage.

Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. 78


Testing o o o

There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. There will be some mock exams.

Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

o Grade 12 AS Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort – ProjectsPresentations Past papers Topics:            

French Culture La famille Droits et responsabilités Loisirs Santé Education Métiers Médias Environnement France plurielle France et Europe Francophonie

o Grade 13 A2 Regular exams – Skills – End of Unit – End of Term – Class work – Homework – Effort – ProjectsPresentations Past papers Topics:     79

French Culture La famille Droits et responsabilités Loisirs


       

Santé Education Métiers Médias Environnement France plurielle France et Europe Francophonie

Key Stage 3

Key Stage 4&5

80

Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB GENERAL SCIENCE POLICY – PRIMARY The learning and teaching of Science at International School of Bucharest aims to develop a child’s interest, curiosity and concern for their environment. The school fosters the development of enquiry, exploration and observations within a stimulating context. The children work independently and with others to ask questions and find out why things happen in the way that they do. Children learn to appreciate the way science contributes to today’s understanding of our world and how it will affect the future on a personal, national and global Objectives: level.      

To enable children to ask and answer scientific questions To plan and carry out scientific investigations, considering the appropriate equipment, to be used To observe, measure and undertake a fair test To interpret results and evaluate scientific evidence and present their conclusions clearly and accurately To know and understand the life processes of living things To know and understand the physical processes of materials, electricity, magnetism, light, sound, forces, simple chemical reactions, energy resources, rocks and weathering

Learning Our principal aim is to develop children’s knowledge, skills and understanding of science. Sometimes we do this through whole-class teaching, while at other times we engage the children in an enquiry based research activity. Within lessons children are encouraged to work collaboratively and independently. We encourage the children to ask as well as answer scientific questions. They have the opportunity to use a variety of data, such as statistics, graphs, pictures and photographs. I.C.T is also used to enhance learning. The children engage in a variety of problem solving activities, and wherever possible, the outdoor classroom is used to create real life situations for the children to research. Field trips are also an important element in developing the child’s understanding. Teaching The school uses the national scheme of work for science as the basis of its curriculum planning. Our medium term plans, give details of the work for each term and make cross curricular links wherever possible. The teaching of Science in our school builds upon prior learning and all abilities are given the opportunity to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding. We also build progression into science to ensure that the children are increasingly challenged as they move up through the school. We recognize that there are children of widely different scientific abilities in all classes and we ensure that we provide suitable learning opportunities for all children by matching the challenge of the task to the ability of the child. We achieve this by setting common open ended tasks, setting tasks of increasing difficulty, grouping children by ability, providing resources of different complexity and using teaching assistants to support the work of targeted groups of children. 81


Curriculum Links Science has many strong links with other subjects as well as constantly reinforcing children’s basic skills. 

 

Literacy - Science contributes significantly to the teaching of English in our school by actively promoting the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Some of the texts the students study in Literacy are of a scientific nature and the children develop oral skills through discussions and recounting their observations of scientific experiments. They develop their writing skills through writing reports and projects and by recording information. ICT - Students use ICT whenever appropriate to find, select and analyze information, record, present and interpret data. They have access to a variety of equipment, including computers, digital cameras, data loggers, movie creator and videos, CD ROM and internet. PSHE - Science makes a significant contribution to the teaching of P.S.H.E. It raises matters of citizenship and social welfare and provides many opportunities for debates and discussions. Science teaching also offers children opportunities to examine some of the fundamental questions in life by raising many moral questions. Through many of the amazing processes that affect living things the children develop a sense of awe and wonder regarding the nature of the world. Numeracy – At all key stages students are expected to use their knowledge and understanding of measurement and data processing at appropriate levels. In Science, they should be applying their numeracy skills at levels similar to those which they are using in their Mathematics lessons.

Extra-curricular opportunities There are opportunities for students to visit places of scientific interest and for visitors to come to the school in order to support the learning objectives for units of work where relevant. Field trips are actively promoted. In addition, the school holds an annual Science Week, the aims of which are to increase awareness of science in everyday life and to encourage curiosity and enthusiasm for science. The students are involved in numerous activities including shows, quizzes, challenges, workshops and experimental work. Assessment for Learning We assess students’ work in Science by making informal judgments as we observe them during lessons. In Key Stages 1 and 2, at the end of each half term a summary judgment is made about each child in relation to the National Curriculum level of attainment and this is based on teacher assessments and a progress test. We also use annual tests to assess the children at the end of each year. The teachers are then able to use this information to assess the progress of each child to inform their annual report to parents and to pass the information on to the next teacher. In Key stage 2 the students are assessed internally by written and oral assessments for individual and group work, divided into categories: tests (includes quizzes, tests, exams), assignments (includes homework, projects, lab reports, research), class work and effort. At the end of Key Stage 3 the students are assessed externally (Checkpoint examination). In Key stages 4 and 5 the students are assessed internally and also externally by University of Cambridge International Examinations (UCIE).

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Resources We have a wide range of resources to support the teaching and learning of Science. We keep these in the science labs and it is the responsibility of the Science Coordinator to renew and replenish these resources. The library contains a good supply of science topic books and we have a wide range of computer software to support children’s individual research. Health and Safety The general teaching requirements for health and safety applies in this subject and the safety policy is available from the Science Coordinator. We teach the children how to use equipment accurately and safely and all living organisms, being used for study are treated with respect and returned from whence they came as soon as the activity is complete. A list of safety rules (see Appendix A) is displayed in all Science labs, which is carefully presented to the students at the beginning of each science course. Equal Opportunities Each child has equal access to Science within our school and every effort is made to ensure that the Science activities and investigations are interesting and achievable. The expectation is the same for each student. Children with special needs, including ESL pupils are involved in all areas of the Science curriculum at an appropriate level to help them achieve their full potential. Monitoring It is the responsibility of the Science Coordinator to monitor the standards of children’s work and the quality of teaching in science. It is their responsibility to provide a strategic lead and direction for the subject, to support colleagues in the teaching of science and inform them of current developments. The Science Coordinator should allow time for monitoring planning, reviewing samples of children’s work and visiting classes to observe teaching in the subject. Policy Review This policy will be reviewed annually by the Science Coordinators. Leadership and management The role of the Science Coordinator is to: -Implement policy development and review, including the continuing successful implementation of the Science curriculum. -Support colleagues in the development of weekly plans from schemes of work. -Keep up-to-date on local and national initiatives and share information. -Take responsibility for the purchase and organization of Science resources. 83


-Encourage the professional development staff. -Organise the annual Science Week. -Maintain an accurate inventory of all equipment. -Assign a long term rota for all topics across all years from Year 1 to Year 6. -Keep Primary topic boxes up-to-date.

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Appendix A

SCIENCE LAB SAFETY RULES 1. Food, drink and chewing gum are prohibited in the lab. 2. Never taste any material in the lab. 3. Never smell a material in a test tube or flask directly. Instead, with your hand, "fan" some of the fumes to your nose carefully. 4. Never look directly into a test tube. View the contents from the side. 5. Never handle chemicals with bare fingers. Always use tweezers, or spatulas. 6. Never indulge in horseplay, practical jokes or behaviour that could lead to injury of others. 7. Never touch any piece of equipment, or other materials in the lab until you are instructed to do so. 8. Work in the lab only when the teacher is present or when you have permission to do so. 9. Before beginning and after finishing work in lab, clean the lab bench top and your glassware. 10. Due to the dangers of broken glass and corrosive liquid spills in the lab, open sandals or bare feet are not permitted in the lab. Shoes must completely cover the foot. 11. Long hair, dangling jewellery, and loose or baggy clothing are a hazard in the laboratory. Long hair must be tied back, and dangling jewellery and baggy clothing must be secured. 12. A lab coat and safety goggles should be worn during lab experiments. 13. Learn the location and proper usage of the first aid kit, eyewash fountain, fire extinguisher, fire alarm box, evacuation routes, clean-up brush and dust pan, glass/chemical disposal can. 14. Report all accidents regardless of how minor to your teacher. 15. For minor skin burns, immediately plunge the burned area into cold water and notify the teacher. 16. If you get any chemical in your eye, immediately wash the eye with the eye-wash fountain and notify the teacher. 17. Immediately notify the teacher of any chemical spill and clean up the spill as directed. 18. Never take chemical stock bottles to the lab benches. 19. Use equipment only as directed: a. never place chemicals directly on the pan balances. b. never place hot apparatus directly on the laboratory desk; use insulated pads. c. use glycerine when inserting glass tubing into rubber stoppers. d. be cautious of glassware that has been heated; do not immerse hot glassware in cold water. 85


e. add boiling chips to liquid that is to be heated before heating. f.

point test tubes that are being heated away from you and others.

g. Never add water to concentrated acid. Instead, as you stir, add the acid slowly to the water. 20. Read the label on chemical bottles at least twice before using the chemical. Many chemicals have names that are easily confused. 21. Take only as much chemicals as you need. Never return unused chemicals to their original container. 22. Return all lab materials and equipment to their proper places after use.

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ISB GENERAL SCIENCE POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject The course fires students’ curiosity about phenomena in the world around them and offers opportunities to find explanations. It engages learners at many levels, linking direct practical experience with scientific ideas. Experimentation and modelling are used to develop and evaluate explanations, encouraging critical thinking and creative thought. Students learn how knowledge and understanding in science are rooted in evidence. They discover how scientific ideas contribute to technological change – affecting industry, business and medicine and improving quality of life. They learn to question and discuss issues that may affect their own lives, the directions of the societies and the future of the world.

2:

Main Text Books Used Grade 7: Science Works 1 (Oxford OxBox, student textbook) – Philippa Gardom-Hulme, Pam Large, Sandra Mitchell, Chris Sherry Science Works 1 (Oxford OxBox, teacher pack) - Philippa Gardom-Hulme, Pam Large, Sandra Mitchell, Chris Sherry

Grade 8: Spectrum 8 (Cambridge, Key stage 3 Science, student textbook) – Andy Cooke, Jean Martin Spectrum 8 Teachers pack (Cambridge) – Andy Cooke, Jean Martin

Grade 9: Spectrum 9 (Cambridge, Key stage 3 Science, student textbook) – Andy Cooke, Jean Martin Spectrum 9 Teachers pack (Cambridge) – Andy Cooke, Jean Martin

3:

Aims 

Key Stage 3

Understand the structure of a plant and animal cell, cell division and recognize that cells build up into any living organism. Become familiar with human reproduction and distinguish between different stages of a human life cycle. Understand the habitat and the environmental conditions, seasonal 87


changes as well as feeding relationships between plants and animals. Become familiar with similarities and differences between species; recognize variation whiting species and what cause it, as well as classification of plants and animals. Understand acids and alkalis, how to distinguish between them, their uses as well as their implications in real life. Get a grasp on neutralization and practical uses of this reaction. Understand some simple chemical reactions, the particle theory and its use to explain daily phenomena. Become familiar with solutions, mixtures and separating methods, as well as solubility. Get a grasp on different types of energy, fossil fuels and renewable energy resources. Understand the two types of electrical circuits and the cell, be able to measure the current and use electricity safely. Become familiar with different types of forces and their effect on objects, as well as the speed of moving objects. Understand the motion of the Earth in space and how seasons are generated, be able to explain eclipses and show understanding of our Solar System and consider our place in the Universe.

4:

Main Curriculum Content 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 The following units are covered in grade 7: Cells, Reproduction, Differences, Classification, Acid reactions, Particles, Elements and compounds, Chemical reactions, Electricity and magnetism, Energy, Forces, and Space. These topics will be approached through practical work and related to everyday experience. These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: a number of five lessons (of 45 minutes each) per week and 36 weeks in total. o Grade 8 The following units are covered in grade 8: Food and digestion, Respiration, Microbes and diseases, Ecological relationships, Atoms and elements, Compounds and mixtures, Rocks and weathering, The rock cycle, Heating and cooling, Magnets and electromagnets, Light, Sound and hearing. These topics will be approached through practical work and related to everyday experience. These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: a number of five lessons (of 45 minutes each) per week and 36 weeks in total. o Grade 9 The following units are covered in grade 9: Inheritance and selection, Fitness and health, Plants and photosynthesis, Plants and food, Reactions of metals and metal compounds, Patterns of reactivity, Environmental chemistry, Using chemistry, Energy and electricity, Gravity and space, Speeding up, Pressure and moments. These topics will be approached through practical work and related to everyday experience. These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: a number of five lessons (of 45 minutes each) per week and 36 weeks in total.

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5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 3 The courses offer on-going assessment in line with the National Curriculum. The scores are recorded as percentage on a scale of 1 to 100. These marks are registered in the paper/virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. The assessment strategies include: progress tests, quizzes, lab reports, oral presentations, self assessment, peer assessment, homework, informal observations, and projects. Students are assessed internally by written and oral assessments for individual and group work divided into four categories:

Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%

At the end of year 9 a period of revision is provided by the teachers prior to the external examination – Checkpoint examination.

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ISB GEOGRAPHY POLICY - PRIMARY This policy reflects the values and philosophy of the International School of Bucharest (Primary) in relation to the teaching of Geography. It gives a framework to which all staff, teaching and non-teaching work. It gives guidance on planning, teaching and assessment. This policy should be used in conjunction with the QCA schemes of work for Geography to develop adapted lesson plans that are within the school’s guidelines. Subject Aims The aims of Geography are:       

to enable children to gain knowledge and understanding of places in the world, within and beyond Romania to develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of how people in different places live their lives to develop an understanding that physical and climatic features affect how people live in different parts of the world to develop discrete skills related to Geography such as map reading and the use of atlases and reading graphs to develop enquiry skills and an appreciation that a variety of sources of information including textbooks, internet, newspapers, maps and atlases can be used to answer geographical questions to use a variety of ways of presenting information such as, posters, leaflets, reports and graphs. where relevant, to incorporate fieldwork into the teaching of topics

The subject is taught in QCA Study Unit Schemes of Work. These are used as working documents and adapted by teachers as necessary. In learning Geography, pupils will have the opportunity to achieve the following objectives:The Objectives for Nursery   

Show an interest in the world in which they live. Comment and ask questions about where they live and the natural world. Notice differences between features of the local environment.

The Objectives for Reception  

Observe, find out about and identify features in the place they live and the natural world. Find out about their environment, and talk about those features they like and dislike.

The Objectives for Key Stage 1   

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Pupils show their knowledge, skills and understanding in studies at a local scale. They recognise and make observations about physical and human features of localities. They express their views on features of the environment of a locality.


They use resources that are given to them, and their own observations, to ask and respond to questions about places and environments. (National Curriculum Level 1)

The Objectives for Key Stage 2      

Pupils show their knowledge, skills and understanding in studies at a local scale. They describe and compare the physical and human features of different localities and offer explanations for the locations of some of those features. They are aware that different places may have both similar and different characteristics. They offer reasons for some of their observations and for their views and judgements about places and environments. They recognise how people seek to improve and sustain environments. They use skills and sources of evidence to respond to a range of geographical questions, and begin to use appropriate vocabulary to communicate their findings. (National Curriculum Level 3)

Curriculum and School Organisation Which year group teaches which QCA Study Unit is listed, and this list may be found in the updated CIS file on the server. This list is attached to this policy and available on the school server. From this list each year group completes an annual Geography long-term planning sheet. This is to be found on the server in each year groups Geography planning folder. The Geography curriculum consists of knowledge, skills and understanding. Geographical enquiry and skills Key Stage 1:1. In undertaking geographical enquiry, pupils should be taught to: 1. ask geographical questions [for example, 'What is it like to live in this place?'] 2. observe and record [for example, identify buildings in the street and complete a chart] 3. express their own views about people, places and environments [for example, about litter in the school] 4. communicate in different ways [for example, in pictures, speech, and writing]. 2. In developing geographical skills, pupils should be taught to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

use geographical vocabulary [for example, hill, river, motorway, near, far, north, south] use fieldwork skills [for example, recording information on a school plan or local area map] use globes, maps and plans at a range of scales [for example, following a route on a map] use secondary sources of information [for example, internet, pictures, photographs, stories, information texts] 5. make maps and plans [for example, a pictorial map of a place in a story].

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Knowledge and understanding of places 3. Pupils should be taught to: 1. identify and describe what places are like [for example, in terms of landscape, jobs, weather] 2. identify and describe where places are [for example, position on a map, whether they are on a river] 3. recognise how places have become the way they are and how they are changing [for example, the quality of the environment in a street] 4. recognise how places compare with other places [for example, compare the local area with places elsewhere in the United Kingdom] 5. recognise how places are linked to other places in the world [for example, food from other countries]. Knowledge and understanding of patterns and processes 4. Pupils should be taught to: 1. make observations about where things are located [for example, a pedestrian crossing near school gates] and about other features in the environment [for example, seasonal changes in weather] 2. recognise changes in physical and human features [for example, lakes freezing over]. Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development 5. Pupils should be taught to: 1. recognise changes in the environment [for example, litter in roadside verges ] 2. recognise how the environment may be improved and sustained [for example, by picking up litter]. Breadth of study 6. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through the study of two localities: 1. the locality of the school 2. a locality outside Romania that has physical and/or human features that contrast with those in the locality of the school. 7. In their study of localities, pupils should: 1. study at a local scale 2. carry out fieldwork investigations outside the classroom.

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Geographical enquiry and skills Key Stage 2:1. In undertaking geographical enquiry, pupils should be taught to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

ask geographical questions [for example, 'What is this landscape like?', 'What do I think about it?'] collect and record evidence [for example, by carrying out a field trip to a river] analyse evidence and draw conclusions [for example, by comparing population data for two localities] identify and explain different views that people, including themselves, hold about topical geographical issues [for example, views about traffic and dogs in Bucharest] 5. communicate in ways appropriate to the task and audience [for example, by writing to the school principal about how to improve the school/local environment]. 2. In developing geographical skills, pupils should be taught: 1. To use appropriate geographical vocabulary [for example, temperature, transport, industry] 2. to use appropriate fieldwork techniques [for example, labelled field sketches] and instruments [for example a trundle wheel] 3. to use atlases and globes, and maps and plans at a range of scales [for example, using contents, keys, grids] 4. to use secondary sources of information, including aerial photographs [for example, stories, information texts, the internet, satellite images, photographs, video clips] 5. to draw plans and maps at a range of scales [for example, a sketch map of a locality] 6. decision-making skills [for example, deciding what measures are needed to improve safety in a local street]. Knowledge and understanding of places 3. Pupils should be taught: 1. to identify and describe what places are like [for example, in terms of weather, jobs] 2. the location of places and environments they study and other significant places and environments [for example, places and environments in the news] 3. to describe where places are [for example, in which region/country the places are, whether they are near rivers or hills, what the nearest towns or cities are] 4. to explain why places are like they are [for example, in terms of weather conditions, local resources, historical development] 5. to identify how and why places change [for example, through the building of new houses] and how they may change in the future [for example, through an increase in traffic or an influx of tourists] 6. to describe and explain how and why places are similar to and different from other places in the same country and elsewhere in the world [for example, comparing a village with a part of a city in the same country] 7. to recognise how places fit within a wider geographical context [for example, as part of a bigger region or country] and are interdependent [for example, through the supply of goods, movements of people]. Knowledge and understanding of patterns and processes

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4. Pupils should be taught to: 1. recognise and explain patterns made by individual physical and human features in the environment [for example, where frost forms in the playground,] 2. recognise some physical and human processes [for example, river erosion, and river pollution] and explain how these can cause changes in places and environments.

Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development 5. Pupils should be taught to: 1. recognise how people can improve the environment [for example, by reclaiming derelict land] or damage it [for example, by polluting a river], and how decisions about places and environments affect the future quality of people's lives 2. recognise how and why people may seek to manage environments sustainably, and to identify opportunities for their own involvement [for example, taking part in a local litter collection]. Breadth of study 6. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through the study of two localities and three themes: Localities 1. a locality in the United Kingdom 2. a locality in a country that is less economically developed Themes 3. water and its effects on landscapes and people, including the physical features of rivers [for example, flood plain] or coasts [for example, beach], and the processes of erosion and deposition that affect them 4. how settlements differ and change, including why they differ in size and character [for example, commuter village, seaside town], and an issue arising from changes in land use [for example, the building of new housing] 5. an environmental issue, caused by change in an environment [for example, increasing traffic congestion, hedgerow loss, drought], and attempts to manage the environment sustainably [for example, by improving public transport, creating a new nature reserve, reducing water use]. 7. In their study of localities and themes, pupils should: 1. study at a range of scales - local, regional and national 2. study a range of places and environments in different parts of the world 3. carry out fieldwork investigations outside the classroom.

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Time Allocation Early Years Geography is part of Knowledge and Understanding of the World, which over the year accounts for approximately one sixth of the time children are at school. This is including break times. KS1 One hour a week for humanities, either history or geography, amounts to 30 minutes a week over the year for Geography and 2% of the weekly timetable.

KS2 Two hours a week for humanities, either history or geography, amounts to 60 minutes a week over the year for Geography and 4% of the weekly timetable. Assessment Recording and Reporting Class teachers use a variety of methods to carry out formative, and where appropriate summative assessments while teaching each Geography study unit. At the end of each unit teachers complete online assessment sheets according to QCA statements for each unit. These assessments inform the written assessments sent to parents in December and June. See also the school Policy for Marking and Assessment. Resources and Accommodation Resources are listed in the humanities inventory which is on the school server. A copy of this has been place in each year group folder. Resources are stored in the Humanities store which can be accessed via the Science room. Evaluation Evaluation of the teaching of Geography is carried out to enhance evaluation of the teaching and learning of Geography. It is the responsibility of SMT and the Humanities Co-ordinator to monitor and evaluate curriculum provision made for Geography in order that pupils make the greatest possible progress. As with all evaluation the School Principal has overall responsibility for this work. Evaluation focuses on:   

An annual review of the QCA schemes of work and their content Reviewing online teacher assessment Staff discussion Observation of lessons when requested by SMT

Year Level

Unit

Geography Units Taught at ISB Primary

1

1

Around our school – the local area

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1

2

How can we make our local area safer?- (adapted)

1

5

Where in the world is Barnaby Bear? – (adapted)

2

3

An island home - (adapted)

2

4

Going to the seaside

2

17

Global Eye

3

6

Investigating our local area – (adapted)

3

7

Weather around the world

3

18

Connecting ourselves to the world – (adapted)

4

8

Improving the environment (in conjunction with Geography Unit 19)

4

9

Village Settlers – (adapted)

4

10

A village in India

5

11

Water

5

12

Should the high street be closed to traffic? (adapted)

96

5

13

A contrasting UK locality – (adapted)

6

14

Investigating Rives

6

15

The Mountain Environment

6

16

What’s in the news?


ISB GEOGRAPHY POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject The study of geography stimulates an interest in and a sense of wonder about places. It helps young people make sense of a complex and dynamically changing world. It explains where places are, how places and landscapes are formed, how people and their environment interact, and how a diverse range of economies, societies and environments are interconnected. It builds on pupils’ own experiences to investigate places at all scales, from the personal to the global. Geographical enquiry encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues affecting the world and people’s lives, now and in the future. Fieldwork is an essential element of this. Pupils learn to think spatially and use maps, visual images and new technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS), to obtain, present and analyse information. Geography inspires pupils to become global citizens by exploring their own place in the world, their values and their responsibilities to other people, to the environment and to the sustainability of the planet

2:

Main Text Books Used

3:

Nelson Thornes

Advanced Geography

Oxford

The New Wider World

Nelson Thornes

Geography Fieldwork Projects

Nelson

Modern School Atlas

Philips

Geog.3

Oxford

Interactions

Nelson Thornes

Geography for AS

Cambridge

Aims 

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Geography: An Integrated Approach

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 o Grade 8 o Grade 9


Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11 o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

IGCSE

AS A2

There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of geography. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Place  

Understanding the physical and human characteristics of real places. Developing ‘geographical imaginations’ of places.

1.2 Space  

Understanding the interactions between places and the networks created by flows of information, people and goods. Knowing where places and landscapes are located, why they are there, the patterns and distributions they create, how and why these are changing and the implications for people.

1.3 Scale  

Appreciating different scales – from personal and local to national, international and global. Making links between scales to develop understanding of geographical ideas.

1.4 Interdependence  

Exploring the social, economic, environmental and political connections between places. Understanding the significance of interdependence in change, at all scales.

1.5 Physical and human processes 

Understanding how sequences of events and activities in the physical and human worlds lead to change in places, landscapes and societies.

1.6 Environmental interaction and sustainable development  

98

Understanding that the physical and human dimensions of the environment are interrelated and together influence environmental change. Exploring sustainable development and its impact on environmental interaction and climate change.


1.7 Cultural understanding and diversity  

4:

Appreciating the differences and similarities between people, places, environments and cultures to inform their understanding of societies and economies. Appreciating how people’s values and attitudes differ and may influence social, environmental, economic and political issues, and developing their own values and attitudes about such issues. Main Curriculum Content

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7:

Map Skills Weather and Climate Physical Geography Rivers

o

Grade 8:

The Coast Europe Ecosystems Brazil

o

Grade 9:

Development Global Tectonics Global Ecosystems People of the World

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 IGCSE: Population and Migration Settlement Plate Tectonics Erosion and Weathering Weather and Climate Natural Environment and Humans

99


o

Grade 11 IGCSE Production Tourism Resources Map Skills Fieldwork

o

Grade 12 AS Physical Core • Hydrology and fluvial geomorphology • Atmosphere and weather • Rocks and weathering Human Core • Population • Migration • Settlement dynamics

o

Grade 13 A Level • Tropical environments • Coastal environments • Hazardous environments • Arid and semi-arid environments • Production, location and change • Environmental management • Global interdependence • Economic transition

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5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 o Grade 8 o Grade 9

The internal score is recorded as a percentage. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as tests, assignments, class work and effort. Tests: include mid-unit tests and end-of-unit tests. They also include mid-term exams and final exams. Assignments: include case studies, projects, research activity, posters and presentations. Assignments can be due by the next class or can be allocated a longer period for research or project work. Class work: includes all in-class marked activities such as, problem-solving, role play and case-studies. Effort: At the end of each semester students will receive a mark for their effort in class activity and promptness in completion of assignments and class work. This mark will also reflect students’ classroom behavior and the level of interest shown towards the subject. Grading Weights Key Stage 3

Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%

Levels In addition, students will be given KS3 levels based on the National Curriculum for England and Wales upon completion of each unit. These are continuously assessed and based on all students’ work and class contributions. 

101

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE


Internal Grading weights Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Assessment will be based on IGCSE mark schemes, aside from effort marks and marks for projects such as presentations. Testing Students will be regularly tested throughout the school year upon completion of specific units or when deemed appropriate. These will include mock examinations and the use of past papers.

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT IGCSE Candidates will be entered for the following papers: (i) Paper 1; (ii) Paper 2; (iii) Paper 4. Paper 1 (1 hour 45 minutes) will consist of one section. Candidates answer any three questions out of six. There are two questions set on each of three themes. Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes). Candidates answer all the questions. The paper is based on testing the interpretation and analysis of geographical information and on the application of graphical and other techniques as appropriate Paper 4, Alternative to Coursework (1 hour 30 minutes). Candidates answer all the questions, completing a series of written tasks based on the three themes. The questions involve an appreciation of a range of techniques used in fieldwork studies. Questions test the methodology of questionnaires, observation, counts, measurement techniques and may involve developing hypotheses appropriate to specific topics

102


Grade 12

AS Paper 1( 3 hours)

Candidates will be entered for the following paper: (i) Paper 1; The paper is split into three sections, which assess the Physical and Human Core topics.

Section A consists of six questions based on the Physical and Human Core topics. Three questions are set on the Physical Core and three on the Human Core. Candidates must answer five of these six questions

In Section B, candidates must answer one question based on the Physical Core topics. The section has three questions, one on each core topic. In Section C, candidates must answer one question based on the Human Core topics. The section has three questions, either on a single topic or on a combination of topics.

Grade 13

A2 Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes)& Paper 39 1 hour 30 minutes)

Candidates will be entered for the following papers: a. Paper 2 b. Paper 3

Paper 2 is set on the Advanced Physical Options. Candidates must answer two questions, each on a different topic. There are two questions on each topic: Paper 3 is set on the Advanced Human Options. Candidates must answer two questions, each on a different topic. There are two questions on each topic:

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Internal Grading Weights Key Stage 5

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Assessment will be based on AS/A2 mark schemes, aside from effort marks and marks for projects such as presentations.

104


ISB HISTORY POLICY - PRIMARY This policy reflects the values and philosophy of the International School of Bucharest (Primary) in relation to the teaching of History. It gives a framework to which all staff, teaching and non-teaching work. It gives guidance on planning, teaching and assessment. This policy should be used in conjunction with the QCA schemes of work for History to develop adapted lesson plans that are within the school’s guidelines. Subject Aims The aims of History are:    

 

to develop an understanding of chronology to develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of how people in different times lived their lives to develop an understanding that historical events had causes which can be identified to develop enquiry skills and an appreciation that a variety of sources of evidence including textbooks, internet, and primary sources such as texts, maps, paintings and artefacts can be used to answer historical questions to understand of ways of presenting information in the third person to have some experience of museums and historical sites.

The subject is taught in QCA Study Unit Schemes of Work. These are used as working documents and adapted by teachers as necessary. In learning History, pupils will have the opportunity to achieve the following objectives:The Objectives for Nursery    

Remember and talk about significant events in their own experience. Show interest in the lives of people familiar to them. Talk about past and future events. Develop an understanding of growth, decay and changes over time.

The Objectives for Reception     

105

Begin to differentiate between past and present. Use time related words in conversation. Understand about the seasons of the year and their regularity. Make short-term future plans. Find out about past and present events in their own lives, and those of their families and other people they know.


The Objectives for Key Stage 1    

Pupils recognise the distinction between past and present in their own and other people's lives. They show their emerging sense of chronology by placing a few events and objects in order, and by using everyday terms about the passing of time. They know and recount episodes from stories about the past. They find answers to some simple questions about the past from sources of information. (National Curriculum Level 1)

The Objectives for Key Stage 2 

   

Pupils show their developing understanding of chronology by their realisation that the past can be divided into different periods of time, their recognition of some of the similarities and differences between these periods, and their use of dates and terms. They show knowledge and understanding of some of the main events, people and changes studied. They are beginning to give a few reasons for, and results of, the main events and changes. They identify some of the different ways in which the past is represented. They use sources of information in ways that go beyond simple observations to answer questions about the past. (National Curriculum Level 3)

Curriculum and School Organisation Which year group teaches which QCA Study Unit is listed, and this list may be found in the updated CIS file on the server. This list is attached to this policy and available on the school server. From this list each year group completes an annual History long-term planning sheet. This is to be found on the server in each year groups History planning folder. The History curriculum consists of knowledge, skills and understanding. Historical enquiry and skills Key Stage 1:Chronological understanding 1. Pupils should be taught to: 1. place events and objects in chronological order 2. use common words and phrases relating to the passing of time [for example, before, after, a long time ago, past.

106


Knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past 2. Pupils should be taught to: 1. recognise why people did things, why events happened and what happened as a result 2. identify differences between ways of life at different times. Historical interpretation 3. Pupils should be taught to: 1. identify different ways in which the past is represented. Historical enquiry 4. Pupils should be taught: 1. how to find out about the past from a range of sources of information [for example, stories, eyewitness accounts, pictures and photographs, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites,] 2. to ask and answer questions about the past. Organisation and communication 5. Pupils should be taught: 1. to select from their knowledge of history and communicate it in a variety of ways [for example, talking and writing]. Breadth of study 6. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through the following areas of study: 1. changes in their own lives and the way of life of their family or others around them 2. the way of life of people in the more distant past who lived in the local area or elsewhere in Europe 3. the lives of significant men, women and children drawn from the history of Britain and the wider world [for example, pioneers such as Florence Nightingale] 4. past events from the history of Britain and the wider world [for example, events such as the Gunpowder Plot, the Great Fire of London and other events that are commemorated].

107


Geographical enquiry and skills Key Stage 2:Chronological understanding 1. Pupils should be taught to: 1. place events, people and changes into correct periods of time 2. use dates and vocabulary relating to the passing of time, including ancient, modern, BC, AD, century and decade. Knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past 2. Pupils should be taught: 1. about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past 2. about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world 3. to identify and describe reasons for, and results of, historical events, situations, and changes in the periods studied 4. to describe and make links between the main events, situations and changes within and across the different periods and societies studied. Historical interpretation 3. Pupils should be taught: 1. to recognise that the past is represented and interpreted in different ways, and to give reasons for this. Historical enquiry 4. Pupils should be taught: 1. how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites] 2. to ask and answer questions, and to select and record information relevant to the focus of the enquiry. Organisation and communication 5. Pupils should be taught to: 1. recall, select and organise historical information 2. use dates and historical vocabulary to describe the periods studied 3. communicate their knowledge and understanding of history in a variety of ways [for example, drawing, writing, by using ICT]. 108


Breadth of study 5. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through a local history study, British history studies, a European history study and a world history study. Where practical, aspects of Romanian history are included in the set study units when they are adapted by teachers in both Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2.

Time Allocation Early Years History is part of Knowledge and Understanding of the World, which over the year accounts for approximately one sixth of the time children are at school. This is including break times. KS1 One hour a week for humanities, either history or geography, amounts to 30 minutes a week over the year for History and 2% of the weekly timetable. KS2 Two hours a week for humanities, either history or geography, amounts to 60 minutes a week over the year for History and 4% of the weekly timetable. Assessment Recording and Reporting Class teachers use a variety of methods to carry out formative, and where appropriate summative assessments while teaching each History study unit. At the end of each unit teachers complete online assessment sheets according to QCA statements for each unit. These assessments inform the written assessments sent to parents in December and June. See also the school Policy for Marking and Assessment. Resources and Accommodation Resources are listed in the humanities inventory which is on the school server. A copy of this has been place in each year group folder. Resources are stored in the Humanities store which can be accessed via the Science room. Evaluation Evaluation of the teaching of History is carried out to enhance evaluation the teaching and learning of History. It is the responsibility of SMT and the Humanities Co-ordinator to monitor and evaluate curriculum provision made for History in order that pupils make the greatest possible progress. As with all evaluation the School Principal has overall responsibility for this work.

109


Evaluation focuses on:   

110

An annual review of the QCA schemes of work and their content Reviewing online teacher assessment Staff discussion Observation of lessons when requested by SMT Year Level

Unit

History Units Taught at ISB Primary

1

1

How are our toys different from those in the past?

1

2

What were homes like a long time ago?

1

3

What were seaside holidays like in the past?

2

17

What are we remembering on Remembrance Day? (adapted)

2

4

Why do we remember Florence Nightingale?

2

5

How do we know about the great fire of London? (adapted)

3

6A

Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past? A Roman case study. (adapted)

3

9

What was it like for children in the Second World War? (adapted)

3

18

What was it like to live here in the past? (adapted)

4

8

What were the differences between the lives of rich and poor people in Tudor times?

4

6C

Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past? A Viking case study (adapted)

4

10

What can we find out about ancient Egypt from what has survived?

5

11

What was it like for children living in Victorian Britain?

5

13

How has life in Britain changed since 1948?

5

14

Who were the ancient Greeks?


111

6

16

How can we find out about the Indus Valley civilization?

6

19

What were the effects of Tudor exploration?

6

20

What can we learn about recent history from studying the life of a famous person


ISB HISTORY POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject History is a dynamic and evolving subject. Its study is crucial to understand a complex and interdependent world. Bearing this in mind, students in the secondary school study a wide variety of topics, from the Roman Empire to Imperial China; from Islamic Empires to the Black Peoples of America, via Renaissance Europe, The French Revolution and the conflicts of Twentieth Century Europe. Students do not only benefit from a greater comprehension of the world in which they live, however. The emphasis in History on critical thinking, selecting and interpreting complicated information, evaluating sources and writing persuasively means the subject is relevant to many other subjects and careers. Qualifications in History are well-respected by universities and are useful to students contemplating careers in Law or Business, for example.

2:

Main Text Books Used             

3:

The Roman Empire Conflict, People and Power Islamic Empires 600-1500 The Native Peoples of North America The French Revolution The Renaissance The Slave Trade Imperial China Black Peoples of America Challenge and Change Twentieth Century History: IGCSE: International Relations since 1919 An Introduction to Nineteenth-century European History, 1815-1914 The Cold War

Hodder Hodder Hodder Hodder Hodder Hodder Hodder Oxford Hodder Hodder Cambridge Hodder Heinemann

Aims 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 o Grade 8 o Grade 9

History fires pupils' curiosity and imagination, moving and inspiring them with the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. It helps pupils develop their own identities through an understanding of history at personal, local, national and international levels. It helps them to ask and answer questions of the present by engaging with the past. 112


Pupils find out about the history of Europe and the world. They develop a chronological overview that enables them to make connections within and across different periods and societies. They investigate relationships within the wider world, and relate past events to the present day. As they develop their understanding of the nature of historical study, pupils ask and answer important questions, evaluate evidence, identify and analyse different interpretations of the past, and learn to substantiate any arguments and judgements they make. They appreciate why they are learning what they are learning and can debate its significance. 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11 o Grade 12 o Grade 13

IGCSE AS A2

The aims of studying History at KS4 and KS5 are to: • • • • • • •

4:

develop an interest in the past and an appreciation of human endeavor; acquire an understanding and a sound knowledge of selected periods or themes; gain an awareness of historical concepts such as change and continuity, cause and effect; appreciate the nature and diversity of historical sources and methods used by historians; grasp a variety of approaches to aspects and periods of History and differing interpretations of particular historical issues; think independently and make informed judgments of issues; cultivate empathy with people living in diverse places and at different times.

