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Jim Wilson

WELCOME TO THE APRIL 2019 ISSUE OF ISnAP! 2019 Spring NAF El Centro Photo Call Jim Wilson, Jim Williamson, John Ford, Jeff Krueger, Chandler Feagin, Mike Bilek, Rod Cromer, Simon Wong, Steve Bigg, Larry Grace Hunterfest Nicolas Limbioul The B-29 Adventure of a Lifetime Jo Hunter The Norwegian Armed Forces Collection Micheal Schultz Oh Canada! Canadian Historical Aircraft Association Simon Fitall 2019 Heritage Flight Training Conference Jeff Krueger Meet Our Members Bob Driver, Dean Curry, Gary Buzel, Geoffrey Arnwine, Steve Walter, Tyler Hernandez, Andrew Burnham, John Little Airplane Silhouettes John Ford FRONT COVER PHOTO: Steve Bigg Up close and personal with the Blue Angels at NAF El Centro BACK COVER: Larry Grace Heat haze from the afterburner exhaust of the Blue Angels at NAF El Centro

ISAP’s goal is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. In this issue we are continuing to highlight ISAP members. I’m sure you will enjoy learning how your fellow ISAP members got started, as well as seeing some of their images and learning some tips. Remember that ISnAP is your publication to share your images, stories and tips with other members and the public. We look forward to each member sharing his or her stories with all of us. Enjoy this issue of ISnAP! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, ISnAP Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg isnap@aviationphoto.org


w e l c o m e

n e w

a n d

r e t u r n i n g

i s a p

m e m b e r s

Geoffrey Arnwine

Charles Frank

John Little

Arnoud Schoor

Kevin Barry

Jim Froneberger

Ron Marasco

Manjeet Singh

Steve Bigg

Rich Gates

Matt McVicker

Richard Spolar

Brent Burzycki

Mitchell Green

Darshan Meda

Paul Stackhouse

Andrew Burnham

Mark Greenmantle

Larry Melby

Steve Walter

Steve Burke

Match Hatta

Vijay Mistry

Rollo Watkins

Steve Chesler

Tyler Hernandez

John Nanartowicz

Jim Williamson

Alexander Cook

Mark Hrutkay

Tow Pawlesh

Robin Wright

Dean Curry

Rob Hynes

Stacy Pearsall

Peter Yee

Sammuel Dammers

Jeff Krueger

Chrissy Power

Steve Zimmermann

Roy Deters

Joshua Lapum

Denis Rouleau

Tyler Foster

Sam Langham

Paul Russo

The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


Jim Wilson • ISAP Vice President El Centro NAF Photo Calls are truly one of the greatest events any aviation photographer could hope to attend. The photographic opportunities are typically exceptional, but it doesn’t take long for attendees to realize that it’s the relationships that are built at these events that are priceless. One never knows what the weather conditions might be, or what types of aircraft will fly but no matter what the days bring, you can count on the attending photographers making the most of the outing. This year was pretty challenging weather wise and lesser enthusiasts might well have slept in and skipped some of the gatherings, but not the ISAP 2019 group. We racked out at “O Dark Thirty” each morning and

headed to the field, excited to capture whatever imagery presented itself. Shooting on the periphery of the base is always fun because it allows for different perspectives and lots of time for discussions about gear and techniques, it’s a great time for building relationships. Our day on the base had an increasingly dismal forecast, 100% chance of rain in fact, but no one was deterred, least of all our hosts at NAF El Centro. Some folks geared up and waterproofed to whatever degree possible, others just braved the elements and shot away. The weather was up and down for sure, but a great time was had by all and the group’s tenacity was rewarded by images that could never have been captured had it been a beautiful California desert day.


There were many highlights this year, having my Grandson at my side is always at the top of my list. Capturing the Harriers spooling up for departure in the rain was a treat ,creating huge vapor clouds as they lifted away from the runway. Capturing The Blue Angels as they roared off the runway and over our heads. Shooting with old friends and new ones, along with our dinner gatherings at the end of each day.

base staff who provided this wonderful opportunity and made us feel so welcome. Last, but not least, thanks to all of our attending members for your friendship, your dedication to our craft, and for being such a pleasure to hang out with. Until the next time!

My sincerest thanks to my good friend and ISAP President Larry Grace, for all the time and effort he put in to make this and all our events a success. Thanks to NAF EL Centro PAO Kristopher Haugh and all of the

2019 SPRING NAF EL CENTRO

PHOTO CALL!


