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Larry Grace

WELCOME TO THE AUGUST 2018 ISSUE OF ISnAP! Introduction by Larry Grace, President of ISAP Air-to-air photography is the art of photographing aircraft in the air, by using another aircraft as a photo platform. It is especially popular among military aircraft photographers and aerobatic pilots flying at air shows. The subject aircraft is photographed while both aircraft are in flight. This allows the photographer to position the subject in specific locations and angles to get the most desirable shot. Some things that must be considered to achieve the best results are lighting and background. Proper lighting is achieved through correct placement of the aircraft relative to the sun and is accomplished flying only at certain times of the day and/or by flying at a heading that lines the sun upon the subject aircraft properly. The background can highlight or distract from the subject and must be carefully considered when taking shots. Air-to-air photography can be used for a variety of purposes, including commercial use and advertising. (Wikipedia) In this special issue of ISnAP, we share with you air-to-air (A2A) photography by our members. Our last issue on A2A photography was over three years ago and since that time some of our members have learned to capture air-to-air images through assignments, an invitation from pilots, attending workshops and learning from each other to capture these images.

Air-to-Air Photos Amit Agronov, Andy Lay, Bonnie Kratz, Brent Blue, Brent Clark, Chuck Burin, Craig Swancy, Gary Daniels, Gary Edwards, Hayman Tam, James Goggin, James Woodard, Jeff Schroeder, Jessica Ambats, Jim Koepnick, Jim Wilson, Jo Hunter, John Freedman, John Slemp, José Ramos, Kevin Hong, Larry Grace, Markus Tatscher, Matt McVicker, Mike Green, Moose Peterson, Philip Johnson, Philip Makanna, Ricardo Padovese, Richard Jack James, Rob Stapleton, Robert Turchick, Scott Diussa, Scott Slingsby, Scott Germain, Steve Bigg, Steve Zimmerman, Su Khoo, Tom Pawlesh, Vincent Laforet How I Got The Shots! Scott Dworkin Meet Our Members Su Khoo FRONT COVER PHOTO: Steve Zimmerman Republic P-47D “Dottie Mae” over Lake Matthews in Southern California BACK COVER: José Ramos Air-to-air with the B-17 Movie Memphis Belle


Kevin Hong

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m e m b e r s

Dick Aarons

Ken Hunt

Herb Lingl

Doug Sisk

Ismael Abeytua

Scott Kelby

Robert Lionel

Mark Streit

Michael Bellinger

Mark Kirker

Matthew Moses

Virginia Harris

Richard Broom

Gary Kratz

Ricardo Padovese

Andres Magai

Trace Choulat

Steven Lewis

Adam Pethel

Phil Fountain

Nicolas Limbioul

David Shirah

ISAP’s goal is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. In this issue we are continuing to highlight ISAP members. I’m sure you will enjoy learning how your fellow ISAP members got started, as well as seeing some of their images and learning some tips. Remember that ISnAP is your publication to share your images, stories and tips with other members and the public. We look forward to each member sharing his or her stories with all of us. Enjoy this issue of ISnAP! Sincerely, Larry Grace, President Kevin Hong, ISnAP Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg • www.instagram.com/isap_aviationphotography

The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


Amit Agronov


DenisAgronov Amit Rouleau


Andy Lay


Andy Lay


Bonnie Kratz


As I have not shot air-to-air in several years, here are images from 2005 AirVenture Oshkosh. In this T-6 photo I am in the back seat of the subject aircraft shooting EAA Cessna 210 photo ship with Bruce Moore and Jim Koepnick.