Main Curriculum Content 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7:

What is History? The Roman Empire Medieval Realms Native Americans

o

Grade 8:

The Renaissance Islamic Empires The French Revolution The Slave Trade

o

Grade 9:

Imperial China Black Peoples of America; A World Study after 1900

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Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 IGCSE: USSR and Eastern Europe The United Nations The peace treaties of 1919–23 Collapse of Peace by 1939 Containing Communism Start of Cold War League of Nations

o

Grade 11 IGCSE Weimar Republic The Nazi regime The Nazis take power

o

Grade 12 & 13 AS/A2 Paper 1 and 3 offered alternately year by year. Paper 1: International History 1945–91 The Origins of the First World War, 1870–1914 The French Revolution Nationalism The Russian Revolution The ‘New Imperialism’, c. 1870–1900 Paper 3: Modern European History 1789–1939 The Development of the United Nations, 1945–91 The Origins of the Cold War after World War II The Globalisation of the Cold War The Crisis of Communism and the end of the Cold War The Nuclear Arms Race, 1945–91

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5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 o Grade 8 o Grade 9

The internal score is recorded as a percentage. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as tests, assignments, class work and effort. Tests: include mid-unit tests and end-of-unit tests. They also include mid-term exams and final exams. Assignments: include case studies, projects, research activity, essays and empathetic writing exercises alongside other homework tasks. Assignments can be due by the next class or can be allocated a longer period for research or project work. Class work: includes all in-class marked activities such as, problem-solving, role play and case-studies. Effort: At the end of each semester students will receive a mark for their effort in class activity and promptness in completion of assignments and class work. This mark will also reflect students’ classroom behavior and the level of interest shown towards the subject.

Grading Weights

Key Stage 3

Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%

Levels In addition, students will be given KS3 levels based on the National Curriculum for England and Wales upon completion of each unit. These are continuously assessed and based on all students’ work and class contributions.

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

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE

Internal Grading weights Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Assessment will be based on IGCSE mark schemes, aside from effort marks and marks for projects such as presentations. Testing Students will be regularly tested throughout the school year upon completion of specific units or when deemed appropriate. These will include mock examinations. EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT IGCSE Candidates will be entered for the following papers: (i) Paper 1; (ii) Paper 2; (iii) Paper 4. Paper 1 (2 hours) will consist of two sections. Section A (Core Content) will contain eight questions, including four on the 20th century Core content. Candidates will choose two questions from the 20th century Core questions. Section B (Depth Studies) will contain two questions on each of the Depth Studies. Candidates must answer one question. All questions on Paper 1 will be structured into three parts and will be based on stimulus material.

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Paper 2 (2 hours). Candidates will answer questions on the 20th Century option. The topics will be prescribed each year and will be taken from the Core Content. Each option will include a collection of source material relating to the prescribed topic, and a series of questions based on the material. For the examination in 2011 the topic will be: The Cold War, 1945–9 Paper 4, Alternative to Coursework (1 hour). On each of the Depth Studies one question will be set. It will be source-based and will be structured into several parts. It will test all the Assessment Objectives. Candidates must answer one question. o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

Internal Grading Weights Key Stage 4&5 Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Assessment will be based on AS/A2 mark schemes, aside from effort marks and marks for projects such as presentations. EXTERNAL ASSESMENT Paper 1 or 3 (3 hours) Section A: Candidates answer one compulsory source-based question (25 marks) Section B: Candidates answer three essays questions from a choice of seven. (25 marks per essay)

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ISB INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY (ICT) - PRIMARY Information and Communication Technology (ICT) prepares pupils to participate in a rapidly changing world in which work and other activities are increasingly transformed by access to varied and developing technology. Pupils use ICT tools to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information responsibly, creatively and with discrimination. They learn how to employ ICT to enable rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures. Increased capability in the use of ICT promotes initiative and independent learning; with pupils being able to make informed judgments about when and where to use ICT to best effect, and consider its implications for home and work, both now and in the future. General Aims and Objectives The overall aim for Information and Communication Technology is to enrich learning for all pupils and to ensure that teachers develop confidence and competence to use Information and Communication Technology in the effective teaching of their subject. Information and communication technology offers opportunities for pupils to: • Develop their ICT capability and understand the importance of information and how to select and prepare it. • Develop their skills in using hardware and software so as to enable them to manipulate information. • Develop their ability to apply ICT capability and ICT to support their use of language and communication. • Explore their attitudes towards ICT, its value for themselves, others and society, and their awareness of its advantages and limitations. • Develop good Health and Safety attitudes and practice. These Aims and Objectives will be pursued through the following steps;  

During the Foundation Stages the pupils explore ICT work that progresses through the Stepping Stones working towards the Early Learning Goals. During KS1 the pupils explore ICT and learn how to use it confidently and with purpose to achieve specific outcomes. They start to use ICT to develop their ideas and record their creative work. They become familiar with hardware and software. During KS2 the pupils use a wider range of ICT tools and information sources to support their work in other subjects. They develop their research skills and decide what information is appropriate for their work. They begin to question the plausibility and quality of information. They learn how to amend their work and present it in a way that suits its audience.

Organisation The revised ICT programme of study is divided into four main themes:    

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Finding things out Developing ideas and making things happen Exchanging and sharing information Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses.


These strands should be combined so that breadth and balance is achieved. ICT will be taught in half term blocks. ICT will be taught in a way which emphasizes it’s cross curricular links although there will still be the need for subject based teaching. Wherever possible various programs should be used in conjunction with the teaching of the National Curriculum. Foundation Stage During the Foundation Stage, pupils should be given the opportunities to:       

Show an interest in ICT Seek to acquire basic skills in turning on and operating some ICT equipment. Know how to operate simple equipment. Complete a simple program on a computer. Use ICT to perform simple functions, such as selecting a channel on the TV remote control. Use a mouse and keyboard to interact with age-appropriate computer software. Find out about and identify uses of everyday technology and uses of information and communication technology and programmable toys to support their learning.

Key Stage 1 Knowledge, skills and understanding 1.

Pupils should be taught how to:

A

Gather information from a variety of sources (people, books, databases, CD-ROMs, videos and TV)

B

Enter and store information in a variety of forms (storing information in a prepared database, saving work)

C

Retrieve information that has been stored (using a CD-ROM, loading saved work).

Developing ideas and making things happen 2. Pupils should be taught: A

To use text, tables, images and sound to develop their ideas.

B

How to select from and add to information they have retrieved for particular purposes.

C

How to plan and give instructions to make things happen (programming a floor turtle, placing instructions in the right order).

D

To try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations (trying out different colours on an image, using an adventure game or simulation.

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Exchanging and sharing information 3. Pupils should be taught: A

How to share their ideas by presenting information in a variety of forms (text, images, tables and sounds).

B

To present their completed work effectively for public display.

Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses 4. Pupils should be taught to: A

Review what they have done to help them develop their ideas.

B

Describe the effects of their actions.

C

Talk about what they might change in future work.

Breadth of study 5. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through: A

Working with a range of information to investigate the different ways it can be presented (information about the Sun presented as a poem, picture or sound pattern).

B

Exploring a variety of ICT tools (floor turtle, word processing software, and adventure game).

C

Talking about the uses of ICT inside and outside school.

Key Stage 2 Knowledge, skills and understanding The children should be: Finding things out 1. Pupils should be taught: A

To talk about what information they need and how they can find and use it (searching the Internet or a CD-ROM, using printed material, asking people).

B

How to prepare information for development using ICT, including selecting suitable sources, finding information, classifying it and checking it for accuracy (finding information from books or newspapers,

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creating a class database, classifying by characteristics and purposes, checking the spelling of names is consistent). C

To interpret information, to check it is relevant and reasonable and to think about what might happen if there were any errors or omissions.

Developing ideas and making things happen 2. Pupils should be taught: A

How to develop and refine ideas by bringing together, organising and reorganising text, tables, images and sound as appropriate (desktop publishing, multimedia presentations).

B

How to create, test, improve and refine sequences of instructions to make things happen and to monitor events and respond to them (monitoring changes in temperature, detecting light levels and turning on a light).

C

To use simulations and explore models in order to answer “What if ‌ ?â€? questions, to investigate and evaluate the effect of changing values and to identify patterns and relationships (simulation software, spreadsheet models).

Exchanging and sharing information 3. Pupils should be taught: A

How to share and exchange information in a variety of forms, including e-mail (displays, posters, animations, musical compositions).

B

To be sensitive to the needs of the audience and think carefully about the content and quality, when communicating information (work for presentation to other pupils, writing for parents, publishing on the internet).

Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses 4. Pupils should be taught to: A

Review what they and others have done to help them develop their ideas.

B

Describe and talk about the effectiveness of their work with ICT, comparing it with other methods and considering the effect it has on others for example, the impact made by a desktop-published newsletter or poster.

C

Talk about how they could improve future work.

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Breadth of study 5. During the Key Stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through: A

Working with a range of information to consider its characteristics and purposes (collecting factual data from the Internet and a class survey to compare the findings).

B

Working with others to explore a variety of information sources and ICT tools (searching the internet for information about a different part of the world, designing textile patterns using graphics software, using ICT tools to capture and change sounds).

C

Investigating and comparing the uses of ICT inside and outside school.

Assessment and Recording The ICT teacher uses a variety of methods to carry out formative, and where appropriate summative assessments while teaching each ICT study unit. At the end of each unit teachers complete online assessment sheets according to QCA statements for each unit. These assessments inform the written assessments sent to parents in December and June. Equal Opportunities We believe that all children, irrespective of background, race, gender and capability should have equal access to the curriculum as stated in each curriculum policy. Our school practice should provide opportunities that reflect the cultural diversity of our school, community and locality. SEN At the International School of Bucharest we recognise the need to cater for children with Special Educational Needs. Work is differentiated to assist children’s learning in terms of:    

learning outcomes tasks teaching methods resources

Tasks can be broken down into small steps, giving children achievable goals. Activities should reinforce children’s understanding of the subject. The more able children should be given open-ended tasks and opportunities for further research and more challenging study. Wherever possible, pupils should use computer programs that are accessible and suitable for their own abilities and age.

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The Learning Environment The computer lab will have displays about work being taught around the computer lab and on display boards. The profile of ICT should reflect its place as a core subject. Resources for the unit of work being covered should be appropriately accessible. Other sources of information should be available. Key Vocabulary being used in the current units of teaching should also be on display in the computer lab. Health and Safety Health and safety regulations in class-based lessons apply as for any other subject. When working with tools, equipment and materials, in practical activities and in different environments, including those that are unfamiliar, pupils should be taught: 1. About hazards, risks and risk control. 2. To recognise hazards, understand consequent risks and take steps to control the risks to themselves and others. 3. To manage their environment to ensure the health and safety of themselves and others. 4. To explain the steps they take to control risks. Staff Training As a school, we’re committed to helping all of our staff become computer literate. The school sponsors teachers to improve their ICT skills through studying the ECDL.

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ISB INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY (ICT) - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the Subject

Information and communication technology (ICT) prepares pupils to participate in a rapidly changing world in which work and other activities are increasingly transformed by access to varied and developing technology. Pupils use ICT tools to find, explore, analyse, exchange and present information responsibly, creatively and with discrimination. They learn how to employ ICT to enable rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures. Increased capability in the use of ICT promotes initiative and independent learning; with pupils being able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to best effect, and consider its implications for home and work both now and in the future. The overall aim for Information and Communication Technology is to enrich learning for all pupils and to ensure that teachers develop confidence and competence to use Information and Communication Technology in the effective teaching of their subject. Information and communication technology offers opportunities for pupils to:     

Develop their ICT capability and understand the importance of information and how to select and prepare it. Develop their skills in using hardware and software so as to enable them to manipulate information. Develop their ability to apply ICT capability and ICT to support their use of language and communication. Explore their attitudes towards ICT, its value for themselves, others and society, and their awareness of its advantages and limitations. Develop good Health and Safety attitudes and practice.

2 : Main Text Books Used    3:

ICT Matters 1,2,3: David Dunn, David Sutton, Liz Hankin (Heinemann) IGCE Information and Communication Technology: by Graham Brown and David Watson (Hodder Education) A/AS Level ICT: by Brian Sargent and Graham Brown (Cambridge University Press ) Aims

Key Stage 3: Learning and undertaking activities in information and communication technology (ICT) contribute to achievement of the curriculum aims for all young people to become:    124

Successful learners who enjoy learning make progress and achieve Confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society.


In Year 10 and Year 11 / IGCSE the aims are to:      

develop in students an appreciation of the range and power of computer applications; foster an interest in, enjoyment of, and confidence in the use of computing; develop students’ abilities to solve problems using computing techniques; develop an awareness in students of the place of computing in society and issues computing raises in society; provide students with a firm understanding of the basic techniques and knowledge required for computing applications; foster a desire to use computers within other interests.

In Applied ICT / Year 12 and Year 13 / AS Level and A Level the aims are to:    

4:

help develop a broad range of ICT skills and knowledge of the uses of ICT in vocational contexts, as a basis for progression into further learning in ICT-related fields, including progression from AS to A2; develop an understanding of the constituent parts, uses and applications of ICT systems within a range of organizations, including the use of basic computer networks; develop an understanding of the effect of these ICT systems on society in general; develop an understanding of the main systems life cycle and apply this understanding to workplace scenarios.

Main Curriculum Content

Year 7       

File management and introduction to the school network E-safety project (Moviemaker) Spreadsheets and modelling Presentations (endangered animals) Presentations (Loch Ness monster) Data handling (super Heroes) DTP leaflets (school leaflet)

Year 8         125

Sequencing Instructions (LOGO) Graphics - Photoshop Elements Sound project Movie project Game generation (Scratch) File management and viruses Email, features and functions Information, reliability, validity and bias


Year 9       

Animation - Pivot Stick figure Using and creating Wikis Technology in the future 3D design and Google Sketch up Cryptography Social networking Impact of ICT on society – samples

Year 10                

Types and components of a computer system Input and Output devices Storage devices and media Computer networks Data types The effects of using ICT The ways in which ICT is used System analysis and design Communication Document production Data manipulation Integration Output data Data analysis Website authoring Presentation authoring

Year 11           126

Types and components of a computer system Input and Output devices Storage devices and media Computer networks Data types The effects of using ICT The ways in which ICT is used System analysis and design Communication Document production


     

Data manipulation Integration Output data Data analysis Website authoring Presentation authoring

Year 12          

ICT systems How organizations use ICT1 The impact of ICT on society 1 The system life cycle Communication Document and presentation production Database and charts Integration Output Data 1 Using spreadsheets

Year 13      

How organizations use ICT 2 The impact of ICT on society 2 Computer networks Mail merge Automation Output Data 2

5 : Assessment Key Stage 3 Assessment Objectives The three assessment objectives in Computer Studies are:   

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Knowledge and understanding Problem-solving and realization Communication


Grading Weights Internal: The assessment marks are registered in the online virtual catalogue system. The students’ performance includes four parts:    

15% effort 20% classwork 50% test 15% assignments

Testing Each semester students will get at least one theory exam and two practical exams Computer Studies / Year 10 and Year 11 / IGCSE Assessment Objectives The three assessment objectives in Computer Studies are:   

Knowledge and understanding Problem-solving and realisation Communication

A description of each assessment objective follows. Knowledge and understanding Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of computing, in relation to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

the range and scope of information processing applications; the effects of the use of computers, both practical and social; the range of equipment, tools and techniques used to solve problems; the functions of the main hardware and software components of information-processing systems; appropriate terminology.

Problem-solving and realisation Students should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 128

identify problems within the field of information processing; analyse problems by considering relevant functional, practical, human and economic factors; draw up specifications for the computer-based solutions of problems; select from a range of resources those which are most suitable for solving problems; develop solutions using appropriate methods; implement solutions using equipment, tools and techniques sensibly;


7. test, evaluate and refine solutions systematically; 8. document solutions to problems.

Communication Students should be able to: 1.

interpret and organise information;

2.

recognise and present information in a variety of forms;

3.

communicate in appropriate ways information about applications of computers, problems and their solutions.

Grading Weights Internal: The assessment marks are registered in the online virtual catalogue system. The students’ performance includes four parts: 1. 2. 3. 4.

10% effort . 10% classwork 70% test 10% assignments

External: Students take IGCSE exam as external assessment at the end of the course. Students take 1 written exam and 2 practice tests. Weightings are as follows:   

Written paper Practice Test 1 Practice Test2

40% 30% 30%

Testing Each semester students will get at least one theory exam and two practical exams Applied ICT / Year 12 and Year 13 / AS Level and A Level Assessment Objectives The two Assessment Objectives in Applied Information and Communication Technology are: 1. Practical Skills 2. Knowledge and understanding 129


A description of each assessment objective follows. Practical Skills At AS level candidates should be able to:        

select appropriate software for the task; communicate effectively with other ICT users using e-mail and search for appropriate information using the internet; prepare, create, amend and edit documents and interactive presentations; create both flat-file and relational database structures, add data, check the data entry, perform searches, reorganize data by sorting and present calculated values based on the data; create graphs and charts; integrate data from several sources; output data in different forms; create and test a data model using a spreadsheet, extract and summarise data in a variety of forms.

Knowledge and understanding At AS level candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in relation to: 1. the functions and uses of the main hardware and software components of ICT systems including portable communication systems; 2. the ways in which organizations use ICT; 3. the impact on society of the use of ICT in the home; 4. the stages of the systems life cycle and the methods used within each of these stages; 5. ICT and computing terminology.

Practical Skills At A2 level candidates should be able to fulfil all of the practical skills from AS level and: 1. create a mail merged document using a word processor and data handling package; 2. create an automated procedure which enables a user to select both the required document and the data to merge it with;

Knowledge and understanding At A2 level candidates should be able to demonstrate all the knowledge and understanding from AS level and extend their knowledge and understanding in relation to: 1. the ways in which an extensive range of organizations use information and communication technology; 2. the impact on society of the use of a wide range of ICT online applications; 3. the networking of information-processing systems and the use of online services;

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Grading Weights The assessment marks are registered in the online virtual catalogue system. The students’ performance includes four parts: 1. 10% effort 2. 10% classwork 3. 70% test 4. 10% assignments Testing Written Exam: AS Level students will get 4 theory exams and A Level students will get 6 theory exams. Practical Exam: AS Level students will get 7 practical exams and 9 practical exams. Last 2 exams will be from the past papers

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ISB MATHEMATICS POLICY - PRIMARY There are four main purposes to this policy:    

To establish an entitlement for all pupils; To establish expectations for teachers of this subject; To promote continuity and coherence across the school; To state the school’s approaches to this subject.

Introduction Mathematics equips pupils with a uniquely powerful set of tools to understand and change the world. These tools include logical reasoning, problem-solving skills, and the ability to think in abstract ways. One of our aims in teaching Mathematics is to equip children to think for themselves. This may be best achieved by providing opportunities for the exploration of the order, pattern and relationships, which form the basis of Mathematics. Certain skills in calculation, and knowledge of facts, are necessary and these should be developed, using a variety of methods, including practical work, problem solving and mathematical investigation that are meaningful to the children. Expectations Levels mentioned refer to The National Curriculum for England & Wales levels. By the end of Key Stage 1, the performance of the great majority of the pupils should be within the range of levels 1 to 3. Most pupils are expected to achieve level 2. By the end of Key Stage 2, the performance of the great majority of the pupils should be within the range of levels 3 to 5. Most pupils are expected to achieve level 4.

ISB aims to:        132

provide a relevant, challenging and enjoyable curriculum for all pupils that stimulate interest and curiosity meet the requirements of the National Curriculum programmes of study make full use of the National Numeracy Framework for teaching Mathematics to cover the National Curriculum in ways which give necessary emphasis to numeracy skills promote Mathematics as an essential element of communication, which allows pupils to describe, illustrate, interpret, predict and explain through use of appropriate mathematical concepts and vocabulary show pupils the fascination of Mathematics and promote ways of experiencing Mathematics which harness their imagination, initiative and flexibility of mind and show how it relates to their lives. encourage pupils to work systematically and to show a respect for accuracy encourage pupils to work independently and with others.


 

developmental imagery enable pupils to experience success

Entitlement and Curriculum Provision

During the Early Years Foundation Stage, our aim is for pupils to cover a broad curriculum that leads towards achieving the national expectations as described in the Practice Guidance for the Early Years Foundation Stage. In this way, the pupils are ready to take a full part in the dedicated Mathematics lesson by the end of the Reception year. In order to achieve this, lessons comprise of: a whole class introduction, involving some counting, with finger games, number rhymes and songs; and a plenary for the whole class to discuss what has been learnt and for the teacher to assess and reward progress. The pupils may undertake group activities at the same time or activities may be structured across the school day, according to the pupils’ age, stage of development and level of maturity. From Year 1, all pupils have a dedicated 60 minute Mathematics lesson every day. Teaching and Learning We aim to provide all pupils with some direct teaching every day, which is oral, interactive and stimulating. Teaching styles and lesson structure provide opportunities for pupils to consolidate their previous learning, use and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills, pose and ask questions, investigate mathematical ideas, reflect on their own learning and make links with other work. Our approach to teaching is based on four key principles:  a dedicated mathematics lesson every day  direct teaching and interactive oral work  an emphasis on mental calculation  activities differentiated in a manageable way so that all pupils are engaged in  mathematics related to a common theme, unless group objectives are diversely  different

As much time as possible, is spent each lesson in direct teaching and questioning of the whole class, groups or individuals. There is an appropriate range of elements in the teaching, namely directing, instructing, demonstrating, explaining and illustrating, questioning and discussing, consolidating, evaluating responses and summarising. Pupils are encouraged to make decisions, communicate their understanding to others and to reason. Teachers aim to create an environment where pupils are secure and feel confident in being able to take risks in their learning. Teaching Mathematics to a whole key stage requires careful organisation Teachers are responsible for planning and teaching all elements of the Mathematics curriculum to their pupils. The Mathematics coordinator provides support and guidance to all teachers.

133


Assessment and Recording Teachers are encouraged to keep their own informal records of those pupils whose progress is markedly different from that which is expected. These informal records are notes of anything which surprises them, either in terms of a lack of understanding or exceptionally good progress. During the last week of each half term the Rising Stars assessments are completed by each child from Years 1 to 6. Teachers use the results from the Rising Stars assessments and classroom observations to complete the class tracker. This clearly shows the progress of each child against the learning objectives for their year group. This information is also used to set individual targets for students which are recorded on a pro forma on the inside front cover of their exercise books. At the end of each school year the information from the class tracker is transferred to an individual record sheet and placed in the child’s portfolio. At the end of each academic year, SATs are completed by Years 2 and 6, optional SATs by Years 3 to 5, and Year 1 completes the fifth Rising Stars test. On entering and leaving Reception, children are assessed using the computer based PIPS assessment.

At both the end of the first term and at the end of each year, teachers use all records to support them in writing reports to parents. One good quality piece of work each term is annotated and added to each child’s individual portfolio, as evidence of achievement. Initial unit assessments are to be conducted at the beginning of each unit to inform planning and adapt groupings within the class. The exact form, be it discussion, question and answers, written questions or observations, is at the teacher’s discretion and must be appropriate to the age and stage, as well as taking into account different learning styles.

Continuity and Progression The yearly teaching objectives and the block planning sheets are used consistently by all teachers to ensure continuity and progression across the school.

Inclusion All pupils are included in the daily Mathematics lessons and have experience of direct, interactive and lively teaching appropriate for their age and stage of development. 134


During the Mental Maths session, teachers use a mixture of questions directed at the whole class and some questions pitched specifically at particular groups or individuals within the class, in order to ensure the involvement of all pupils. Teachers leave sufficient ‘thinking time’ after questions and use a balance of open and closed questions. During the main teaching activity, teachers plan activities, which are differentiated around a single mathematical theme. Across each week all pupils have the opportunity discuss and show their learning during the plenary. Learning Resources Shared resources are stored in the Resource room, next to the staff room, in three clearly labelled cupboards. It is expected that staff take resources they need for their classes and return them in a good condition, and in a timely manner. Classroom resources are attractively labelled and stored in easily accessible positions in the classroom. If staff require any new Maths equipment they should ask the Maths coordinator, who will make every effort to organise the purchase of the requested items locally or will order them in Spring from international suppliers, ready for delivery the following September.

The Use of Calculators These should be used judiciously and must never interfere with, or be a replacement for mental arithmetic activity. In the earlier years the children should become familiar with their use and children should progress, in later years, to using them for checking and for carrying out a pre-determined plan for solving a problem. There are many times when a child having a calculator actually impedes the ‘cracking’ of a problem

The Learning Environment Classrooms are stimulating learning environments. Wall displays vary according to year group, but should all be relevant to a given year group’s learning objectives and referred to regularly during classes. Where possible they may be interactive. Key vocabulary associated with the current unit will be clearly displayed in a prominent place in the classroom and referred to regularly during the unit. One board per classroom should be used to display children’s mathematical work. The learning objective should be clearly written on the board and referred to during the lesson and reviewed during the plenary.

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Homework Homework will be set for pupils according to ISB’s homework guidelines. This consists of short written exercises or tasks that consolidate and develop work experienced in lessons. These tasks are varied, interesting and fun. They must motivate and stimulate pupils’ learning and encourage good study skills and may comprise of the following:      

activities that makes use of the home context; number games or puzzles; some number facts to learn by heart; activities requiring pupils to collect data or take measurements; problems to think through and decide how they might be solved; preparing contributions to group presentations to the rest of the class.

ICT Computers may be used to encourage pupils to: · explore, describe and explain number patterns (e.g. by using a counting programme or a spreadsheet); · practise and consolidate certain number skills (e.g. by using programmes designed to sharpen the rapid recall of mental skills or to remember the names of 2-D shapes); · explore and explain patterns in data (by using data-handling applications); · estimate and compare measures of length or distance, angle and time (by using a floor robot or a program which allows the child to navigate a point around the screen); · experiment with, and discuss properties of, patterns in shape and space (by using applications that transform shapes and create geometric patterns). Planning All unit plans should be completed as a year group and should follow ISB’s pro forma. Learning objectives, Mental Maths activities, whole class teaching, group, paired or individual work, plenary, differentiation, required resources, role of support staff, key vocabulary, ICT opportunities and homework will be clearly indicated. Informal initial and end of unit assessments must also be included in planning for each unit. A photocopy of all planning will be kept in each teacher’s planning folder, in the Mathematics section. Notes from initial and end of unit assessments will be kept in the assessment section of teacher’s planning folder. A copy of all planning will also be kept in the relevant folder in the Online planning folder.

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ISB MATHEMATICS POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Mathematical thinking is important for all members of a modern society as a habit of mind for its use in the workplace, business and finance; and for personal decision-making. Mathematics is fundamental to national prosperity in providing tools for understanding science, engineering, technology and economics. It is essential in public decision-making and for participation in the knowledge economy. Mathematics equips pupils with uniquely powerful ways to describe, analyse and change the world. It can stimulate moments of pleasure and wonder for all pupils when they solve a problem for the first time, discover a more elegant solution, or notice hidden connections. Pupils who are functional in mathematics and financially capable are able to think independently in applied and abstract ways, and can reason, solve problems and assess risk. Mathematics is a creative discipline. The language of mathematics is international. The subject transcends cultural boundaries and its importance is universally recognised. Mathematics has developed over time as a means of solving problems and also for its own sake.

2:

Main Text Books Used      

3:

Maths Links Years 7 - 9: Student Book, Homework Book, and CD – by B. Housden, K. Frazer, S. Raw, and S. Sullivan (Oxford University Press) IGCSE Mathematics, by Ric Pimentel and Terry Wall Pure Mathematics 1, by Neill and Quadling (Cambridge University Press). Pure Mathematics 2&3, by Neill and Quadling (Cambridge University Press). Mechanics 1, by Quadling (Cambridge University Press). Statistics 1, by Dobbs and Miller (Cambridge University Press).

Aims 

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 o Grade 8 o Grade 9 The goal of the mathematics program at ISB is to provide students with the ideas, concepts, and attitudes that are essential for further academic study and which will enable them to function confidently and intelligently in a rapidly changing society. To help students adapt to an ever-changing world, the math department stresses problem solving, reasoning, logic, and communication in all of its course offerings to fulfil its purpose of helping students become mathematically literate. We are committed to the belief that each student can

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experience a feeling of success and accomplishment by developing his/her mathematical knowledge and understanding.

Learning and undertaking activities in mathematics contribute to achievement of the curriculum aims for all young people to become: • successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve • confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives • responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society. 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE

The aims of the IGCSE syllabus are to enable students to: 1. develop their mathematical knowledge and oral, written and practical skills in a way which encourages confidence and provides satisfaction and enjoyment; 2. read mathematics, and write and talk about the subject in a variety of ways; 3. develop a feel for number, carry out calculations and understand the significance of the results obtained; 4. apply mathematics in everyday situations and develop an understanding of the part which mathematics plays in the world around them; 5. solve problems, present the solutions clearly, check and interpret the results; 6. develop an understanding of mathematical principles; 7. recognise when and how a situation may be represented mathematically, identify and interpret relevant factors and, where necessary, select an appropriate mathematical method to solve the problem; 8. use mathematics as a means of communication with emphasis on the use of clear expression; 9. develop an ability to apply mathematics in other subjects, particularly science and technology; 10. develop the abilities to reason logically, to classify, to generalise and to prove; 11. appreciate patterns and relationships in mathematics; 12. produce and appreciate imaginative and creative work arising from mathematical ideas; 13. develop their mathematical abilities by considering problems and conducting individual and cooperative enquiry and experiment, including extended pieces of work of a practical and investigative kind; 14. appreciate the interdependence of different branches of mathematics; 15. acquire a foundation appropriate to their further study of mathematics and of other disciplines. o o

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Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2


The aims of the A Level syllabus are to enable students to: 1. develop their mathematical knowledge and skills in a way which encourages confidence and provides satisfaction and enjoyment; 2. develop an understanding of mathematical principles and an appreciation of mathematics as a logical and coherent subject; 3. acquire a range of mathematical skills, particularly those which will enable them to use applications of mathematics in the context of everyday situations and of other subjects they may be studying; 4. develop the ability to analyse problems logically, recognise when and how a situation may be represented mathematically, identify and interpret relevant factors and, where necessary, select an appropriate mathematical method to solve the problem; 5. use mathematics as a means of communication with emphasis on the use of clear expression; 6. acquire the mathematical background necessary for further study in this or related subjects.

4:

Main Curriculum Content     

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 Number: Integers and decimals, Fractions, Calculation and measure, Percentages, ratio and proportion, Calculations. Algebra: Sequences and functions, Expressions and formulas, Integers, Functions and graphs, Expressions and equations, Sequences and graphs. Shape, Space and Measure: Measures, 2-D shapes and constructions, 3-D shapes and constructions. Handling Data: Processing data, Probability, Surveys and data. o

   

   

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Grade 8

Number: Integers, Fractions, decimals and percentages, Calculations, Ratio and proportion. Algebra: Expressions and formulae, Equations and graphs, Sequences and roots, Simplifying expressions, Algebraic fractions, Solving linear equations. Shape, Space and Measure: Measures, Angles and 3-Dshapes, Transformations, Constructions and 3Dshapes. Handling Data: Probability, Collecting and representing data, Analysing and interpreting data. o Grade 9 Number: Decimals, Fractions, Percentages, Factors, Standard form, Significant figures, Rounding, Indices. Algebra: Equations, Inequalities, Formulae, Graphs, Algebraic expressions, Coordinates and the straight line Shape, Space and Measure: Circle, Loci, Pythagoras’ theorem, Three-figure bearings, Trigonometry. Handling Data: Statistics, Probability.


  

 

 

 

5:

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 Number: Set notation and language, Limits of accuracy, Ratio, proportion and measure of rate, Percentage. Algebra: Functions and graphs, Algebraic representation and manipulation, Equations and inequalities, Indices, Linear programming. o Grade 11 IGCSE Shape, Space and Measure: Geometrical relationships, Angle properties, Trigonometry, Vectors, Matrices, Symmetry, Transformations. Statistics and Probability: Handling data, Probability. o Grade 12 AS Pure Mathematics 1 (Quadratics, Functions, Coordinate geometry, Circular measure, Trigonometry, Vectors, Series, Differentiation, Integration) Mechanics 1 – Year 12 (Forces and equilibrium, Kinematic of motion in a straight line, Newton’s law of motion, Energy, work and power) o Grade 13 A2 Pure Mathematics 3 (Algebra , Logarithmic and exponential functions, Trigonometry, Differentiation, Integration, Numerical solution of equations, Vectors, Differential equations, Complex numbers) Statistics 1 (Representation of data, Measures of location, Measures of spread, Probability, Permutations and combinations, Probability distributions, The binomial distribution, Expectation and variance of a random variable, The normal distribution)

Assessment

Each semester grade is a composite of Tests, Assignments, Class work, and Effort, with the weights below: Key Stage 3

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Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%


Key Stage 4&5

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

Tests:   

Three unit tests will be given each semester. A midterm exam will be given at the end of the first semester based on all the chapters covered. A final test will be assigned in the last week of the school year, consisting questions from the entire subject studied.

Assignments:   

There will be homework assignments and projects. Homework will be assigned daily and discussed the following day. Projects will be given during the school year. They will be done at home and turn in by the due dates. For students who don’t meet the first deadline, a second one will be established with a penalty of 10%. A list of answers is not acceptable to turn in. ALL problems, work, and answers are due.

Class work:    

All work is to be neat and shown in the notebook. Grades for oral presentation will be given at the end of each semester. Quizzes will be given regularly. May be "pop" or announced. Incomplete class work will be considered homework, beside the daily assigned homework.

Effort:  

Each semester all the students will get at least a mark for the effort in class activity and completion of homework assignments and projects. The mark will reflect student’s behaviour and interest shown to the subject.

The final grade is the mean of the semester grades.

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ISB MUSIC POLICY – WHOLE SCHOOL

At the International School of Bucharest we value music as a unique way of communication that both inspires and motivates children. It gives opportunities for personal expression and can play an important part in the personal development of the individual. Music represents our society and culture in all its forms, both past and present. Therefore the teaching and learning of music enables children to better appreciate the world they live in and the variety of cultures they share it with and help them to understand and feel part of their own and the wider world community.

General Aims and Objectives:       

Provide experiences and resources which promote knowledge, skills and understanding in music, in relation to both their own and others’ musical traditions. Provide learning experiences in music which promote confidence and the social, emotional and educational development of the student. Build confidence by encouraging students to perform to different audiences. Support progression and continuity in students’ musical experiences and the development of knowledge and understanding. Influence pupils’ development in and out of school by fostering personal development and maturity, creating a sense of achievement and self-worth, and increasing pupils’ ability to work with others in a group context. Develop the cultural understanding of musical traditions throughout time and the part music plays in national and global culture. Develop creative and compositional skills - including song writing, to work individually, in musical groups of different sizes and as a class and to make links between music and other subjects and areas of the Curriculum.

Main Curriculum Content KS 1 and KS2:  Children’s musical experiences will include regular involvement in performing, composing, listening and appraising.  Children will develop musical and technical skills through a variety of musical activities and the use of a range of appropriate resources.  Children will develop an understanding of the musical elements and their use.  Children will build a musical repertoire and technical vocabulary.  Children will regularly listen to and appraise their own work as well as the work of others.  Children will perform individually or within a group to different audiences for special occasions.  Children will explore a widening range of musical skills in response to varying stimuli.

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KS 3: Pupils are taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through three areas of knowledge:   

Music theory Music history Styles within classical music

Music Curriculum Planning The ISB follows the National Curriculum for England and Wales, QCA Scheme of Work for Music. There are opportunities for children of all abilities to develop their skills and knowledge in each unit. The planned progression built into the scheme of work means that children are increasingly challenged as they move through the school. The medium/short term plans made by the music teacher will give details for each unit of work and each daily lesson. Contribution of Music in other subjects Where possible music will be linked with other subjects to reinforce learning. English  Children develop their language skills through singing songs with attention to diction, meaning, rhythm and rhyme.  Music is also used to stimulate discussion or creative writing.  Through working with others in a musical setting, children develop their ability to communicate ideas effectively. Mathematics  Music contributes to the teaching of mathematics through observing patterns and processes.  Talent in music is often linked with talent in mathematics as the rhythm and structure of music is mathematically based (e.g. the metre – number sequencing; rhythmic and melodic repetition – patterning; a rhythm or a melody played backwards - symmetry). Personal, social and health education (PSHE) and citizenship  Through the common goal of making music, children learn to work effectively with other people and build up good relationships. Music is the basis of many social activities and has an important role to play in the personal development of many young people. It also has a vital role to play in building selfconfidence.  We encourage children to reflect on the important effect that music has on people’s moods, senses and quality of life. Children at ISB have the opportunity to encounter music from many cultures and through their growing knowledge and understanding of music, are encouraged to develop more positive attitudes towards other cultures and societies.