Denis Jim Wilson Rouleau


Jim Wilson


Jim Williamson


What a thrill! I could end this article right there... The Blue Angels are the main attraction at the February photo call at NAF El Centro. But the Navy (other than the Angels), Marines, and the Canadian Air Force are amazing photo-targets too. The USAF even made an appearance. We gathered at the hotel on Tuesday evening and started making our plans. The weather forecast was rather ominous; rain for Wednesday, and heavy rain for Thursday. So ISAP President Larry Grace made a command decision to head to the base for some early Wednesday off-base shooting, instead of starting with the training and photo reviews. We assembled at 0630 in the hotel lobby and headed out. We got some nice shots of approaching aircraft U.S. Navy T-45 Goshawks, Marine AV-8B Harriers, some Canadian Air Force CT-155 Hawks, and a C-130H from the Missouri Air National Guard. When we noticed the Blue Angels starting to get ready, we relocated to the approach end of runway 30 to watch the morning practice session. This was where we got to verify that we needed both in-the-ear, and over-the-ear hearing protection. If we had been any closer, we would have needed flame resistant clothing as well! Finally, back to the hotel for photo critiques and some invaluable training (and pizza).

Thursday was our day for the on-base part of the photo call. A sincere thanks to the officers and sailors who made us feel welcome. Kristopher Haugh is the public affairs officer and gave the safety briefing and introduced the team to us. They really are terrific hosts! Then onto the buses and out to the flight line. The terrible weather forecast was overstated. We had occasional light rain, but never the downpour we had feared. The rain made for some interesting photos. The moisture in the air made for awesome vapor shots as the Angels did their show! Then, we relocated to runway 08/26 for the rest of the day. We were warned to stay out of the mud or else we sink to our hips, never to be heard from again. No problem, the taxiway was fine by me! Each of us got some cool shots from this vantage point, but the Harriers make some especially great spray/vapor shots when operating off a wet runway. A sincere thanks to Larry for organizing this great ISAP event and coordinating with NAF El Centro. If you have a chance to participate in future events like this and do it! Don’t let a bad weather forecast worry you. (But bring rain gear!)


Jim Williamson


Jim Williamson


John Ford


As can be expected at these ISAP events we had a great bunch of guys that melded well as a group. Our fearless leader ISAP President Larry Grace is an excellent cat herder. Getting us going, providing opportunities, solving the problems that crop up and doling out the help and advice we need. The weather this time was not all blue skies which offered us something interesting. PAO Kristopher Haugh at NAF El Centro was his usual jovial self, while casual, he leaves no room for misunderstandings. Whether we were outside the fence getting blasted by the solo pilot or right up next to the jets on base it’s a great time. My thanks to NAF El Centro, PAO Kristopher Haugh and to the group for an incredible experience.


John Ford


Jeff Krueger


I pulled into the Fairfield Inn, El Centro on Tuesday afternoon, and the weather was just about perfect. I didn’t get out to the NAF that afternoon and the weather report wasn’t great for the next few days so I wasn’t sure what to expect for this Photo Call. Earlier in the day, we all got a text from ISAP President Larry Grace letting us know to gather Tuesday evening for dinner and planning. The plan was to go to the field Wednesday morning and spend the afternoon at the hotel critiquing the photos Larry asked us to bring for “show and tell”. Well, as the weather was closing in on Wednesday and heavy rain in the forecast for Thursday, the Photo Call day, we decided to spend the whole day shooting just in case of a rain out. It was nice to have two chances to shoot the Blue Angels from outside the fence and gave us some practice in less than ideal lighting conditions. Getting back to the hotel about 5pm, we then spent the evening eating pizza and doing our photo critique as well as exchanging ideas and techniques. Getting post processing tips from each other was a great addition. Waking up early on Thursday morning to overcast and threatening skies, a number of us went out to the field to shoot the early practice session. No rain yet, but really gray, backlit skies so I was able to try out some of the tips learned the night before. Then, back to the hotel to gather the rest of our group. We got on base about noon and had our briefing by PAO Kristopher Haugh as well as a pizza lunch opportunity before heading to the flight

line. It was cold, gray and starting to rain, but we were there and ready for anything. We all had rain gear for ourselves and our cameras so off we went. With light rain falling the Blue Angels taxied out and just about takeoff, the rain stopped and we actually got some really cool sky texture and lighting conditions. Shooting the practice session worked out well considering, and we went on to spend the afternoon shooting air operations with T45’s and Harriers which, with the drizzle and gray skies, was a really great learning experience. This Photo Call turned out to be really great from my perspective. Not only did I get to meet a number of ISAP members I didn’t know, but we all have different levels of experience and we were all willing to share what we know and how we each go about our shooting. I am pretty comfortable with my camera’s settings and operation, but I learned a couple of new settings I didn’t know I had. The “classroom” session was another learning experience I don’t know if I would get otherwise. Adding the review session to the Photo Call gathering was a super idea and I hope it continues and possibly expands. Our group played well together, got to know each other, learned from each other, and had a lot of fun. I believe we represented ISAP well and Larry put together a fantastic opportunity for all of us. I hope to participate again in the future and appreciate being able to attend this event.