Bonnie Kratz


Brent Blue


Brent Clark


Brent Clark


Brent Clark


Brent Clark


Chuck Burin


Chuck Burin


Craig Swancy


Craig Swancy


Gary Daniels


Cold War Air Museum MI-24 Hind


Denis Gary Rouleau Daniels


Craig Hutain joining the formation in his SNJ


DenisDaniels Gary Rouleau


Cavanaugh Flight Museum AD-6 Skyraider


DenisDaniels Gary Rouleau


David Fields at sunrise in his N2S-5


Gary Edwards • ISAP Treasurer


DenisEdwards Gary Rouleau


Hayman Tam


I splurged on my first and only air-to-air session back in 2015. I learned a lot about photo mission briefings, proper safety gear to have for the flight and photo equipment selection. Any unease sitting next to a large hole in the plane evaporated with the sight of a Lightning sliding into formation. I used my two Nikons with 18-200 & 80-400mm and managed to cycle between them, though I didn’t go through as many shutter speeds as intended. I did put the cameras down for a period just to soak in the experience.


Denis Rouleau Hayman Tam


James Goggin


Denis Rouleau James Goggin


Denis Rouleau James Goggin


This was a rendezvous in October 2017 with Supermarine Spitfire HF IXE, TD314 / FX-P / G-CGYJ (msn CBAF.10492), of Aero Legends. This was a photo shoot over the Kent countryside and English Channel. The intention had been to capture the White Cliffs in the Dover region as a backdrop, however cloud cover around the coast hampered this. However, I was fortunate to capture a brief glimpse of the cliffs just before turning and heading for home base at Headcorn (Lashenden airfield). The camera ship was a De Havilland Dove.    Equipment used were a Canon 5D IV with Canon 24-70mm F/2.8 L II and Canon 1DX with Canon 70-200 F/2.8L IS


James Woodard


Denis Rouleau

The mission of the 514th Air Mobility Wing based at Joint Base McGuireDix-Lakehurst in NJ, is to recruit, train and sustain Reserve Citizen Airmen to fly, fight and win, and enhance our nation’s air mobility capability. I was honored to be a part of a recent media flight with the 78th Air Refueling Squadron (as part of the 514th AMW) to celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the Air Force Reserves. Aboard one of their KC-10 Extenders we flew a refueling mission with two F-35 Lightning IIs from the 419th Fighter Wing out of Hill Air Force Base. Also in the air was a second KC-10 and for a brief moment towards the end of the flight an F-15 Eagle from the 104th Fighter Wing. What made this media flight particularly special is that all crew, both tankers and fighters were Reservists.


James Woodard


James Woodard


James Woodard


Jeff Schroeder


Jeff Schroeder


Jeff Schroeder


Jeff Schroeder


Jessica Ambats


Jessica Ambats


Jessica Ambats


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


Denis Jim Koepnick Rouleau


Denis Jim Rouleau Koepnick


Jim Wilson • ISAP Vice President


Jim Wilson


Jim Wilson


Jim Wilson


Jo Hunter


Jo Hunter


Jo Hunter


John Freedman


Riding along in the slot of a formation of ex-RAAFÂ CAC Winjeel trainers at the annual David Hack Fly-In at Toowoomba Airport.


John Freedman


Mark Awad in his ex-RAAF CAC Winjeel A85-429 over Evans Head during the Great Eastern Fly-In.


John Slemp


JosĂŠ Ramos


The US Navy first introduced Northrop’s F-5E/F Tiger II into service as an Adversary in 1975 with the Navy Fighter Weapons School and VF-126. 43 years later, the Tiger II continues to test Naval Aviators in Air Combat Training. VFC-13 Fighting Saints show bird, bearing the name of the squadron commander, sports a livery that many will find familiar in the form of the enigmatic MiG-28s from the movie Top Gun. In this image, Bogey 13 leads the camera ship to a low-level route near Mono Lake.