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Extra-Curricular Opportunities The school has a choir which practices regularly through the school year. Children from KS2 are entitled to join the choir and are actively encouraged to do so. Opportunities to perform both at school and outside are organised. After school clubs are provided for piano and other instruments where possible. Teaching and Learning Styles At ISB we make music an enjoyable learning experience. We encourage children to participate in a variety of musical experiences through which we aim to build up the confidence of all children. We recognise that there are children of widely different musical abilities in all classes so we provide suitable learning opportunities for all children by matching the challenge of the task to the ability of the child. We achieve this in a variety of ways:  Setting common tasks which are open-ended and encourage a variety of responses.  Setting tasks of increasing difficulty for more able children.  Grouping children in a variety of different ability groups which includes differentiation by ability, setting tasks that support, consolidate and extend children as needed. Organisation In Key Stage 1, 2 and 3, each year group has a weekly timetabled lesson with the music specialist teacher. Assessment and Recording The music teacher will asses children’s work in music by making informal judgments about achievement of teaching and learning objectives as these are observed during lessons. At the end of each QCA Unit the music teacher makes a summary judgement about the work of each pupil in relation to the expectations set by the QCA scheme of work. These are recorded and an assessment tick sheet. They are used for assessing the child’s progress, completing reports which will be sent to parents two times a year and as a base for future planning. (See School Policy for Assessment and reporting). In KS 3 the assessment marks are registered in the online virtual catalogue system. The students’ performance includes four parts:    

20% class work ( skills& behaviour ) 15% assignments (projects, researching material ,planning activities) 15% effort (punctuality, correct uniform, participation ) 50% test ( theory 40%, practical 60% )

Health and safety     144

Instruments will be put away after each session. Children are encouraged to take care when transporting instruments. Children are taught not to step over instruments and to handle them with care and respect. Appropriate steps are taken to ensure hygienic use of blowing instruments such as recorders.


The role of the Music Coordinator is to:        

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Implement policy development and review, including the continuing successful implementation of both the Music curriculum and Music policy. Support colleagues with ideas and advice on how to introduce music into the classroom and to support other areas of the curriculum. Take responsibility for the purchase and organisation of Music resources. Encourage the professional development of staff. Organise opportunities for children to share their work by performing in the school choir, school productions and assemblies where appropriate. Maintain an accurate inventory of all equipment. Maintain the musical instruments by making sure they are cared for and in good working order. Play musical instruments and prepare music for assemblies, productions and other activities as requested.


ISB PHYSICAL EDUCATION POLICY - WHOLE SCHOOL This policy reflects the values and philosophy of The International School of Bucharest in relation to the teaching of Physical Education. It gives a framework to which all staff, teaching and non-teaching work. It gives guidance on planning, teaching and assessment. This policy should be used in conjunction with the Scheme of Work for Physical Education that can be utilised as a springboard to develop the individual teacher’s ideas in a personal way knowing they are within the school’s guidelines. This should enable teachers to design a programme of activities that is responsive to their own and children’s skills and needs in art at that particular time. Subject Aims The aims of P.E. are:          

To develop a range of physical skills; To develop stamina and strength; To express ideas in dance form; To develop an appreciation of fair play, honest competition and good sportsmanship; To develop an appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of movement; To learn how to cooperate with each other and work successfully in pairs, groups and teams; To develop physical and mental coordination, self control and confidence; To develop self confidence through the understanding of one’s own capabilities and limitations; To provide opportunities for a wide experience of all six physical activities in the curriculum; To monitor each child so that they retain a lifelong interest in all aspects of PE and recognize the importance of living and maintaining a healthy life.

The subject comprises of Programmes of Study, which are divided into levels of increasing challenge. In learning PE, children will have the opportunity to achieve the following objectives

The objectives for Key Stage 1

For pupils to have the experience of enabling them:      

146

To perform confidently basic ways of moving from one place to another, for example running, jumping, rolling, climbing, transferring weight from one body part to another and holding the body still; To perform contrasting movements including quick and slow, strong and light, wide and narrow and high and low; To use apparatus to get on/off, under/over and along to absorb shock when jumping or moving from apparatus of various heights; To appreciate and respond to contrasting sounds in music, percussion and words; To propel a variety of objects, including balls of various sizes, quoits, beanbags, hoops, and so on; To undertake simple ball skills, e.g. throw, catch, bounce, kick;


  

To play simple games with and alongside others in order to experience being a member of a team; To become familiar with various forms of apparatus and to set it out and push it away efficiently and safely; To explore the potential for physical activities in the immediate environment.

The objectives for Key Stage 2 For pupils to have the experience of enabling them to:           

Combine basic actions such as travelling and turning in the form of a sequence; Perform sequences on the floor and apparatus on different heights; Repeat and refine the original sequence; Reproduce some specific movement including named skills such as forward roll and headstands; Absorb shock and momentum on landing and travelling from different levels of apparatus; Respond physically and aesthetically to rhythms, moods, qualities in music, words and sounds; Develop and repeat movements in dance; Strike/propel a ball with reasonable accuracy by using different parts of the body and various implements; Invent their own games selecting appropriate equipment, size and shape of playing area and number of players; Participate in team games involving various numbers of players and conform to rules; Experience outdoor and adventurous activities.

The objectives for Key Stage 3-4

For pupils to have the experience of enabling them to:           

147

Become skilful and intelligent performers; Acquire and develop skills, performing with increasing physical competence and confidence, in a range of physical activities and contexts; Learn how to select and apply skills, tactics and compositional ideas to suit activities that need different approaches and ways of thinking; Develop their ideas in a creative way; Set targets for themselves and compete against others, individually and as team members; Understand what it takes to persevere, succeed and acknowledge others’ success; Respond to a variety of challenges in a range of physical contexts and environments; Take the initiative, lead activity and focus on improving aspects of their own performance; Discover their own aptitudes and preferences for different activities; Take informed decisions about the importance of exercise in their lives; Develop positive attitudes to participation in physical activity;


The subject comprises of Programs of Study and Scheme of Work that reflect the aim of organizing levels of ability and challenges. The children will undertake a balanced programme that takes account of abilities, aptitudes, physical, emotional and intellectual development. Curriculum and School Organization The curriculum covers four areas:  ATHLETICS  DANCE  GAMES  GYM There will be a progression from Early Years to Y11 as outlined in the thematic and subject timetables at the end of this policy. Each group from Y1 – Y11 is allocated 2 periods of PE per week. Each group of lessons is allocated an area of activity and each area is planned and matched against the Program of Study to ensure suitable progression, and full coverage of the curriculum throughout the school. Planning at a year group level ensures that classes within a year group cover the same areas of work. Planning at a Key Stage and whole school level ensures continuity and progression within the subject and avoids unnecessary duplication or omission. Detailed curriculum content and progression can be found in the Scheme of Work for PE. Key Stage 1 During Key Stage 1, children build on their natural enthusiasm for movement, using it to explore and learn about their world. They start to play and work with other children in pairs and small groups. By watching, listening and experimenting with movement and ideas, they develop their skills in movement and their coordination, and enjoy expressing and testing themselves in a variety of situations. Key Stage 2 During Key Stage 2, children enjoy being active and using their creativity and imagination in physical activity. They learn new skills, find out how to use them in different ways, and link them to make actions, phrases and sequences of movement. They enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They develop an understanding of how to succeed in different activities and learn how to evaluate and recognize their own success. Key Stage 3 During Key Stage 3, pupils become more expert in their skills and techniques, and learn how to apply them in different activities. They start to understand what makes an effective performance and how to apply these principles to their own and others’ work. They learn to take the initiative and make decisions for themselves about what to do to improve performance. They start to identify the types of activity they prefer, and take a variety of roles, such as leader and official.

148


Key Stage 4 During Key Stage 4, pupils tackle complex and demanding activities, applying their knowledge of skills, techniques and effective performance. They decide whether to get involved in physical activity that is mainly focused on competing or performing, on promoting health and well being, or developing personal fitness. They also, decide which roles suit them best including performer, coach, choreographer, leader and official. The view they have of their skilfulness and physical competence gives them the confidence to get involved in exercise and activity out of school and in later life. The competitive games activities are compulsory throughout key stage 1 to 3. In Key Stage 4, although pupils can choose others activities instead of competitive team and individual games, the school continues to provide these for pupils who wish to take up this option. Extra – curricular Activities These are an important part of a child’s education. They enable pupils to develop particular skills and further their interests in one or more sporting activities. It helps to introduce a competitive element in team games and promote cooperation and a sense of good sportsmanship. In addition to the school clubs offered by other members of staff, the school is also active in competitions like:  Football  Basketball  Volleyball  Athletics Time Allocation: Early Years 4% KS1 8% KS2 8% KS3 6.5% KS4 3% Classroom Organization and Teaching Style Specialists PE teachers deliver Physical Education to all classes. Assessment, Recording and Reporting See the school Policy for Marking & Assessment Resources and Accommodation The current specialist materials are stored centrally in the PE storeroom. Large pieces of equipment are stored in the Multipurpose Hall or outside play area. Staff using equipment for after school clubs is asked to consult with PE Department beforehand for access. Changing facilities are available for both boys and girls. Locker keys are available from the PE staff if personal belongings need to be stored in a locker before a lesson begins The purchase of resources is planned each year by the PE department based on the items the team bid for from the main school budget. The PE budget will reflect the priority which PE is given in the School Development plan for any one year.

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Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Year 1st Half

2nd Half

1st Half

2nd Half

1st Half

2nd Half

Y1

General games; Gymnastic skills

General General games games Dance Gymnastic skills skills

General games Gymnastic skills

General games Gymnastic skills

General games

Y2

General games; Gymnastic skills

General General games games Dance Gymnastic skills skills

General games Gymnastic skills

General games Gymnastic skills

General games

Athletics

Games skills;

Dance

Games skills; Games skills;

Games skills

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Games skills;

Dance

Games skills

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Games skills;

Gymnastics

Games skills

Gymnastics

Dance skills

Athletics

Athletics

Athletics

Games skills

Gymnastics

Games skills

Games skills

Games skills

Gymnastics

Dance skills

Athletics

Athletics

Games

Y3 Athletics

Athletics

Games skills Games skills;

Games

Y4 Athletics

Athletics

Games skills Games skills;

Games

Y5

Y6

150

Games


Volleyball

Basketball

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Volleyball

Basketball;

Football

Football

Athletics

Basketball

Volleyball

Basketball

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Basketball;

Football

Football

Athletics

Basketball

Football

Volleyball

Basketball

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Volleyball

Basketball;

Football

Football

Athletics

Basketball

Football

Volleyball

Basketball

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Athletics

Volleyball

Basketball;

Football

Football

Athletics

Basketball

Football

Volleyball

Basketball

Fitness

Fitness

Athletics

Volleyball

Basketball;

Football

Football

Athletics

Basketball

Football

Y7 Football Volleyball

Y8

Y9

Y10

Y11&12

Evaluation The Evaluation is carried out to enhance teaching and learning of PE and is the responsibility of SMT and PE staff to monitor and evaluate the curriculum provision made for PE in order that children make the greatest possible progress. As with all evaluation the Heads of School has overall responsibility for this work. Evaluation Focuses on:     

Assessing pupils’ achievements Reviewing the Programmes of Study coverage Analyzing teacher and year group planning Staff discussion Observation of PE lessons when requested by SMT

Long & Medium Term plans for each year group are kept and filed

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ISB PHYSICS POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Physics occupies a central position in science linking disciplines from mathematics to medicine and affects every aspect of our lives. It provides a worthwhile educational experience for all students, through well-designed studies of experimental and practical science, whether or not they go on to study science beyond this level. It enables students to acquire sufficient understanding and knowledge to • • •

become confident citizens in a technological world, able to take an informed interest in scientific matters recognize both the usefulness and the limitations of scientific method, and appreciate its applicability in other disciplines and in everyday life be suitably prepared for studies beyond IGCSE in pure sciences, in applied sciences or in science dependent vocational courses.

• Physics develops abilities and skills that are relevant to the study and practice of Physics, are useful in everyday life, encourage efficient and safe practice, encourage effective communication. It develops attitudes relevant to Physics such as concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative, inventiveness. It stimulates interest in the environment and caring for it. It promotes awareness that • • • •

2:

scientific theories and methods have developed, and continue to do so, as a result of cooperative activities of groups and individuals the study and practice of science are subject to social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural influences and limitations the applications of science may be both beneficial and detrimental to the individual, the community and the environment science transcends national boundaries and that the language of science, correctly and rigorously applied, is universal.

Main Text Books Used Cambridge IGCSE Physics, David Sang. Complete Physics for IGCSE, Stephen Pople; New Physics for you, for all GCSE; Keith Johnson. Advanced Physics for you, K. Johnson, S. Hewett, S. Holt, J. Miller.

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3:

Aims

Key Stage 4 o o

Grade 10 Grade 11

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2

The main aims of the IGSCE course are to encourage students to: acquire a systematic body of scientific knowledge and skills needed to apply this in new and changing situations in a range of domestic, industrial environmental contexts; acquire an understanding of scientific ideas, how they develop, the factors which affect their development and their power and their limitations; plan and carry out a range of investigations, considering and evaluating their own data and that obtained from other sources, using ICT where appropriate; evaluate in terms of their scientific understanding, the benefits and drawbacks of scientific and technological developments, including those related to the environment, personal health and quality of life, considering ethical issues where appropriate and select, organise and present information clearly and logically, using appropriate scientific terms and conventions, using ICT where appropriate. Key Stage 5 o o

Grade 12 Grade 13

AS A2

AS-Level Physics and A2-Level Physics builds upon the knowledge, understanding and skills developed within IGCSE Physics .The main aims of the course are to encourage students to: 1 Develop essential knowledge and understanding and skills in Physics; 2 Develop an understanding of the link between theory and experiment; 3 Develop an awareness of the use of ICT and instrumentation in Physics; 4 Appreciate the contribution of Physics to society and; 5 Sustain and develop their enjoyment of an interest in Physics. AS/A2 Level All the students in Year 13 who study Physics are prepared for AS Examination in Physics. 4 : Main Curriculum Content Key Stage 4 and 5 o o o o

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Grade 13

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2 AS A2

Physics involves the study of how the world around us works. This study ranges from an analysis of the fundamental particles which make up the protons, neutrons and electrons in the atom to the universe. This is achieved by finding out about and understanding Energy, Forces, Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Waves, Sound, Light, Electricity, Magnetism, Radioactivity and the Earth in Space. 153


The subject at AS/A2 Level builds on the knowledge and understanding Physics represented in the IGSCE. 5 : Assessment Key Stage 4 and 5 o o o o

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Grade 13

IGCSE 1 IGCSE 2 AS A2

Students are assessed internally. The internal score is recorded as a percentage. These marks are registered in virtual catalog and appear in the school transcirpt. Students are assessed by written and oral assessments for individual and group work such as quizzes, class participation, project work, homework, presentation, laboratory investigation, demonstrations which actively involve the students and the end of the semester exams. The aspects of the internal assessment will comprise: Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%

At the end of Year 11, the end of Year 12 and the end of Year 13, besides the internal assessment students may choose to be assessed externally by University of Cambridge International Examinations (UCIE).

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ISB PSHE Subject Policy 1:

Introduction – General Information about PSHE Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) helps to give pupils the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to lead confident, healthy, independent lives and to become informed, active, responsible citizens. Pupils are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of their school and communities. In doing so they learn to recognise their own worth, work well with others and become increasingly responsible for their own learning. They reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, tackling many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. They learn to understand and respect our common humanity, diversity and differences so that they can go on to form the effective, fulfilling relationships that are an essential part of life and learning.

2:

Main Text Books Used The materials used in PSHE including texts, handouts, quizzes, video presentations…e.g. are generally taken from http://students.discoveryeducation.com/ . PSHE coordinator holds a selection of reference materials. The PSHE coordinator supports colleagues in the teaching of PSHE and citizenship, by giving them information about current developments in the subject and by providing a strategic lead and direction for the subject in the school.

3:

Aims Personal, social and health education (PSHE) enables children to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society. We encourage our pupils to play a positive role in contributing to the life of the school and the wider community. In so doing we help develop their sense of self worth. We teach them about rights and responsibilities. They learn to appreciate what it means to be a positive member of a diverse multicultural society. The aims of personal, social and health education is to enable the children to: • • • • • • •

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know and understand what constitutes a healthy lifestyle; be aware of safety issues; understand what makes for good relationships with others; have respect for others; be independent and responsible members of the school community; develop self-confidence and self-esteem, and make informed choices regarding personal and social issues; develop good relationships with other members of the school and the wider community.


4:

Main Curriculum Content The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each year group. Course Content shall include study skills (such as active listening skills, note-taking skills, reading with a system (sq3r), organizational skills), health education (such as nutrition and a healthy diet (bulimia, obesity), allergies, germs, alcohol abuse and its effects, smoking, emergency, first aid, depression, headache, drugs…e.g.) personal and social skills (such as respect, violance, greed, bribery, anger management, carrier planning, building character, empathy, integrity, time management, honesty, frugality, setting and achieving goals…e.g.) These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: one 45 minute lesson a week over 35 weeks in total.

5:

Assessment Teachers assess the children’s work in PSHE by making informal judgements as they observe them during lessons. In PSHE there are two broad areas for assessment: •

Children's knowledge and understanding, for example, information on health, understanding of rules, understanding of health and safety procedures, and the meaning of ideas including honesty, integrity, respect. How well children can use their knowledge and understanding in developing skills and attitudes, for example through participating in discussions, group tasks and activities, managing conflict, making decisions and promoting positive relationships.

The following marking scheme is for recording the academic progress of pupils through observation of their performance during lessons. Key Stage 3

Very Good Good Average Poor Very Poor

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ISB RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SUBJECT POLICY 1:

Introduction – General Information about RE “Religious education should enable pupils to consider and respond to important questions related to their own spiritual development, the development of values and attitudes and fundamental questions concerning the meaning and purpose of life.” Religious Education should help pupils to: developing awareness of the fundamental questions of life raised by human experiences, and how religious teachings can relate to them; responding to such questions with references to the teachings and practices of religions, and to their understanding and experience; and reflecting on their own beliefs, values and experiences in the light of their study; develop a positive attitude towards other people, respecting their right to hold different beliefs from their own, and towards living in a society of diverse religions. Unless the school has a religious foundation, it is not the role of the school to encourage or discourage pupils from believing in any particular religion. Religious education is concerned with helping children learn about religion and from religion. It is not about persuading them to adopt a particular commitment. RE also recognizes the changing nature of society, including changes in religious practice and expression and the influence of religion in the local, national and global community.

2:

Main Text Books Used • • • • • • •

3:

The Usborne Internet-Linked Encyclopaedia of World Religions, Kirsteen Rogers and Clare Hickman Discovering Religions Christianity, Sue Penny (Heinemann) Discovering Religions Buddhism, Sue Penny (Heinemann) Discovering Religions Judaism, Sue Penny (Heinemann) Modern World Religions Islam, Andrew Egan (Heinemann) Modern World Religions Hinduism, Andrew Egan (Heinemann) Ethics&Religion, Joe Jenkins (Heinemann)

Aims Religious Education at ISB aims to develop knowledge and understanding of, and their ability to respond to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and the other main religious traditions of the world. Religious education can provide a rich and wide range of experiences inside and outside the classroom which give children/pupils/students opportunities to develop concepts and skills that will help them to make sense of their own experiences and beliefs, and to understand the beliefs and practices of members of faith communities. Pupils are given the opportunity to express their opinions in a balanced and considered manner taking into account the diverse views of others. Ultimately pupils are encouraged to ask "why are we here?" "What makes us human?" and "what happens when we die?" in a safe or sensitive environment which complements the "Every Child Matters" agenda. The overall aim of Religious Education is to help pupils to develop as whole people and in particular in the spiritual and moral dimensions. By widening their understanding of how we can relate to God and our fellow man, educators can play a major part in helping our young people to maximize their potential and contribute to society as well-rounded citizens. “Indoctrination and conversion are not part of the educational process and therefore have no place in religious education. Religious education is an educational subject in its own right, taught within an educational framework.” The principal aim of

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Religious Education is to enable the pupils to understand the nature of religious beliefs and practices and the importance and influence of these in the lives of believers; To enable pupils to understand the nature of Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, Muslim beliefs and practices ; To teach tolerance and challenge prejudice towards people of different faiths through providing opportunities to develop an understanding of the value of living in a multicultural, multi-faith and multi-lingual society; To help pupils reflect upon their own needs, experiences and questions and to confront what are sometimes referred to as ‘ultimate questions’; To encourage pupils to develop open minds to new and different concepts and to form their own opinions based on evidence and argument; To maintain close links with local churches and other religious communities; To learn from religions in addition to gaining knowledge and understanding about religions.

4:

Main Curriculum Content The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each year group. Course Content shall include analysis of the four major religious traditions of the world - Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Other topics are not limited to the following: Common Elements of Religions, Historical Development of World Religions, Religious Doctrines (The fundemental tenets), the articles of faith, founders, rituals, stages of life and Sects, Doctrinal Relationships, Inter-religion Differences, Cultural Variations, Geographic Variations, The Impact of Religion, The Nature of Religious Belief, Psychological Effects of Religion of Believers, Social Impact of Religions. These topics are taught over both semesters as follows: one 45 minute lesson a week over 35 weeks in total. The steering committee is aware in KS2 that there is a disparity in RE options for students. It recommends that Islamic and Orthodox studies be offered as after school clubs, rather than school courses.

5:

Assessment A student's grade will be based on multiple measures of performance. Evaluation may be based on a variety of factors, which may include, but are not limited to:

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A.

In class quizzes that show student's recognition of major doctrinal concepts.

B.

Out of class writing assignments that requires student analysis of religious ideas and practices and/or comparison of such concepts and practices across religions.

C.

In class examinations which test students' ability to analyze and compare religious ideas and practices.


D.

Key Stage 3

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Supplementary exercises requiring student reporting and evaluation of actual religious worship, in person, or through video presentation. Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%


ISB ROMANIAN POLICY - PRIMARY SCHOOL The International School of Bucharest offers one Romanian language session per week for native and nonnative students. The Romanian I (native speakers attend) lessons are held in the Romanian language room and Romanian II (non-native speakers attend) are held in their classrooms. Romanian lab, texts and other print materials, reading books appropriate for each grade, technology resources are available to enhance teaching and learning. In Romania primary school starts at the age of six and consists of grades 1 to 4. In our school year 1 corresponds to preparatory grade(in Romanian system)year2 corresponds to grade 1, year 3 to grade 2, year 4 to grade 3, year 5 to grade 4 and year 6 to grade 5(in Romanian educational system secondary school starts with grade 5). General objectives:     

Developing the capacity to understand an oral message; Developing pupils ability to orally communicate effectively ; Developing the capacity to understand written language (reading); Developing the capacity to express ideas in writing; Develop the understanding of cultural and intercultural customs and beliefs.

Curriculum Romanian language is taught following The Romanian National Curriculum. The Romanian National Curriculum is based on a functional-communicational model and aims to help children develop oral and writing skills, to offer them a communicational culture, to help them understand the cultural and linguistic environment they live in, to relate with local people, to express feelings, thoughts, ideas, opinions and to use efficiently creative approaches for problem solving related to real life. The Romanian curriculum contains:    

General objectives Lesson objectives Learning activities Contents-organized in units

Romanian programs organize the contents in units that cover all aspects of Romanian language: listening, speaking, writing, handwriting, reading, literature. The lesson objectives are designed progressively.

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In year 1 we focus on consolidating and enriching the vocabulary; learning the sounds and symbols of the alphabet; exercising the basic graphical elements for handwriting. In year 2 we learn the Romanian handwriting; practice reading and writing and studying short stories and poems. In years 3 students develop their writing, reading and comprehension skills. In years 4 and 5 we focus on building the capacity to communicate correctly orally and in writing and start the study of Romanian language grammar. In year 6 students will consolidate and complete the study of grammar concepts; develop their literature knowledge and start developing their personal reading and writing skills. Local cultures are incorporated into the curriculum in appropriate ways and the school supports specific courses, assemblies and shows.

Planning Planning must be completed by the Romanian teachers and submitted to the Romanian subject coordinator at the specified dates. The long term planning should be online and in the teacher’s files together with the short term planning. The short term planning should be designed to answer the needs and abilities of all students. Romanian programs for Romanian-first language were adapted for one lesson per week to make the lesson as valuable as possible. Teachers use varied methods, materials and technology to address individual student’s needs, abilities and learning styles. Teaching methods provide appropriately for students for whom Romanian is not the first language.

Assessment The assessment practices are made according to the evaluation standards and descriptors specified in the Romanian National Curriculum. Assessment practices include reading and writing tests at the end of each term, multi-task tests at the end of each unit, oral quizzes before starting a new lesson, continuous assessment through revision, projects and short debates on real life subjects. Teachers mark the assessments taking in consideration whether the child is or not a native speaker, the child’s age and level. In some cases we mark the student’s progress. The result of student assessments are communicated to students and parents and used for future planning to improve the learning process.

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Romanian specific events – Extra-curricular activities 1st December – Romanian National Day -Assembly 15th January – Romanian National Poet Day – Mihai Eminescu- Assembly Assemblies or shows involving parents are organized in the beginning of March. 1st March - Martisor and 8th March–Mother and Women’s Day. Parents play an important role in the learning process offering the support needed at home for completing different tasks, projects or simply listen the child reading.

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ISB ROMANIAN AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE POLICY - PRIMARY SCHOOL The Romanian as an additional language curriculum addresses to students that have no or very small knowledge of Romanian language. The program is built on three age levels:   

Level I: 6-10 years (used in primary school) Level II: 11-14 years Level III: 15-18 years

Main objectives Developing elementary capacities of oral and written communication; familiarizing with the main cultural elements specific to Romania.   

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The teacher should manage the learning process stimulating children to develop self-trust and creating a positive learning environment focusing on the value of child’s progress and not on the child’s limits. Teachers will use varied methods and strategies to create an interactive learning process based on cooperation. The evaluation of the learning process (formal and informal) will be sensitive to the specific characteristics of each group and will be adapted to the age level.


ISB ROMANIAN LANGUAGE POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Romanian is vital for communicating in and outside of the school and may be fundamental to learning after graduating from the school. Students develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate in society and employment. Students learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively. Literature in Romanian reflects the experiences of people in the country at different times and contributes to the students’ sense of cultural identity. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts.

2:

Main Text Books Used Limba română, Manual pentru clasa a VI-a, Editura Humanitas, autori: Alexandru Crișan, Sofia Dobra, Florentina Sâmihăian, Bucharest, 2008 Limba română, Manual pentru clasa a VII-a, Editura Humanitas, autori: Alexandru Crișan, Sofia Dobra, Florentina Sâmihăian, Bucharest, 2008

3:

Aims 

Key Stage 3 The aims of the course are to develop a correct and adequate usage of the Romanian language in different situations of communication, to develop the comprehension and interpretation of the texts, to enable students to situate in the context the studied materials through report to the epoch or to cultural/literal currents, to develop oral or written argumentation of opinions in different situations of the communication.

Key Stage 4 and 5 The aims of this course are to develop a correct and adequate usage of the Romanian language in different situations of communication, to enable students to express in writing and orally their attitudes and their views, to develop the comprehension and the reading skills.

4:

Main Curriculum Content 

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Key Stage 3 o Grade 7  Cartea si textul  Arta naratiunii  Arta dialogului  Arta descrierii  Epic si liric  Universul textului  Recapitulare


o

o

Grade 8  Universul cartii  Structura si compozitie  Literatura populara  Literatura culta  Epic si liric  Recapitulare Grade 9  Structura textului liric  Poezia lirica  Literatura si semnificatie  Naratiune si constructive  Textul dramatic  Sintaxa

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 12/13  Introduction  Family  Human Relationships  Young People  Everyday life  Food and drink  Health and fitness  The media  Law and order  Work and leisure  Sports  Tourism  Medicine  Education  The Environment  Technological Innovations

5

:

Assessment

--Key Stage 3 Tests, skills, end of unit, end of term, homework, class work, projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Romanian Curriculum.

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Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. --Key Stage 4 and 5 Tests, skills, end of unit, end of term, homework, class work, projects Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Romanian Curriculum. Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Key Stage 3

166

Class work

: 20%

Tests

: 50%

Assignments

: 15%

Effort

: 15%


Key Stage 4&5

167

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB SOCIOLOGY POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Sociology is the study of how people behave in a society. It teaches how society is organised, each person’s role in it and how it works. Sociology is the study of society’s beliefs, values, culture and the identities of its citizens. Sociology utilizes the scientific method when carrying out research and favours objective evidence over subjective opinion to guide its theories.

2:

Main Text Books Used Sociology Alive Third Edition – Stephen Moore An Introduction to Sociology – Ken Browne

3:

Aims          

4:

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11 IGCSE Promote candidates' awareness, knowledge and understanding of human societies Develop candidates' understanding of sociological method, including the collection, analysis and interpretation of data Provide an introduction to sociological concepts, theories and research findings Stimulate awareness of the range and limitations of sociological theory and research Promote candidates' understanding of continuity and change in social life Encourage a critical awareness of social, economic and political processes, and their effects Develop the capacity for the critical evaluation of different forms of information and evidence Promote an appreciation and understanding of individual, social and cultural diversity Enhance candidates' ability to apply sociological knowledge and understanding to their own lives and participation within society.

Main Curriculum Content 

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Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11 IGCSE • Understanding Society • Research Methods • Social Divisions and Social Class • Gender • Crime and Deviance • Media • Power and Authority • Education • Family


5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 o Grade 11

IGCSE

Students are tested internally throughout the year to monitor their progress and assign marks.

Key Stage 4&5

169

Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB SPANISH LANGUAGE POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Spanish should develop the ability to understand and communicate confidently and clearly in the foreign language using vocabulary from a variety of registers. The aims are set out below and describe the educational purposes of studying a language following The National Curriculum of England and Wales for KS 3 and the IGCSE, Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level Curriculum for KS 4 and 5.

2:

Main Text Books Used • • • • • •

3:

Amigos 1, by Vincent Everet and Amma Diaz Fernandea, Oxford University Press: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Book, CD’s, Exercises Books 1 and 2, Copymaster and Coursemaster. Amigos 2, by Vincent Everet and Amma Diaz Fernandea, Oxford University Press: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Book, CD’s, Exercises Books 1 and 2, Copymaster and Coursemaster. Amigos 3, by Vincent Everet and Amma Diaz Fernandea, Oxford University Press: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Book, CD’s, Exercises Books 1 and 2, Copymaster and Coursemaster. ¡Mola!, by Jaqueline Lopez-Cascante and Judith O’Hare, Hodder Education: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Guide, CD’s Español de primero, by Isabel Alonso de Sudea and Cathy Knill, Oxford University Press: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Book, CD’s Animo 2, Spanish A Level, by Isabel Alonso de Sudea and Vincent Everett, Oxford University Press: Students’ Book, Teacher’s Book, CD’s

Aims 

Key Stage 3 The aims of the course are to develop the ability to understand the language at a basic level, to enable the student to communicate confidently, simply but correctly and clearly in the foreign language using a core vocabulary, to form a base of skills, language and attitudes required for further study, to encourage positive attitudes to language learning and sympathetic approach to other cultures and civilizations, to further intellectual and personal development by promoting learning and social skills.

Key Stage 4 and 5 The aims of the course are the same for all students and include: to develop the ability to understand the language from a variety of registers, to enable the student to communicate confidently and clearly in the foreign language, to form a base of skills, language and attitudes required for further study, work and leisure, to encourage positive attitudes to language learning and sympathetic approach to other cultures and civilizations., to further intellectual and personal development by promoting learning and social skills.

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4:

Main Curriculum Content  -

-

-

 -

Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 Learn about Spain, classroom language, greetings, name , alphabet, introducing themselves and other people, numbers, nationalities, countries, family, pets, colours, places in town, directions, weather, house, daily routine, telling the time, free-time activities, going out, days of the week, school subjects, opinions, transport. o Grade 8 Spanish words, masculine and feminine, classroom language and school objects, verbs and connectives, different types of food, opinions about food, parts of the body, illnesses and symptoms, at the chemist’s, clothes, school uniform, clothing preferences, clothing sizes, cinema and television, talking about weekend and holidays, travel, future plans, appearance and personality, exchange visits. o Grade 9 Usefulness of Spanish, facts about Spain and Latin America, opinions, using languages, earning and spending money, Mass media, talking about abilities, jobs adverts, making phone calls and taking messages, recycling facilities, local environment and threats to in, at the travel agent’s, planning a trip, detailed opinions, talking about events in the past.

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grade 10 Family, Home, Town area, Free time and hobbies, Mass media, Famous people, School life, Work, Talk about future plans

-

o Grade 11 Travelling, Transportation, Holidays, Weather, Parties and Festivals, Parts of the Body, Health, Give instructions and advices, Shopping, Eating out, Food tips and Recipes, Give opinions and debate.

-

o Grade 12 Hellos, School life, Free time and hobbies, Family, Home and living areas, Everyday life, Shopping, Birthdays and gifts, Carriers and future education, Going out, Parties and Festivities.

-

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o Grades 12/13 - AS/A Level Human relationships, Religion and belief, Cultural life/heritage, War and peace, Technological innovation, Environment, Pollution, Contemporary aspects of the country where Spanish is spoken and literature according to the Cambridge Set Text for A Level Spanish Exam.


5:

Assessment 

Key Stage 3 Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. A summative assessment material is provided on Control copy masters for every unit. This is designed to coincide with the Repaso pages in the Students’ Book after every unit. There are four Controles per assessment section to assess individual skill areas: Escuchar, Hablar, Leer and Escribir. There is also a differentiated end-of-unit assessment in all four skills. Answers, mark scheme and assessment criteria are provided for all assessment material. Each assessment copy master has a total of 25 marks so that each test can be graded as a percentage. The assessment materials are graded Uno (lower level) y Dos (higher level) so it can be easily selected the appropriate activities for student. Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

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Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grades 10 and 11 IGCSE Students are assessed both internally and externally. The external assessment is made in year 11 by the University of Cambridge International Examination during May - June. The IGCSE includes Listening test (Paper 1), Reading and Direct Writing test (Paper 2), Speaking test (Paper 3) and Essay test (Paper 4). Each paper weights 25% from the final mark. All the papers are provided by the University of Cambridge International Examination and they are marked by the Cambridge Centre also. There is no question paper for the speaking test. The speaking test is conducted by the local Examiner who will also mark the candidates. The candidates are recorded and the tapes are sent to the Cambridge Centre. The reports are sent back in august. Grades are from A to F, where A is “very good” and F “very poor”.


Grading weights For the internal assessment students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester.

o Grade 12 Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. o

Grades 12 and 13

AS/A Level

Students are assessed both internally and externally. The external assessment is made by the University of Cambridge International Examination during May - June. The Advance Level Exam includes Advance Subsidiary Spanish Language Exam and Advance Subsidiary Spanish Literature Exam. The Advance Subsidiary Spanish Language Exam consists in Speaking test (Paper 1), weighting 30%, Reading and Direct Writing test (Paper 2), weighting 50%, and Essay test (Paper 3), weighting 20%. The Advance Subsidiary Spanish Literature Exam consists in Literature exam (Paper 4), weighting 100%. The Advance Subsidiary Spanish Language Exam it is preferable to be taken in year 12, so in year 13 the assessment would consist only in component 4 (literature). However, students have the option to take the entire examination in one year, 12 or 13, if they wish to do so. All the papers are provided by the University of Cambridge International Examination and they are marked by the Cambridge Centre also. There is no question paper for the speaking test. The speaking test is conducted by the local 173


Examiner who will also mark the candidates. The candidates are recorded and the tapes are sent to the Cambridge Centre. The reports are sent to us in august. Grades are from A to F, where A is “very good” and F “very poor”. Grading weights For the internal assessment students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester.

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ISB TRAVEL AND TOURISM POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject

IGCSE and AS/A2 Travel and Tourism is designed to help meet the need for skilled and knowledgeable individuals in this rapidly diversifying industry. The intention of the syllabus is to provide a broad introduction to the travel and tourism industry and related ancillary service industries. The syllabus develops practical skills across a range of working roles, as well as providing a global and local perspective on travel and tourism. Students gain an overview of the industry, and learn about popular destinations, customer care, working procedures, travel and tourism products and services, and marketing and promotion. Through their studies, students will gain an understanding of the concepts, models and theories used within the industry, and also enhance their skills of investigation, analysis, interpretation and evaluation. 2:

Main Text Books Used  

Travel and Tourism – Ann Rowe, J. Smith and F. Borein GCSE as Level Travel and Torism – H. Blackman, J. Smith, A. Rowe and S. Stewart

General Aims and Objectives IGCSE : The aims of the Travel and Tourism syllabus are to provide candidates with:      

understanding of the travel and tourism industry theoretical knowledge of the industry and related sectors, including knowledge of travel and tourism products and services, the infrastructure on which they depend and the transport system needed to operate them practical ability in a range of skills and procedures related to working in the travel and tourism industry, including knowledge of the essential personal and professional skills required by individuals working in the service sector critical awareness of the physical, social and economic environments in which travel and tourism takes place, including understanding of the global, regional and local perspectives of travel and tourism.

General Aims and Objectives AS/A2 : The aims of the Cambridge International A & AS Level Travel and Tourism syllabus are to enable candidates to develop:  an understanding of the scale and importance of the industry  an appreciation of the importance of host destinations and communities to the industry  an understanding of the importance of sustainable development to the industry  the ability to recognise the positive and negative impacts the industry may have on people, environment and economy  an understanding of the global and dynamic nature of the industry  an interest in the issues affecting the industry and their potential effect on employment opportunities  an appreciation of the importance of the customer to the industry  practical and technical skills relevant to the industry  an understanding of how the industry responds to change

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an appreciation of the impact of ICT on the industry their own values and attitudes in relation to industry issues.