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Chandler Feagin


I’ve had the privilege of attending ISAP/NAF El Centro Photocalls twice and both events have been amazing experiences from top to bottom. The 2019 Spring event, my second time around, was even more enjoyable than the first, because I knew what to expect and how to best prepare for the opportunity. Attending these gatherings allows one to meet great people and you leave with memories that will last forever. I enjoyed everything about this trip, especially the feedback and input I got from the other photographers at the classroom session, as well as out in the field. I learn a tremendous amount just by listening to the conversations that take place between the attending members, one of the things that I like most about these trips.


Chandler Feagin


Chandler Feagin


Mike Bilek It all started on a Tuesday afternoon in an alfalfa field just on the outskirts of Naval Air Facility El Centro, CA (NAFEC). A meeting of International Society of Aviation Photography (ISAP) members from throughout North America. Since receiving the email confirming my attendance to the workshop, the anticipation was building. What images do I bring? Am I out of my league? Will I be frowned upon for being a Sony shooter? Believe it or not, these were the thoughts running through my head. Those questions were all put to rest in the company of the other members of the group. We were all gathered there to trade secrets, offer up constructive criticism and help each find ways to improve our skills. We officially met as a group on Tuesday night for dinner at Famous Dave’s Barbecue joint, just a stone’s throw from our hotel. This meeting allowed us to get to know each other; where we came from, how we got started in photography, and why we all love aviation so much. The next morning, we awoke early and headed to the spot where the infamous hay bales once stood. During the weeks leading up to the workshop, I made repeated trips to NAF El Centro to practice my skills, scout shooting locations, and get comfortable with my new Sony gear. I was fortunate to have this opportunity because of the relatively close proximity of Orange County to El Centro. Because of this advanced knowledge of the area, I was unofficially appointed Chief Intelligence Officer (CIO) by some members of the group. This title would prove to be an oxymoron because many of my expectations from previous visits to the air field were wrong. The good news is that all shooting locations were fairly close to each other and we were able to adjust quickly. Following a full day of shooting on Wednesday, we retired to the hotel and conducted the critique portion of the workshop; each member of the group brought 15 of their images to share. We were all able to draw from the each other’s various experience levels and shooting styles. The environment was critical, yet positive as we were all there to learn. I left the conference room with several ideas which I was able to incorporate into the following days shoot. On Thursday, the actual day of the NAFEC Photo Call, several members of the group traveled to the air field to catch the early morning practice of The US Navy Blue Angels and make any necessary camera adjustments for shooting against cloudy skies. The threat of rain was ever-present throughout the week, but ultimately proved to provide some unique shots.


Once we gathered for the official Photo Call portion of the workshop, we were transported by bus to a central meeting area where we were greeted by NAFEC Public Affairs Officer (PAO) Kristopher Haugh and base Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Eric Hubert and given a safety brief. Following the brief, we were driven to the flight line where we were able to capture a full Blue Angels practice. In between the action on the flight line, I was able to have a great conversation with Aviation Ordnanceman Second Class Anthony (didn’t catch his last name). He told me an excellent story about shivering on the deck of an aircraft carrier off the Korean coast, huddled up with a group of fellow “Ordies” trying to stay warm in the exhaust of an E-2 Hawkeye. Following the Blue Angels practice demonstration, we were driven to the runway most heavily used by the aircraft on base. The day’s earlier rainfall and high humidity levels provided some amazing shots of water vaporizing on the runway during AV-8B Harrier takeoffs and landings and wingtip

vortices coming from Blue Angel #7 combined with afterburner against the cloudy skies of the Imperial Valley. As the shooting session ended, we were handed a treat from the heavens when the skies parted and provided some amazing silhouette shots of the Harriers circling the pattern prior to landing. Although the shooting experience was awesome, I more so enjoyed the camaraderie of the group and the constant lighthearted jabbing that took place; it reminded me of my time in the military and the fire service. I would like to express my sincere thanks to the NAFEC PAO, NAFEC Base Personnel, and ISAP President Larry Grace for the opportunity to attend this workshop for the first time. I hope to be involved in many more to come.