JosĂŠ Ramos


The VFC-13 pilot of Bogey 02, commonly referred to as the Rotten Banana, begins a turn over Lake Tahoe en route back to Fallon ahead of a winter storm, it’s predominantly sand yellow scheme contrasting almost violently with its surroundings. The effects of a heavy winter are readily visible on the slopes of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the background, a testament to how they got their name.Â


JosĂŠ Ramos


JosĂŠ Ramos


Kevin Hong • ISnAP Editor, Board Member


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Larry Grace • ISAP President


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Markus Tatscher


Markus Tatscher


Markus Tatscher


Denis Rouleau Markus Tatscher


Matt McVicker


A Marine PBJ (B-25) operated by the SoCal CAF Wing and flown by Jason Somes over the coast of California. D810, 1/60th @ f10


A pair of Stearmans from the Red Barron airshow team flown by Brian Aukes and Ric Woldow over a midwest cornfield. D810, 1/60th @ f10


Matt McVicker


A pair of P-51D’s: “Gunfighter” flown by Larry Lumpkin and “The Brat III” flown by Chuck Gardner. D810, 1/80th @ f4.5


Matt McVicker


Matt McVicker


“Lopes Hope” P-51C owned by the Texas Flying Legends and flown by Bernie Vasquez. D810, 1/80th @ f13


Mike Green - International ISnAP Editor


Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor taken 19 April 2016 in air-to-air refueling Area 8 off the eastern coast of the United Kingdom during a deployment to RAF Lakenheath as part of a European Theater Security Package in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve (F.7.1, 1/640, ISO 125, 80mm)


Mike Green


VMFA(AW)-224 FA-18D Hornet taken 16 April 2015 from the ramp of a US Marine Corps KC-130J Hercules over the Yuma ranges during the WTI 2-15 exercise (F.8, 1/1000, ISO 100, 40mm)


Mike Green


NATO Boeing E-3A Sentry taken 12 January 2015 from the ‘Boomers’ position of a Utah ANG KC-135R Stratotanker over Scotland, whilst part of a 2-ship flight heading across the Atlantic to NAS Norfolk, Virginia (F.8, 1/500, ISO 160, 24mm)


Mike Green


Photographed during the Frisian Flag 2018 exercise over the Netherlands. Three Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons operating as ‘Saw’ flight (F.9, 1/500, ISO 125, 67mm)


Moose Peterson


Moose Peterson


Moose Peterson


Moose Peterson


Philip Johnson


This image was photographed out in Chino, CA at the Planes of Fame Museum. The Lockheed P-38J “Skidoo� is from the Planes of Fame Museum and the other P-38L is from the Collings Foundation.


Philip Johnson


This Messerschmitt Bf 109 and Hawker Hurricane were photographed at the Military Aviation Museum near Virginia Beach, VA. The weather for this mission was a big factor and we just had to go whenever we could get the planes up and back.


Philip Johnson


This is the P-51C “Lope’s Hope III” from the Texas Flying Legends collection. This image was taken around Minot, ND with Bernie Vasquez piloting.


Philip Johnson


This is the Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX from the Texas Flying Legends collection. This image was taken around Minot, ND with Warren Pietsch piloting.


Philip Makanna


Philip Makanna


Ricardo Padovese


Ricardo Padovese


Ricardo Padovese


Ricardo Padovese


Richard Jack James


China Airlines B777-300ER arriving from Taipei, Taiwan taken 1500ft over Los Angeles International Airport


Richard Jack James


China Southern B777-300ER departing Los Angeles International Airport creating come condensation as climb over the thin marine layer.


Richard Jack James


Kalitta Air Boeing B747-400F N742CK taken 1500 ft over Los Angeles International Airport


Richard Jack James


Emirates A380 “Los Angeles Dodgers Livery A6-EON arriving from Dubai taken 1500ft over Los Angeles International Airport.