The syllabus develops a clear understanding of the relationship between the theory and practice of working in travel and tourism. Candidates are encouraged to develop an understanding of tourist industry operations and problems, and competence in identifying procedures and solutions, by using best practice from industry, established business techniques and information systems. Through investigation, candidates apply their knowledge and skills in a detailed study of a particular aspect of the travel and tourism industry. 4:

Main Curriculum Content Grade 10 and 11 - IGCSE

The curriculum content is organised into six study units. These are used to explore the background to the travel and tourism industry and more specific areas.

     

The travel and tourism industry Features of worldwide destinations Customer care and working procedures Travel and tourism products and services Marketing and promotion The marketing and promotion of visitor services

Grade 12 AS and Grade 13 A2 Candidates study the travel and tourism industry within the local and international context. They do not need to have studied the subject previously. This section outlines the content of Papers 1, 3 and 4. Paper 2 is the Coursework component. Paper 1: Core paper This paper gives candidates a broad understanding of one of the world’s fastest growing industries. Candidates investigate the reasons for the rapid growth in the modern travel and tourism industry and learn why it is described as ‘the world’s biggest industry’. They learn that the international travel and tourism industry consists of a wide variety of commercial and non-commercial organisations that work together to supply products and services to tourists. During their studies, candidates will develop an appreciation of the values and attitudes of different organisations and the significance of travel and tourism to the economy of many countries.         176

Features of the industry The nature of travel and tourism The scale of the travel and tourism industry The development of the modern travel and tourism industry The structure of the travel and tourism industry Objectives of tourism development Impacts of tourism development Changes in the evolution of destinations


  

Needs of external and internal customers The delivery of customer service Assessment of the quality of customer service in travel and tourism

Paper 2: Planning and managing a travel and tourism event This paper gives candidates the opportunity to work as part of a team to plan, carry out and evaluate a real project in the form of a travel or tourism event. Candidates can set the event in a variety of contexts related to travel and tourism, such as: • the staging of a conference, meeting or exhibition (with or without hospitality) • the delivery of a guided tour or similar group activity • the running of a trip or other group venture. Candidates will require guidance in choosing an appropriate event. They should have the opportunity to demonstrate essential business and customer service skills, which are an integral part of the travel and tourism industry. Candidates must produce a business plan for a specific travel and tourism event. They should develop the plan as a group but present it individually. It should include: • a description of the event • objectives and timescales for the event • resource needs (physical, human and financial) • legal aspects of the event (health and safety, security, insurance) • methods they will use to evaluate the event. Candidates also need to produce a record of their involvement in carrying out the team event, including: • details of their allocated task(s) • details of any problems that arose and how individual team members responded to such difficulties • details of deadlines and progress made towards each deadline • an evaluation of their role in the event • the effectiveness of the team in achieving the event’s objectives. Paper 3: International business and leisure travel services The number of international arrivals has increased from 25 million in 1950 to over 700 million in 2002, which corresponds to an average annual growth rate of 6.6%? Europe and the Americas were the main tourist-receiving regions between 1950 and 2000. Both regions represented a joint market share of over 95% in 1950, of 87% forty years later and of 76% in 2000. International tourist arrivals reached an all-time record of 763 million in 2004. The number of international tourist arrivals worldwide increased in 2004 by 73 million. In 2004, leisure travellers made up 52% of international tourist arrivals, business travel accounted for 16% and 24% were for other reasons, such as visiting friends and relatives (VFR), religious purposes/ pilgrimages, and health treatment. The remaining 8% in the survey of international arrivals did not specify the purpose of their visit. 45% of international tourists reached their destination by road, 4% by rail, 44% by air transport and 7% by water transport. This paper requires candidates to develop key vocational skills such as researching the features of particular types of travel, matching the needs of potential customers with potential providers and evaluating suitability. It also allows candidates to consider the importance of selected organisations, the 177


effects of legislation and the range of factors that influence the increasing numbers of international travellers that enter and depart from the world’s major travel gateways.     

Candidates need to learn about: International transport products and services Other international travel service providers Organisations and regulations influencing international travel Factors influencing international travel

Paper 4: Specialised tourism This paper requires candidates to make clear links with ideas and information from Papers 1, 2 and 3. They should demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge, critical understanding and decision making to unfamiliar contexts. There are important links between this paper and other sections of the syllabus, e.g.: Paper 1 • The nature of travel and tourism • The scale of the travel and tourism industry • The development of the modern travel and tourism industry • The structure of the travel and tourism industry • Objectives of tourism development • Impacts of tourism development • Changes in the evolution of destinations • Needs of internal and external customers Paper 2 – Resource needs • Tour operators, accommodation providers and ancillary service provision. Ecotourism Candidates need to clearly understand what the term ecotourism means, and what its role and function is within the travel and tourism industry. They must appreciate why travel to, and tourism in, natural areas must respect the culture and ecology of an area. Cultural tourism This topic explores the exciting and dynamic role of culture within tourism. Every country attaches cultural importance to places, buildings and artefacts which give meaning to its heritage and achievements. Culture is important to tourism and is the reason why many tourists want to visit people and places. There is, therefore, a need to appreciate the diverse range of cultural characteristics that exist. This part of the paper offers the opportunity to appreciate the significance of cultural backgrounds, and of the needs and expectations of visitors in a variety of tourist destinations worldwide.

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Culture and tourism are intrinsically linked. Inevitably, tourism will affect host cultures and populations in either positive or negative ways, or both. In some instances, a host population or way of life has adapted as a result of tourism. Some customs may be lost whilst new lifestyles and behaviour may be introduced. Some cultural and heritage sites have been lost, or indeed in some instances redeveloped, in order to meet a new or evolving market. Candidates need to consider such links by exploring examples of:

• redevelopment/restaging of traditional cultural/heritage • altering the tourism product specifically for the benefit of tourists • negative cultural impacts Adventure tourism ‘Adventure holidays’ are those that include vigorous or extreme activities such as climbing, water sports, scuba diving, mountain biking, surfing or white-water rafting. In the USA, adventure travel is growing at a rate of 10% per year. More than 50% of the U.S. adult travelling population, or 147 million people, have taken an adventure trip in their lifetime, 98 million in the past five years. Thirty-one million adults have taken part in ‘hard’ adventure activities like white water rafting, scuba diving, and mountain biking. An additional 25 million took part in both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ adventure activities. The most common adventure holiday activities are camping (85%), hiking (74%), skiing (51%), snorkelling or scuba diving (30%), sailing (26%), kayaking or white water rafting (24%) and biking trips (24%). It is clear that most adventure tourism activities are outdoor leisure activities that generally take place in an unusual, exotic, remote or wilderness setting, often involving some form of unconventional means of transportation, and tending to be associated with low or high levels of physical activity. There may be some element of risk. It is this risk that helps to produce the ‘white knuckle’ and/or the ‘adrenaline rush’ effects of this type of holiday. Candidates should become familiar with their local area before examining the growth and development of adventure tourism in wider destinations. However, the starting point for this unit should be a consideration of what is actually involved in terms of the main adventure tourism activities: • Climbing activities • Caving • Non-motorised water sports • Motorised water sports • Motorised land sports • Air sports • Mountain biking • Hill walking/trekking • Other land-based adventure activities

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5:

Assessment

The internal score is recorded by number grades on a scale of 10 to 100. These marks are registered in the virtual catalogue and appear in the school transcript. Students are assessed internally by written/oral assessments for individual/group work such as: quizzes, tests, homework, class work, class participation, project work, presentations, research, and laboratory investigations. The final score for both key stage 4 and 5 is calculated using the following algorithm:

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Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB TURKISH LANGUAGE POLICY - PRIMARY SCHOOL The International School of Bucharest offers Turkish language session per week for native students. The Turkish lessons are held in the Turkish Language Room. Turkish lab, texts and other print materials, reading books appropriate for each grade, technology resources are available to enhance teaching and learning. General objectives:     

Developing the capacity to understand an oral message; Developing pupils ability to orally communicate effectively ; Developing the capacity to understand written language (reading); Developing the capacity to express ideas in writing; Develop the understanding of cultural and intercultural customs and beliefs.

Curriculum Turkish language is taught following The Turkish National Curriculum. The Turkish National Curriculum is based on a functional-communicational model and aims to help children develop oral and writing skills, to offer them a communicational culture, to help them understand the cultural and linguistic environment they live in, to relate with local people, to express feelings, thoughts, ideas, opinions and to use efficiently creative approaches for problem solving related to real life. In Primary Turkish language is studied from year 1 to year 6. The Turkish curriculum contains:    

General objectives Lesson objectives Learning activities Contents-organized in units

Turkish programs organize the contents in units that cover all aspects of Turkish language: listening, speaking, writing, handwriting, reading, literature. The lesson objectives are designed progressively. In year 1 we focus on consolidating and enriching the vocabulary; learning the sounds and symbols of the alphabet; exercising the basic graphical elements for handwriting. In year 2 we learn the Turkish handwriting; practice reading and writing and studying short stories and poems. In years 3 students develop their writing, reading and comprehension skills.

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In years 4 and 5 we focus on building the capacity to communicate correctly orally and in writing and start the study of Turkish language grammar. In year 6 students will consolidate and complete the study of grammar concepts; develop their literature knowledge and start developing their personal reading and writing skills. Local cultures are incorporated into the curriculum in appropriate ways and the school supports specific courses, assemblies and shows.

Planning Planning must be completed by the Turkish teachers. The long term planning should be online and in the teacher’s files together with the short term planning. The short term planning should be designed to answer the needs and abilities of all students. Turkish was adapted for one lesson per week to make the lesson as valuable as possible. Teachers use varied methods, materials and technology to address individual student’s needs, abilities and learning styles.

Assessment The assessment practices are made according to the evaluation standards and descriptors specified in the Turkish National Curriculum. Assessment practices include reading and writing tests at the end of each term, multi-task tests at the end of each unit, oral quizzes before starting a new lesson, continuous assessment through revision, projects and short debates on real life subjects. The result of student assessments are communicated to students and parents and used for future planning to improve the learning process. Turkish specific events – Extra-curricular activities     

29 October – Turkish National Day 24 November – Teachers’ Day 23 April – Children Day International Week Different activities to celebrate religious holidays.

Parents play an important role in the learning process offering the support needed at home for completing different tasks, projects or simply listen the child reading.

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ISB TURKISH LANGUAGE POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject Turkish, with Text-based on Mother Language Education’s approach, aims to cultivate new generations with well-developed intellectual taste who are able to read, understand and analyze what they read, who have reading habits, who can make discussions, reach, synthesis through comparisons and use mother language properly in both verbal and written expressions.

2:

Main Text Books Use      

3:

MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Ders Kitabı-6 MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Öğrenci Kitabı-6 MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Ders Kitabı-7 MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Öğrenci Kitabı-7 MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Ders Kitabı-8 MEB İlköğretim Türkçe Öğrenci Kitabı-8

Aims  Key Stage 3 At KS 3 levels ‘Theme-Based New Turkish Teaching Program’approach is adopted.Compulsory and elective themes ,which are determined in advance,are given through some literary work(main text) selected at each level,and some supportive text of different literature types.Some of these text are used for reading and some others for listening/following.All activities related with measuring different skills(reading,speaking,listening/following and gramar)and writing activities are based on the literary work under study. Thus, internal integrity of Turkish Glass is ensured.

 Key Stage 4 (10-11 IGCSE) The aims of Turkish Literature and Turkish Language and Composition courses are able to use their mother language correctly know other cultures as well as their own cultures, respect differences, have the habit of reading and thinking systematically and have enhanced written and oral expression skills. 4: 

Main Curriculum Content Key Stage 3 o Grade 7 Themes are introduced to the students; poem, fairytale, fable, short story, novel, theatre, text, memoir, letter and essay types. Foundations of literary product examination (analysis) are laid at this level. Paragraph writing work is done within the context of written expositions. Making citations and references is important in paragraph work at this level.

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o Grade 8 Themes are introduced to the students; poem, fairy tale, fable, short story, novel, theatre, text, memoir, letter, travel writing ,written conversation and biography types. Students are expected to develop skills of making references to other literary works during the study of themes and formative ideas in the text. Introduction, development and conclusion paragraphs are studied within the context of written exposition. o Grade 9 Themes are introduced to the students through; poem, short story, memoir, article, novel, essay, written conversation, critics and epic types. Creativity becomes important at this level. Students are expected to correlate (find similarities or differences in) text, themes and ideas. 

Key Stage 4 o Grade 10 Turkish Literature course is designed to teach students basic knowledge, terminology and concepts of literary forms such as poetry, short stories, novels, plays and essays. Students are made aware of the connection of literature with fine arts and other disciplines and activities are carried out using only extracts of text but also full text .This course aims to equip year 10 students with the skills to analyze texts, write critical reviews and express themselves accurately in oral and written forms. o Grade 11 Among the ultimate goals of Turkish course are to have the students individually understand, analyze, interpret and tell the materials they read ;use language effectively and in such a manner that suits the purposes and addresses the audience; to become good spectators of culture and art related activities; and to become individuals, who are sensitive towards the problems in their surroundings and the problems in the world.

5: 

Assessment Key Stage 3 Regular assessment of the students is an integral part of the learning process. This course offers an approach assessment in line with the National Curriculum. Turkish course for develop five basic skills namely speaking, writing, listening, reading and grammar. Teachers adopt a measurement and assessment system that will help to reflect these five basic skills of the students parallel with this aim. Our students are measured and assessed written exams, performance, projects and class assignments. Grading weights Students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 20%), Tests (weighting 50%), Assignments (weighting 15%) and Effort (weighting 15%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

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Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester. Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass. 

Key Stage 4 and 5 o Grades 10 and 11 IGCSE Students are assessed both internally and externally. The external assessment is made in year 11 by the University of Cambridge International Examination during May - June. The IGCSE includes Reading and Direct Writing test (Paper 1-2). All three questions on Paper 2 are assessed for Content and Grammar. Content marks are awarded for:   

understanding what is read, identifying what is relevant from the texts in answering the specific question, organizing the answer in an effective way, using a range of structures and vocabulary appropriately,

  

staying relevant throughout, maintaining coherence Grammar marks are awarded for demonstrating knowledge of Turkish Grammar, for example:  the rules of writing  tenses, subject verb agreement, word order etc.  conventions of paragraphing  punctuation  spelling

All the papers are provided by the University of Cambridge International Examination and they are marked by the Cambridge Centre also. The reports are sent back in august. Grades are from A to F, where A is “very good” and F “very poor”. Grading weights For the internal assessment students’ work will be evaluated as: Class work (weighting 10%), Tests (weighting 70%), Assignments (weighting 10%) and Effort (weighting 10%). Marks are between 1 and 100. A final annual average above 50 (out of 100) is required in order for a student to pass.

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Testing There will be a test at the end of each unit. There will be also a final test at the end of each semester.

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C:

POLICIES REALTED TO GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT

ISB ATTENDANCE AND REGISTRATION POLICY – PRIMARY ISB aspires to give children the best education possible. Therefore, except in the case of sickness, the expectation is that children should maintain a 100% attendance record and arrive at school punctually. The School day The Primary School Day- Monday to Friday 08.30-15.00 Nursery 8.30 – 09.00

Arrival /Structured Play

9.00 – 09.30

Snack and Toilet

9.30 – 09.50

Circle Time/PE/Music/Dance

9.50 – 10.10

Circle Time/PE/Music/Dance

10.10 – 11.10

Structured Play

11.10 – 11.50

Outside Play

11.50 – 12.20

Lunch and Toilet

12.20 – 13.50

Structured Play /Quiet Time

13.50 – 14.10

Story Time

14.10 – 14.25

Snack and Toilet

14.25 – 15.00

Outside Play

Reception 8.30 – 09.30

Communication, Language and Literacy

9.30 -

Snack and Toilet

09.50

9.50 – 10.50

KUW/Creative Development

10.50 – 11.50

PE/Music/ICT

11.50 – 12.10

Story Time

12.10 – 13.00

Lunchtime/Outside Play

1.00 – 14.00

Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy

2.00 – 14.30

Structured Play/PSE/Dance/Assembly

2.30 – 15.00

Snack, Toilet and Get Ready to Go Home

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Key Stage 1 and 2 08.30 – 08.40

Registration

08.40 – 09.40

Lesson 1

09.40 – 09.55

Guided Reading (KS1 Creative writing Handwriting)

09.55 – 10.55

Lesson 2

10.55 – 11.15

Break

11.15 – 12.15

Lesson 3

12.15 – 13.00

Lunch Break

13.00 – 13.45

Lesson 4

13.45 – 14.30

Lesson 5

14.30 – 15.00

Lesson 6

Early Arrivals and Late Collection There will be no supervision before 8.10 am or later than 3.30 pm, unless a teacher or administrator has scheduled an activity or event, which necessitates early arrival or late departure. Early Dismissal 1. Parents must send a note or phone the office when early dismissal is necessary. A reason must be given for early dismissal. 2. The Principal, or in his absence the Deputy Principal, has the final approval or disapproval for dismissal. 3. Parents are to check with the office when picking up pupils for early dismissal and sign an early dismissal book. Under no circumstances should a parent go directly to the pupil’s classroom. Absences When a pupil is absent, parents must notify the school office and give the reason and approximate date of return.

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Parents are required to telephone the office between 8:00 am and 9:00 am on the first day their child is absent giving the reason and expected length of absence. Parents should send a note to the teacher, explaining the absence on the day that the child returns to school. Any child who accumulates a total of 5 unexcused absences will be sent a warning letter requesting adherence to the school policy regarding absence. If the total reaches 10 unexcused absences the parents will be required to attend a compulsory meeting with the Principal. Parents who wish to take their child out of school for any period of time must normally inform the Principal through the school office at least one week in advance. A pupil is marked absent if they are not actually present for classes even if the cause of the absence is beyond their control. When a pupil is away from school for a school activity this does not count as an absence. ISB primary school observes the following codes for absences: /

Present

O

Absent

The following codes should be written in the O to explain the absence: S

Absent due to sickness

L

Absence due to Lateness

M Absent due to medical/dental appointment R

Absent due to religious or cultural holiday

H Absence due to family holiday E

Absent due to Suspension or temporary Exclusion

Where no code is marked in the O the absence will be deemed unexcused. Lateness Registration will take place as close to 8.35am as possible. Pupils who are not present when the register is taken will be marked absent.

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Any pupil who arrives after registration must report to the office. The secretary will record the name of the child, arrival time and any given reason for their late arrival in the late arrival book. The child will then be given a late arrival slip which should then be handed to the class teacher on arrival to the classroom. The secretary is responsible for making sure the child has been marked present regardless of where the register is at the time of the arrival of the child. If pupils arrive late due to a late bus, this should be noted in the late arrival book and reported to the Deputy Principal.

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ISB ATTENDANCE AND REGISTRATION POLICY – SECONDARY ISB aspires to give children the best education possible. Therefore, except in the case of sickness, the expectation is that children should maintain a 100% attendance record and arrive at school punctually. The School day : Secondary Secondary School- Monday to Friday 08.30 to 15.00 08.35 – 08.40

Registration

08.40 – 09.25

Lesson 1

09.30 – 10.15

Lesson 2

10.15 - 10.30

Break

10.30 - 11.15

Lesson 3

11.20 - 12.05

Lesson 4

12.10 – 12.55

Lesson 5

12.55 - 13.25

Lunch Break

13.25 - 14.10

Lesson 6

14.15 - 15.00

Lesson 7

Early Arrivals and Late Collection There will be no supervision before 8.10 am or later than 3.30 pm, unless a teacher or administrator has scheduled an activity or event, which necessitates early arrival or late departure. Early Dismissal 4. Parents must send a note or phone the office when early dismissal is necessary. A reason must be given for early dismissal. 5. The Principal, or in his absence the Deputy Principal, has the final approval or disapproval for dismissal. 6. Parents are to check with the office when picking up pupils for early dismissal and sign an early dismissal book. Under no circumstances should a parent go directly to the pupil’s classroom.

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Absences When a pupil is absent, parents must notify the school office and give the reason and approximate date of return. Parents are required to telephone the office between 8:00 am and 9:00 am on the first day their child is absent giving the reason and expected length of absence. Parents should send a note to the teacher, explaining the absence on the day that the child returns to school. Any child who accumulates a total of 5 unexcused absences will be sent a warning letter requesting adherence to the school policy regarding absence. If the total reaches 10 unexcused absences the parents will be required to attend a compulsory meeting with the Principal. Parents who wish to take their child out of school for any period of time must normally inform the Principal through the school office at least one week in advance. A pupil is marked absent if they are not actually present for classes even if the cause of the absence is beyond their control. When a pupil is away from school for a school activity this does not count as an absence. Acceptable absences The consistent, daily attendance of each student is necessary to ensure their academic progress. Therefore, students should be absent only for important reasons such as personal illness, family emergencies, or religious holidays Unacceptable absences The School considers it unacceptable for a student to be absent for extended vacations or family outings and parties. Requests for such absences should be submitted in advance, in writing to the Principal through the school office. A record of all such absences will be kept on file. Absence procedure It is important that if a child is sick and not well enough to attend school that they stay home until they have fully recovered. This is particularly important if the child has an illness that is infectious. (Please note that if a child comes to school sick particularly after an absence they will be sent to the doctor and sent home again if appropriate) In the event of an unforeseen absence, parents are requested to inform the School by telephone between 08.00-09:00 on the day of the absence, giving details as to the nature of the absence and the anticipated length of the absence. 



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On return to school parents are requested to inform the School, in writing, of the reasons for the absence and of any ailment which might affect the student’s participation in physical education or breaks. Parents are requested to inform the School, in writing, of any ailment that is contagious.


Lateness Registration will take place as close to 8.35am as possible. Pupils who are not present when the register is taken will be marked absent. Any pupil who arrives after registration must report to the office. The secretary will record the name of the child, arrival time and any given reason for their late arrival in the late arrival book. The child will then be given a late arrival slip which should then be handed to the class teacher on arrival to the classroom. The secretary is responsible for making sure the child has been marked present regardless of where the register is at the time of the arrival of the child. If pupils arrive late due to a late bus, this should be noted in the late arrival book and reported to the Deputy Principal. Record of Absence and Lateness The number of times a student is absent (acceptable and unacceptable) and/or late is recorded on the first and third term reports.

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ISB PRIMARY AND SECONDARY CANTEEN POLICY The canteen at ISB is used for serving a cooked lunch to Primary students at 12.15 and Secondary students at 12.55. Under no circumstances should students arrive at the canteen before these times. Entering the Canteen In the Primary school, it is the responsibility of the teacher teaching each class immediately before lunch to ensure all children in their charge have washed their hands, where appropriate have their lunch boxes, and enter the canteen in a quiet and orderly manner. Teachers teaching KS1 children should ensure their class is sitting down with an appropriate meal in front of each of them before leaving the canteen. KS2 teachers should make sure that their students are lining up in a quiet single file line on either side of the serving area. Secondary students can make their own way to the canteen, but should be reminded of appropriate behaviour before leaving their classroom. Students with a Packed Lunch Students can bring in their own packed lunch from home. However, the school does not offer facilities to heat any food that is brought in. The packed lunch must be healthy and not full of junk food or a meal purchased from a fast food outlet like McDonalds or KFC. Students with a packed lunch may sit down as soon as they arrive in the canteen. Expectations during Lunch All Key Stage 1 children will be seated together in the area furthest away from the serving area. They should be encouraged by duty staff to eat the various courses of their meal in an appropriate order and use the correct utensil. Children will be rewarded, by the duty staff, with a house point for eating all of their soup and another for eating the rest of their meal. Key Stage 2 and Secondary students are free to choose where they wish to sit in the canteen. Students who are loud or behaving inappropriately will be warned about their behaviour. If this inappropriate behaviour persists, offenders will be moved to sit elsewhere in the canteen. Duty staff will report persistent poor behaviour to class teachers or form tutors. Leaving the Canteen No Primary students should leave their seats until the whistle is blown by the duty teacher at 12.25. Students may then raise their hand to indicate they have finished their meal. A duty teacher (or prefect for KS1) will decide if the student has eaten (and drunk) enough, if this is the case they may leave the canteen. Before going to the playground, all students should push their chair under the table. KS2 and Secondary students should also take their tray to the tray collection points and put their rubbish in the bin. Primary students eating a packed lunch are also expected to raise their hand to gain permission to leave the canteen. KS1 students should put their lunchboxes in a box by the exit to the KS1 playground. Prefects are responsible for taking this box up stairs to the KS1 foyer. KS2 and Secondary students are responsible for taking care of their own lunchboxes. All food should be consumed in the canteen. No student should leave the canteen with food or drink.

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Tuck Shop Secondary students are able to buy their lunch from the Tuck Shop to the left of the serving area. Under no circumstances are Primary students allowed to use this facility. Climbing Wall No food or drink should be taken into the climbing wall area, and under no circumstances should any student be in that area without a suitable adult. (See Climbing Wall Safety Policy for more details) Duty Staff Duty staff should be on time for their duty and should remain in the canteen until the last child under their supervision has left. The canteen should be a quiet, calm place where students can enjoy eating their lunch. It is the responsibility of duty teachers to ensure that this is reinforced. Menu The menu for each month will be attractively displayed in English at each end of the serving area.

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ISB CHILD PROTECTION POLICY

The International School of Bucharest (ISB) Child Protection Policy supports Article 3.1 of the Convention of the Rights of the Child which states that, ‘ in all actions concerning children, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities or legislative bodies, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration. We are committed to prevent child abuse and protect children within our community.’ The policy sets out to outline the actions that will be taken to ensure that all students are protected from all forms of abuse. We believe that all children have the right to:      

Grow up in a safe secure and caring environment Be protected from harm – including neglect, abuse and exploitation Be listened to, and heard Be valued in terms of their language, culture, religion, sex and race Be treated as an individual This is a collective responsibility of all adults in our community

Recruitment of staff ISB recruits staff from all over the world and therefore has limited access to up-to-date Criminal Records Checks (CRB). In most western country’s CRB checks are possible and are made at the point of issuing a contract to new staff. No system will guarantee that unsuitable staff will not be recruited to our school, nor will any system of checks prevent the first offender. However there are procedures which will ensure that all precautions have been taken to ensure that all staff can safely work with children: Degree/post grad certificates are confirmed through the Romanian authorities by the HR department. Original copies are to be given to the HR department on arrival. A medical certificate is sought – either from the country of departure or on arrival in Romania. References from the present employer (head/principal) and any previous recent employer are sought. Gaps in the employment history should be investigated. If the staff member applies from Romania – a police check can be obtained from the police. At the point of contract the teacher must provide such a form.

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If the staff member applied from the UK, the school will be able to confirm whether a police check has been obtained. This is part of the reference. If the teacher’s CRB check is more than a year old a current one should be sought. The present school head/principal should be contacted directly as one of the referees. If the staff member applies from some other country in the world, an up-to-date police clearance form should be obtained at the candidate’s own expense from that country. Discretion should be used when confirming the appointment to see that the staff member has not been seen to be moving too often. Interviewing new staff Opportunities should be offered to candidates to explain whether there is any reason why they should not work with children that they feel the school should know about. Gaps in employment should be questioned. Verification from previous employers should be sought either in written form or by telephone – ‘is there any reason that you are aware of that X should not work with children?’ The present head/principal should always be asked for a reference – either verbally or in writing and the above question should be always asked.

1. DEFINITIONS OF ABUSE       

Infliction of physical injury on a child by other than accidental means, causing death, disfigurement, skin bruising, impairment of physical or emotional health or loss or impairment of any bodily function; Creating a substantial risk of physical harm to a child’s bodily functioning; Committing or allowing to be committed any sexual offence against a child as defined in the criminal code, or intentionally touching, either directly or through clothing, the genitals, anus or breasts of a child for other than hygiene or child care purposes; Committing acts that are cruel or inhumane regardless of observable injury. Such acts may include, but are not limited to, instances of extreme discipline demonstrating a disregard of a child’s pain and/or mental suffering; Assaulting or criminally mistreating a child as defined by the criminal code; Engaging in actions or omissions resulting in injury to, or creating a substantial risk to the physical or mental health or development of a child; Failing to take reasonable steps to prevent the occurrence of all above.

Physical Abuse: “Physical abuse is any non-accidental injury to a child under the age of 18 by a parent or caregiver.” Ref: Lois J. Engelbrecht (2002)

These injuries may include beatings, shaking, burns, human bites, strangulation, or immersion in scalding water, with resulting bruises and welts, broken bones, scars, burns, retinal haemorrhage, or internal injuries. 197


Sexual Abuse: “Sexual exploitation involving physical contact between a child and another person.” Ref: Lois J. Engelbrecht (2002)

Exploitation implies an inequality of power between the child and the abuser on the basis of    

Age Physical Size Nature of the emotional relationship Media (photographic, pornographic, paedophile clips)

Physical contact includes:     

Anal Genital Oral Breast contact Inappropriate touching of other parts of the body that cause discomfort

Physical Neglect: “Neglect is the chronic failure of a parent or caregiver to provide a child under 18 with the basic needs such as food, clothing, shelter, medical care, educational opportunity, protection and supervision.” Ref: Lois J. Engelbrecht (2002)

Emotional Maltreatment: “The consistent failure of a parent or caregiver to provide a child with appropriate support, attention and affection” or “A chronic pattern of behaviours such as belittling, ridiculing and humiliating a child”. Ref.: Louis J. Engelbrecht (2002)

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The following outlines indicators of abuse and neglect and should be used by the educator as a guideline for reporting. It is not necessary to know the details of the possible abuse or be certain whether or not an indicator means abuse has taken place in order to report. The reporting law specifies reporting when you have “reasonable cause to believe that a child has suffered abuse or neglect that could cause a reasonable person in a like position, drawing when appropriate on his or her training and experience, to suspect child abuse. The severity of an indicator or statements by the child as to the non-accidental nature of the injury may indicate possible abuse. For signs and symptoms of abuse see Appendix 2. 2. PROCEDURES Initial reporting guidelines for the teacher Notification of abuse or neglect is required when “a person suspects on reasonable grounds that a child has been or is being abused or neglected”. Ref: Child Protection Act (1993) How to respond to a child’s disclosure of abuse ISB recognises that the class teacher/tutor is the first stage in the pastoral care of the child in the school. Teachers and resident staff are well placed to observe outward signs of abuse, changes of behaviour or failure to develop or thrive. In the UK all state schools are linked into the social services and the child protection procedures. There is inter agency training to facilitate communication. In Romania there are minimal services to communicate with. Whilst there are clear guidelines as to what course of action to take on suspicion of child abuse in the UK and other western countries there are minimal support services in Romania. If a teacher becomes aware of the above and is concerned for the child, the Director of School or his/her deputy who is the School’s Child Protection Officer (CPO) shall be informed immediately. The Director will investigate as far as is possible and involve the relevant ‘in-school’ services, counselling, parents, foster parents etc. The outcome of this will depend upon the individual case but it could result in the child’s name being entered onto the Child Protection register in the school. The Director of School will keep the class teacher, Head of Key Stage, SENCO up to date with developments. Every attempt will be made to offer support for the child whilst at school and it is hoped that the school will provide an environment in which he/she can relax and spend the school day in complete confidence and safety.

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The educator’s role is not to investigate or verify the situation, but rather to make the report and set in motion the process of getting help for the child. A child may tell you directly and specifically what is going on, or s/he may hint indirectly at a situation. Sometimes, the child will use “strings attached,” such as asking the teacher to promise not to tell anyone (a promise the teacher cannot keep) or, a child may claim the problem belongs to someone else, that s/he is only there about a friend. Judgment should be used in deciding how much to discuss about the situation with the child. Often a child is willing to reveal the details of an incident only once. As far as possible, the child should be encouraged to speak to a school counsellor who is trained to deal with these situations. Support of the child is important. In order to do this, the following recommendations are suggested:   

        

 

Reassure the child that it is okay to tell what happened. Ask the child if it is okay for a school counsellor/head to be present. Limit any questioning to the minimum necessary to seek clarification only, strictly avoiding ‘leading’ the student or adult who has approached them by making suggestions or asking questions that introduce their own ideas about what may have happened. (Do not ask questions like ‘Did he do X to you?’, asking a minimum number of questions such as ‘Tell me what has happened?’) Stop asking questions as soon as the adult/student has disclosed that he or she believes that something abusive has happened to him or her or to someone else. Tell the child what to expect. If you don’t know, say so, but let the child know s/he can be supported by you. Project a calm, understanding and supportive attitude to the child. Avoid having the child repeat her/his explanation to different staff. Let the child know that you must tell authorities to get help. Explain that you will have to tell another person because s/he is at risk. Use a script such as “If you tell me something that makes me feel that you are unsafe or at risk in any way, then I will need to tell someone else”. Reassure the child that it is not her/his fault. Make clear, detailed notes of the conversation. Respect the child’s privacy by not discussing the situation out of school. If the head/Counsellor has not been present for disclosure, meet a counsellor as soon as possible to disclose the information you have been given. Either take the child with you, or ensure s/he is left in a secure location. The Head/counsellor will complete the Document of Suspected Child Abuse (Appendix 2). The counsellor will then follow the Child Protection Procedures. After reporting, it is important to maintain a supportive presence for the child.

In addition:  

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It is important to understand the importance of early reporting. An educator who reports in good faith is protected from civil liability. Reporting a child disclosure is a request for an investigation.


3. RECORDING PROCEDURE FOR THE EDUCATOR:     

Be specific about the context in which the child disclosed. Record notes using the child’s own words – try not to add your own interpretation and judgments (or make separate notes about these). Describe any injuries you see. Take the child to the school nurse who should take photos of the injuries, bruises, cuts and or bleeding, and write a report. Sign all notes with the date and time as well as name of the signatory. Make sure that notes are given to a school counsellor and that they are stored under lock and key (NOT in the child’s regular school files).

4. REPORTING: COUNSELLOR’S PROCEDURE FOR REPORTING SUSPECTED ABUSE 1. The child is referred by a member of staff or self-refers to the CPO officer/Counsellor. 2. The CPO/counsellor meets with the child, and completes the Document of Suspected Child Abuse (Appendix 3) and notifies the DH, Headmaster, of suspected abuse in person or by email, if personal means is not possible. 3. The school nurse examines the child, documents and takes photographic evidence, where applicable, if it has not already been done. 4. The counsellor informs the DH/Head verbally, within same school day, of the meeting with the child. 5. The counsellor completes the documentation and collects the evidence (photographs by nurse, etc). 6. The Director and the Principal, where appropriate, each personally receive a written hard copy and an electronic copy of the report (labelled CONFIDENTIAL and URGENT) from the counsellor within 24 hours. 7. A decision, based on the counsellor’s recommendation and school procedure, will be made by Deputy Principal or Principal, where appropriate, within 24 hours of the receipt of the counselling report. 8. The procedure to be followed for child abuse cases:a) Ensure the physical and emotional safety of the child – if the child faces danger by returning to the family, (family abuse) an alternative living arrangement must be made. b) Assess and provide appropriate medical care. c) Arrange a meeting with parents, including the Director, Principal, if appropriate, and counsellor, as soon as possible but no later than 96 hours of the abuse being disclosed to the counsellor. d) At the time of the meeting, the School to arrange counselling and support, via a schoolapproved psychologist for family therapy. e) If this recommendation is not followed to the satisfaction of the psychologist, the school and the family, the case will be reviewed to see whether the child is fit to return to an academic environment and whether governmental authorities should be notified. 9. The Counsellor will meet with the child and continue to provide support, as deemed appropriate, by the psychologist/psychiatrist. 201


All reports or other actions must be kept confidential. Each incident of possible abuse should constitute a separate referral. Immunity: The school shall not hold responsible or fault any school employee making a report of abuse that is later judged to be false, unless it can be demonstrated that the person wilfully and intentionally falsified a report. Suspected or confirmed cases of physical and sexual abuse, physical neglect and emotional maltreatment must be reported. The reporter should have reasonable cause or reasonable suspicion to believe that abuse or neglect has occurred. The reporter is not required to have proof. Abuse that took place in the past must be reported as long as the child remains in the home of the abuser or, as long as the child is at risk of further victimisation from the abuser. 5. COUNSELLOR’S CHECKLIST FOR FOLLOW-UP AFTER DISCLOSURE After disclosure, the counsellor must determine the risk for re-offence by considering the questions:- What? / Who? / When? / Where? If the offence is ongoing and the child lives with the offender, decisions must be made as to whether:1. The counsellor will report it to the authorities ( p.6, Reporting Procedure) 2. Someone will be brought in to protect the child, such as a non-offending parent. 3. There are immediate actions the child could take, apart from reporting.

6. PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT: School Doors should have clear glass windows – staff must be visible from outside the room. The school must be a safe place for all children. 7. PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING DISCLOSURES OF TEACHER/ EMPLOYEE OFFENDERS When a child discloses about inappropriate behaviour of school personnel, the school must respond no differently than if the alleged offender is a parent, relative or other. Teachers have daily access to children and the emotional and physical safety of a child is determined by the access of the offender to the child, thus disclosure of teacher offences must be handled immediately and with seriousness. The integrity of a school and a system is NOT dependent on whether or not an offender exists; instead, the integrity of the school or system IS dependent on whether and how that school responds when an alleged offender within the school is reported. It is the duty of the Headmaster to prevent and deter sexual harassment, as well as to provide procedures for the resolution or prosecution of sexual harassment between teacher/employee and child. 202


Stage 1 1. The counsellor reports the suspected abuse to the DH, Principal or Director 2. The child’s parents are informed immediately. 3. Restrictions are placed on the teacher’s access to the child, and possibly to all children.