Mike Bilek


Mike Bilek


Mike Bilek


Rod Cromer EL Centro. To aviation photographers it means a special opportunity. Selection to attend is never a sure thing. But I had sent my bodies and lenses to Canon Professional Services and saved some funds for this project just in case. I was really excited when I got the news I was included in the 2019 Spring El Centro Photo Call. I made airline, hotel and rental car reservations. When I arrived at El Centro Tuesday evening introductions were made, room assignments established, and conversations went too late into the night. Wednesday was photo day “outside the fence”. There was plenty of activity with Canadian Hawk T2’s, Navy T-45’s, Marine Harriers and an occasional C-130. Throughout the morning we moved from location to location, depending on the lighting and what was flying. Lunch and back to the fence for the afternoon Blue Angel practice. We have all seen the head-on images of the Blues taking off and passing low over the fence, but those images do not prepare you for the reality of seeing the four diamond planes turn on smoke, begin their roll four abreast and come blasting down the runway towards you! After take-off, the diamond thundered overhead! And then the solos departed. I had seen the pictures and heard the stories, so I knew what was coming, but I stood there watching anyway. As the plane passed over our heads, it seemed so close I could almost touch the bottom of the plane. Then the deafening roar and exhaust heat of the jet hit us. I had earplugs and muffs, and the noise was still overwhelming! The greatest sensation was the shock wave as the plane flew over and then turned vertical. It wasn’t a blast of air hitting me, it was a shock wave compressing my whole body! And then dust and debris enveloped us! It took a moment to recover and we all had a big grin on our faces. The rest of the day was part capturing images and part reliving that moment when a Blue Angel F18 blew right over our heads at full takeoff speed and blasted our senses! Wednesday evening was the infamous ISAP “photo critique”. Attendees bring images they select for review by the assembled photographers, including our fearless leaders ISAP President Larry Grace and Vice President Jim Wilson. For me, this ranks right there with root canals and broken fingers but it was the best learning experience I could have received. This constructive critique gave me direct, usable information that I could apply to my photography. The plan for Thursday was to work the fence in the morning and then gather around noon for the photo call. We got word that the planes were flying earlier than planned, so we rushed through breakfast, jumped into cars and headed to our vantage points. After lunch it was time to gather at the front gate for the main event. We were greeted by the Public Affairs Officer, Kristopher Haugh, our identifications confirmed and then moved to the briefing facility. Following restroom break, pizza and El Centro souvenir purchase, Kris gave the introduction and safety briefing, followed by comments from the Airfield Manager and the command’s Master Chief Petty Officer. The emphasis as always was safety. All were professional and courteous, but you knew they were serious about what they said. As we boarded buses for the flight line it began to rain. Onward into the gathering gloom we went...ain’t no rain stopping this parade! We parked alongside the taxiway where the Blues rolled right past us. As the aerial practice began, the rain stopped and the clouds started to part. At the end of the practice session we moved to the active runway. This is the real treat at El Centro. The good news is that we were 100 feet from an active military runway. We could take as many images of anything flying as we wanted! The not so good

news was the rain had returned. We spent the next three hours on the buses avoiding the rain or jumping out anytime something taxied by or landed. The late afternoon turned into something special. The rain stopped, the waning sun pierced the clouds and the Harriers put on a show! Darkness came and the group headed to Burgers and Beer for the traditional after-party. Later back to the room to download and then pack for the trip home. My thoughts about my El Centro experience? If you fancy yourself an aviation photographer you have to go. I’ve seen 50 years of airshows and airplanes, but this environment is like no other I’ve ever been in. An event like this is always dynamic in nature, and the schedule constantly changes, so be very flexible. Check the weather before you travel. Know your equipment well. Opportunities for unique images come and go in an instant. Come a day early and stay a day later. On Friday when I was leaving the sun came out, the skies cleared and everybody else went to the fence for one last session. Our thanks to PAO Kristopher Haugh for hosting us, my thanks to Larry Grace for including me and to my fellow photographers for sharing their time and photographic talents with me.


Rod Cromer


Simon Wong After joining the ISAP late 2018, it was extremely exciting to have the opportunity to participate in this years spring photo call in El Centro. Prior to this event, I knew little about the Navy Blue Angels running practice at the base, let alone how they like to throw a few tricks to the photographers outside the fence. Ever since the announcement, weather has always been a looming threat. Even with modern day forecast technology embedded in countless apps, no one could have a sure mind of when and how bad the rain may come down. Little did we knew, those worries all turned out to be the best highlights. The drive down to El Centro was a smooth one. About 30 minutes from the meetup point, the Blue Angels were already visible doing practice runs with their famous diamond formation. After meeting Larry, Mike, Jim and Chandler, the day started with a band of Canadian CT-155 and Navy T-45 training jets and some Harrier actions. Larry and Mike were really keen on keeping us on schedule for the best experiences. So around 3:30pm we headed for the runway 30 to witness the Blue Angels last practice of the day. It was hard to describe the sensation seeing multiple jets take off pointing straight at you. The sheer deafening sound and collected shock wave made this whole trip worthwhile already. Never had I felt such power of the engine afterburners head on and in such close proximity. That rush was addictive, to say the least, and I wanted to feel it again. Not long after, #6 Angel took off towards the other end of the runway. A bit disappointed, I went in Mike’s car to change out the lens. All of a sudden, a high-pitch sound boom hit my eardrums, the car started wobbling heavily, one opened door slammed violently onto my body, continued to squeeze hard, as if it was trying to make me into its dinner sandwich. Dust were flying all over covering my body for what felt like an eternity. Finally, everything settled and I emerged from the chaos,