Rob Stapleton


Alaska is a great place for landscape photography and a wonderful backdrop for air to air imagery. In the past few years I have not had a platform to shoot Air to Air very often. When possible, I try to use backgrounds that are not distracting from the aircraft. The images submitted were taken with the idea of isolating the aircraft from the background. The Alaska Airlines jet image with the city in the background was shot from a helicopter, as well as the image of the jet over the Upper Cook Inlet with the mountains in the distance. The Anchorage Mike Hunt Wing of the Commemorative Air Force needed a new image of its BT-13 so we did a photo shoot in between rain storms over the Susitna and Yentna Rivers in the Matanuska Valley. The AT-6 piloted by owner Chuck Miller flew during the Alaska Aviation Museum’s Festival and Fly-Bys in July over Lake Hood Seaplane Base.


Rob Stapleton


Rob Stapleton


Rob Stapleton


Robert Turchick

YAK-52 at the Red Star Pilot’s Association ARS 2017 Porterville, CA Sierra Nevada Mountains in the background


Robert Turchick


Beechcraft King Air F-90 over the owner’s farm NW of Phoenix, AZ


Robert Turchick


Cecil Loter’s freshly painted North American T-28B over Mesa, AZ


Robert Turchick

Canyon State Aero’s R-44 next to Camelback Mountain’s Praying Monk (upper right corner) Mesa, AZ


Scott Diussa


Scott Diussa


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Germain


Scott Germain

The last three years of my air-to-air photography have focused on more local subjects. Mike Doyal, a fellow captain at American Airlines, has been gradually making his 450hp Super Stearman customized to his desires, and it’s been fun to shoot the airplane as it’s changed. He’s the one flying in that image, as well as the 600hp Ghost Ship, probably the most highly modified Stearman out there. It’s modeled to look like Boeing’s F4B biplane fighter from the 1930s - it always draws a crowd when it gets pulled out of the hanger. These images are possible with his skill, as well as that of Scott Urschel. We’ve shot out of various helicopters he operates for me. This allows me to explore more dynamic photos; much like the one where the Stearman is pretty much coming at the helicopter vertically with the smoke on. I’ve also been busy shooting more fighters at the Chino air show, as well as Michael Pfleger locally in Phoenix. I normally hate backlit shots, but the one of him flying The Rebel over Lake Pleasant. Hope you all enjoy the images!


Scott Germain


Steve Bigg


A Brazilian Air Force F-5 Tiger II caught as it cruses down the coast of north east Brazil. The shot was taken on a media flight during the FAB’s primary multinational air warfare exercise: CRUZEX.


Steve Bigg


A Royal Aircraft Factory SE5a and a Sopwith 1 ½ Strutter of the Great War Flying Museum in Brampton Ontario, patrol the country side as they return from an aerial display in which they were victorious in battle over the museums Fokker DR.1 triplane. A fairly common outcome to the museums air displays.


Steve Bigg

Two CF-18 Hornets are seen after completing air refueling from a CC-130HT Hercules tanker. These aircraft are flying as members of the red force during a Maple Flag mission at 4 Wing Cold Lake in northern Alberta. Having been “splashed”, they’ve tank up and will return to the fry to fight again.


Steve Bigg


Captain Stefan “Porcelain” Porteous pitches up his CF-18 Demonstration Team jet in spectacular fashion during a media flight. We were shooting from the ramp of a CC-115 Buffalo and this pass was the first time I’ve actually been able to hear and feel the power of the Hornets engines during an air to air shoot. It an experience I won’t forget and this image takes me back to the ramp of the Buffalo flying up the west coast of Canada every time I pause to fully take it in.


Steve Zimmerman


The RNZAF Black Falcons recently started flying their formation displays in new Beechcraft T-6 Texan II turboprops. Here, five of their number are seen flying in formation over the pristine waters of Lake Wanaka, South Island, New Zealand.


Steve Zimmerman


Owner Cam Hawley flies his beautifully restored Beechcraft Staggerwing C-17B with Adam Butcher piloting the Croydon Aviation Heritage Centre’s DeHavilland DH.89B Dominie on his wing. The stunning backdrop is near Wanaka, South Island, New Zealand.