Stage 2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The Director sees the teacher concerned, with a witness. The teacher is isolated from the school, with no access allowed to the school, pending investigation. The Director meets with the teacher, outside the school, if necessary, for further discussion. In light of evidence, the Director decides the appropriate course of action. The Director takes appropriate action. This could include a verbal warning/a formal warning/dismissal/re-instatement.

Stage 3 (External to the School) 1. 2. 3.

The Director reports the suspected abuse to the police for investigation. The alleged offender is reported to the Ministry of Education for possible administrative action. Where a case has been concluded, a report should be sent to the offender’s embassy and the Ministry of Education.

8. STAFF TRAINING AND SUPERVISION: Every year, all staff: 

Should be made aware of the school’s policy and procedures regarding child protection. Have regular, mandatory child protection training.

The School Nurse should be part of the Child Protection team. 9. USEFUL WEBSITES and other documentation 

‘Working together: a guide to arrangements for inter-agency co-operation for the protection of children from abuse’ (DfES – 1999)

‘Safeguarding Children in Education’ (DfES 2004)

‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused’ (DfES 2003)

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All the above are available from: www.dh.gov.uk www.dfes.gov.uk The Independent School Standards Inspectorate (ISI) is also a useful source of relevant information: www.isinspect.org.uk (the key document is the guidance in part three.)

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Appendix 1

CHILD PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS ACCORDING TO ARTICLE 19 OF THE CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD AND ACCORDING TO THAI LAW A Child Protection Policy is important for schools for prevention, intervention and healing. This includes educating parents and teachers, providing information and resources. It is also our obligation, in loco parentis, to protect children as Article 19 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child states and current Thai Laws states: Article 19: Protection from Abuse and Neglect: No one should hurt the child in any way. Even the parents have no right to hurt the child. Adults should make sure that the child is protected from abuse, violence and neglect. Article 34: Sexual Abuse: Every child has the right to be protected from sexual abuse. This means that nobody can do anything to the child’s body that s/he does not want them to do, such as touching, taking pictures and making the child say things that s/he does not want to say. Further training is available on developing intervention in the region.

Ref: Convention on the Rights of the Child Article 25: 5. Parents or guardians are forbidden to treat a child in ways or manners which constitute unlawful caring. Article 26: A person is forbidden to: 1. Commit or omit acts which result in torturing a child’s body or mind.

Ref: Child Protection Act 2003

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Appendix 2 SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS Indicators of Physical Abuse:           

Unexplained bruises and welts on any part of the body. Bruises of different ages (various colours). Injuries reflecting the shape of the article used (electric cord, belt, buckle, table tennis bat). Injuries that regularly appear after absence or holidays. Unexplained burns, especially to soles, palms, back or buttocks. Burns with a pattern from an electric burner, iron or cigarette. Rope burns on arms, legs, neck or torso. Injuries inconsistent with information offered by the child. Immersion burns with a distinct boundary line. Unexplained laceration, abrasions or fractures. Extreme fluctuations in weight.

Indicators of Sexual Abuse:       

Venereal disease in a child of any age. Evidence of physical trauma or bleeding to the oral, genital or anal areas. Difficulty in walking or sitting. Refusing to change into gym clothes. Child running away from home and not giving any specific complaint. Pregnancy at 11 or 12 with no history of peer socialization. Sexual knowledge, behaviour, or use of language not appropriate to age level.

Indicators of Neglect:         

Child is left unattended at home for long periods of time. Child consistently comes to school dirty and wearing clothes that have not been cleaned. Child consistently comes to school without snacks, lunch, or money to purchase lunch. No one accounts for the child before or after school. Demonstrating disregard of a child’s pain and/or mental suffering. Lack of necessary dental or medical care. Untreated illness or injury. Child abandoned or left with inadequate supervision. Weight fluctuations (loss/gain).

Indicators of Emotional Maltreatment:     206

Lack of attachment between child and parent. Lack of responsiveness to the environment. Failure to thrive. Parent is highly critical and negative towards the child.




Parent has a highly unrealistic expectation of the child.

Behavioural indicators in and of themselves do not constitute abuse. Together with other indicators they may warrant a referral.

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Appendix 3

DIRECTOR/COUNSELLOR’S DOCUMENTATION OF SUSPECTED CHILD ABUSE

Child’s Name:

Parent(s) Name(s):

D.O. B. / Tutor Group

Contact number:

Passport/Country: Person who registers concern:

Statement of concern/suspicion:

How concern came about (e.g. child verbal report, physical observation, diary writing):

Nature, frequency & dates of suspected abuse:

Information on previous injuries or background data

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Child’s current whereabouts:

Considered to be in immediate danger:

Yes

No

Yes

No

If Yes – why?

Examined by a health professional?

(Report attached; if yes.) Urgency for medical attention:

Names of family members involved:

Any other agencies or persons involved:

Recommended action:

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Report submitted by:

Date:

Director’s agreed action:

Signed:

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Date:


Appendix 4

INDICATORS OF ABUSE AND NEGLECT WHICH CAN BE USED AS A GUIDELINE FOR REPORTING

The following outlines indicators of abuse and neglect and should be used by the educator as a guideline for reporting. You do not need to know the details of the possible abuse or to be certain whether or not an indicator means abuse has taken place in order to report. The reporting law specifies reporting when you have “reasonable cause to believe that a child has suffered abuse or neglect.”

Reasonable cause/suspicion exists when it is objectively reasonable for a person to entertain, based upon facts, that could cause a reasonable person in a like position, drawing, when appropriate, on his or her training and experience, to suspect child abuse.

The severity of an indicator or statements by the child as to the non-accidental nature of the injury may indicate possible abuse.

Listen to as much as the child wants to tell you without pushing the child for details. Try to keep limits, giving the child alternatives to talk to others in the support system, if more time is needed.

Listen to as much as the child wants to tell you without pushing the child for details. Try to keep limits, giving the child alternatives to talk to others in the support system, if more time is needed.

Explore the feelings and concerns the child has about the experience. These can include:   

Guilt Fear Shame Anger

Affirm that the experience actually was “assault” and, thus, s/he is never to blame for someone else’s action. Affirm each of the feelings, while also determining if those feelings are overwhelming to the child, then work on helping the child put those feelings within a healthy limit. 211


Explore the support system so the child can have someone to talk with:  

Parents or other adult relative? Friend? Trusted adult such as a teacher, friend’s parent, minister?

Explore the activities/hobbies the child enjoys and help her/him continue to do these things:   

Movies with friends Shopping with friends Parties that are safe Arts, writing

End the session by making sure the child knows what to do, if attempted or actual abuse happens again: 

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Say NO, or run away to somewhere safe – ask the child to specify to whom. Tell someone – ask the child to specify to whom.


Appendix 5 FEARS OF DISCLOSURE

A child may be frightened of disclosing what has happened because of fears of:-

Remembering: Sexually abused children often cope by pushing the experience as far back in their minds as they can, to “forget” and avoid feeling hurt again.

Losing love: Abuse makes most victims feel “dirty.” Child victims also often feel responsible for what happened to them. Because of these, they worry that their parents and friends will stop loving them, once they learn about the abuse. They fear the separation from loved ones that could result from their telling.

Shame & guilt: Children either know or can sense that their sexual experiences with adults are wrong. This makes telling someone and acknowledging it occurred, shameful. Older children have also been known to suffer more from a sense of guilt than younger ones.

Being blamed: Children fear that they will be blamed for the sexual touches and that they somehow wanted it. People tend to believe adults more than they would believe children. Offenders also often make the excuse that their victims “asked” to be touched sexually. Children ask for affection and attention, which is their right, and not for sex about which they do not, as yet, have appropriate context for consent.

Further harm: Offenders often threaten their victims and their families as a means of maintaining control. Victims then carry the burden of keeping their families safe by not telling.

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Appendix 6 CURRICULUM: AN INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL SAFETY

Empowering schools and children in the prevention of child abuse can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Lessons are available from Primary Learning Support to cover the nine major concepts in the Primary and Secondary Schools. It is only one methodology and based on experiences with children and professionals working with children. At least one-third of our children, boys and girls, are sexually abused before they reach the age of 18. In order to help protect children, the lessons focus on the information and skill deficits found in many children and their families that make them most vulnerable to be exploited:    

Adults who are afraid to talk about sex with their children and thus children are left without even a vocabulary to talk about what may have happened. Children who are told to obey parents and respect all adults unconditionally, thus not building any skills in assertiveness or decision making. Children who are not allowed their own feelings; instead adults tell children, “Don’t cry,” “Don’t be afraid,” “It’s bad to be angry,” “Don’t laugh at that,” thus often removing the inner signals children need to protect themselves and understand what is happening. When forgiveness is forced upon victims of abuse, adding further responsibility for an assault they are not to blame for in any way. When family sanctity, respect and shame are all used incorrectly to keep silent about the sexual abuse of our children.

The nine major concepts that can be taught through these lessons are:-

        

Body access and the right to be safe A continuum of touch from safe to unsafe Intuition and using feelings for safety The right to say “NO” Safety rules Support systems Private body parts Sexual contact with an adult is never the child’s fault Secrets about touching are not okay

The nine major concepts are taught within three major components of Personal Safety lessons for children: 1. Information Some information needed by children (depending on age):   214

Touching rules (boundaries) Body parts vocabulary


   

Sexuality / gender differences and issues Support systems Laws Telling / reporting for early intervention

2. Skills   

Assertiveness How to tell (using support systems) Decision making

3. Building Self-esteem - To practise the skills of:  

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Understanding feelings/emotions Affirmation of worth and rights Building / teaching empathy


ISB CLEANING POLICY

Guiding Principles: It is very important for the health and welfare of the children that all parts of the school are kept clean and safe. Children quickly pick up infections from an unclean environment. It is the responsibility of the School to maintain a clean and healthy environment and to minimize health and safety risks for all, children and adults alike. All parts of the school, inside and outside, and all fixtures, fittings and equipment with which the children come into contact must be regularly cleaned and maintained. Domestic staff is asked to carry out their duties thoroughly. Failure to assist the School in maintaining a safe and healthy environment will be considered as a serious matter. All requests made by the School Director should be carried out without delay. Requests for assistance from other members of the teaching staff, should also be met. Classrooms should never be cleaned, when teaching is in progress, unless domestic assistance has been requested by the teacher. There are many times in the school day, however, when classrooms are empty and when additional cleaning tasks could be carried out. Minimum requirements: Domestic staff can expect all items on the list below to be personally checked by the Director, or his delegate, whose responsibility it is to ensure that a clean and healthy environment is maintained for the children. Shortcomings will be brought to the attention of the domestic staff member responsible on the first occasion. Thereafter, they will be regarded as a poor standard of work and, therefore, as a serious matter. The School will try to make sure that all the necessary materials and equipment are provided. The need for replacements should be brought to the attention of the Mrs. Rehab.. Inside: Before the Start of Every School Day:   

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Check that all toilets are clean and properly stocked, including spare supplies Eliminate mosquitoes, especially in toilet bowls Report any damage or problems to the assistant Campus Manager as soon as he/they arrive


During Every School Day: Toilets   

All toilets used by the children should be checked for cleanliness and necessary supplies after morning break and after lunch break. If necessary, they should be cleaned and restocked. (Note: If the toilets are cleaned during the School day the floor must be dried so as not to present a slipping hazard) If the hand towels are wet and/or dirty, replace them. Towels must be changed after morning break and lunch break.

Drinking Water:  

Please check and replenish whenever necessary. The overspill tray should be regularly emptied

Dining Room:   

All tables and chairs should be thoroughly washed, all over, using warm water and a good, non-toxic, cleaning agent. The floor should be cleaned. The area around the bins should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected

At the End of Every School Day: Classrooms:       

Floors should be swept, and mopped using a good cleaning agent. Tables wiped, using warm water, a good non-toxic cleaning agent and a clean cloth. Chairs checked and cleaned if necessary. Inner and outer door handles wiped, as per tables. Teacher’s desk tidied and wiped but nothing thrown away. Waste bin emptied. Blinds and curtains closed.

Toilets (and showers in Sports Centre):      

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All toilets/basins in the school (including those for staff and visitors) should be thoroughly cleaned, using lots of water and a good non-toxic cleaning agent. After cleaning, toilet cleaner should be left in all toilet bowls and toilets lids left closed. Toilet paper and soap should be replenished if necessary. Hand towels should be changed. All bins should be emptied. Inner and outer door handles should be wiped and disinfected.


Dining Room: As this room is used for the serving and eating of food its cleanliness is particularly important. At the end of every day, please:   

Sweep the room thoroughly, especially along the walls, under tables, behind the refrigeration units and into the corners. Mop it as above, using warm water and a good, non-toxic cleaning agent. Empty the bins.

Drinking Water: 

An adequate supply should be ensured.

Offices, Staff Room, Store Rooms and Reception Area:     

Sweep, and mop using warm water and a good cleaning agent. Empty rubbish bins. Wipe all surfaces. Blinds and curtains closed. Reception Area window glass should be cleaned.

Library:   

All surfaces should be wiped, using warm water, non-toxic agent and clean cloth. All floors should be thoroughly cleaned with either a mop, using warm water and a good non-toxic agent, or a Hoover (where carpeted). All bins emptied.

Corridors, stairways and landings: 

Should be swept and thoroughly mopped (if tiled).

Walkways:  

Thoroughly sweep. Wash down when appropriate (e.g. if there has been spillage or if there is need)

Ongoing Tasks: During the normal school working week, these additional tasks should also be accomplished. This work should be undertaken when rooms are empty.

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  

All windows should be cleaned, inside and out. Window frames and runners should be cleaned. Items of furniture which can be moved by one person should be moved away from the wall and dust and dirt removed from behind.

Every Saturday: Classroom:   

Whiteboards should be washed. Whiteboard cleaners should be washed, dried and returned to classrooms. All surfaces should be wiped.

Also requiring special attention are Practical Rooms – Science, Art/DT, as follows:   

All surfaces should be washed with hot, soapy water. The floor, including under the free-standing units, should be mopped. The sink, sink surround and counter-top should be thoroughly cleaned.

Toilets:  

Doors and windows should be opened, to air the rooms. Walls and doors (including handles) should be thoroughly washed.

Dining Room:    

All tables should be thoroughly washed, all over, using warm water and a good, non-toxic, cleaning agent. The floor should be buffed. The bins should be thoroughly disinfected, using hot water and an appropriate disinfecting agent. The area around the bin should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

Half-Term and Holiday: During the two main school holidays, every room in the school should be thoroughly spring cleaned once. Tasks marked with * should also be undertaken each half-term holiday. This spring cleaning should include:      219

Pulling furniture away from walls to clean thoroughly behind it. Cleaning all terms of furniture, including chair seats. Washing walls, floors and skirting boards. Buffing the floors. Beating carpet pieces*.


  

Washing cushion covers, soft toys etc. Cleaning out the fridges. Drinking water machines thoroughly cleaned*.

Outside: Before the Start of Every School Day:    

Pathways should be swept. Any mess left by animals must be removed from the school site and the area in which it was found made clean. The driveway and all grassed areas must also be checked for cleanliness If it has rained overnight, the play equipment must be dried. Stones and other debris should be removed from all grassed areas. Particular attention should be paid to the area round any play equipment (also after 8:30 a.m.)

At the End of Every School Day:  

The outside litter bins should be emptied. Grassed areas, pathways and the driveway should be checked for litter and any found removed.

Every Saturday:   

Please check the safety of all items of any outdoor play equipment, especially that all nuts and screws are fully tightened on the wooden equipment. Report any problems to the Director first thing on Monday morning. Please remove all stones from the grassed areas. The grass must be kept short, so that snakes can be easily seen. Any which are seen on the school site should be dealt with.

Other Matters: Health and Safety Considerations: 1. The materials used in maintaining the buildings and grounds are, in many cases, extremely dangerous to children, especially to young children. Wherever possible, non-toxic substances must be used.

2. All cleaning fluids and agents should be kept where children cannot get hold of them. This is also the case for any cloths, mops etc which are used to apply cleaning agents. Cleaning materials should not be kept in bottles which might make them attractive to young children, e.g. empty drink bottles.

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3. Any substance used in the grounds (fertilizer, weed killer etc) should be very carefully checked to ensure its suitability for use in an area where children play. Only proprietary brands, in clearly marked packaging and carrying proper instructions for application should be bought. During the school term, such substances should be applied only after 4:00 p.m. on Fridays or at any time on Saturday. If at all possible, their application should be confined to school holiday periods.

4. As a rule, please remember that it is our duty to keep our buildings and grounds clean and safe for the children. It is impossible to legislate for every eventuality and a degree of common sense is required about the suitability and safety of cleaning and maintenance tasks. Please at all times ensure that cleaning and maintenance activities present no dangers for the children, either immediate or when the children will next be present. Our responsibility extends to ensuring that safe materials and practices are used in all cleaning and maintenance work.

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ISB ENGLISH LANGUAGE USAGE POLICY

The International School of Bucharest is an English-speaking community. This has been the case from the School’s very first day, since when a colossal amount of time and effort and ingenuity have been devoted to ensuring that the school remains an all-English environment. All students, of whatever nationality, should be encouraged to speak English at all times of the school day and in all places on the School premises. Teachers are expected to support our stance and Romanian Administrative staff and Teaching Assistants are asked to lead by example, speaking English at all times in the children’s hearing.

The only circumstances in which a child may speak Romanian or Turkish are: 1. 2. 3. 4.

In Romanian/Turkish Lessons In an emergency If they are unwell If they have a problem with some aspect of their life at School which they need to explain to a Romanian/Turkish member of Staff. 5. If speaking on the School premises with their parent or carer. 6. To show courtesy to a Romanian/Turkish visitor who speaks in Romanian.

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ISB HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 1.

Introduction

Health and safety is an important consideration for our school. We will take all reasonable steps to provide a safe and caring environment for children, staff and our visitors. All personal data/information maintained in this respect will be held in the strictest confidence. The governing body will:  Ensure health and safety has a high profile  Ensure adequate resources for health and safety are available  Consult staff and provide training opportunities  Monitor and review health and safety The Director/Principal will:  Develop a health and safety culture throughout the school  Take day to day operational decisions  Ensure staff are aware of their responsibilities  Update governing body  Draw up health and safety procedures  Monitor effectiveness of procedures  Appoint a Health and Safety officer and committee, including members of the primary school, secondary school, medical office, kitchen and administration Health and Safety committee will:  Monitor the implementation of the Health and Safety policy  Undertake regular inspections of the school premises to identify any potential hazards  Liaise regularly with the site management staff over identified hazards  Conduct fire, earthquake and lockdown drills and monitor their effectiveness All staff will:  Support the implementation of health and safety arrangements  Take reasonable care of themselves and others  Ensure as far as is reasonably practicable that their classroom or work area is safe  Report shortcomings to the campus manager by e-mail so they can be recorded in the Site Maintenance Record Book. General Health and Safety Arrangements The school building, maintenance and medical procedures as well as kitchen hygiene and cleaning standards are strictly monitored by Romanian authorities. - Smoking is not permitted anywhere on the school site. - When contractors are on site they are expected to follow school safety procedure. The Campus Manager, Principals or Director will liaise with contractors as appropriate. - A yearly check will be carried out by a member of the board, the Campus Manager and the health and safety representative to monitor the upkeep of buildings and grounds. - The Board agrees to appropriate training for staff in relation to health and safety. - All new staff and visiting staff, as part of their induction programme, will be advised on safety procedures and associated contingency plans. 223


Monitoring and Review of Health and Safety Arrangements - The yearly check will be used to prioritise need and to inform planning. - The Site Maintenance Record Book will be used to ensure immediate action is carried out when necessary. - All staff will carry out monitoring on a day to day basis. - The Campus Manager will monitor school grounds and premises daily. - Monitoring by Board will be via the Principal/Director's Report. - The policy will be reviewed annually. 2. Equipment - Any equipment in school should be used safely and for its intended purpose only. - Equipment identified as defective should be taken out of use immediately and labelled accordingly. Admin staff should be informed immediately in order that arrangements for repairs or replacement can be made swiftly. - No second hand equipment must be introduced to school without the agreement of the Principal/Director. - Electrical equipment, plugs and leads will be visually checked regularly. - Any electrical equipment used outside must be attached to the electric supply through an RCD, and any lead should be covered by mats to allow safe passage over the wire. - Fire-fighting equipment and alarm systems are maintained via annual contract. - Hazardous substances, such as glazes, cleaning materials, etc., are kept locked in appropriate storage areas. 3. Curriculum - Use of Resources We follow the safety guidelines with regard to science, ICT, technology, art and PE. A copy of each is kept in the school office and also with the subject manager who is responsible for disseminating the information to the staff and pupils. In addition the following have higher risk aspects: - Science reference should be made to the 'Science Lab Safety Rules' document (Appendix A); - Art reference should be made to the 'Safety in Art and Design' document (Appendix B); - Technology reference should be made to 'Make it Safe - Safety Guidance for the Teaching of Design and Technology at Key Stages 1 and 2' document. PE Clothing All children will change into suitable clothing for the activity in which they will participate -details of clothing are listed in the school handbook. Teachers should, where possible, change into appropriate clothing for outdoor games. This sets a good example to children and allows a greater degree of manoeuvrability for demonstrating skills, or accessibility to a child should an accident occur. Jewellery The wearing of jewellery and nail varnish is not permitted. If ears are pierced, studs only may be worn but must be removed or taped over for P.E. A watch may be worn if it is named and not of any great value. It is advisable to collect all such items prior to the lesson and store safely. Lifting and Moving Each child should be taught how to lift and move equipment. Techniques should be revised at least each year with your new class. Children should be stationed at the corners of each piece of equipment. A leader of the group says when the lift should start. 224


4. General Safety School Building Access In order to improve safety for everyone in school, measures have been taken to restrict access into the school building. - Children may use the two entrances. - Visitors or late arrivals should enter via the main entrance. - All visitors must report to the gate and sign the visitor's book where they will be issued with a visitor's badge. All visitors must sign out when leaving the school building. - Any adults on site who do not work in the school and who are not wearing a visitors badge must be reported to the school office. Vehicles - The school site has a designated area for school busses to pick up and drop off students at the beginning and at the end of the school day. - Parents and staff are requested not to bring their cars onto the school site, but to use the public parking lot outside the school premises. - Parents collecting children who are injured or unwell could use the school designated car park. Other areas should remain clear. - Delivery vehicles are expected to use the delivery area. Wherever possible deliveries should be made once the children are safely in the building. - Other trade vehicles should park safely and not block doorways, disabled parking or delivery areas. Fire Safety The school will provide a safe and healthy working environment with respect to fire safety. The Fire Policy Statement is detailed at Appendix C. Earthquake Safety The Earthquake policy Statement is detailed at Appendix D. Evacuation Procedures Evacuation procedures, detailed at Appendix E, are practised each term and reviewed annually or more regularly if appropriate. Evacuation routes and meeting points are detailed on the school site plans and are displayed on each floor. A sample of one evacuation plan is shown at Appendix F. Terrorist threats Lock down procedures and bomb threats are detailed at Appendix G 5. Supervision of Children School Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Children should not arrive at school before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00a.m. There will be no arrangements after 3:15 p.m., except for the days when after-school activities are organised. Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Duties A member of staff needs to be around the playground area to supervise children arriving for school. The bell is rung at 8.30 a.m. At 3.00 p.m. the class teachers supervise the children leaving school. At break times members of staff are on duty. Staff should return to their classrooms in time for lessons to resume. -Outdoor Duty: The members of staff on duty supervise the play area of the school. The bell should be rung promptly at the end of each break. -Indoor Duty: In case of bad weather the members of staff on duty supervise the students inside the school. -Lunch Time Supervision: The members of staff on duty at lunch room have responsibility for organizing proper line up of the students. KS1 TA’s also supervise the students. All staff at KS1 has collective responsibility at lunch times and should speak to children and support the duty staff whenever the need arises. -Bus Duty: Members of teaching staff supervise the gates and the school parking lot at the beginning and the end of the school (8:00-8:30 and 15:00-15:15), making sure the students get on and off the busses safely and quickly. Staff from transportation department also monitor and coordinate the arrival and departure of each bus. All members of staff are responsible for making sure that their classroom is clear of children. All teaching staff should be in their designated areas to receive the children as they come in the morning, after first break and after lunch. Any children working in classrooms or activity areas must be supervised by a class/teacher. The rota for duties is on the staff room notice board. 6. Medical Procedures Medical staff and trained personnel All staff members receive a health and safety overview at the commencement of the school year including any updates to the Health and Safety Policy and a reminder of basic first aid training. A checklist is kept of which staff members have attended and the Nurse/Doctor is responsible for providing catch up sessions to those members of staff who missed the initial session. See Appendix H for certified first aid personnel. First Aid The school has a medical doctor/nurse. First aid and medical treatment is available in the medical room from 08:00-16:30. In the absence of school doctor/nurse, one of the first aide trained staff will take responsibility for the administration of first aid. If advance care is deemed necessary during these hours, then appropriate arrangements will be made by school doctor/nurse. This may include an ambulance, a specialist appointment or hospital care. Attendance and sickness Fever- Students with a temperature of 38 degrees Celsius or above- parents will be contacted and arrangements made to send the pupil home. Diarrhoea and sickness- Students with diarrhoea and sickness should go home immediately and remain out of school until symptom free for a minimum of 24 hours. 226


Contagious illnesses Staff or parents should immediately inform the nurse/doctor upon diagnosis of a contagious disease. It is the school nurses/doctors responsibility to inform parents in the appropriate year groups of the risk of infection. Appendix I shows a sample letter. Accidents and injuries Minor illnesses and injuries Minor injuries in the classroom or playground should be dealt with by the member of staff on duty. Students requiring further attention should be sent to the medical room with a responsible friend or an available adult, or if the nurse/doctor is not available then to the school office who will contact a first aider. Students must ask permission from their class teacher or member of staff on duty before visiting the medical room. If a student seen by the nurse/doctor and any treatment or advice given then the student details are entered into health record book. The student’s details and accident or illness needs to be added. An accident form must be completed and sent home with the student to inform the parents of the incident and any treatment given. See Appendix J for a copy of the accident form. When students are considered too unwell to remain in school, staff will be informed, transport details arranged with parents and a letter sent home giving details of the student’s condition as well as advice on the best course of action to be taken. Major illnesses and accidents In case of a more serious injury or illness the nurse/doctor should be contacted as soon as possible. The student should remain where the incident has occurred until they have been seen by the nurse/doctor unless the student is in immediate danger. If the nurse/doctor is not available then a qualified first aider must be sent to the scene. The nurse/doctor or first aider will assess the injury and give appropriate medical attention on site or make arrangements to transport the student to receive advanced care. Parents will be informed immediately by phone and kept up to date with any care given to the children. Staff will be informed when students are sent off site. It is expected that following a telephone call from school nurse/doctor, the parents will collect the student and transport them to the appropriate place. The school has a contract with the Puls Medica. If a student has an accident during school time then Puls Medica or 112 emergency service will be contacted and asked to provide immediate assistance. See Appendix K for more emergency contact numbers. A serious injury accident form (see Appendix J) must be completed immediately and given to the school principal. It is school nurse’s/doctor’s responsibility, in liaison with the school principal to ensure all documentation is completed as quickly as possible. Medication Policy Medical room Medical room is the general store of first aid kits, first aid supplies and medicines within the school. NO MEDICINES SHOULD BE KEPT ANYWHERE WITHIN THE SCHOOL EXCEPT IN THE LOCKED CUPBOARDS IN THE MEDICAL ROOM. If a student is unwell then they should be kept at home. If a student is fit to return to school but needs to finish a course of medication, this should be handed to the school nurse/doctor in a sealed envelope at the beginning of the day with administration instructions enclosed and a consent form needs to be completed by the parents. The consent form (see Appendix L) can be obtained from the school nurse.

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Administration of medicines Medication can only be administered by the school nurse/doctor. In the absence of school nurse/doctor a first aider may administer the medicine but only if accompanied by another first aider of a member of SMT, provided a consent form has been completed (detailing dosage and administration instructions). ‘At Risk List’ Children who are at risk due to allergies or known medical conditions are placed on a list which is kept in the medical room on the notice board and is also displayed in the staff room and in the cafeteria. This list is continually updated when new information is provided by parents. At the start of the school year it is nurse’s/doctor’s responsibility to compile this list with the aid of information received from the pupils medical forms (Admissions Officer). When new pupils start the school the nurse/doctor will compile the medical forms as soon as possible. The ‘At Risk List’ is then distributed to all staff members. It is nurse’s/doctor’s responsibility to ensure that the relevant teachers are made aware of those children who have severe medical problems and may require attention while in school. Medicals All students have an annual medical performed by the school paediatrician/doctor. The school doctor completes the student medicals, administers any vaccinations and advises the school community on relevant health issues. The doctor may prescribe medications or offer parents advice as appropriate. The Annual Medical The doctor reviews each student in the following areas;  Height  Weight  Chest circumference  Blood Pressure  Palpation of pulse and heartbeat  Chest sounds  Straightness of spinal column  Flat feet  Colour and distance vision The school nurse or another adult should always be present when the doctor examines the pupils. Whilst it is not essential for students to remove clothing the doctor requires some access to the student’s chest, heart and spinal column in order to fulfil the medical requirements. Any significance findings are reported to the parents via letter and appropriate advice given. All findings are recorded in the student’s medical file and stored confidentially. Hair checks The school nurse is responsible for checking student’s hair for head lice after each school holiday. See Appendix M for Hair checks form. If any head lice are found the parents must be informed and the student is to go home and treatment commenced. Treatment can be bought from pharmacies without the need for prescription. The student can return to school the next day but must be seen by the school nurse/doctor before re-entering the classroom. If any head lice or eggs are still found the parents are advised to continue with combing to attempt to remove the eggs.

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Vaccinations The school nurse assists the doctor in the organization and administration of compulsory vaccinations in accordance with current Romanian legislation. At present this includes:  MMR - year 2  against poliomyelitis - year 4  diftero-tetanos - year 9 The school nurse/doctor agrees the date of administration with the SMT and advises parents of this with a letter which includes a consent form which must be returned signed before vaccination may be given. See Appendix N for a sample consent form. The vaccinations do not have to be given in school. If parents wish they can be obtained privately by the pupil’s individual doctor and a certificate of administration sent to school. Medical Records Medical records are stored in the medical room for all students and staff. All pupils must have a medical form completed on admission, which can be seen and downloaded from the school’s web site. The school nurse/doctor must liaise with admissions officer to collect in medical forms and follow up parents who have not returned them to the school. When completed, the medical form is stored in the filing cabinets in the medical room. Each pupil has a folder whether medical form has been completed or not. An annual summary of the medicals performed that year by the doctor is included at the front of each class group. First Aid Kit First Aid Kits are available in all science laboratories, in the medical room, in the primary and secondary offices, in the PE office, in the PE air dome, in the theatre and in the kitchen. First aid kits should be taken on all school trips. The school nurse/doctor will discuss with the trip leader any pupils who are on the ‘At risk list’ and appropriate medications and necessary training will be given. See Appendix O for first aid kit contents. The first aid kit is checked regularly by the school nurse, reading the expiration dates and replacing any used or out-of-date content. 7. Staff Health and Welfare Safety All staff members have a responsibility to be mindful of their own safety when putting up displays and moving equipment or furniture. Staff should not climb on chairs or tables. A ladder/stepladder is available for use and is stored in the shared area. Both staff and children should take care when moving or lifting equipment. If in doubt seek help. (See notes re PE in curriculum section of this document). Violence Staff should always take steps to minimise the possibility of violence in school. See the parent handbook and the Behaviour policy. Parents who are known to be violent or aggressive should never been seen by staff unless another adult is present.

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8. Off- Site Activities Any visit off site must be approved by the Principal. For any visit to take place off the school site, a letter home requesting permission is required. At the beginning of each school year parents are asked to sign a form giving their permission for visits within walking distance in the city. Also, at the start of the year parents are asked to give emergency contact names and phone numbers to be used in an emergency. One copy of the official list of the children and adults in the party on a school visit and their contact numbers must be kept in the school office. The list(s) should also include the registration number of any vehicle(s) involved. If the party is travelling on two or more coaches it should be clear on the official list of children and adults who is travelling on which coach. Each adult on the visit should have a copy of the list and a copy should also be left with the driver at the front of the coach. The pupil : adult ratio recommended by for the activity must be met. Where the visit is in the evening, the leader must hold the home telephone numbers of senior members of staff. At least one of the supervising adults must have first aid training. All coaches hired by the school will have seat belts fitted, adults should ensure that they are used. Adults must base themselves in different parts of the vehicle to minimise the risk of all adults being injured. Children should not sit in the front seats of the coach or in the centre back seat. Children should not be seated by an emergency exit. Children are not allowed to eat or drink on coaches and should sit still not distracting the driver or drivers of other vehicles. On a visit involving transport the following should be easily accessible: Plastic gloves; First aid kit; Official list of adults and children, including the school name and telephone number; Drinking water and beaker; Paper towels and hankies; 'Sick bags'. NB: The office staff and class teachers are responsible for ensuring children have access to inhalers and their medication where necessary.

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Appendix A SCIENCE LAB SAFETY RULES 1. Food, drink and chewing gum are prohibited in lab. 2. Never taste any material in the lab. 3. Never smell a material in a test tube or flask directly. Instead, with your hand, "fan" some of the fumes to your nose carefully. 4. Never look directly into a test tube. View the contents from the side. 5. Never handle chemicals with bare fingers. Always use tweezers, or spatulas. 6. Never indulge in horseplay, practical jokes or behaviour that could lead to injury of others. 7. Never touch any piece of equipment, or other materials in the lab until you are instructed to do so. 8. Work in the lab only when the teacher is present or when you have permission to do so. 9. Before beginning and after finishing work in lab, clean the lab bench top and your glassware. 10. Due to the dangers of broken glass and corrosive liquid spills in the lab, open sandals or bare feet are not permitted in the lab. Shoes must completely cover the foot. 11. Long hair, dangling jewellery, and loose or baggy clothing are a hazard in the laboratory. Long hair must be tied back, and dangling jewellery and baggy clothing must be secured. 12. A lab coat and safety goggles should be worn during lab experiments. 13. Learn the location and proper usage of the first aid kit, eyewash fountain, fire extinguisher, fire alarm box, evacuation routes, clean-up brush and dust pan, glass/chemical disposal can. 14. Report all accidents regardless of how minor to your teacher. 15. For minor skin burns, immediately plunge the burned area into cold water and notify the teacher. 16. If you get any chemical in your eye, immediately wash the eye with the eye-wash fountain and notify the teacher. 17. Immediately notify the teacher of any chemical spill and clean up the spill as directed. 18. Never take chemical stock bottles to the lab benches. 19. Use equipment only as directed: a. never place chemicals directly on the pan balances. b. never place hot apparatus directly on the laboratory desk; use insulated pads. c. use glycerine when inserting glass tubing into rubber stoppers. d. be cautious of glassware that has been heated; do not immerse hot glassware in cold water. e. add boiling chips to liquid that is to be heated before heating. f. 231

point test tubes that are being heated away from you and others.


g. Never add water to concentrated acid. Instead, as you stir, add the acid slowly to the water. 20. Read the label on chemical bottles at least twice before using the chemical. Many chemicals have names that are easily confused. 21. Take only as much chemicals as you need. Never return unused chemicals to their original container. 22. Return all lab materials and equipment to their proper places after use.

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Appendix B SAFETY IN ART AND DESIGN Primary The school is responsible for teaching art, craft and design in a healthy and safe environment with reference to appropriate risk assessments for activities likely to incur possible risk. The teaching staff and art coordinator are responsible for the supervision of activities such as cutting with scissors or a paper-cutter and using glue guns safely. All art equipment is subject to maintenance and safety checks and any faulty equipment is to be reported to the Art Coordinator. Secondary Art and Design lessons are scheduled in Art and Design Rooms (Primary and Secondary), and are taking place in a safe and healthy environment especially designed for this activity. The room is equipped with a sink, soap and handkerchiefs, cupboards and bookshelves. Art and Design Room is provided with a proper natural light source and an artificial light source. Special Art and Design equipment: Drawing boards Easels Drop table Cutting board Brushes, pencils, sharpeners, plastic cups, rulers, palettes, etc. Paper – non toxic Colours (tempera, acrylics, aquarelles, pastels, colour pencils, inks) - all non toxic colours Colours - oils and diluting agent – in use for KS 4 and KS 5 – low level of toxicity (students are working under direct surveillance of a teacher). All KS 3, 4, 5 Art and Design students are assisted and guided permanently by teachers. KS 3 students are not allowed to manipulate sharp objects (e.g. cutters, knifes) KS 4 and KS 5 students are assisted by teachers while working with sharp objects – for this action they are using the special cutting board.

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Appendix C FIRE POLICY ISB School will provide a safe and healthy working environment with respect to fire safety in its establishments. ISB Fire policy complies with the local fire regulations. The Campus Manager /Campus Manager Assistant will be responsible for:  Checking all fire doors is free from obstructions and slip/trip hazards. 

Checking all escape routes is clear.

Checking all fire doors can be opened quickly and easily.

Checking all fire resisting doors close properly.

Checking no fire resisting doors are wedged or propped open.

General housekeeping standards are adequate.

Building generally tidy.

Rubbish and waste materials are not being allowed to accumulate.

 There is no storage, especially combustible materials, in unsuitable locations (corridors or electric intake rooms).  Waste containers stored externally in a secure compound. Appointments:  The named Fire Safety Co-ordinator is the Director, Mr. Yilmaz Gursakal, or in his absence the Principal, Mr. Faruk Erduran. 