confused yet exhilarated for the rush. Later I found out #6 Angel took a 180 turn headed straight back, executed a vertical climb right on top of our location. What a day it had been, and we were just getting started. That evening, a workshop and critic session was held, sharing experiences and photos from everybody. It was extremely humbling and inspiring to see how professional aviation photography should be conducted and the passion each photographer committed to the work. The next morning, we gathered at the NAF El Centro base for the official event. PAO Kristopher Haugh along with the base personnels gave us a very detailed briefing of the rundown and safety precautions. By the time we headed out to the field, rain has finally claimed the sky. Luckily, it was dimming down as the Blue Angels taxied out. The show was magnificent, coupled with the vapor in the air, vortices were plenty and provided interesting shooting opportunities. These would never have been possible if not for the rain. Weather has finally turned around and worked in our favor. Another surprise was with the Harrier jump jets later in the day. Utilizing their unique side nozzles and plenty of water on the runway, each takeoff was a breathtaking scene, like a grey phoenix bursting out of water. As the day drew to closing, the Harriers came back with last dimming light peeking from heavy clouds, putting a perfect end note to the event. Throughout the shoot, I was using a Canon 7D Mark II with 24-70mm f/2.8L and Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 lenses. It was a great experience participating the event, especially meeting so many dedicated fellow photographers. Thanks to Larry and PAO Kristopher Haugh for organizing such a wonderful activity. As the air show season is right around the corner, I hope to reunite with everybody and share more laughters in the art of aviation photography.


Simon Wong


Simon Wong


Steve Bigg


You just never know. For all the computing power thrown at it, forecasting the weather is still… let’s say, an imperfect science. As the days rolled by during the week before the 2019 Spring Photo Call at Naval Air Facility (NAF) El Centro, the forecast for the day of the shoot got progressively worse. Frustration was growing among the ISAP group that had traveled to El Centro to participate in the photo call to shoot a Blue Angels practice session flown at the base and to have an opportunity to get up close to the afternoon action at the base while shooting next to the active runway. Possible photo subjects included United States Navy and Marine units training at the base with their T-45 Goshawks, VMAT-203 with their V-8B Harriers and any other aircraft operating at El Centro. A welcome addition to those using the base to take advantage of the typically ideal weather was the Royal Canadian Air Force 419 Squadron with their CT-155 Hawks. But the forecast was far from ideal. The probability of precipitation was pushing past 90% expecting significant rain for most of the afternoon. But I thought to myself, if I’ve learned anything from years of aviation photography it’s that you’ll only know the weather for any given shoot once the shoot is actually over. More than once I’ve seen an airshow suffer weak attendance due to a forecast of poor weather and find myself shooting the show with sunshine beaming between fluffy white clouds in a beautiful blue sky. So, the ISAP group crossed our fingers, prepped our gear and made sure we had some means of protecting our lenses, cameras and ourselves, if the forecast should prove to be correct. In the end the supercomputers were less than half right.

Our rainy-day preparations were put to the test a couple times during our visit, but for the most part the rain held off. We were even graced by a brief period of sunshine that timed itself perfectly for catching some great Blue Angels vapor shots during their practice. While there wasn’t too much activity on the runway for the rest of the afternoon apart from VMAT-203 flying with their Harriers, in the end the rain proved to actually help the shoot! Having the opportunity to get close to and shoot the Harrier, certainly one of the most unique military aircraft flying today, was only enhanced by the wet runway. As the aircraft’s vectored thrust was directed downward for short field takeoffs and landings, the heat and force of the thrust turned the water on the runway into a cloud of steam and vapor significantly enhancing the shoots we took. All in all, I think both the ISAP members as well as the other groups and independent photographers that participated in the NAF El Centro 2019 Spring Photo Call would all agree that when it comes to the weather forecast, be prepared, but don’t throw in the towel too soon. You’ll never know just what the weather might have in store for a photo shoot till it’s over. Many thanks go out to the NAF El Centro PAO, troops and the units training there during our shoot for the one of a kind opportunity to participate at the Photo Call and their exceptional hospitality while hosting the event.


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


Larry Grace • ISAP President


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


HUNTERFEST FORMER SWISS FIGHTER JETS IN BERNER OBERLAND (SWITZERLAND) Article and photos by Nicolas Limbioul


2018

On Saturday, August 25, the former military airfield St. Stephan has been putted back into active duty. As in the past glory days, Hunter and Vampire jets provided the visual and acoustic backdrop for hopefully numerous visitors. This year, the program of the airfield festival was still spectacular despite of bad weather along the day. Jet fans got their money’s worth! The various Hunter and Vampire fighter jets, which are airworthy in Switzerland, showed their glossy polished best side on the ground and in the air. The white Obersimmental Papyrus Hunter was one of the attraction of the day by making not less than three demo flights. Some nice opportunities for the photographers. The event begins in the morning with the entry of the guest machines, followed by the general meeting of the Hunterverein Obersimmental. It also offered sightseeing flights with helicopters. Which aircraft visit St. Stephen’s is probably one of the most frequently asked question in the run-up to the event and this depends heavily on the weather conditions. Due to poor visibility and rain on this Saturday, we were lucky enough to see various historical machines to make the show. Thanks to all the staff for their attention and help during the event.