Steve Zimmerman


Two P-38 Lightnings---a P-38J owned by Planes of Fame and a P-38L from the Collings Foundation ---backlit by the setting sun over southern California’s Chino Hills.


Steve Zimmerman


The polished aluminum skins of Republic P-47D “Dottie Mae�, newly restored after spending over six decades at the bottom of an Austrian lake, shine in the early morning light over Lake Matthews, in southern California.


Su Khoo


Su Khoo


Su Khoo


Su Khoo


Tom Pawlesh

When I was in high school, I always tried to sit where I could watch the planes fly over. Bored with school, my notebooks were a list of the flights that passed by on their approach to Pittsburgh International Airport: Eastern B-727, TWA L-1011, Allegheny Convair 580. My teachers told me I would never get paid to stare out a window. Well, they were wrong. Not only do I get paid to look out a window, sometimes I take photographs. This is a selection of airliner images that I have photographed while looking out my window. A little background information. North Atlantic flying is set up on a track system called the North Atlantic Organized Track System or NAT OTS. These tracks are constructed daily, east bound from North America in the evening and westbound from Europe in the morning. The tracks are constructed to take advantage of the best winds and to avoid turbulence and weather. If you are interested, the daily tracks and more in depth information can be found with a quick Google search. All aircraft on the NATS are flying in the same direction and separated by 1000 feet of altitude and 10 minutes in trail. Aircraft on the Tracks can fly along the centerline or are allowed to offset one or two miles right of course. This is called Strategic Lateral Offset Procedures or SLOP. This is the fun part, an aircraft could be 1000’ below you and one mile to your right which can give some pretty spectacular views.


Virgin Atlantic A-330-343, G-VGBR, Flight 12 from Boston to London Heathrow in the holding pattern at Ockham VOR at 7000’.


Tom Pawlesh


United Airlines B-777-224/ER, N78009, Flight 18 from Milan, Italy to Newark, NJ at 38,000’ over the North Atlantic.


Tom Pawlesh


Aer Lingus B-757-2Q8, EI-LBT, Flight 119 from Dublin, Ireland to Washington Dulles at 36,000’ over the North Atlantic.


Tom Pawlesh


American A-330-243, N289AY, Flight 755 from Paris Charles de Gaulle to Philadelphia, PA at 37,000’ over the North Atlantic.


Vincent Laforet


Vincent Laforet


Vincent Laforet


How I got the shots! Article and photos by Scott Dworkin


A few years back I had the opportunity to spend the better part of a year embedded with Carrier Air Wing 11, primarily with the two Super Hornet squadrons VFA-147 Argonauts and VFA-154 Black Knights. After following them around NAS Lemoore, NAS Fallon and embarking on the USS Nimitz I was given the unique opportunity to head back to Lemoore to shoot a mixed formation of the two squadrons aircraft. The goal of the shoot was to have to standard grey fleet jets with the two Commander Air Group or CAG jets. Obviously from the photos you can see one of those didn’t happen, as unfortunately the VFA-147 CAG jet went down the morning of the flight. A wise man and close friend of mine who spent 24 years in Naval Aviation once told me “until your butt is in the seat, and you are rolling down the runway, don’t count on anything happening for sure.” I’ve learned this to be a true statement over my years doing aerial photography! Regardless, we got four jets in the air and were able to complete not only the required mission for the aircrews, but our photo op as well. As for the details, we pre-briefed a few formations that I would like to try to photograph along with a few single ship shots in between. To be totally honest, while I always come into the brief with a wish list of shots, my flights are typically on a “not to interfere basis” with the squadrons training, so while I may want to do certain things, I am not typically going up doing a “photo-ex” so the squadron gets what they need done, done and we work the photo opportunities in when and where we can. Photo Ex flights do happen, but it is not MY typical flight with the Navy. That being said, I’ve rarely had any squadron I’ve worked with not try as bet they can to accommodate my requests, either in transit to the working area, or on the RTB leg of the flight. They certainly want the photos as much as I do so we work collectively to achieve mission success on both sides. Otherwise, a portion of the flight I am just along for the ride, and I won’t lie, usually it is a pretty interesting ride, and a great opportunity to see first hand the demanding nature of what it really means to be a Naval Aviator.