The Campus Manager Assistant is Ms. Mihaela Rehab.

 The Health and Safety Representative is Mr. George Popescu Responsibilities:  Checking all areas: Head teacher-overall supervision.  Classrooms: class teachers.  In case of evacuation each floor will be checked (classrooms, student and staff toilets) by an assigned staff member: Primary – Oliviana Tugui (ground floor), Cristina Savu (first floor), Cipriana Stan (second floor), Raluca Draghici (third floor). Secondary – Carmen Zaharia (ground floor), Susan Archiball (first floor), Atakan Derelioglu (second floor), Nick Brown(third floor).  Phoning fire service: the Admission Officer  Registers and visitors book: Primary and Secondary secretaries  Copies of fire evacuation plans are posted on the hallways, in the main gallery and the school office.  The fire alarm is tested monthly by the Campus Manager and recorded in the Fire Log Book, which is kept by the Health and Safety officer.  A fire drill is completed once a term. A record is kept in the Fire Log Book.  A fire safety risk assessment is carried out by the Campus Manager and the Health and Safety officer each term. A report is then presented to the governing body.  Systems and extinguishers are checked on a regular basis. This is recorded in the Fire Log Book.

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  

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The Fire Safety Co-ordinator will be responsible for the upkeep of the Fire Log Book. The Fire Safety Policy will be reviewed annually. The Campus Manager Assistant keeps the updated fire permits that comply with the local fire regulations, accredited by the Romanian authorities.


Appendix D EARTHQUAKE POLICY The steps outlined below are to be followed by all staff in the event that the school must be evacuated upon evidence of an earthquake. Earthquakes happen with no warning; therefore, action must be taken at the first indication of ground shaking. Even in the most severe earthquakes, buildings rarely collapse completely. Injury and even death are most often caused by the shattering and falling of non-structural elements such as window glass, ceiling plaster, lighting fixtures, chimneys, roof tiles, and signs. There will be no time to think of what to do. Each room in the school has a map posted by the door that clearly shows the recommended evacuation route. Staff members are encouraged to review these routes for each space that they occupy while at ISB. During Instructional time: DUCK-COVER-HOLD  Issue “Duck and Cover” command  Immediately face away from windows and take cover under or beside desks, counters or tables.  In science labs, activate emergency shut-off for all power and extinguish all burners if possible, before taking cover; stay away from hazardous chemicals that may spill.  In the library, move away from where books and bookshelves may fall, take cover.  Assume “Crash” position on knees, head down, one hand clasped over neck (or neck/head covered with book or jacket) and one hand holding on to furniture. Posture must be such that the most vulnerable areas (the neck and chest) are protected. Teachers must immediately take steps to protect themselves and prevent personal injury during an earthquake. Teachers have an extremely important role to play in assisting students through the post earthquake recovery stage.  Count aloud for the duration of the earthquake. After the shaking stops start counting again and count aloud to sixty (60).  If the teacher is injured, two student monitors should have designated authority to give instructions.  Sixty seconds after the shaking has stopped, students should be instructed to check carefully for injuries and dangerous objects such as broken glass before moving and standing up. Students should be instructed to be silent during this time.  Apply life saving first aid interventions only. Do not delay the evacuation of uninjured students.  Survivors and walking wounded should be evacuated first. The seriously injured must be left for the school’s designated search and the rescue team.  Teachers lead the students, where possible, out of building using the evacuation route (Appendix E).  Leave any belongings in the classroom.  Each floor will be checked (classrooms, student and staff toilets, windows) by an assigned person:  Primary – Oliviana Tugui (ground floor), Cristina Savu (first floor), Cipriana Stan (second floor), Raluca Draghici (third floor).  Secondary – Carmen Zaharia (ground floor), Susan Archiball (first floor), Atakan Derelioglu (second floor), Nick Brown(third floor).  Once out of the building, classes will be lead to the emergency assembly area.  Avoid overhead wires that may have broken during the earthquake. Lead students directly away from the building and into an open space.

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If a secondary earthquake or “aftershock” occurs, students/staff should “Squat and Cover” (Place head close to knees, clasp hands behind neck, cover side of the head with arms (if cover is available use it or place back against an interior wall.) The “Duck and Cover” procedure is not advised as the ground may be littered with debris from the initial shock. Repeat the above earthquake instructions and continue evacuation procedures. The secretaries will print the registers and give it to the form teachers at the assembly point, together with a green-red visual signal card.

The form teachers will check that all children are accounted for, continuously signalling the status to the emergency coordinator using the green-red visual cards.

Teachers report any seriously injured person that was left in the school for the rescue team.

Students should stand still and quiet waiting for further instructions.

The emergency coordinators (Mr. Patrick Casey for secondary and Ms. Laura Brai for primary) wearing distinctive equipment, will lead each class and members of staff back to the building.

Form teachers will hand the green-red signal cards and the registers to the emergency coordinators while returning to the building.

During Non-instructional Time (before and after school, break, and lunch): DUCK-COVER-HOLD  Students sleeping in the Nursery will be woke up by the teachers, assistants and duty teachers and will be moved in a corner of the room, away from windows, shelves, cupboards. If the alarm is false, the designated staff members will be advised of the situation as soon as possible and given instructions.  Anywhere else in the building, move away from windows, shelves and heavy objects that may fall.  Take cover under a table or desk, in a corner or doorway.  In halls, stairways and other areas where no cover is available, move to an interior wall, kneel, clasp hands behind neck, and cover side of head with arms.  In the library, move away from where books and bookshelves may fall, take cover.  Stay inside for 60 seconds after shaking stops. Usually the most dangerous place during a quake is just outside of the building where debris may fall; exit only after the shaking has stopped.  In science labs, activate emergency shut-off for all power and extinguish all burners if possible, before taking cover; stay away from hazardous chemicals that may spill.  Staff and students are to proceed to the emergency assembly area as quickly and efficiently as possible using the emergency exit routes, leaving all belongings in the building.  At the emergency assembly areas teachers are to: o -take attendance. o -remain with class at all times. o -students and staff will remain on the playground until instructed to do so.

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Appendix E EVACUATION PROCEDURES The overall aim is to save life, therefore evacuation is of paramount importance. Members of staff are not expected to fight fire nor should they go back into the building. Anyone discovering fire or smoke should raise the alarm by breaking the glass at the nearest alarm point. Fire drills are carried out at least once a term and recorded in the Fire Certificate Log Book which is kept by the Health and Safety officer. On hearing the alarm:  Direct children to walk quietly to the nearest emergency exit (marked FIRE EXIT) and then walk quietly in single file to the assembly points on the playground.

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Classrooms located in the East and West wing use the FIRE EXIT doors which go through STUDENT STAIRWELLS and exit the building through the sides.

Classrooms and other rooms located along the main lobby (Library, staff room, Admission office, Turkish, Romanian, ESL, Art and Design, Music, Theatre, Canteen, administration on the third floor) and the second floor Primary (West wing) will use the FIRE EXIT doors located in the central part of the building. The open stairs in the main lobby for evacuation should not be used for evacuation.

Everyone on site, children and adults, must leave the building.

Leave all your belongings in the classroom.

Ensure that the classroom is empty, the windows are closed and leave the doors shut but unlocked.

 

Each floor will be checked (classrooms, student and staff toilets, windows) by an assigned staff member: Primary – Oliviana Tugui (ground floor), Cristina Savu (first floor), Cipriana Stan (second floor), Raluca Draghici (third floor). Secondary – Carmen Zaharia (ground floor), Susan Archiball (first floor), Atakan Derelioglu (second floor), Nick Brown(third floor). Walk towards the assembly point, leading the students as far away as possible from the building. Children will line up in register order at the assembly point on the front playground.

Admission Officer will call the fire brigade and check that the medical room is empty.

The secretaries will print the registers and give it to the form teachers at the assembly point, together with a green-red visual signal card.

The form teachers will check that all children are accounted for, continuously signalling the status to the emergency coordinator using the green-red visual cards.

Students should stand still and quiet until asked to re-enter the building.

The emergency coordinators (Mr. Patrick Casey for secondary and Ms. Laura Brai for primary) wearing distinctive equipment, will lead each class and members of staff back to the building.

Form teachers will hand the green-red signal cards and the registers to the emergency coordinators while returning to the building.


NB: As the attendance register reflects the true number of children in school at the start of the morning or afternoon, it is important that it is completed quickly and accurately and then returned to the school office. Please ensure that children arriving late, after registration has taken place, report to the school office. Teachers should be mindful of any child that is later taken off site for illness or an appointment. If any visitors are present, the adult they are working with should ensure that they know what to do. IF THE BUILDING HAS TO BE EVACUATED DURING LUNCHTIME On hearing the alarm:  Children walk quietly to the nearest exit and then walk quietly in single file to the assembly points on the small playground. 

Children will line up in register order.

Everyone on site, children and adults, must leave using the emergency exit routes.

Admission officer will call the fire brigade and check that the medical room is empty.

The School secretary will issue registers. Staff with the help of the Supervisory Assistants will carry out roll call at the assembly point.

The Head teacher or designated member of staff will check that all adults and children are accounted for.

IF THE NURSERY HAS TO BE EVACUATED DURING SLEEPTIME  

Students sleeping in the Nursery will be woken up by the teachers, assistants and duty teachers and will be helped to evacuate the building to the assembly point, leaving all belongings in the sleeping room. If the fire alarm is false, designated staff members will be advised of the situation as soon as possible and given instructions.

FIRE EVACUATION FOR PERSONS WITH RESTRICTED MOBILITY REQUIRING ASSISTANCE IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY 

The advice given below should be used to formulate personal fire emergency and evacuation arrangements.

Fire emergency and evacuation arrangements may include designated employees to assist students with restricted mobility.

If the fire alarm is false students with restricted mobility and designated employee will be advised of the situation as soon as possible and given instructions.

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Appendix F NEAREST ALARM POINTS AND ONE EVACUATION PLAN

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Appendix G LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES The following security measures shall apply to protect against any threat caused by the presence of an armed individual on or near the school premises. Level 1: Danger Inside School                 

The principal or someone in authority makes the announcement of a lockdown over the sound system. Sound alarm will ring inside and outside the building. Those in the hallways are required to immediately head to the closest room and lock the door. Teachers in each classroom lock their door. Students on the outside of the school building are supposed to head away from the building and meet in the public parking lot. All students and teachers are required to lie on the floor if gunshots are heard unless they hear otherwise. Everybody stays quiet in classrooms and nobody uses radio, TV, or cell phones. Teachers keep everyone facing away from the glass and doors where possible. Windows are closed, but the curtains stay open and the lights stay on, so police and emergency officials can see inside each room. Release no one except by the direction of the principal or designate or the police. Do not release students or staff for restrooms or lockers. The office contacts the Police or local authorities by calling 112. Have a consistent message for parents who are calling the school during the lockdown. Take attendance in each room. Note those who are absent and notify the office immediately/after the emergency is over. Only open the doors when an "all clear" or "Release code" is given. If necessary, parents will be called, but only after the emergency is over. The office will call other schools in immediate vicinity, which may be affected by the circumstances that created the need for the lockdown.

Level 2: Danger Outside School Building 

Most of the procedures are the same, except the lights are turned off and the blinds and drapes are closed, and exterior school doors are locked by the designated person.

Level 3: Danger in the Neighbourhood 

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This situation involves slightly less serious precautions, because the threat is farther away. It involves increased supervision, locking the outside doors and controlling the movement of students inside the building.


BOMB THREAT INSIDE SCHOOL       

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The principal carefully evaluates each threat for authenticity. No threat should be disregarded. The principal makes the announcement of an evacuation over the sound system. Sound alarm will ring inside and outside the building. Everybody evacuates the school immediately and quietly, using the evacuation routes, heading far away from the building and meet in the public parking lot. The office contacts the Police or local authorities by calling 112. Teachers take attendance and everybody waits until “Release code” is given by police/local authorities. If necessary, parents will be called, but only after the emergency is over.


Appendix H

LIST OF FIRST AID TRAINED PERSONNEL Early Years 

Oana Ionesco (teacher)

  

Adriana Cocora (PE teacher) Laura Brai (PE teacher) Paul Benton (KS1 teacher)

    

Lavinia Andora (Chemistry teacher) George Popescu (Science teacher) Ervin Iusein (Science teacher) Carmen Zaharia (Spanish teacher) Alina Piuaru (ESL teacher)

Primary

Secondary

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Appendix I SAMPLE LETTER: CONTAGIOUS ILLNESS INFORMATION

Date

To Parents/Guardians:

Your child may have been exposed to impetigo at school. Please watch your child for the following symptoms. If your child has the symptoms below, please call your child’s healthcare provider for guidance. Symptoms usually appear 4-10 days after exposure. Common Signs and Symptoms:    

Itchy rash Red sores that blister, then ooze The sores may grow in size and spread When blisters break, they form a flat, honey-colour crust

Impetigo is contagious and diligent hand washing is advised. If you suspect impetigo, your student needs to be seen by your healthcare provider. If your child is diagnosed with impetigo, he/she should not return to school until under treatment for 24 hours or until lesions are dry. Please call the school’s doctor/nurse if you have any questions or concerns.

, School Nurse

School Name Phone Number

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Appendix J INCIDENT/ ACCIDENT REPORT FORM DETAILS OF INJURED PERSON Name of Injured person: ……………………………………Gender: ……………. Age: ……………………………. Family member contacted:…………………………..Relation:………….. Contact No.:…………………….. DETAILS OF INCIDENT/ACCIDENT Date of Incident/Accident:……………………….Time of Incident/Accident:……………………………....... Place of Incident/Accident:……………………………………………….. Give details of how the incident/accident took place. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Give full details of the action taken including any first aid treatment and the name(s) of the first aider(s): ……………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………..……………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Where any of the following contacted: Police: Yes No Ambulance: Yes No

Parent/Guardian: Yes No

What happened to the injured person following the incident/accident? (e.g. went home, went to hospital etc.) …………………………………………………………………………… Signed: ______________

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Dated: ________________


Appendix K MEDICAL CENTER CONTRACT Puls Medica

021.9733

Biomedica

0722.338.383

BGS

021.9505

Ambulance

112

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Appendix L MEDICATION CONSENT FORM International School of Bucharest Parent Consent Form Student Medications I have read the medication label and my child does not have any health problems that could get worse by taking this medicine. My child is not taking any other medication at home that could interact with this medicine and cause unwanted side effects. I will notify the school in writing if I want this medication to be stopped. Otherwise, I understand that it will be kept in the clinic and will be administered as indicated below for the current school year by a school nurse or a designated employee. Medication must be picked up by the parent or a designated adult at the end of the year. Any medications left at school will be destroyed. Please, administer the medicine according to the following directions: PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION Fill out and return it to school with your child’s medicine in its ORIGINAL and SEALED bottle or with the physician’s order for sample medication. May we have the permission to contact the Doctor’s office to clarify this medication order?

YES

NO

Student: _________________________________________ Year / Teacher: ___________________________ Medication: ______________________________________ Dosage: _________________________________ Purpose: _________________________________________ Time to be given: _________________________ Dates to be given: _________________________________ Doctor’s name: ___________________________ Allergies: _________________________________________Number of pills sent to school: ______________ Current day time phone number: _____________________ Signature of parent/guardian:

Date:

Number of pills arrived at school: ___________. Signature of Nurse/Health Aid/Secretary:

Date:

Special instructions: ________________________________________________________________________ If prescribed morning dose is missed at home, I authorize the school to give medication after parent contact. The morning dose is: _______________________________ Signature of parent/guardian: Date: “I hereby release International School of Bucharest, its officers and its employees, from any and all liability resulting from my child carrying their asthma inhaler, epipen or diabetic supplies to and from school.” Signature of parent/guardian:

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Date:


Appendix M HAIR CHECKS FORM Year Group / Class

____________________

____________________

Inspection Date Student Name

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______ /______ /______

______ /______ /_____

______ /______ /_____


Appendix N VACCINATION CONSENT FORM Dear parents,

We would like to inform you that starting with ______________ there will be a _________________ vaccination campaign. If you want your child to receive this vaccination please give your consent by ticking the box below. We mention that we will not administer the vaccine if we do not receive this letter back until _________ . In case of refusal, please bring a letter from your doctor to certify that your child had this immunization.

Yes, I agree with the vaccination. No, I do not agree with the vaccination.

Child name ---------------------------------------------- Year--------------------------------------------------Parent name----------------------------------------------Parent signature------------------------------------School nurse

If you agree, we would also like to know if your child: Has an acute febrile illness Had prior allergic or severe reaction to a vaccine Is taking any immunosuppressive therapy Received immunoglobulin or blood transfusion in the last three months Has an allergy to eggs (anaphylactic reaction to eggs) Received another vaccination in the last 4 weeks Has chronic disease and long term treatments.

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Appendix O FIRST AID KIT CONTENT First aid kits contain the following items: 

2 absorbent compress dressings (14x25 cm)

25 adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)

1 adhesive cloth tape (10x2.5 cm)

5 antiseptic wipe packets

1 breathing barrier (with one-way valve)

2 pairs of non latex gloves (large size)

scissors

1 roller bandage (10 cm wide)

1 roller bandage (8 cm wide)

5 sterile gauze pads (7.5 x 7.5 cm)

5 sterile gauze pads (10x10 inches)

2 triangular bandages

first aid instruction booklet

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ISB HOME SCHOOL BUS SAFETY POLICY ISB attaches the greatest importance to the safety of the children under its care. Therefore the arrival and departure from the school including the transportation home of the children has particular safety considerations that are addressed under this policy. All staff must be familiar with this policy and its contents must be followed in its entirety. The following should be implemented at all times. 1

Whilst travelling on the bus each child should be seated in a single seat. The seat must never be shared. Children must never be sitting on another child’s lap. Children must never be standing whilst the bus is moving. If the bus has too many children, the driver must not move the bus until the excess children have been taken off. Other transport arrangements will then be made for them.

2

Children must be wearing a seatbelt.

3

The windows must be closed at all times.

4

The driver must never leave children unattended on the bus.

5

Drivers must never smoke or use bad language whilst working for ISB.

6

Drivers must complete the register of children after the end of each journey.

It is the responsibility of the driver to make sure the above rules are followed. Management should never put pressure on any driver to break this policy. If this should happen, the driver must refuse the request made and report the matter orally to the director and put in writing what was asked of them and by whom. Any member of staff found pressuring a driver to disregard this policy will face disciplinary action which will include dismissal. By following this policy drivers jobs are guaranteed. Similarly, any driver found disregarding this policy will face disciplinary action which will include dismissal. Transportation to school. 1

2 3 4 5

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Children should be waiting for collection at their home address. (Supervision of the children at this point is wholly the responsibility of the parents.) if the child is not there the driver must call the parent and let them know they are waiting. If after 3 minutes they are still not there the driver may continue their journey. The driver should make sure that the bus stops in a safe position, free of other traffic or dangers. The driver, or if present, bus assistant, is responsible for making sure that the child gets into the bus safely. As the child gets on the bus there name should be ticked on the register. The driver or bus assistant should make sure that the children are seated and wearing a seatbelt. On arrival at school the driver, or if present bus assistant, should make sure the children get out of the bus safely and go into the playground where their supervision will be taken over by the duty teachers.


Taking the Children to the Buses. 1 2 3

4 5

In the primary department, the teacher teaching the children at the end of the day is responsible for taking the children to the buses. (Secondary children will go to the buses independently.) Once the children arrive with the teacher the teacher should make every reasonable effort to make sure the children get onto the correct bus as quickly as possible. When the teacher is satisfied that the children are on the correct buses they may leave. The duty teachers will then take responsibility for making sure that the children stay on the buses until it is ready to leave. (Secondary duty teachers will take responsibility for the secondary children.) The duty teachers should make all reasonable effort to make sure that children are seated and wearing a seat belt. Once all the buses have left the duty teachers will finish their duty.

Transportation to Home Address 1. Before departure, the driver or bus assistant should make sure that the children are seated and wearing a seatbelt. 2. Before departure the driver should complete the register and be satisfied he has all the children that he is taking home. 3. On arrival at the home address, the driver, or if present bus assistant, should make sure the children get out of the bus safely. 4. For Early Years, Year 1 and Year 2 children the child must be collected by an adult. If there is no adult present the driver should try to contact the parent to let them know their child is waiting. After three minutes the driver should inform the transport school office and continue the route and return the child to school. The office will then take responsibility for contacting the parent. Children of Year 3 upwards are expected to go to their house independently. If the driver and/or bus assistant have followed this policy, but children are persistently ignoring the instructions they are given they must be reported to the Deputy Principal (Administration) through the school secretary, who will take further action on the matter. The following procedure will be followed; Warning 1

The Deputy Principal will speak to the child and warn them about their future behaviour. The incident will be recorded in the bus incident book.

Warning 2

The parents will be telephoned by the Deputy Principal and given a warning to their child’s future behaviour. The call will be recorded in the bus incident book.

Warning 3

The parents must attend an interview with the Principal where they will both orally and in writing be given a final warning. The warning will be recorded in the bus incident book.

Warning 4

The child will no longer be able to use the school buses. A letter will be sent to the parents explaining this and the reasons why.

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As mentioned at the start of this policy the safety of all people who travel on the buses is of paramount importance. Children who cannot follow the safety rules will be excluded from using school transportation. Note

253

This policy has been interpreted into Romanian and the policy fully explained to all school drivers. Laminated checklist cards have also been supplied to the drivers.


ISB ICT USAGE POLICY Introduction Networked computer resources and Internet access are widely available at The International School of Bucharest. They enhance the teaching and learning environment for both teachers and students, but are sophisticated and powerful tools, and Internet use in particular raises a range of legal, ethical, technical, and management issues. There is thus a need for proper regulation in the use of computers and Internet by staff and children. This is provided in the School's 'ICT and Internet Policy' contained in this document. All those who wish to use the system must comply with this policy. The Policy The policy is in two parts: a) School Network Security Policy b) School Internet Access Policy Staff, and parents who wish their son/daughter to make use of the school computer network and the Internet must agree to abide by the school policy by signing the 'School ICT & Internet Use Agreement'. Sanctions

Violations of the School ICT & Internet Policy will result in a temporary or permanent ban on your use of the school network or of the Internet. Additional disciplinary action may be added in line with existing practice on inappropriate language or behaviour When applicable, the School may be under an obligation to involve outside authorities.

School ICT Security Policy Information includes data, facts, ideas and knowledge of group activities and exists in many forms i.e. typed documents, facsimiles, computer files, films, photographs, conversation, and any other media used to record or convey knowledge or ideas. Access to the school network will be provided for you to carry out recognised school work, but only on the understanding that you agree to follow these guidelines. These guidelines apply to both pupils and staff. General Users are responsible for good behaviour on the network and Internet just as they are in a classroom or a school corridor. General school rules apply. There is to be no eating, drinking, or grooming near the equipment due to the serious damage that may be caused. 254


All users receive desktop icons and start-menu-shortcuts to all the main application programs and common utilities. Access to certain resources such as Internet software may be removed for certain network users, where found to be necessary. Intentional damage to computers, computer systems or computer networks, including unauthorised damage or interference to any files is not permitted and may be considered a serious offence. The unauthorised access or use of personal information is not permitted. ALWAYS scan files in diskettes or CD’s or thumb drives that you receive before opening them. Viruses corrupt files and destroy valuable information. If a "virus alert" occurs when transferring work files from a floppy disk, a member of the ICT staff or the Helpdesk should be informed immediately. Use of the main software packages is continually audited for each user. Sites visited on the Internet are also monitored. A Firewall is in operation at all times. Any unwarranted or accidental access to unsuitable sites should be bought to the attention of the ICT coordinator immediately. This is to ensure that related sites may not be accessed and our Firewall updated accordingly. Secure your workstation and information. Keep your PC secure from unauthorized access i.e. use screen saver with password protect on when you need to be away from your desk. Secure confidential information in a locked cabinet or restricted area when you leave the office. Never connect a modem to your office workstation without authorization. All public computers must be configured with a blank Screen Saver to automatically start within 3 minutes of being left unattended. 1. Access to Network Computers Access to the school network is available from any network station during the normal school day. Computer access is not available during school holidays unless prior arrangements have been made. Staff is responsible to ensure that the computers in their classrooms and work areas are turned off at the end of the day. Computer equipment should not be taken off-site without formal authorisation. Please leave the computer and its surroundings as you would wish to find them. Use of the internet for private use is not permitted during the normal school day (8am to 3pm). Student curriculum and activity use will always take priority.

255


2. Passwords All network system and administration passwords are to be recorded by the ICT Coordinator and kept in a secure place. All users are required to log on with their own personal user ID, which will remain with them throughout their time at the school. They must not use another person's user ID when logging on. All users have their own password to allow them to log on, which should not be made available to anyone else. The password must be changed at regular intervals - at least once a term and using a minimum of seven characters including a number and a special character. User areas must not be left logged-on and unattended, except for staff that have exclusive use of a computer station. Such staff must use screen-saver. 3. Email Access

Staff and students are provided with an email address in the ISB mail system. Email passwords should be at least four characters. Electronic Mail is a tool provided for business use. Staff are asked to exercise good judgment when using the system. Unnecessary personal use is strongly discouraged. Abuse of the system will be challenged. Use of the Company’s mail system for the transmittal of undesirable materials is not permitted and subject to disciplinary measures. Staff and others provided with mail accounts will at all times take every precaution to guard School’s intellectual property, protect network integrity and prevent legal liability. All staff are advised to use Internet Email in a proper and professional manner and not to respond to mass mail distribution. Access to ISB email is upon approval by the Director based on business requirement. The Director may revoke email access when an employee is found to have misused the system. Careless use of Internet Mail over the public domain could subject users to legal action. All email users are required to be guided by these policy and guidelines. Access to the mail system may be granted to third parties (contractors, consultants and others) following the approval process. Third parties should be made aware of ISB’s email policy and guidelines and advised that they are bound by them.

256


An employee who is found to have misused the system will be challenged by his/her immediate supervisor. The said employee may be subjected to disciplinary procedures up to dismissal depending on the severity of the violation. Sending messages for general distribution is strongly discouraged. This is to ensure messages are screened and best practices adhered to. If you wish to send such messages, please forward to the Director for dissemination. Email users are allowed to manage their own mailboxes. There is neither automatic deletion nor specific retention period for messages. It is the responsibility of each User to manage the allocated space by deleting and archiving messages on a regular basis. 4. File Security Computer file storage areas will be treated as school property. ICT staff can view a computer screen at anytime from anywhere on the school network without the user's knowledge, to ensure that the system is being used responsibly.

The network servers are located within the computer room next to the staff room. This room is out of bounds to all staff and children and is to be kept locked by the Helpdesk staff when not under direct supervision. The servers are equipped with disk mirrors to ensure fault tolerance. Backups are performed regularly by the Helpdesk staff. Important work files must be copied to your own floppy disc in case you accidentally damage them or delete them from the network server. Files on the hard disk (C:drive) are not backed up. Storing files on the hard drive of any computer (C: drive) is discouraged for public computers. Such computers may be formatted (cleared of all files) when necessary.

It is forbidden to trespass in others' folders, work or files Users should not expect that their work and emails would always be private Users should use password protection for sensitive or personal files to provide additional security.

To reduce the chances of the server hard disk filling up and crashing the whole network, the amount of disk space for each user is limited to normally 50 MB. Overflowing this limit will cause the user to be locked out until sufficient files have been deleted.

257


Precautions are taken to reduce the chances of infection by computer viruses via the Internet, email, or floppy disk. The anti-virus software, which is installed on all school network stations and server, is updated regularly. An automatic daily search is made for any executable program and zip files stored in user areas. These are automatically logged against the user then deleted. Accounts not used within a full academic year will be deleted, including all work saved. 5. Network Directories/Folders All users have their own user directory for storing their work on the network server. ( 'My Documents' folder). This means that they can access their work from any network station. No other user including system administrator may access this folder. However, in case of any dispute or investigation, such folder may be accessed upon request by the Director. Shared folders are available for restricted access within a group of users. Public folder (Z:/fileserver) is available for shared access around the school on a read-only basis. Files stored on this folder include policies, handbooks, procedures etc. 6. Supervision Staff should supervise the use of the network as closely as is reasonably possible during timetabled lessons. It should be realised however, that all users do have access to the network at other times and with very little supervision beyond the restrictions contained in this policy document.

7. Installing and Copying Software The unauthorised copying of software is not permitted. Games must not be loaded, played or used on any computer unless approved by the ICT Co-ordinator for authorised training or teaching purposes. It is forbidden to load executable programs from a CD-ROM, floppy disk, or from the Internet. Only a member of the ICT staff may do this. The installing, copying or transmitting of obscene material is not permitted and may be considered a criminal offence.

258


9. Downloading Files/Programs from the Internet Due to virus risk, limited bandwidth and the impact of slowing the entire network down, downloading files and executable programs from the internet are strictly prohibited.

When necessary, requests for file download must be submitted to the ICT co-ordinator in advance. Helpdesk support staff will download the files outside office hours.

10. Access to Printers Most printers are networked and are therefore shared.

Use of printer credits is continually audited for each user and for each printer on the network.

11. Access to LCD and Overhead projectors LCD and Overhead projectors are available in all the secondary classrooms and several primary classrooms.

12. Hardware Security An inventory is to be maintained of all equipment together with make, model, serial number, date of purchase and location. All hardware is maintained by a service contract. Rooms containing computers must be locked overnight. Those holding keys to the computer room must keep them in a secure place. All major items are security marked to identify them as the property of the school.

13. Software Inventory An inventory should be maintained containing a record for each item of software that is available for use on the network and the number of licences held. Licences and invoices must be sent to the ICT department for filing in case proof of ownership is required.

259


ISB SCHOOL INTERNET ACCESS POLICY Access to the Internet is a privilege, not a right, and relies upon the proper conduct of staff and pupils who must adhere to certain Internet protocols and guidelines. This policy serves to inform users of School computers of the School's expectations and the user's responsibilities, and should be read in conjunction with the School Network Security Policy. Internet access will be provided for users to conduct research and communicate with others, but only on the understanding that you agree to follow these guidelines. These guidelines apply to both pupils and staff. Parents and Children Whilst the benefits of the Internet are enormous, parents need to be aware that the Internet is an open system that, in certain circumstances, can give access to some unsavoury sites. The School will make every effort to prevent your son or daughter accessing inappropriate materials on the Internet, but we cannot guarantee that they will not encounter text, pictures, or references that are objectionable. Children must comply with the 'Rules for Responsible Internet Use' which are displayed in the Computer Room. The Internet is provided for users to conduct recognised school work only. All Internet sites that you visit are recorded and may be monitored. THE FOLLOWING ARE NOT PERMITTED: a) Sending, displaying, accessing or trying to access any obscene or offensive material. b) Chatting online. c) Using obscene or offensive language. Remember that you are a representative of your school on a global public system - avoid bad spelling and grammar, and never swear, use vulgarities, or any other inappropriate language. d) Violating copyright laws. Never copy and make use of any material without giving credit to the author. e) Revealing any personal information, the home address or personal phone numbers of yourself or other people. f) Downloading games or other executable programs. g) Private use of the Internet or email service without prior permission from the Director

h) Undertaking financial transactions of behalf of the school. I) Staff are not allowed to have current students as friends on Face Book. 260


CHECK WITH A MEMBER OF THE ICT DEPARTMENT BEFORE: a) Opening unidentified email attachments. b) Completing questionnaires or subscription forms INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF BUCHAREST ACCEPTABLE INTERNET USE STATEMENT Staff The computer system is owned by the school and is made available to staff to enhance their professional activities including teaching, research, administration and management. The school’s Internet Access Policy has been drawn up to protect all parties – the staff, the students and the school. Staff requesting internet access should sign a copy of this Acceptable Internet Use Statement and return it to the respective Principal for approval.          

All internet activity should be appropriate to staff professional activity * Access should only be made via the authorized account and password, which should not be made available to any other person. Activity that threatens the integrity of the school ICT systems or activity that attacks or corrupts other systems is forbidden. Users are responsible for all email sent and for contacts made that may result in email being received Use for personal financial gain, gambling, political purposes or advertising is forbidden Copyright of materials must be respected Posting anonymous messages and forwarding chain letters are forbidden As email can be forwarded or inadvertently be sent to the wrong person, the same professional levels of language and content should be applied as for letters or other media. Use of the network to access inappropriate materials such as pornographic, racist or offensive material is forbidden *in recognition of our unique environment staff are permitted to use the system for personal use provided it is outside of curriculum hours (before 8 am. and after 3:30 pm.)

Instance of improper use of the internet will be dealt with by SMT. In such cases the school reserves the right to examine or delete any files that may be held on the school network or to monitor any internet site visited. Full name

Position

Signed

Date

Access granted

Date

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ISB INSET AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR STAFF POLICY

All staff are encouraged to keep their certification current and/or engage in continuous professional development. The allowance may be used toward the cost of registration for a course or workshop, the course fee, transportation fee, and accommodation outside Bucharest. Procedure - after identifying the course/training that you would like to attend: 1. Complete 'Part A' 2. Ask your line manager to approve the application. 3. Pass the form to a member of the SMT 4. The SMT will consider each application in their weekly meeting - and a decision will be made (Part B). 5. The applicant will be informed of the decision. 6. The application will go to Accounting Department for processing of payment. 7. A copy of the application will go to HR Manager for filing. 8. The applicant must complete the 'Evaluation' after completion of the course (Part C).

262


Professional Development Application Form – Part A

Name: _______________________________________________ Date of application: ___________________

School: EY/Primary/Secondary/Admin/Other

Department: _____________________

Course title : ____________________________________________________________________ Start date:__________________

Number of Days: __________________

Term Time / Weekend / Holiday Days absent from school : _____________

Venue: __________________________

Justification - Why has this course been selected?

Cost

 Met the Department/School Development Plan  Met the targets as set in my Review & Development

Course Fee : _____________________ Accommodation : ________________

 For personal interest  Requested to attend by my line-manager

Transport : ______________________

 Others (please state): ____________________ Total : _________________________ I am requesting

_______ % funding

How do you intend to share the outcome of the course with your colleagues?

How will the students benefit as an outcome at this course?

How will the school benefit as an outcome at this course?

Signature of Applicant: ____________ 263

Signature of Line Manager:

____________


HOD’s Decision – Part B Accepted 

Deferred 

Rejected 

Amount of funding offered ___________

Reason for decision (if deemed necessary e.g. more information required, etc.)

HOD:

Date:

Director:

Date:

264

Baht


Professional Development Evaluation Form – Part C Inset/Course Content 5 = Excellent ………………. 1 = Poor 5

4

3

2

1

The inset/course achieved its stated objectives

The school will benefit as an outcome of this course

The students will benefit as an outcome of this course 

The topics covered were logically sequenced

The contents are useful to me in my work and career

The inset/course has fulfilled my expectations

The facilitator’s knowledge and expertise

Overall rating of the facilitator

Professional Development Evaluation Form – Part C Course duration

Overall rating of the course content

Inset/Course Content I intend to share the outcomes of this course with ______________________ on the ____________ (date) 5 = Excellent ………………. 1 = Poor 4 3 2 1 Has this course met any of the targets/CPD requests from5your Review & Development? Theinset/course achieved its stated objectives Yes No 

Other comments The school will benefit as an outcome of this course Signature of Applicant:

Date:

The students will benefit as an outcome of this course  Signature of Line Manager:

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Date:


ISB MAINTENANCE POLICY The building and landscaped environments at ISB must be kept in such condition to ensure that the facilities are adequate:   

for the courses of study provided by the school, for the numbers of students in each course and, for safe and secure occupancy and use by students, staff and visitors.

Responsibility The Director of ISB, in collaboration with the Advisory Council and with the support of school staff, is responsible for ensuring the school’s built environment is adequately maintained in sound operational condition for the courses of study and the number of students in each course.

Maintenance: Maintenance falls into three broad categories 1. Essential Maintenance – work that is recurrent in nature, required to keep systems operational, safe and/or as required by statutory authorities or regulation, for example:        

Fire protection systems Security systems Ventilation systems Heating and cooling plant and equipment Lift services Electrical equipment safety inspections and testing Hazardous materials management Playground equipment

2. Planned Maintenance – work that has been identified through asset inspection and assessment procedures required to be undertaken to preserve a building's fabric including features, for example:       

266

Painting previously painted surfaces Replacement of floor coverings Replacement of furniture Replacement of blackboards with whiteboards Annual cleaning Gutter cleaning Major repair or restoration (e.g. roof replacement)


3. Unforeseen Maintenance – work that cannot be anticipated, usually as a result of a breakdown or an accident, which is essential for health safety, security or protecting the environment, for example:    

Blocked drains from storm water or sewerage Electrical hazards Vandalism outside school hours Water leaks from taps, toilets or bubblers

Procedures Acceptable Standards Categories: The school uses the same categories as used in the Registration and Renewal Facilities Inspection to identify unacceptable standards or condition/operational nonconformities, Good - Surface finish is as new, structure is visibly sound; environment is habitable, comfortable and lit in accordance with Romanian Standard; operational procedures are appropriate Fair - Minor imperfections, marks or deterioration detract from as new appearance or structural integrity; environmental performance is less than good yet still habitable; operational procedures are flawed but not negligent Poor - Surface finish or structural integrity is unsatisfactory and must be improved; environment is uncomfortable if left unimproved, procedures are unsatisfactory or non-existent These categories are recorded and qualified on the relevant maintenance checklist and the Director is notified. The Director takes any necessary corrective action to ensure the unacceptable condition or operation situation is resolved. Systematic Inspections: The school has implemented the following inspection protocols to identify nonconformities with respect to condition/operation of buildings and premises:

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When

Operation Inspection: Individual staff identify issues during the course of the day by visually checking their workplace.