Aircraft List: • The polished Swissair DC-3 with three Beech 18 from the Classic Formation • Two Hunter double-seater represented by Amici Dell Hunter and Hunter Flying Group. • A Vampire trainers from A-Jet AG • And last but not least the Papyrus Hunter from Hunter Verein Obersimmental based at Sankt Stephan Airport.


Nicolas Limbioul


Nicolas Limbioul


Nicolas Limbioul


THE B-29 ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME Article and photos by Jo Hunter

It started in early December, when I received a phone call from ISAP’s Kevin Hong over in Houston. He told me the B-29 ‘ FIFI’ was coming in to Austin, she had just come out of the paint shop, and would I be available to go and take some photos of her with the paint sponsor? Of course I was, so Kevin gave me the phone number of Neils Agather, who was organizing the proceedings. I spoke to Neils, who turned out to be the copilot. He said that they also wanted to get some photos of the paint crew at the shop in Longview, TX. If he got me a rental car, would I be interested in driving to Longview and flying back in FIFI? Yes; yes, I would! Fast forward a week or two and I was on the ramp with the crew at East Texas Regional Airport at 05:30. Their plan was to fuel the airplane, take the photos and be on the way ASAP. Longview’s fuel truck was quite small and FIFI is large, so the fueling started early.


She was parked outside Aerosmith Aviation, the paint shop in which she has been totally refreshed, resplendent in a new coat of sparkling silver (which according to Aerosmith took 28 gallons of primer, 45 gallons of silver and 45 gallons of clear). It’s a big paint shop, but the B-29 has such a large wingspan that they had to disassemble some of the internal structure of the building in order to get her inside. It was a beautiful (and cold) pre-dawn, so I took the opportunity to get some light-painted shots while it was still dark. As the sun came up, the paint crew gathered. The B-29 crew had brought special ‘ FIFI Paint Crew’ hats for them all. Paint shops tend to have plenty of platforms and lifts, so I requested the use of a scissor lift which was parked outside in order to get the group shots, of the paint crew and flight crew. Very soon it was time to leave, so everyone loaded up into the aircraft, including the two owners of the paint shop; Wayne Smith and Scott Moore, whose signatures are with the paint shop credit on the side of the tail. They were with me in the front of the aircraft. I was very lucky to be given the seat immediately behind the pilot, which afforded me the best view in the house. I was able to see everything through that fabulous glasshouse, as well as watch the pilots and flight engineer.

Jo Hunter

Once airborne, they allowed us all to move about the aircraft. There are some seats behind where I was sitting, and then there is a crawl tube to get to the rear of the aircraft. Since the B-29 was designed for pressurized operation at 30,000ft, the tube is necessary; the bomb bay has a separate pressure hatch underneath. You do need to be a bit limber to get along and out of the tube! Once in the midsection, you can look out of the aircraft either side, through the huge observation blisters. Or you can sit in the rotating chair for the top gun turret. There are crew seats either side as well, and a round hatch on the floor which presumably leads to the belly gun, although this remained closed.

From here, one can go back to the tail gunner position. This involves a small crawl space right before you get in there, after which it is possible to stand up at the gun position. It’s a small compartment. The windows (and gunsight) are very close to you, which results in a great field of view. However the view of Texas from 6000 ft on a beautiful sunny morning is quite different from what wartime crews might have seen, and I wasn’t being shot at. Returning to the front of the airplane, I went forward to the bombardier position in the glasshouse, in front of and in between the two pilots. This gives the most amazing view; there’s nothing between you and the outside but for the panes of glass. There’s no propeller in front, or even visible either side since they are mounted way behind. You have bomb aiming equipment either side of you. You can watch the world slide underneath your feet. It’s an amazing aerial platform. We landed at Austin Bergstrom airport about an hour and 15 minutes after leaving Longview. We met with a major sponsor of the paint job. and was presented with a tour around the aircraft, while I took candid shots, followed by a group shot of him with the aircrew. This concluded my time with the aircraft. I raced home to process the photos, while the B-29 flew home to Dallas. I remain super grateful to Kevin Hong, Neils Agather and the crew of the CAF B29 B24 Squadron for such a fabulous opportunity. There is a short video here: https://youtu.be/ZwnOeevw5FU


Jo Hunter


Jo Hunter


Jo Hunter


The Norwegian Armed Forces Aircraft Collection Oslo, Norway

Article and photos by Marc Schultz

List of Aircraft Collection at museum: Noorduyn Norseman Mk.IV Lockheed C-60A Lodestar Supermarine Spitfire PR XI SAAB 91B-2 Safir Cessna O-1A Birddog De Havilland Vampire F.3 Lockheed T-33A Republic F-84G Thunderjet Republic RF-84F Thunderflash North American F-86F Sabre Lockheed TF-104G Starfighter Northrop F-5A(G) Freedom Fighter De Havilland of Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter Lockheed C-130H Hercules Kjeller P.K. X-1 Sikorsky H-19D-4 Chickasaw


Located directly at the western outskirts of Oslo airport, the Norwegian Armed Forces Aircraft Collection is the biggest aviation museum in southern Norway, with more than 40 aircraft currently on display, including a number of Cold War era fighter jets that have been operated by the Royal Norwegian Air Force. The inventory can truly be described as an impressive showcase of Norwegian aviation history: The collection also covers a number of WWII aircraft, including a German Luftwaffe Junkers JU-52/3m transport and the Heinkel He-111P-2 bomber. It is certainly worth to mention that most of the activities to run the collection is based on voluntary effort. For further information visit www.flysam.no All shots in this report were taken in September 2017 with a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 camera.