Further details‌.Most of this flight took place over the Owens Valley, in and around the Sierra Nevada Mountains and in the military operating area above NAS Lemoore. On this shoot, as it was a few years back I was using my Canon 7D, with my trusty Canon 24-105, the lens I almost exclusively fly with in jet aircraft. I now fly with a Canon 1DX.


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MEET OUR MEMBER


MEET OUR MEMBER So the flights became more of a regular activity as we had our own aircraft. The first few times I took a camera with me in the airplane were a steep learning curve; I read avidly anything I could find about aviation photography, scouring the internet for books, articles, advice and tips and on forums for anything which might help me perfect my technique. Additionally I had no prior knowledge of formation flying so could not anticipate where the aircraft would move and when; the exchanges I heard through my headphones in those early days sounded like a mysterious coded language exclusive to those fortunate enough to be able to fly an aircraft. I also learned that the light changes very quickly when you are airborne, so you have to be prepared for that and react accordingly. Knowing when you will be facing into the sun or away from it helps, as does planning where to place which aircraft in relation to the camera ship.

Su Khoo

My introduction to the world of aviation happened quite by accident, as a result of “life circumstances”. I have always loved photography, although I had not previously considered pursuing it with any seriousness, certainly not as a means of generating income, which some might say is a fortunate coincidence, as photography in the digital age is definitely not one of the best ways to secure a place on the “Rich List”. Throughout my teen years and early adult life, I was generally designated the “family holiday snap taker” as my father, also a very keen photographer, had set a worthy example - my sister and I had many memories of sitting waiting patiently in the car while dad ventured off to take a photograph; he would wait patiently for the sun to come out from behind first this large cloud, and then another one, and another one after that, so that the lighting would be exactly right; we of course could not appreciate or understand his need for this particular attention to detail as we all knew was that it stood in the way of getting on our journey towards the shops! After years of working as a Chartered Accountant I signed up for a Foundation course at Herefordshire Art College; I soon found myself specializing in photography and by the end of the two-year course, I started to set up a dark room at home. This project was never completed as the world of digital photography was beckoning, and I sensed that I needed to move with the times. It was with certain reluctance that I took that step, because I always felt that the ease with which one could take a digital picture had huge implications for the dedication towards furthering one’s skill and the requirement to be critical at the point of capture. Then, as luck would have it, six years ago, I met my partner, Derek; we were both avid car enthusiasts, and met through a car club of which we were both members. He had retired from the RAF but was still very active as a pilot, owning a share in a Cirrus aircraft that he flew regularly. He invited me to fly with him as part of the “research” for an article we were writing for a magazine. On that occasion we flew from Turweston in Northamptonshire, England, where the airplane was based, to Kemble in Gloucestershire, for the renowned “£100 burger” which pilots have made legendary. In 2013 Derek bought his own Scottish Aviation Bulldog, and following a long and detailed (for detailed read “expensive”) restoration that took the best part of three years our aircraft metamorphosed into a frequent concours success at events including the RIAT at Fairford.