Daily

Action: Staff record the non-conformity in the school maintenance book, which is located in the school offices. However, if in the opinion of the staff member, the matter is hazardous, the staff member implements appropriate emergency procedures and contacts and records the issue later. Follow-up: The Director or Assistant manager checks the maintenance book each day and assesses the degree of risk of each non-conformity and implements necessary corrective action. Inspection: The school Director or Assistant manager assisted by selected others walks around the school visually checking buildings and grounds to identify condition/operational non-conformities.

Monthly

Action: The Director or Assistant manager records the issues in the school maintenance book and implements appropriate corrective action. Follow-up: The Director tracks the maintenance issues identifying repeat issues and costs and prepares report for School Board. Inspection: The maintenance committee comprising school Director, School Advisory Chairperson and Assistant manager, undertake a visual check of buildings and grounds to identify condition/operational non-conformities. Action: The maintenance committee records those issues requiring immediate rectification in the school maintenance book and separately

Biannually

records issues for long-term rectification on the schools planned maintenance register. Follow-up: The Director implements appropriate corrective-action for issues requiring immediate attention. The Director presents long-term maintenance matters to the School Advisory Council for consideration for inclusion in the school’s next year’s budget.

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ISB MEDICATION AND ACCIDENT POLICY MEDICATION POLICY Children must NOT bring medication to school and take it without adult supervision. The school nurse will look after medicines (in the original container) sent in with a child and will supervise the student taking them in the correct quantity at the proper time. Medicines will only be given if there is a written and signed note from a parent/guardian. The concealment of medication and failure to hand it in to the school Nurse will be treated as a breach of school rules and a disciplinary offence. The school policy requires the Nurses only to give medicines where it is clear that they will help control pain or fever. On the understanding that it is not always easy/necessary to contact parents or guardians, we will not always ask for permission before giving medication for pain relief or fever. However, if any medication is to be administered to a child by the school Nurse without authority, the slip at the end of this document should be completed and return to the Primary/Secondary office (as relevant) as soon as possible. If there is any reason why a child should not be given a particular type of medicine (e.g. an allergy), this information will be passed on to the school nurse. Antibiotics will not be given to any pupils unless they are prescribed by a doctor. Day pupils with conditions which require the use of antibiotics should see their own doctor for the prescription and must hand the medicine in to the nurse if they need to take it during the school day. Where boarders show the symptoms of bacterial infection, parents will be contacted and they may either be taken to Hospital or collected by parents in order to visit their own doctor. A careful record will be kept of any medication administered at school. If a child is given medicine, they will be given a slip by the nurse indicating the type of medicine and the time at which it was given. This slip will be passed to parents. ACCIDENT POLICY  

Minor incidents (scrapes, cuts, etc.) will be dealt with as deemed appropriate by the school nurse, teacher or assistant, using basic first aid techniques. If a more serious accident (sports injury, broken bones, head injuries, fainting, etc.) occurs on school property during school hours, the child will be taken to the school Nurse to be evaluated and an incident report will be made. The Director must be informed immediately of any head injury or serious injury/accident/illness. If the Nurse and staff dealing with the incident think that it is in the best interests of the student to take them immediately to hospital, he/she will be taken to hospital. Parents will be notified by telephone as soon as possible if the child is taken to hospital, otherwise a copy of the incident report will be sent home with the child. Parents of day students will be notified as soon as possible after any serious accident and before the child is taken to hospital. If the parents cannot be contacted and it is thought appropriate, the child will be taken immediately to Hospital and school staff will continue to attempt to contact the parents. Where an accident or serious illness occurs on a school trip, the child will be taken to the best available hospital in the area and parents will be contacted as soon as possible.

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INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF BUCHAREST SCHOOL POLICY REGARDING SICK CHILDREN Communication in the event of an accident requiring a visit to hospital

INCIDENT OCCURS

NURSE COMPLETES INCIDENT REPORT FORM IMMEDIATELY ON RETURN FROM HOSPITAL AND COPY SENT TO DIRECTOR’S OFFICE

Day Student

STAFF DEALING WITH INCIDENT CONTACT NURSE

STAFF COMPLETE INCIDENT REPORT FORM AT FIRST OPPORTUNITY

NURSE ON DUTY DECIDES IF A HOSPITAL VISIT IS REQUIRED

INCIDENT REPORT FORM COMPIES SENT TO HEADMASTER

DIRECTOR (Contacted immediately)

GENERAL MANAGER HEAD OF SECTION WHERE INCIDENT CONNECTED WITH SCHOOL BUILDINGS OR EQUIPMENT FILE

Between 8.30 am. To 3.00 pm.

HEADMASTER

School day

HEAD OF SECTION

INFORMS DIRECTOR’S SECRETARY GIVING NAME OF CHILD AND NATURE OF INJURY

Day Student HEADMASTER HEAD OF SECTION

INFORMS PARENTS BY PHONE

RECORDS AND FILES CONTACT AND OUTCOME

Incident report form will be kept in the medical centre.

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GENERAL MANAGER WHERE INCIDENT CONNECTED WITH SCHOOL BUILDINGS OR EQUIPMENT

FILE


Allergies/Ongoing medical problems The school medical form should be completed and returned to school. If this has not been filled in parent should request one as soon as possible from the school office. The school should be notices in writing about any new allergies (food or medication) that a child has, or any change in contact number or medical conditions. From time to time we will ask parents to update the information we have by asking for a new form to be completed. Comments or Complaints About the Policy The Nurse carries out the policy but do not make it, so if parents have any questions or comments about the school medication policy, they should contact to the Head of Secondary or Head of Primary.

Name of Parent

Name(s) of pupil(s)

I do not wish my child to be given any medication by the Nurse at ISB

I do not wish my child to be given Nurse at ISB

Signature

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(specify medicine) by the


ISB PARENTS/GUARDIANS IN SCHOOL POLICY

   

Other than parent/teacher conference days, parents should make appointments to see teachers, or seeing teachers before 8:30 am. Or after 3:00 pm. to arrange an appointment, by phoning the school office and arranging meetings, at a time convenient to both parties. Parents and maids should bear in mind the needs of teachers and students once the school day has started. Socialising with other parents should be conducted outside the school campus so that the school day can progress unhindered. Adults dropping off children should leave the building immediately the child has been given to a member of staff. Adults collecting children should not be in school before 2:45 pm. Parents wishing to observe their child’s learning environment, should do so only by prior arrangement with their child’s teacher. Where children are involved in performing to an audience, all members of the audience are expected to remain with mobile phones switched off, quiet, for the consideration of performers and other audience members.

This code of conduct is made in the interests of parents, teachers and children alike.

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ISB RECRUITMENT POLICY

ISB recruits suitable teachers from both local and overseas. All the applicants must meet minimum qualifications as required by the Ministry of Education and Labour Department of Romania. All teaching staff must also meet our minimum qualifications:

   

a 4-year Bachelor of Education degree (or equivalent); or a Bachelor degree with PGCE (UK); or a Bachelor degree with Teaching License (USA); or a Bachelor Degree with Dip.Ed. (Australia).

ESL/EAL teachers must have, in addition to one of the four qualifications above:

a recognised ESL qualification such as DELTA or CELTA diploma. Short term TEFL courses are not recognised.

After the screening process, the applicant will be forwarded to the Head of Department for an initial interview. Based on the recommendation from the Head of Department, the Deputy Principal, Principal or Director will have the final interview with the applicant. The applicant must provide a list of references including the latest employer. At least three references will be contacted. Once the final decision has been made, an offer letter, approved by the Leadership Team, will be sent to the applicant along with the employment contract. The Initial teaching contracts at ISB will normally be two-yearly, occasionally annually, with opportunity for further renewals by mutual agreement.

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ISB SICK CHILDREN POLICY

At ISB, the School Nurse works with the teachers to provide a high level of care for children who are sick or hurt during the school day. However, to reduce the chances of making other children ill, a child should not be brought to school if she has any of the following:     

Fever Diarrhoea Vomiting Contagious disease Head lice Please remember to inform the school if your child is absent because of illness. A child with a contagious disease (a disease which can easily be passed on to other people) will be sent home. They may come back to school when the risk of infecting other children has passed. The school should be called if a child becomes ill with a contagious disease. We can then watch out for similar symptoms in other children. Common childhood diseases: How to tell when it is safe to send a child back to school.      

Chickenpox once all “bumps” are dry and crusted over Impetigo at least 24 hours after of antibiotic Conjunctivitis (red-eye) at least 24 hours after the start of antibiotic eye drops AND there is no drainage from eye(s) Lice and Scabies following medical treatment and removal of all eggs Hepatitis physician statement required for re-admittance Strep Throat 48 hours after the start of antibiotic

Other illnesses will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Fever is usually an indication of infection and is often a symptom of a contagious illness. A child should not come to school if he/she has a fever or has had a fever within the last 2 hours (even if the temperature has come down with medication). If a student is found to have a very high temperature (usually above 40 C) then, at the discretion of the Nurse, we will contact parents to arrange collection from school. In the case of a boarder or if parents cannot be contacted, the student will be taken to Hospital. Diarrhoea In severe cases, children should not come to school if they have diarrhoea or have had it in previous 24 hours.

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ISB STUDENTS WELFARE AND SAFETY POLICY

The International School of Bucharest is committed to providing a warm, caring and safe environment for all our children so that they can learn and play in a relaxed and secure environment. ISB employs a full time nurse and several staff is trained in First Aid.

FIRST AID First aid materials are kept in the infirmary, laboratories, kitchens and school buses. A first-aid kit is also taken on all relevant school-sponsored activities off premises. Prompt and competent first-aid care is available for children in case of accident or sudden illness. STUDENT HEALTH Parents are required to complete and submit an up-to-date medical form for their child. A confidential medical card is kept for each student which contains information from the medical form. The School does not give medication for a minor or passing complaint, such as a headache, stomach-ache or sore throat. ALLERGIES Some of our students suffer from potentially serious allergies. Parents are asked to ensure that the school doctor and teachers are aware of a student’s condition. The allergy should be acknowledged on the school admission medical form. It is important that full information concerning an allergy and its immediate treatment be communicated ahead of time to the school doctor. SICKNESS DURING THE SCHOOL DAY Any student who feels unwell should first report to their form tutor, who will then direct them to the school doctor. If it is thought that the student is not well enough to continue in class, parents will be contacted by the school office so that the student can return home. INJURY If a student is injured during the school day parents will be advised if, in the opinion of the doctor, the student should be taken home or if it is thought that it would be wise for parents to consult their own doctor. If the parents are not available, or the child requires emergency treatment, the school will arrange such a check. If the injury is sufficiently serious, the principal, through the school staff will take immediate emergency action and inform the parents as soon as possible.

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ACCIDENT OR SERIOUS ILLNESS When accidents or serious illnesses occur at the School, the Principal will be called at once. If a student needs to be taken to hospital, his/her parents or guardian will be called immediately, notified of the situation, and asked to take care of the child unless the emergency is so great that urgent action must be taken. In the latter case, the doctor and the principal will choose the hospital and arrange for the student to be taken immediately. If the student cannot be moved without special care, an ambulance will be called. INFECTIOUS DISEASE Many infectious diseases begin with symptoms such as runny eyes and nose, earache, and temperature. Parents are requested to keep their child at home if he/she is suffering from any of the above symptoms, and to let the School know immediately if any infectious disease is diagnosed by their doctor.

ABSENCE OWING TO ILLNESS The following are guidelines for excluding a student from school owing to illness:  Temperature of 38 0C or above  Nausea, vomiting or severe abdominal pain  Marked drowsiness  Acute cold, sore throat, persistent cough  Red, inflamed or discharging eyes  Acute skin rashes or eruptions  Suspected scabies or impetigo  Swollen glands around the jaws, ears or neck  Earache  Any weeping skin lesion unless protected and diagnosed as non-infectious  Head lice  Other symptoms suggestive of acute illness Parents are encouraged to use these guidelines at home in judging whether or not to send their child to school. STUDENT POSSESSION OF MEDICATION Students should not be in possession of any kind of medication in school or on field trips. All medication should be given to the doctor or form teacher with precise written instructions from the student’s parent/guardian. In some cases, after mutual agreement between the parent/guardian and the teacher, the medication may be given over to the student to keep in his/her own possession to be administered by him/herself.

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D:

POLICIES REALTED TO STAFF

ISB STAFF APPRAISAL POLICY 1. Rationale Performance management means a shared commitment to high performance. It helps to focus attention on more effective teaching and monitoring to raise the quality of teaching and thus benefit students, teachers and the school. It means providing appropriate and effective personal training and development to ensure job satisfaction, a high level of expertise and progression of staff in their chosen profession. 2. Roles Performance management is a shared responsibility. It involves the Director, the line managers and the teachers, working together to ensure that objectives are discussed and agreed, regular and objective feedback is given, and adequate training and development are provided and that the performance review takes place.

3. Responsibility for Reviews The Director, Principals of Primary and Secondary Schools, Deputy Principals, Heads of Departments and Year Leaders are responsible for performance management in their areas of the school. All class and subject teachers are involved in the peer review process that runs complementary to the Performance Management cycle.

4. Timing of Reviews The reviews follow a one-year performance management cycle: (a) Review and Development Part 1 This will offer a school management focus for the academic year. Professional development objectives will be taken into account when setting the school’s overall priorities for staff development. Targets will be set by teachers on the understanding that they will be reviewed in Term 3. (b) Monitoring and Feedback Each teacher will be formally observed by the appropriate line manager at least twice during the academic year. Each teacher will also participate in the ‘peer review’ system at least once per year and, preferably, once per term. The results of the formal observation will be shared (orally and with a copy of the observation report) with the teacher observed within two working days of the observation or as soon as possible thereafter.

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(c) Review and Development Part 2 Targets set in Term 1 will be reviewed in Term 3 and will continue to inform management with regards to further professional development and teacher performance issues. 5. Managing Weak Performance The review meeting and review statement do not form part of any formal disciplinary or capability procedures. However, relevant information from review statements may be taken into account by those who have access to them in making decisions and in advising those responsible for taking decisions, or making recommendations about performance, pay, promotion, dismissal or disciplinary matters. 6. Confidentiality The individual plan and the review statement are personal and confidential documents will be kept in a secure place. 7. Access to outcomes There will only be two copies of the review statement – one held by the teacher and another held by the Director on a central file. 8. Complaints Teachers can record their dissatisfaction with aspects of the review on the review statement. Where these cannot be resolved with the line manager, teachers can raise their concerns with the Director. Lesson Observation: How to use this form Observing teachers in the classroom is an important part of improving the effectiveness of teaching and learning. There are three stages: collecting evidence; drawing conclusions based on the evidence; and giving feedback. Collecting Evidence: Before the observation, the observer and teacher should be clear about the context of the lesson, the activities planned and the learning objectives. This should be done either through discussion or from the lesson plan. A time/events log might be used to record events during the lesson. Drawing Conclusions: The observation form covers eight aspects of effective teaching, with a fuller description of each in the guidance sheet. Most if not all should apply to any lesson. The description should help both teacher and observer in assessing the quality of teaching and learning. The observer then considers for each aspect whether it has been shown to an excellent standard, a good standard, and a satisfactory standard, whether further development is needed or whether the aspect is not applicable or there is not enough evidence to assess it (N/A). Conclusions should always be supported by evidence. 278


Giving Feedback: The teacher and observer should discuss the conclusions as soon as possible, with the observer giving full and constructive feedback. The teacher should be given the opportunity to record any comments. ISB GUIDE TO JUDGING THE OVERALL QUALITY OF LESSONS The inspectors would use a guide similar to this. The overall judgment will be a ‘best fit’ of the grade descriptions in the box, except in the case of an unsatisfactory lesson where particular conditions mean that the lesson cannot be satisfactory.

Description

Characteristics of the lesson

Excellent/

Very Good

    

 

Good

      Satisfactory

         

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Almost all students make considerably better progress than might be expected, as a result of the very good teaching. Students behave very well and are engrossed in their work. The excellent relationships are very conducive to their personal development. Teaching is based upon an expert knowledge of the curriculum and is stimulating and rigorous. The work is sensitively matched to the needs of the individuals and teachers’ high expectations ensure that all students are challenged and stretched whatever standard they are working at. Teaching methods are imaginatively selected to deliver the objectives of the lesson, no time is wasted, and teaching assistants and resources are well directed to support learning. Assessment of students’ work is used successfully to inform the teaching and students have a clear idea of how to improve. Most students make good progress because of the good teaching they receive. Behaviour overall is good and students are keen to get on with their work in a secure and friendly environment in which they can thrive. Relationships are very positive. Teaching is well informed, confident, engaging and precise. The work is well matched to the needs of students, so that most are suitably challenged. Teaching methods are effectively related to the lesson objectives and the needs of students. Teaching assistants and resources are well deployed and good use is made of time. Assessment of students’ work is regular and consistent and makes a good contribution to their progress. Most students make at least satisfactory progress. Behaviour is generally satisfactory. Most students are sufficiently motivated to continue working at an adequate pace throughout the lesson. The tone of the lesson provides a satisfactory basis for the students’ continued personal development. Relationships are good. Teaching is accurate, based upon a secure knowledge of the curriculum. The work is geared to the needs of most students, although some might do better if given extra or different tasks. The methods are soundly matched to the objectives, but are not particularly imaginative or engaging. Adequate use is made of teaching assistants and resources, but there are ways in which their deployment could be more effective. Not too much time is lost. Assessment is reasonably regular, but could be used more effectively.


Unsatisfactory

A lesson cannot be satisfactory if:          

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Most students, or a significant minority of students, make less than satisfactory progress, whether this is due to unsatisfactory teaching or the impact of bad behaviour. Students’ overall behaviour or attitudes are unsatisfactory, and the tone of the lesson is contrary to the development of students’ personal qualities. Relationships are strained. The teaching is unsatisfactory and is likely to have one or more of the following: Weak knowledge of the curriculum leading to inaccurate teaching and low demands on students Work badly matched to the students’ starting points Ineffective classroom management of behaviour Methods which are poorly geared to the learning objectives or fail to gain the interest and commitment of the students Inadequate use of resources, including assistants and the time available Assessment is limited to superficial marking of students’ written work, with little or no feedback.


ISB DISPLAY POLICY Rationale Displays enhance the school environment reflecting standards and expectations; they are a visual representation of our school and its ethos. Displays of children’s work, gives recognition and value, confirming their achievement. Displays also help create an interesting and attractive environment in which learning is facilitated; and which can help foster a caring attitude by children to their surroundings. When children's work is valued and displayed, their self-esteem rises. Purpose Displays should reflect the quality and expectations of the school. Displayed work and the way in which it is displayed should be reflective of the school's standards. Pre-planning is a necessary preliminary to display work. Displays should be both imaginative and appealing. Work showing a variety of techniques and media should be displayed. Displays should comprise of the children's own work, and this should be shown to its best advantage. Careful consideration should be given to how the work is mounted, the choice of background color and texture and the use of text for providing information. Displays should be relevant to the work being carried out in the class. Work in progress, as well as finished work should be part of displays. Displays should be exciting and stimulating to look at, perhaps with questions to involve their audience. Children should be encouraged to make decisions about displays. They should be involved in the selection, presentation and where possible, mounting of displays. Expectations  

  

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Displays should have a theme and a title. Questions can encourage the children to look carefully and focus on particular aspects. Single or double mounts should be used. Backing paper should also make the display more attractive without being the focal point. Over-bright and busy rooms will bombard the eye with colour rather than drawing it to the work. Displays on boards should have a high quality border. Children’s names should be word processed and attached to their work. The learning objective for the activity should be clearly displayed on the board.


      

Interest areas containing objects and reference materials relating to a topic can influence the children's work. Displays should be used positively as a teaching and learning resource. Draw the children's attention to the display during work time. Displays within the classroom should include Literacy and Numeracy along with at least one other subject. The boards should include essential key vocabulary, questions and information to support pupil learning. Other subjects/topic work can be displayed on a rotating basis. Displays should be changed a minimum of once a half-term. The outside display board should be changed a minimum of once every four weeks. Plan in advance for display work – consider forthcoming pieces of work that are most appropriate to use for display and allow time for the work to be completed. All staples must be removed from the boards when displays are changed.

Good display immediately attracts and involves visitors in the school environment. Good display provides a valuable learning tool and enhances children’s sense of value of their own work. We will all be justly proud of our children’s work.

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ISB MARKING POLICY What is marking? Marking is recognition that a teacher has checked out the quality of what has been produced. It needs to identify strengths and weaknesses, through oral or written remarks, to help provide guidance on how to develop ideas and concepts further. Aims: 1. To provide helpful feedback to individual children. 2. To aid ongoing assessment of pupil’s progress linked to learning objectives. 3. To help teachers with future planning. Effective Marking Should: 

Provide clear feedback to pupils about the strengths and weaknesses in their work

Recognise, encourage and reward pupil’s effort and progress

Provide a record of pupil’s progress

Encourage pupils to strive to improve their standard of work

Direct pupils to what they need to do to improve their work

Help parents understand strengths and weaknesses in their children’s work

Who is Responsible for Marking? The teacher should undertake the majority of the marking, especially when the complexity of the work needs analysing and decisions need to be made about what needs doing next. The teacher is responsible for overseeing all marking that takes place within the class, although when appropriate the teaching assistant in Primary may support the marking process. Children may mark their own work or another child’s work if the marking is of a mechanical nature; for example mathematics work consisting of specific number answers where a tick or cross is sufficient. Every effort should be made to allow children time to reflect on marking and to edit / improve their work. Marking Procedures for the Whole School 

Symbols used for marking should be consistant and clearly understood by the children (see appendix i)

A green pen should be used to contrast with the pupil’s writing implement and promote a positive feeling.

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As far as possible, marking should be done daily or when a piece of work is completed.


Wherever possible, marking should be related to a clear learning objective, which has been shared with the children. Therefore incorrect spellings may not always be corrected.

Marking should celebrate success whenever possible in order to raise self esteem and encourage all children to work to their full potential.

Sometimes a piece of work may be marked with a single tick that shows that it has been completed successfully. This is particularly appropriate for pieces of work which are designed to allow children to practise and consolidate learning.

In Early Years Foundation and Key Stage 1: 

When marking emergent writing: There is no necessity to always rewrite the original script. Key features such as basic punctuation and high frequency words should be clearly corrected as appropriate and in conjunction with relevant targets and objectives.

Standard symbols should be used in all classes to indicate errors. (See appendix i and class charts for marking)

In Key Stage 2: 

Good presentation is expected and should be marked.

A progression of the standard symbols used in Key Stage 1 should be used in all classes to indicate errors.

Comments written on the children’s work should : 

Relate to the planned learning objective;

Be legible and clear in meaning;

Recognise children’s achievement;

Indicate the next steps in the children’s learning.

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Appendix i : Symbols used for marking English written work 1. Missing capital letters should be circled 2. Punctuation errors should be circled 3. Incorrect spellings should be indicated by underlining 4. Repeated words should be crossed through with a straight line 5. Missing words should be indicated with an arrow 6. New sentences or spaces should be indicated with a diagonal line 7. The start of a new paragraph should be shown with a square bracket 8. Missing punctuation should be put in 9. Incorrect words or tenses should be shown in brackets with the correct word written above 10. Grammatical errors should be indicated with a wavy underline Mathematical errors should be indicated with a circle around incorrect numbers and underlining of incorrect words. Comments should be added to encourage improvement. Foundation subjects should be marked according to the objectives taught and should reflect the child’s understanding of the subject rather than specific English errors.

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ISB SMOKING POLICY Introduction ISB is a non-smoking environment and no student or member of staff (teaching administrative and support) is allowed to smoke on the campus except in the designated area. Aims of the Policy The policy seeks to:    

To comply with Health & Safety Legislation and Employment Law To protect the students, staff and members of the community from exposure to second hand smoke Raise awareness of the dangers associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and promote the benefit of a smoke free lifestyle to our students Take account of the needs of those who smoke and to support those who wish to stop Restrictions on Smoking

Smoking is not permitted at the entrances or on the grounds at any time, by any person regardless of their status or business with the school. Smoking is only allowed in the designated area.

Because of our commitment to the well-being of children and the wider health of the community, this No Smoking Policy extends to the use of our building outside school hours. Visitors

All visitors, contractors and deliverers are required to abide by the no smoking policy. Staff members are expected to remind parents and visitors of the no smoking policy. However they are not expected to enter into any confrontation which may put their personal safety at risk. Vehicles Smoking is not permitted in vehicles being used on school business, including taxis and school buses. Disciplinary Action

 

Staff who disregards the policy will be disciplined according to usual disciplinary procedures. We will follow our Behaviour Policy when responding to students who disregard the no smoking policy. Monitoring and reviewing

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This policy will be monitored annually and reviewed every two years to ensure it continues to meet the aims.


ISB STAFF DRESS CODE POLICY The International School of Bucharest is a professional establishment and requires staff to dress accordingly. Both male and female staff must be dressed in a smart, modest and professional fashion, setting a good example to the children they teach. Staff should recognise and take account of the fact that we work in an International School where other religious and cultural sensitivities need to be considered. Male staff should wear a formal shirt and tie, trousers and closed shoes. Female staff should wear a blouse or a top with sleeves, trousers or skirt which should be knee length or longer and a professional leather or leather looking shoe or sandal. On no account should trainers or flip flops be worn. Physical Education staff should wear a professional looking track suit and when needed, according to the weather conditions, a sports T shirt and medium length shorts. Proper training shoes should be worn. Staff should not wear clothes that are excessively tight fitting or revealing. Jeans are not acceptable (except on INSET days and when taking children on a field trip where uniform is not required). The Principal may relax this policy on specially designated days such as Non Uniform Day, or INSET. Staff are asked to promote ‘safe in the sun’ behaviour to students by wearing a sunhat or cap when outside during sunny weather. Staff should be aware that disciplinary procedures will be followed should any member of staff not comply with the school policy.

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ISB STAFF DUTY ROTA – DEFINITION OF RESPONSIBILITIES AND ROLES The Duty rota is published at the beginning of the academic year. If changes are made a new version is published. Staff who wish to make changes to the time or venue of a duty must inform Deputy Head first. 1.

All staff should ensure that they are on time for their duty. Staff are expected to be in the designated position for the full duration of the duty.

2.

All duties are ‘ACTIVE’ duties. By this it is meant that staff are expected to speak to students (about behaviour, uniform etc.) in a kindly and positive manner – but clearly not to allow inappropriate dress or behaviour to pass them by. Leaning on walls, sitting in chairs, drinking cups of coffee/tea are not conducive to an air of professionalism. ‘Walking the duty’ is appropriate in many cases – rather than being stationary. Being visible is important – a staff presence should be obvious.

3.

The duty should also be seen as an excellent opportunity to interact with students whom one does not necessarily teach. The use of English should be encouraged at all times.

Vehicles: Staff should ensure that students are in no danger from vehicles and that students are safely ushered into buildings. Health and Safety is paramount. Steps and stairwells: There should be no mass groupings on steps. An obvious presence is required at all times in the main buildings. Please ensure that access to other buildings is for either authorised/official purpose . Ball games are only permissible in the proper areas. Field/Playgrounds: This duty should be undertaken on the field. Supervision of games and activities is required. Dining Room Supervise the queue. There should be no pushing in. Younger students are served first. Timings for when each year attends the Dining Room are also published. Do not allow the queue to extend too far. Behaviour and uniform should be appropriate (e.g. no trainers or sweaty PE kit). Hands should be clean. Occasionally check students in the Hall to ensure that tables are cleared properly, unwanted food and plates are put in the correct place.

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Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during Activities Students attend Activities as normal from 3.50 – 4.00 pm. At the conclusion of the activity students either reenter the building to change and collect belongings or then wait outside for collection. Monday to Friday – end of day Students leaving between 3.00- 3.15 exit the buildings and leave either by school bus, private vehicle or taxi. As part of the duty at 3.15pm there should be a sweep of the area and check of the rooms. Students not participating in an organised activity are not allowed on the fields/classrooms etc. Meetings Monday and Wednesdays’ is our meetings day and therefore causes certain problems with regard to supervision. Duties take preference to meetings and staff on duty can get the minutes of these meetings from the Deputy Principals. With this system in place it is imperative that all staff be proactive in implementing the procedures. All staff should actively encourage full participation in the Activities programme. All staff are ‘on duty’ until at least 3.30. It is therefore everyone’s responsibility to ensure that these procedures are put into place. Staff in corridors for example should escort ‘slow movers’ to the busses or if taking an activity instruct students who may be on the field to leave unless in an activity. By just after 4.00pm all buildings should be clear of all students with the exception employee’s children. The policy for students working with staff after 3.00pm but not in a timetabled or regular activity e.g. The Student Council doing some preparatory work for the Talent Show etc. is that staff must inform other staff via briefing or email. General rules Before entering buildings insist on the student dressing as expected. The same applies at the end of the school day. Issuing of warnings and detentions are appropriate strategies to use for those who do not follow the school rules and expectations. Duties are allocated fairly by the DH. Staff teaching less than their allotted teaching load might find that they have been allocated extra duties to compensate. Allowances are made for responsibilities and other roles staff have in school. In all these duties your professionalism is depended and relied upon. Your co-operation is appreciated.

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ISB INDIVIDUAL TUTORING OUTSIDE SCHOOL POLICY

The School asks its Class Teachers not to enter into any private arrangement to teach past, present or registered future pupils of the International School of Bucharest outside normal school hours or in the school holidays. This policy is the result of considerable thought and is felt to be in the best interests of everyone. The School asks parents to respect and abide by this Policy. The School does recognise, however, that occasionally some support in a child’s early months as an ISB pupil can be helpful, especially if this is provided by a Romanian-speaker. In such instances, parents may wish to seek help from the School Teaching Assistants. The following must apply to all such cases: 1. All such requests should be made through the respective Principals 2. Although some members of the School’s Romanian staff may be willing to assist, they are not under any obligation to do so. 3. Any business arrangement between a parent and a member of the school’s Thai staff is entirely a matter for those individuals. The School will not be liable for any aspect of any such arrangement. 4. To ensure fairness, the School has a suggested hourly rate for such work. This is available on application to the Principals. 5. The assistance given should be confined to two areas only:  Conversational English, in particular to support the pupil’s integration into the School or to support class work in progress.  Assistance with homework, in particular ensuring that the instructions are understood. 6. Before endorsing such arrangements the Principal will need to know the scope and nature of the requirements in order to propose appropriate assistance. 7. Endorsement of any such arrangement will be for three months, at the end of which time the Parent, the Headmaster and the member of staff concerned should meet to decide whether a renewal is desirable.

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E:

POLICIES RELATED TO STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

ISB ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE POLICY (EAL) - PRIMARY At the International School of Bucharest we have a majority of pupils who are using English as an additional language to their mother tongue and possibly as a second, third or fourth language. It should therefore be considered when teaching the pupils English that they may already be dealing with an ever increasing range of vocabulary and language structures. This can be beneficial to the individual child who can make connections in terms of vocabulary and grammar structures, but an added pressure for those who may already be struggling with more than one language. Teachers should be sensitive to the children’s abilities and plan work accordingly to encourage language progression at a suitable rate and the level of support required. Initial Assessment and Recording: All children entering the school will be assessed on their knowledge and ability to communicate in English by a member of the EAL department. There will not be an entry examination at this stage; however, it is important that the school has a record of each child’s ability in English when they start with us so a written assessment will need to be made. This also applies to returning children who need to be assessed into EAL levels for their Pupil Profile information sheets and for continuing EAL support. EYFS and Key Stage 1: Children in Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 will receive EAL support within their classrooms from the teacher and the teaching assistant where possible. Emphasis should be made on speaking and listening activities at every opportunity to allow the pupils to gain confidence and promote enjoyment of language learning. Key Stage 2: In Key Stage 2 all levels of EAL pupils work alongside their peers within the classroom. Differentiated activities are prepared by the class teacher in line with the Primary Framework Units of Study. Support from the EAL team will be given to children at Beginner level, either in the classroom under the teacher’s direction or in the EAL room for individual or group activities relating to their class work. Intermediate groups will be given support according to their needs. EAL Support Lessons: Levels of support for each group with an EAL teacher are as follows: 

Beginner

2 hours per day

Intermediate 1

1 hour per day

Intermediate 2

2 group lessons per week

Advanced

Individual lessons can be negotiated between the teacher and the EAL Team if required.

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Lessons will be timetabled during the first half term of the year to accommodate all the children as appropriate. This will give time for teachers to become acquainted with their class and make assessment of their EAL needs. Where possible lessons at all levels will concentrate on teaching the pupils work related to the curriculum being followed in their classroom. Complete beginners of English will need extra instruction to include basic vocabulary, reading and writing. ISB EAL Level Descriptors: Within the school the children will be categorised by their level of written and spoken English to enable teachers and assistants to monitor the progress of each child effectively. The categories are as follows: 

Beginner

Has little or no English and is unable to access the curriculum

Intermediate 1

Can say/write a few words and/or simple sentences in English and has some access to the curriculum.

Intermediate 2

Shows some fluency in speaking, reading and writing English and can access the curriculum with some independence.

Advanced

Shows a good level of fluency in written and spoken English and can access the curriculum independently.

(NB These category titles do not correspond with any other level descriptors used in educational establishments or commercially.) Planning: Planning will be done by the EAL teachers for pupils in the ‘Beginner’ groups with reference to the medium and short term unit plans supplied by the class teacher. Specific skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening will also need to be planned for with this level of pupils in order to build their confidence and encourage independent study. Intermediate 1 and 2 groups will also have work planned to support their individual needs relating to the curriculum. Assessment: Regular assessments will be undertaken by the EAL teachers and results reported back to the class teacher. A full written and oral test will be taken at the end of the year to give accurate information to the parents via the end of year reports.

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Cessation of EAL support: EAL support will be withdrawn slowly when the pupils are able to pass key assessment levels and move into the next category. Assessment results and consultation with the class teacher will indicate when a pupil is able to access the curriculum independently even though it may be one level below what is expected for the year group.

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ISB ENGLISH PREP POLICY - SECONDARY 1:

Introduction – General Information about the subject The PREP programme operates to serve the needs of those students who do not have an adequate level of English to join the main secondary school programme. On arrival at the school students between 12 and 18 are tested, and if they require extra help, they join the Prep group. The English part of Prep classes is taught by members of the English department and focus intensively on the acquisition of Basic English skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. The classes incorporate a wide range of stimulating activities, including multimedia, games, role play, films, audio, and writing tasks. When a student is judged to be ready to move to the main programme, they are tested and a recommendation is made to the parents as to the progress of their child.

2:

Main Text Books Used

3:

Channel your English Beginners – MM Publications English in Everyday Life Third Edition - Prentice Hall Regents New Framework Language Focus

Aims This programme is designed to take students smoothly from Beginner to Intermediate level and enable them to communicate with others speakers of English in real life situations. One of the aims of this course is to explicitly demonstrate how English is used in real life situations, thus, enabling learners to use it in meaningful contexts. PREP lessons have been meticulously designed to build the learners ability to communicate their ideas fluently, accurately and confidently, thus, enabling them to participate in regular lessons taught in English. Other important factors, such as the learner’s age and interests, have been taken into considerations in the planning and design of this course. The topics have been carefully selected to motivate learners and stimulate learning. By the end of this course students will have been systematically exposed to the functions and structures outlined in the Curriculum Content. Additionally, they will have been given the opportunity to develop all four skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening.

4:

Main Curriculum Content

-

Home and abroad - Unit 1 Alphabet, countries and nationalities, names, jobs, numbers, Nice to Meet You 294


-

Favourite things – Unit 2 Personal items, colours, opposites, people My Favourite Things

-

Home and Work – Unit 3 House, ways of getting around, days of the week, sports, free time Upstairs and Downstairs

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Lifestyles and the city – Unit 4 Adverbs of frequency, time, chores, directions, transport Lifestyles

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What would you like? – Unit 5 Food and drinks, weather, dates, ordinals Fruit and vegetables / in restaurant

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Shopping and jobs – Unit 6 Shopping, talents and abilities, jobs How much is that?

-

History and technology – Unit 7 Famous people, computers, appliances, inventions Looking Back

-

Accidents and travelling - Unit 8 Parts of the body, aliments, misfortunes, holiday, landscapes Not My Luck Day In addition the PREP course consists of classes covering oral English, listening, role-play, games and multi media activities. 5:

Assessment All four skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening will be tested throughout the unit (homework, class work, quizzes) and at the end of each unit they will be sitting a test.

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In addition to end of unit tests students in the PREP programme will be tested at the end of each semester, and a recommendation made with consultation with all PREP teachers, whether to remain or move to the main programme is made.

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Class work

: 10%

Tests

: 70%

Assignments

: 10%

Effort

: 10%


ISB SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS POLICY a.

Governing Body Policies regarding the school’s position on the admission and education of special needs students. For New Students: A short screening assessment to determine the student’s specific case needs and learning gaps. The student has to be able to do mostly inclusive learning, and to be mainstreamed most of the day. The student could spend some lessons in EAL and/or Individual Special Needs sessions with the specially assigned TA or SENCO. In some cases of specific case needs the administration might expect a student to be accompanied by a shadow teacher/ nanny. As this the Special Needs Department is still new, severe cases that need to be taught individually for the biggest part of the day, are not accepted yet although it is planned in the near future, to have a few classes for more severe cases such as autism, or genetic disorders. Physical disabilities that need special facilities such as wheelchair access are not yet accepted, but will be in the future when there is a lift in place.

b.