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


OH CANADA!

CANADIAN HISTORICAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION

Simon Fitfall

Article and photos by Simon Fitall


So, here’s a couple of interesting questions: what do you do when your town bought a WW2 bomber, put it on a pedestal and it started to fall apart? What do you do when you’ve always wanted to restore or rebuild a WW2 mainly wooden aircraft? Answers – “restore it” and “build one”. That is the center of the restoration work going on today at the Canadian Historical Aircraft Association (CH2A) based at Windsor International Airport, Ontario - just across the bridge from Detroit. The wooden wonder is, of course, a De Havilland Mosquito Mk.35. Using a fuselage bought from the New Zealand company that makes them, as well as restored bits rescued from crash sites, the aircraft is being built from plans obtained from the Air & Space Museum (who have the plans because the USAAF also operated Mosquitoes). A perfect example of the way CH2A work is the ailerons. They have borrowed a set of ailerons which are going to be used to generate the plans so that CH2A can build their own, after which the originals will be returned. Whilst I was there the team built the bench that will be used to create those plans.

The WW2 bomber in question as an Avro Lancaster B Mk.10 built by Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario – one of 430. This aircraft has the highest hours of any Lancaster as it was used for much of the mapping of Northern Canada – a huge project resulting in over 8,000 hours of flight time. The City of Windsor bought the airframe and decided to display it on a pedestal in town. After 40 years in the open, the elements had created structural weaknesses that meant it had to be taken down, which is where CH2A comes into the picture. CH2A is based in the primary hangar of what was one the No.7 Empire Flight Training School – one of over 120 such schools that trained more than 133,000 British aircrew during WW2. Flying the Fleet Finch and Fairchild PT-19 Cornell, student pilots would either graduate and move on to operational conversion or move to other flight crew training. For my visit this February I had emailed ahead to make contact (always a smart move). We were greeted at the door with “Oh are you the photographer from Washington?” and immediately introduced to Larry Whitmore the Secretary of CH2A who also manages tours. What a nice chap! We did the full tour without making a single photograph; I wanted the tour and his commentary to be the center of attention as I was sure that this would highlight some little gems of information that would change the photos – and it did (he pointed out the long range ferry tank on the shelf at the back of the workshop – probably the only surviving example in the world!).


The Lancaster is being restored to near flying condition. It won’t fly, but the quality of work is being put in so that it could – if someone would put up the addition $2-3 million to make it happen. The principle of the project is to beg, borrow and barter for the pieces that can be found, and to build those that can’t, case in point is the rear turret. When RM212 was displayed the turrets were removed and CH2A are looking to find a rear turret anywhere in the world that they can obtain and restore. That isn’t looking hopeful and so the current plan is to build one from scratch! The Mosquito is a recognizable shape, with all the bits attached (the fin had been removed just before my visit) but it is, of course, well away from being finished. When completed, both the Lancaster and the Mosquito will be housed in a new building for which funds are currently being raised. The photos that follow describe the restoration and building work better than my words, so I’ll let the captions speak for themselves.

Lancaster wing outer-section awaiting renovation.

As is nearly always the case with days like this, there is a picture I regret not making. At lunch all the volunteers sit around in the workshop to eat their sandwiches. We’re talking about hundreds of years of expertise, experience and stories. Next time I shall make these guys the focus of my visit! My thanks to Larry Whitmore and Don Christopher (who I didn’t meet but emailed) for the assistance, friendliness and commentary. This is a working hangar with a museum attached and I shall certainly be returning – probably quite soon – and recommend it to anyone who is in the Detroit area (it is 10 minutes from the tunnel). One technical note. All photos were shot RAW with a Nikon D300 with 16-80 f2.8-4 DX VR and Speedlight SB-800 (except the ferry tank shot which used 70-200 f2.8 lens). All photos have not been cropped but have been processed in Lightroom Classic CC 8.2, mainly for highlights and sharpening.

Lancaster nose section showing bomb aimer/front gunner position and pilot’s rubber pedals.


Lancaster bomb bay also showing missing floor that was removed to place the aircraft on a pedestal for display. Anew floor is being built.

Simon Fitfall

Lancaster fuselage mid-section showing navigator’s position.


Simon Fitfall

Lancaster Port main undercarriage and wheels ready to be reinstalled. Note port outer wing section behind.