At first, it was as much as I could manage just to keep the aircraft within my viewfinder and focus, but with experience I can now think about other elements, such as lighting, background and composition. It is an exhilarating experience being in the aircraft and I feel very privileged when I sit in the briefings with the pilots and discuss what we are going to do. When we return from a sortie, we remind ourselves that the objectives are always, first and foremost, to come back safely, and secondly, to return with a smile on our faces. And if you are attentive to safety, it’s impossible not to come back grinning. Without doubt, there is much truth in the old adage, “if you can’t beat them, join them”, and as one thing tends to lead to another, last summer I obtained my own private pilot’s license. My choice of gear consists of two Canon 6Ds, a Mark I and a Mark II partly because the 6D happens to be the smallest and lightest fullframe DSLR currently available, plus having always been a Canon user I am very comfortable with the layout of the controls; I also use Canon 24-105mm and 70-300mm lenses and a Tamron 28-300mm – I am still getting used to the Tamron, which is a relatively new product to the Tamron line-up; it’s quite impressive for its price, and it is quite compact as well, an advantage in a cramped cockpit. I use Lightroom fairly extensively for organization and editing, in conjunction with Photoshop when I need to do some detailed retouching, and DXOs excellent Nik Collection when I want to create a particular mood or effect. My shooting philosophy is very similar to the acknowledged pilot belief that one never stops learning; the day you feel you have no more to learn is the day to hang up that flying helmet, or put down that camera gear; be constructively critical of your own work and always look for ways to improve; feedback and the opinions of others can be invaluable, but it is also important to experiment, find out what works for you and what doesn’t and to allow your own style to develop. Above all, do not be afraid to share knowledge – there’s more than enough to go round, and even someone who apparently knows little about your subject can still teach you something! I look forward to meeting other ISAP members, exchanging views and hearing about their experiences! Happy shooting!


Denis Su Khoo Rouleau


Denis Su Khoo Rouleau


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©Moose Peterson

The Art of Air to Air

Aviation Photography: Post Processing

Aviation Photography: Warbirds and the Men Who Flew Them

VISIT WWW.KELBYONE.COM TO VIEW ALL INSTRUCTORS, GET MORE INFO & BECOME A MEMBER Adobe, Photoshop, and Lightroom are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems, Incorporated. All images courtesy of Moose Peterson.


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Special Offer for ISAP Members

For the special offers visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/HelpCenter/NYSuperStore08. jsp?About_Us-The_Professionals_Source pays tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices, as we moved to our SuperStore: www.bhphotovideo.com/find/HelpCenter/NYSuperStore08. jsp?About_Us-History on 34th Street and opened our cyber-doors at www.bhphotovideo.com. We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.


ISAP Merchandise

If you wish to purchase any ISAP merchandise please email info@aviationphoto.org Send your name and current address and you will be invoiced via PayPal. Shipping cost will be added to your invoice. Members with an international address will have a higher shipping rate. ISAP Challenge coin - $10 + shipping ISAP safety vest (Small to X-Large) - $38 + shipping (An additional $10.00 will be charged for a 2X-4X size vest) ISAP membership patch - $5 + shipping Limited patch version with Velcro backing - $10 + shipping


Visit the new ISAP online store for your ISAP shirts, hats, bags and more!

ISAP SUMMER SPECIAL


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ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards Past Treasurer Bonnie Kratz Secretary Mike Collins ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller ISnAP Editor Kevin Hong ISnAP International Editor Mike Green The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at info@aviationphoto.org, isnap@aviationphoto.org or isappresident@aviationphoto.org ISnAP is a publication to showcase our members work in capturing aviation events. Anytime you have images or would like to inquire on doing an article for ISnAP contact us via email at isnap@aviationphoto.org Images should be sized at 2150 x 1500 @ 300 dpi (5� x 7�) in a landscape format only. Submit up to 10 images per article and submit your text in a word document and email a link by using www.wetransfer.com and send info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). You can also submit images for review for a future cover or back page display. If any questions you can email us as well to isnap@aviationphoto.org. We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


ISnAP August 2018 • Special A2A Photo Issue  

In this special issue of ISnAP, we share with you air-to-air photography by our members. Our last issue on A2A photography was over three ye...

ISnAP August 2018 • Special A2A Photo Issue  

In this special issue of ISnAP, we share with you air-to-air photography by our members. Our last issue on A2A photography was over three ye...