Philosophy and Objectives of the Special Needs Department ISB’S OBJECTIVE is…to raise attainment; maximize achievement in its broadest sense (including personal and social achievement) and promote inclusion. Targets:     

…to increase the percentage of children who, having started their key stage with below average attainment, have by the end of that key stage made progress at above the average national rate. …to reduce the frequency with which pupils are sent out of lessons …to increase the social integration of pupils with severe or complex SEN, as measured by the amount of time they spend interacting with others in the playground. ..to provide a stimulating, challenging, inclusive program for over achievers and under achievers. Moving away from over individualizing without underestimating the value of IEP’S

The above mentioned targets are based on whole-school measures, rather than on individual children. They allow the school to challenge and evaluate itself in relation to outcomes for their provision as a whole. These targets are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-constrained.

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c. Referral Procedures and assessment criteria    

Students do not need IEP’S in order to access this provision, but teachers still need to know which students have special needs. There should therefore be something like a “Watch Out” list for SEN, which includes every student from those once classified firstly as “additional to or different from…” In addition there should be extra students on the “Watch-Out” list for whom teachers might need extra information and guidance in differentiated and inclusive teaching. This information can be provided on an A4 Student Information Sheet. This SIS should have bullet points detailing the specific SEN concerns for the student and information on the action teachers could consider taking to promote learning. The bottom half of the sheet is left for teachers to keep working notes under two headings: ‘problems relevant to this subject’ and ‘action taken to ensure success in the subject’ This forms the review feedback provided to the Learning Support Department and updated information for the next SIS, if one is needed. These SIS’s should always be discussed with students and parents at parents’ evenings. Should specific difficulties become a learning barrier despite differentiated teaching in the classroom; the student will be referred to SEN Department.

d. Types of support available to students in each division of the school.  Early Intervention: nurture groups and group work to develop the social, emotional and behavioural competencies of young children showing early signs of difficulties, particularly where this can be combined with group parenting support.  Early Language and Literacy intervention  Family Learning Programs  Some interventions for children with literacy difficulties  Peer tutoring  A homework club  A wide range of alternative curriculum options in Key Stage 4  Individual Target setting for students (with behaviour issues) by teachers  Social Skills group work, such as anger management  Some learning support units  General in-class support with Differentiated Learning  Small reductions in class sizes  ICT Schemes  A stimulating, challenging program or club for excelling students e. Special Needs class or Group sizes At this stage of the development of the SEN Department there are one-on-one lessons offered to individuals, but no groups yet. Apart from the EAL and special phonics sessions in Foundation Phase and Key stage 1, where groups vary up to maximum 8 students per group. 298


f.

The nature of the reporting system to parents of special needs students. As soon as a learning difficulty is noticed and confirmed by the teacher as a learning barrier or learning gap and the student is on the teacher’s watch-out list in class, the parent is involved, and communicated to by the teacher. Should ANY learning barriers re- occur (despite the differentiated learning in the classroom), like emotional, behaviour, able, gifted etc. and teachers decide to take further actions in individualizing the indicated students learning to some extent. Parents are asked permission for proper assessment to be done in school, or student is referred for professional assessment by the SENCO. After proper assessment is done and/or reports are back from professional assessment ALL teachers responsible, SENCO and parents are involved in setting up and implementing an Individual Education Plan for the student. Regular follow up meetings, and IEP adjustment sessions are scheduled, with all parties involved.

g. Criteria for determining student placement  …to increase the percentage of children who, having started their key stage with below average attainment, have by the end of that key stage made progress at above the average national rate.  …to reduce the frequency with which pupils are sent out of lessons  …to increase the social integration of pupils with severe or complex SEN, as measured by the amount of time they spend interacting with others in the playground.  ...to provide a stimulating, challenging, inclusive program for over achievers and under achievers.

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F:

POLICIES RELATED TO RESOURCES

LIBRARY POLICY - WHOLE SCHOOL Aims The School Library aims to provide a wide range of good quality books and other learning resources in order to:      

Support the curriculum needs of all pupils and teachers, Foster a love of reading books for pleasure which will evolve into a habit for life Develop a wide knowledge, tolerance and understanding of other traditions and cultures, Enable children to gain library, research and language skills for them to become independent learners, Create a suitable environment for special library lessons which build children’s confidence to express their own ideas. They will learn to check and extend their knowledge of vocabulary and develop receptive and productive language skills.

Guidelines for Implementation Staffing The Librarian is responsible to the Principal for the overall running of the Library. The teaching and learning process within the Library will be monitored following the school professional development policy. Subject coordinators are responsible for the purchasing of subject related books and materials. The Librarian is responsible for updating and renewing the Library books and resources. ISB Primary will select Student Librarians from years 5 and 6. They will be trained in various library skills which will include returning the reading scheme fiction and non-fiction books, re-shelving of returned books in the Primary and Secondary sections and how to aid pupils visiting the Library during lunchtime. Accommodation and Organisation At ISB there is a common Library for both Primary and Secondary departments in the same location (on the first floor of the premises). The Library provides a safe, attractive and welcoming environment which provides time for quiet reading and information gathering as well as challenging educational activities, team competitions and writing contests. English language and library skills lessons are held on a daily basis in the Library for all pupils in Years 1-6. The Primary section of the Library is divided into the following categories of books: science, geography, entertainment, ICT, PSHE, tourist information, RE, history, dictionaries, foreign languages, Turkish encyclopaedias and course books, and fiction. The Secondary section is divided into the following categories: science, design and arts, entertainment, encyclopaedias, sports and PE, physics, chemistry, biology, ICT, medicine, parent issues, business and economics, maths, English language, English literature, RE, history, geography, and course books. There is a variety of different language fiction, non-fiction and course books, and a wide range of magazines. The Secondary section hosts a shelf dedicated to university prospectuses and other advertising materials kept as reference for year 12 and 13 pupils. Fiction shelves for both Primary and Secondary are in alphabetical order by author surname. 300


Resources The Library supplies a wide range of resources. ISB intends to increase the number of books that will be available to ten per pupil. Resources will be kept up to date and in good condition by regular monitoring. The Librarian will advise on a regular basis for the renewal and updating of the Library stock. When appropriate, the Librarian may seek advice from the relevant Literacy or English coordinator in order to periodically buy quality resources from various sources (book exhibitions, catalogues). The Librarian will run twice yearly the Primary Book Club where children will have the opportunity to purchase books through mail order. The Librarian will make sure that each Primary and Secondary classroom has a selection of suitable books for the purposes of a class library. Access and Use The Library can usually be accessed by the student body and staff, between the hours of 8:30 to 5pm. The Library may be closed for a short while to allow the Librarian to have a lunch break. The Primary children are timetabled by class for a minimum 30 minute lesson per week. The timetable for Primary library lessons is displayed on the door along with the opening times. Pupils are never left unattended in the Library. When pupils come into the Library for the first time The Golden Rules of the Library are elicited and discussed. The Golden Rules of the Library are:  Always keep the Library clean and tidy  Respect the books and people who are in the Library  Show your best behaviour and do not make unnecessary noise  Ask permission to use the Library and its resources  Respect the Library timetable and the due dates  Participate in the library activities to the best of your ability. The rules are displayed at the entrance. Both Primary and Secondary pupils as well as teachers, teaching assistants and other staff involved in the teaching process are given an electronic ID and have a computerised file. This system is currently under development. The books children take are recorded in their computerised reading records. All teachers are responsible for ensuring that the Library is left tidy after whole class use or if small groups have been sent to work there with another adult.

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G:

POLICIES REALTED TO STUDENT AND COMMUNITY LIFE

ISB ANTI-BULLYING POLICY Rationale The International School of Bucharest is committed to providing a warm, caring and safe environment for all our children so that they can learn and play in a relaxed and secure environment. Bullying of any kind is unacceptable and will not be tolerated in our school. We take all incidents of bullying seriously. Bullying hurts. No-one deserves to be a victim of bullying. Everybody has the right to be treated with respect, whilst pupils who are bullying others need to learn different ways of behaving. The International School of Bucharest acknowledges that bullying does happen from time to time. When bullying does occur, everyone must understand that any incident will be dealt with promptly and effectively in accordance with our anti-bullying policy. Definition Bullying is anti-social behaviour and affects everyone; it is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Bullying is defined as deliberately hurtful behaviour, repeated over a period of time, where it is difficult for those being bullied to defend them. The three main types of bullying are:   

Physical (hitting, kicking, theft) Verbal (name calling, racist remarks) Indirect (spreading rumours, excluding someone from social groups).

Children must be encouraged to report bullying in school to a teacher or staff member. This policy is designed to ensure that as a school we are alert to signs of bullying and act promptly and firmly against it. Why is it Important to Respond to Bullying? Bullying hurts; no one deserves to be a victim of bullying. Everybody has the right to be treated with respect. Children who are bullying need to learn different ways of behaving. Bullying can cause stress and can affect a child’s health. Schools and parents have a responsibility to respond promptly and effectively to issues of bullying. Aims This policy aims to: Promote a secure and happy environment free from threat, harassment and any type of bullying behaviour. 302


Ensure all teaching and non-teaching staff, pupils and parents have an understanding of what bullying is. Inform children and parents of the school’s expectations and to foster a productive partnership, which helps maintain a bully-free environment. Show commitment to overcoming bullying by practicing zero tolerance. Identify and deal with incidents of bullying consistently and effectively. Signs and Symptoms A child may indicate by signs or behaviour that he or she is being bullied. Adults should be aware of these possible signs and that they should investigate if a child:               

is nervous or shows signs of stress about going to or from school on the school bus is unwilling to go to school (school phobic) becomes withdrawn anxious, or lacking in confidence starts stammering attempts or threatens self-harm cries themselves to sleep at night or has nightmares/bedwetting regularly feels ill in the morning begins to do poorly in school work comes home with clothes torn or books damaged has possessions that go “missing” has unexplained cuts or bruises becomes unreasonable when dealing with school issues stops eating is frightened to say what’s wrong gives improbable excuses for any of the above

These signs and behaviours could indicate other problems, but bullying should be considered a possibility and should be investigated. Prevention To fulfil our aims, the following strategies are used:       

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A structured programme to raise self-esteem in pupils. For more details on the school’ approach to this, refer to the school’s behaviour policy. Constant monitoring of school buildings and grounds to ensure a safe and secure environment is maintained. Involvement of all school staff to ensure a consistent approach is in evidence. An open door policy in the school. Encouraging pupils and parents to report bullying. Raising awareness of bullying. Paired learning and buddy systems.


Procedures It is recognized that incidents of bullying occur in all schools. It is essential that all such incidents are taken seriously and dealt with in an appropriate manner. A pupil or parent may report an incident to any member of staff, but the responsibility for ensuring all incidents are consistently dealt with lies jointly with the class teacher and the Senior Management Team. The Deputy Principal responsible for student behaviour and welfare will be in charge of the recording and overseeing of incidents. The Principal will be responsible for embedding anti-bullying awareness in the policies and practices of the school. The following steps may be taken when dealing with incidents:     

 

If bullying is suspected or reported, the incident will be dealt with immediately by the member of staff who has been approached. Staff investigates alleged bullying by consulting the victim(s). Appendix 1 provides a checklist for investigating an incident. If it is felt that an incident of bullying has taken place, then it will be taken seriously and investigated. A member of staff wishing to report an incident of bullying should approach the appropriate Deputy Principal/Coordinator. The member of staff and the Deputy Principal/Coordinator should reach agreement as to whether this incident constitutes bullying or should be addressed as an incident of poor behaviour. If deemed to be bullying the Deputy Principal will speak to the pupils involved and proceed accordingly. If the matter can be resolved in school without the need for parental contact then this will be done and monitored by an appropriate member of staff and the Deputy Principal/Coordinator. It may be decided that parents should be informed immediately and this will be done by the Principal. A written copy of events will be kept and this will be updated until the situation has been resolved. In serious cases parents will be informed that their child has been subject to bullying. The parents of the perpetrator(s) will also be contacted via telephone or letter and offered a meeting with the head teacher to discuss incident. Sanctions will be used as appropriate and in consultation with all parties concerned in accordance with the school’s Behaviour policy.

Support for the Victim(s) Support for the victim is essential both immediately following the incident and during an agreed period of review. Peer, staff and parental support may all be essential to ensure that the victim does not suffer any long term effects. After a period of time staff will meet with the victim to reassess the situation and the relationship between those involved. Children who have been bullied will be supported by:     304

Offering an immediate opportunity to discuss the experience with a member of staff of their choice Reassuring the pupil Offering continuous support Restoring self-esteem and confidence


Within the curriculum the school will raise the awareness of the nature of bullying through inclusion in PSHE, assemblies and subject areas, as appropriate, in an attempt to eradicate such behaviour.

Support of the Perpetrator(s) It is recognized that support must be given to the perpetrator. Disciplinary procedures against the perpetrator(s) are intended to change or modify behaviour rather than label anyone as a bully. The schools Behaviour Policy should be followed. However, for serious incidents and where the behaviour policy seems insufficient, other procedures may include:     

Withdrawal of activities The establishment of mentoring or a buddy system Discussion about the effects of bullying Peer mediation Involvement of the Special educational needs Coordinator (SENCO) who may recommend outside help such as an educational Psychologist.

Staff Responsibilities All staff will be kept abreast of current thinking with regard to anti-bullying and if required, support will be given to implement this policy. Monitoring, Evaluation and Review The school will review this policy in every academic year and assess its implementation and effectiveness. The policy will be promoted and implemented throughout the school.

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ISB BEHAVOUR POLICY - PRIMARY The International School of Bucharest has high expectations of children’s behaviour. We expect all children to behave in a positive and thoughtful manner that reflects the aspirations of the schools mission statement. Respect is a key component of this and is the cornerstone of the behaviour policy document. The policy is an integrated document recognizing that no one area of school life is responsible for good behaviour and discipline. However, consistency by all staff in every area of school life, in the application of positive discipline is essential for the success of the behaviour policy. Children need to be clear about behaviour expectations and the implications through rewards and sanctions of appropriate and inappropriate behaviour. Behaviour Expectations Behaviour expectations are introduced and reinforced to children through the Golden Rules which is linked to Golden Time. This should start in the classroom where the children spend the majority of their time. The principle is that children should earn their Golden Time which is a reward for appropriate behaviour demonstrated through the week. The Golden Rules are: 1 2 3 4 5

We are proud of our school and show it. We always work hard and do our best. We listen carefully to each other. We take responsibility for our actions. We respect the people who share our lives.

The Golden Rules are designed to be as meaningful and child friendly as possible. They allow for a wide variety of positive actions that the children should strive towards. Specific actions that should be discussed and reinforced with children through the year and as appropriate are; 1

We are proud of our school and we show it: -

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Wear full school uniform at all times in school and on school excursions. (as appropriate) Line up quickly, quietly and sensibly. Clean up any mess that is made – use bins. On school excursions the children are school ambassadors and they should represent the school with pride. Care is taken of the physical environment of the school – damage to school property and resources is unacceptable. Behaviour on the buses is calm, quiet and controlled following the school bus safety policy. Behaviour that puts at risk any passenger on the bus is unacceptable.


2

We always work hard and do our best: -

3

Homework and class tasks are required to be completed to the best of each child’s ability. Students will take part in all activities quickly, promptly and positively. Instructions will always be followed. Students should be on time for school and attend all days that the school is open unless they are ill. We listen carefully to each other:

-

4

The instructions of teachers, teaching assistants and other support personnel should be followed without argument. Peer problems should be solved through discussion and listening to each other and respecting each other’s right to be heard. A teacher’s advice should be sought if this does not resolve the issue. Students will raise their hands in class to be heard and will listen attentively and quietly to another student’s contributions. Students do not seek another teacher to gain permission for a request that has already been refused by another teacher. We take responsibility for our actions:

5

Students are expected to be honest at all times. Students are expected to accept correction and discipline and understand that it is part of their responsibilities to do so. Students should acknowledge error and strive to correct it. We respect the people who share our lives:

-

-

Good manners and politeness are required at all times. Students should say please, thank you, sorry, excuse me and pardon at all appropriate times. Students should knock on the door before entering a room where adults are present. They should wait patiently for others rather than pushing past people. Students should not run inside the school building. Children should safely and careful ascend and descend the stairs, staying to the right. Students should not engage in racial or sexist behaviour. Swearing is not tolerated. Students should not harm another person either physically or emotionally. Any form of bullying is totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated.

In the promotion of positive discipline within the classroom it is the teacher’s responsibility to develop their own system for indicating positive and negative behaviour up to the awarding of weekly Golden Time. There must be a system which should be clearly visible and understood by the children. If the system shows the child has had a positive week then they are awarded their Golden Time.

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Children who follow the Golden Rules and are awarded Golden Time will receive their reward straight after assembly on Friday. This will be in the form of a choice of activities that is offered by the class teacher after taking every opportunity to find the wishes of the children. (Children need to be supervised so practical considerations such as space need to be taken into account.) Children who have lost their Golden Time are required to sit quietly and reflect on the reasons why, whilst watching the other children enjoy their reward. On no account should a child who has had their Golden Time taken away have it reinstated later for good behaviour. This appropriate behaviour can be rewarded through a house point. Star of the Week Star of the Week is to be awarded to a member of each class (Nursery-Year 6) who has in the opinion of the Class Teacher/Teaching Assistant shown consistency and effort that encompass the spirit and meaning of the Golden Rules. When deciding the winner of each weeks award account should be taken of each child’s baseline starting point and the effort they have shown from there. The winner will be awarded a certificate and small prize which will normally be presented in front of their peers in Monday’s assembly. (Where appropriate, Reception will join the rest of the Primary School for a whole school assembly.) Each child will have their name and picture displayed in an appropriate place to celebrate their achievement. Discipline Code ISB believes that the components of positive discipline are well supported by the Golden Rules and the awarding of Golden Time and the Houses and House Point System. However, there may be times where support is needed from the SMT when dealing with disruptive, aggressive or other inappropriate behaviour. Support will be provided after the teacher has pursued all reasonable efforts of positive discipline within the classroom. Support will be provided by the SMT following the set out procedure. • Step 1 • Step 2 • • • • • •

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Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8

Seek advice from the EYF/KS Coordinator Refer the child to the EYF/KS Coordinator. At this stage the child will be placed on a behavioural diary. Parents will be informed by the appropriate Coordinator. The child should be referred to the Deputy Principal Detention (Year 5 and 6.) Parent meeting with the Deputy Principal Parent meeting with the Principal Suspension Expulsion


Houses and House Competitions The House System The house system operates for inter-house activities such as (music; art; sport; literacy and numeracy.) academic achievements, duty responsibilities, good behaviour and other activities as required. There are four houses which are; The Grizzly Bears

(Red)

The Elephants

(Blue)

The Leopards

(Green)

The Lions

(Yellow)

Students are allocated to Houses on enrolment at the school starting with Nursery and will remain in that House throughout their years at the school. Siblings who join the school at a later time will be allocated to the same House. Membership of a house will be indicated by the wearing of a badge with the symbol and colour of the House. These should be worn on the school uniform. Children will also have a House T shirt which will also bear the symbol and be in the colour of their house. The T shirt should be worn where practical when representing their house in competition. At the beginning of the year, each house will have two captains (one boy and one girl) who will come from Year 6. Children will be nominated by the Deputy Principal after consultation with other teachers. There will then be an election by their peers (Years 5 & 6) after making a speech as part of the election process. The role and responsibilities of the house captains will include assisting and organizing house events with the house teachers along with other designated duties that will arise from time to time. Each house will be allocated a House Leader and supervisory teachers who will monitor the house. Pupils will be awarded house points for positive social behaviour and academic achievements. House points may also be awarded for individual or group achievements. Pupils can be awarded house points for their team during different activities which will take place following the school calendar. The house points should be on display in each class room. The house captains will collect the house points on Friday morning and the total presented in the Friday afternoon assembly. At the end of each half term a cup will be presented to the team with the most points. The cup will be decorated in the coloured ribbons of that team. The cup will be displayed in a showcase visible to the primary children. At the end of the year a trophy ‘ISB House Team� will be presented to the house with the most points. They will hold the cup for the whole of the following year until the next winner is announced. The cup will be decorated in the coloured ribbons of that team. The cup will be displayed in a showcase visible to the primary children. 309


House Points System The awarding of house points is at a teacher’s discretion. There can be no real formula of when, where and for what activity house points should be awarded. However, the principle of the system for it to be a success is that house points are given for meaningful reasons and that they are applied consistently across the primary and EYF School. Children should recognise that the giving of house points is for a positive reason to reward work or effort that they have put in. Therefore the awarding of house points should be done in the singular and for an exceptional reason two may be awarded. There are occasions where children will be working collectively as part of a team where a block of house points to go to the whole school house total will be awarded. Specifically; Class events (E.g. collective team effort for the week etc/this should be one per week per class). 1st Place

4 Points

2nd Place

3 Points

3rd Place

2 Points

4th Place

1 Point

Organized Events (Following School calendar (See below) 1st Place

40 Points

2nd Place

30 Points

3rd Place

20 Points

4th Place

10 Points

Bonus Points 5 points can be awarded for activities or events such as sitting in line nicely or class of month. These will be decided at the discretion of the SMT and Key Stage Coordinators. On no account should house points that have been given be later taken away. If a sanction is warranted children’s Golden Time could then be used.

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House Competition Calendar The houses will organize different events each month according to the curriculum plan. September

Behaviour

(Best School Uniform.)

October

Art Week

(Halloween Mask).

November

Literacy

(Poetry/Spelling.)

December

Drama

(Talent Show.)

January

Behaviour

(Golden Rules.)

February

Environment

(Recycling.)

March

Science/Book Week

(Different projects.)

April

Numeracy

(Math World Day.)

May

Sport

(Sports Day.)

Inter School Competitions ISB encourages each individual to take responsibility for their own actions and to take pride in the efforts and achievements of those within the entire school family. Inter school competitions are part of the ISB program of academic and personal development and are represented at this stage by sport and music. ISB anticipates other further inter school competition developing through the next school year. Delegation of Responsibility ISB believes that children should have the chance of be given responsibility at an appropriate level within the classroom. Therefore each class teacher and subject teacher should have in place a system that gives children who demonstrate willingness and maturity to take on appropriate responsibility. This might include monitors for registers, giving out books and pencils etc. Being a class monitor also gives children a goal to aspire to for improving their behaviour. Librarians The Librarian in consultation with the Deputy Principal will appoint six librarians. (Three each from Years 5 and 6) The librarians will be responsible for assisting the School Librarian by returning books to their shelves and keeping the library clean and tidy and supervising other primary students who are using the facility at break and lunchtimes. A Librarian Badge will be worn.

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Professional Development ISB will take practical measures for the staff to develop the skills necessary to implement the behaviour policy effectively. The policy itself was developed with the involvement of staff on committees looking at specific areas of the policy. The development measures are as follows. 1 2 3

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The policy in its final draft form will be introduced at a whole school meeting. The policy will then be inserted into the policy files. At the next available Key Stage Meeting the Deputy Principal will discuss the document answering questions and identifying perceived training needs. Training needs that are identified will be considered for inclusion into the professional development budget for the academic year 2009/2010.


BEHAVIOUR POLICY : SECONDARY CODE OF BEHAVIOUR The school’s expectations with respect to behaviour and the systems which operate to support these expectations are essential in ensuring that all members of the school community work together to produce an environment which is well ordered and secure. This policy is intended to communicate what the school stands for and the kinds of behaviour that are valued by the school and its community. The communication is to students, teachers, parents and all others associated with the school. GENERAL BEHAVIOUR EXPECTATIONS All students will do their best to be all of the following: Caring    

Students will use kind words. Students will be courteous and considerate of others at all times. Students will be compassionate towards others. Students will do good deeds without expecting a reward.

Responsible    

Students will do what is expected of them by teachers. Students will strive to do their best in whatever they do. Students will have good classroom behaviour and follow the rules of the school and the classroom. Students will be responsible for their actions and themselves.

Respectful   

Students will respect themselves and be proud of their accomplishments. Students will be respectful of everyone at ISB and of their property. Students will be proud of their school and take care of school property.

Fair    

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Students will treat others the way they want to be treated. Students will listen to others’ points of view. Students will play by the rules while on the playground. Students will speak up or work to change things that are unfair.


Trustworthy   

Students will be honest, truthful and sincere. Students will be reliable, so others can count on them. Students will do the right thing.

Bus conduct Riding a school bus is a privilege for ISB students. All pupils being transported are under the authority of the bus driver and must obey his/her requests. Students are expected to do the following: 

   

Have written permission from the principal's office to ride a bus other than their own or to leave the bus in some place other than home or school. If a student is to ride the bus home with another student, BOTH students must bring a note from their parent/guardian and present it to the office that morning. Be on time, wait patiently for the bus, and stand a safe distance from the curb or highway. Use steps and handrails when entering or exiting the bus. Sit in seats assigned by the driver, without crowding or pushing. Remain seated until they have reached their destination.

ASSEMBLY EXPECTATIONS During assemblies students are expected to:    

Arrive and line up quietly, orderly and on time in their form groups at the specified time and location. Remain patient and maintain a courteous silence throughout the proceedings. Heed all announcements made by each member of staff. Follow their form tutor in a quiet, orderly fashion after the conclusion of proceedings.

REGISTRATION EXPECTATIONS During registration students are expected to:     

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Be in their form room from 8.30 a.m. for the full 10-minute duration. Wait patiently for their name to be called. Listen carefully to all announcements and acknowledge all actions which need to be taken on their part. Raise concerns and problems at school with their form tutor during this period. Head quietly to their first class only when dismissed by the teacher.


EXPECTATIONS FOR THE CAFETERIA Children are expected to:     

Enter and exit quietly, in single-file lines Be courteous to classmates and the adults on duty. Be polite to cafeteria employees - use "please" and "thank you" Carefully clean their own eating space (both on the table and floor). Always walk and use indoor voices in the cafeteria.

PLAYGROUND EXPECTATIONS During breaks and lunch students are expected to respect the following code of conduct: Safe     

Follow the duty teacher’s directions at ALL TIMES. Play safely and follow the rules on the equipment. Play safe activities: dangerous games are not allowed Play on the playground only and away from the building and fences. Basketballs, soccer balls and jump ropes are the ONLY things allowed from home.

Punctual and Prepared 

Return to class immediately when the bell rings

Achieving  

Try to see both sides and solve problems. Make new friends.

Respectful and Responsible  

Report injuries or inappropriate behaviour to a staff member. Include everyone.

IN-CLASS EXPECTATIONS We expect all students to contribute to a supportive and positive classroom environment. When expectations are understood and encouraged by all, students feel good about them and feel good about their learning. Listed below are our expectations for behaviour in the classroom:

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Respectful   

Actions that disrupt the educational process such as belittling others and speaking out of turn are not acceptable behaviour. Students are expected to refrain from eating, drinking and chewing gum in the classroom. Students are to refrain from abusive, disrespectful language and/or behaviour to both the teacher and other students.

Safe  

Students noticing/suspicious of anything which could cause harm must inform the teacher immediately. Students are expected to treat class furniture and fittings in an appropriate manner. Tables and chairs are to be moved and windows opened only under instruction from the teacher. Students are not to tamper with any other piece of equipment or electrical device.

Responsible 

    

Students are to enter each classroom in an orderly fashion and be seated with books (course book and notebook)/stationery on the table, coats off and bags under the table within two minutes of the final bell. Students are expected to make an effort in class, completing all work set and making on-topic oral contributions. Students are expected to approach the teacher either BEFORE or AFTER class (not during) with any issues not directly related to the individual lesson. Students are to continue working until the teacher tells them to pack up. It is the teacher not the bell who decides when the lesson has finished. All handouts and notes taken are to be filed and available for the teacher to see in any lesson. All class assignments are to be done in ink unless the class is otherwise instructed. Trim edges from spiral notebooks.

A Good Listener 

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Students are to listen to both the teacher and students nominated by the teacher at all times.


ISB DISCIPLINE POLICY : SECONDARY DEPARTMENT There are inevitably times when it may be necessary to impose disciplinary procedures. When problems of behaviour arise, they are dealt with according to regulations developed by the School. When necessary, problems will be referred to the Director for his supportive action. The International School of Bucharest is committed to ensuring that students are provided with a safe, secure and orderly learning environment. A safe, secure and orderly school environment depends on students, staff, and parents demonstrating mutual respect and support. The Code of Discipline aims at promoting responsible behaviour and establishing guidelines to help students as they strive to become well-rounded citizen in a diverse society. 1:

ISB GROUND RULES

All members of the school community –students, staff and parents- must know and understand the following standards of behaviour. They are also expected to live up to the consequences if these standards are not met as the teaching of self-discipline is one of the goals of this Code. The Code applies to all students alike. Fair and equitable discipline is intended to protect the rights and privileges of all persons, in all matters relating to the school. Consistent and unbiased treatment will be given to all students subject to disciplinary action.           

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Students must wear proper uniform for class and P.E. lessons. Cell phones, MP3s are not allowed on campus and will be confiscated immediately. Students will be able to collect them at the end of school day. No fizzy drinks are allowed anywhere in the school. Gum is also forbidden. Food and drinks can only be consumed during morning break (10:25 – 10.40) and lunchtime. Students are allowed to eat outside or in the lunch room. There are 2 breaks during the school day, morning (10:15 – 10:40) and lunch (12:30 -13:10). Only then can students go to the toilets or have their snacks. Students are not allowed to wander around corridors at any time. Hall passes will be given by teachers if and when necessary. After school, students should proceed to their school bus without delay. A credit/debit system is established to reward good behaviour and sanction poor discipline. After school detentions will take place on Tuesdays & Fridays (from 3:15 to 4:00 p.m.) and on Saturday mornings (from 9:00 to 12:00 p.m. in full uniform) should the problems persist. Criteria for detention are listed further down. A contract of agreement will be signed by students, parents or guardians and by form tutors at the beginning of the school year. The discipline committee will deal with students with specific discipline problems. The standards apply to behaviour in school during school hours, while on school property, while travelling on school vehicles, at all sponsored school events and resident trips.


2: INFRACTIONS AND DISCIPLINARY RESPONSES Exemplary behaviour is to be rewarded and encouraged. A special award will be handed out at the end of each term to the best behaved students in each Form group. A “Student of the Year” will be chosen at the end of the academic year. These awards will give an advantage to students seeking to attend universities abroad. To determine who receives these awards, Form teachers will collect positive comments on Behaviour Slips. Whenever possible, students will be given every opportunity to make up for their misconduct. However, should they fail to improve their behaviour at school, the Principal and Disciplinary Committee may resort to the following measures. INFRACTIONS CLASS A Failure to complete assignments

CONSEQUENCES

Disruptive behaviour Verbal reprimand Failure to follow instructions Detention slip Lack of proper equipment After school detention Classroom tardiness Saturday morning detention Failure to wear proper uniform Behavioural contract Use of abusive language Parents’ notification Dishonesty and cheating Use of forbidden items on school grounds Gum chewing

Break detentions are held during the first break After school detentions are from 3:15 to 4:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays. Saturday school detentions are from 9:00 to 12:00 a.m. students must wear the school uniform. Students and their parents are required to arrange for pick-up after detention, the inconvenience being the result of students’ misconduct.

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INFRACTIONS CLASS B Continuation of unmodified misconduct

CONSEQUENCES Class

A

Stealing Improper use of school materials/Vandalism Truancy Cutting class Using forged notes or excuses

Saturday morning detention Parents’ notification Student/Form teacher Conference Behavioural/Probation contract Principal’s suspension

Scholastic dishonesty and plagiarism INFRACTIONS CLASS C Bullying

CONSEQUENCES Parent/Guardian conference

Assault Disciplinary hearing Open defiance of authority Behavioural/Probation contract Possession of illegal substances Principal’s suspension Aggressive behaviour Referral to authorities Destruction of property

In the case of dangerous or violent behaviour, the Principal may take more serious action and resort to expulsion. 3: RED AND GREEN CARD PROCEDURE Green slips will be issued for: •

Personal Development of behaviour (consistently improved)

Personal Development of work (consistently improved)

Citizenship (helping others without being asked / building a sense of community)

Outstanding Work

Other (teachers’ discretion, doing something useful without being asked)

According to the number of green cards the students will be rewarded at the end of each semester. 319


Red/Detention slips will be issued for: •

Continuously talking when teacher is talking and/or not listening

Disruptive/disrespectful behaviour (e.g. continually arguing with the teacher – having the last word, not talking in English)

No material

Tardy to class

Chewing gum

Wearing improper uniform

Misuse of school material

No Homework done

Using cell phone during school hours

Other (teachers’ discretion to be specified: e.g. leaving class without permission, non participation in class).

Daily Behaviour Report •

For every 3 slips a student receives he/she will be put on a Daily Report and a letter will be send home.

The Daily Behaviour Report is issued for a week and each teacher will comment on the student’s behaviour in his/her class.

The Deputy Principal overseeing discipline will check the report at the end of the week.

Should the bad behaviour continue, the Disciplinary Committee will be informed to make suggestions.

MOBILE TELEPHONES AND VALUABLES Children are not permitted to bring mobile phones to school. Students should not bring large sums of money or valuables to school, unless specifically asked to by their form teacher. Any such items should be handed to the teacher for safe-keeping. The school insurance does not cover the loss or damage of student property. CONFISCATION OF STUDENT PROPERTY

Teachers have the right to temporarily confiscate any inappropriate private property brought to school by a child. The teacher will inform the student when the confiscated item will be returned. In some cases, the confiscated item may be returned directly to the student’s parent/guardian. 320


ISB GREEN CARD POLICY - SECONDARY What are Green Cards ? Green Cards are simple paper awards given to students which accrue to the student’s name. They are an efficient means of recording what a student’s behaviour, attitude and work is like. They provide evidence in statistical form to support the more generalised opinion of staff that may only see one side of a student. When should staff give them? Green Cards are awarded to students for extraordinary or very special effort, achievement or behaviour if positive. The Green Card system is intended to assist staff in the normal course of their teaching and general duties. Green Cards are intended to offer incentives and disincentives to help students achieve positive outcomes. How many should be given? This is entirely dependent upon the role you have and the context in which you work. As the system develops we will monitor the number given and advise as necessary. The key should be ‘Value’. They should be given sparingly by all staff, lest they fall into disrepute. As guide a full time teachers issues between 5 and 10 Green Cards a term. Who should give merits? Only teachers may issue Green Cards, although other staff who work on site may advise a teacher of a student’s worthiness. When should a Green Card be given? Examples include:    

A student who has worked conscientiously throughout a long project, exceeding previous expectation and demonstrated that this is beyond the norm. A student who has given up a great deal of extra time, willingly and positively to help the school (e.g. at an Exhibition stand, doing some notice-boards etc). A very obvious and recognisable effort in a subject, or throughout a period of time. Exemplary behaviour at an important time

When should Green Cards NOT be given?  For reaching the normal expectation of that student in that situation  For getting 10 out of 10 in a test. However, doing this over 4 or 5 successive weeks MAY be worthy of a Green Card.

These should be written out by the member of staff with the student’s name, the date, their form/tutor stating the reason given and signing with a clear name or initial.

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ISB SCHOOL TRIPS POLICY Staff is encouraged to organise school trips to enrich the curriculum as well as extracurricular activities. In organising a trip, please observe the following: 1. Before you organise a trip, please submit your idea on a ‘trip request form’ (available from the secretaries) to the Principal detailing the following:  Place of Visit  Date of visit  Reason for visit  Teacher in charge  Other supervising adults  Number of children  Number of buses required  Time of departure  Time of arrival back at school  Other staff informed (e.g. PE, IT)  Arrangements for lunch  Arrangements to cover duty (and lessons) where appropriate.  Cost per child

2. Once the Principal has approved the trip, write a letter to parents, allowing time for translations (template available from the office . This must include:  Place of visit  Date of visit  Reason for visit  Name of teacher in charge  Time of departure  Time of arrival back at school (if later than 3pm, remind parents that they must collect their children themselves)  Arrangements for lunch  Cost per child  Permission Slip

3. Book the necessary buses (a bus request form is available from the secretaries). The following timescale must be observed: Three weeks before trip

Submit proposal to principal

Two weeks before trip

Send letter to parents

One week before trip

Organise buses

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In the case of an expensive residential trip, parents may need more time to bring the money. Adult: Child Ratios Please ensure that you observe the following adult: child ratios on your trip: Foundation Stage

1:6

Key Stage One

1:8

Key Stage Two-Five

1:10

E.g. a class of 20 key stage 2 children on a trip would need 2 adults. A class of 20 Key Stage 1 children would need 3 adults. A class of 20 Foundation children would need 4 adults. You can always involve parents. REMEMBER: If a child does not bring a permission slip / money they do not attend the trip. Unless stated otherwise, children not wearing uniform will not be allowed to participate. Staff organising residential trips must ensure that at least one male and one female member of staff accompany pupils. THE TEACHER IN CHARGE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ENSURING THAT A FIRST AID KIT IS TAKEN ON THE TRIP. (Available from the doctor) THE TEACHER IN CHARGE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR TAKING A MOBILE PHONE AND CONTACTING THE SCHOOL OFFICE IMMEDIATELY IN THE CASE OF ANY EMERGENCY OR DELAY.

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ISB Policy Manual - 29/02/2012