Lancaster tail section awaiting a refurbished turret (if a turret cannot be sourced CH2A plan to build one from scratch). Note signatures where CDN$100 gets you a single panel – these will eventually be painted over but not erased.


Mosquito port engine and undercarriage.

Mosquito nose.


Simon Fitfall

Mosquito starboard Rolls-Royce Merlin 225.

Fleet 7B Fawn 1 – very similar to the Fleet finch flown by No 7 EFTS.


Fairchild 24R-46 Argus III used for fund raising rides.

De Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk with updated cockpit and canopy, used for fund raising flights.


Simon Fitfall

One of 4 Packard-Merlin V-1650 Lancaster engines awaiting renovation.


2019 HERITAGE FLIGHT TRAINING CONFERENCE Article and photos by Jeff Krueger

It’s 0640 and I find myself sitting in the security office at the gate of Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson. The reason I’m there was to spend some time photographing the Heritage Flight Training practice. This was in advance of the “Thunder and Lightning over Arizona” air show at the base. The morning started out with our small group being met and escorted by a trio of young officers that were very responsive and understanding of our mission. We convoyed out to the field and by 0730 we were on the tarmac and ready to spend some time photographing not only today’s top end fighters, but some of the iconic World War ll fighters all gathered to honor our military aviation heritage. It was impressive to see modern age F-35’s, F222’s, F-16’s and A-10’s sitting alongside a P-47 Thunderbolt, P-40 War Hawk, P-38 Lightning and a flock of P-51 Mustangs. Once on the field and after our briefing, we were let loose to wander around the aircraft, talk with pilots and flight crews. In effect, full access to everything going on. The morning light was great and the aircraft placement was perfect for doing some static beauty shots of all the aircraft. We had about an hour and a half to mingle with the aircraft, men and women who fly and keep them flying.

Near the close of our time on the tarmac, a pair of 2 seat F-16’s fired up, taxied out and took off with a couple of lucky passengers. The process of getting these birds ready to go was fascinating to watch and perfectly executed. Shortly after, it was time to clear the area as all the aircraft were prepping to head up to practice their Heritage flights. Shortly, we heard the sound of a P-51 firing up and watched it taxi out, followed closely behind by an F-22 Raptor. Seeing these two aircraft in close proximity really gives you a sense of scale between the fighters of yesteryear and today’s multi mission fighters. It was pretty impressive to watch. First up, flying over the runway was the F-22 demonstrating the capabilities of that aircraft with precision. The ability of that aircraft was amazing and the pilot put her thru its paces flawlessly. I think he’d done it a few times before! We even got vapor trails in our dry Arizona air. After a few minutes, off he went to link up with the P-51 for the first of the Heritage Flights that morning. Making several passes over us and the runway, both pilots had everything pretty much in sync. It’s still amazing for me to see such totally different technologies flying in perfect formation. Upon completion of the practice session, both aircraft did individual flybys and then back on the ground.


Next, we enjoyed watching the P-47, P-38 and P-40 fire up, warm up, and taxi out for their turn. As they taxied out, an A10 started rolling out and followed them onto the taxiway. After all had taken off, the WWII Warbirds headed out to form up and play as the A-10 took the stage and showed clearly why this aircraft is such a superb battlefield asset. After a few minutes of showing its stuff, the A-10 departed to link up with the Warbird formation. Flying over the field, the four aircraft were in perfect formation, the sun was in a great place for photography and I burned through a whole lot of digital frames. The formation made numerous passes and each one was executed flawlessly. With their practice time coming to an end, each aircraft did a flyby and returned to the ground. It was now time for the third and final Heritage Flight group to take the center stage. This flight was made up of a Korean War F-86 Sabre Jet, a P-51 Mustang and the latest in fighter technology, the F-35 Lightning. This was my first time seeing the F-35 and man, what an aircraft. I was so glad I had my hearing protection! As the pilot put this aircraft through numerous maneuvers, I couldn’t help but be blown away by its flying capabilities. From full power straight up flight, to the “turn on a dime” ability, this is one mean machine.

After a great demonstration, the F-35 took off towards the mountains to rendezvous with the other Warbirds and set up the Heritage Flight over the base. As mentioned earlier it is absolutely amazing how a propeller driven World War II fighter can fly in perfect formation with one of the earliest US jet fighters and the world’s most advanced fighter jet. It’s just something to see. With the conclusion of the third and final training exercise for the morning, our escorts gathered us up, answered any questions and we headed out. I have had the opportunity to photograph a number of aviation events up close as a member of ISAP. Each time I learn and get better at my aviation photography. Being able to attend the Heritage Flight Training Conference, here in my town, was one more opportunity I don’t know I would have had otherwise. Thanks to Larry and the folks at Davis-Monthan AFB for making it happen.


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


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MEET OUR MEMBERS


MEET OUR MEMBER

Bob Driver

Like many of you, I was introduced to photography at a pretty early age. I was around 10 years old when both of my Grandfathers introduced me to photography. I received hand-me-down equipment mostly; one being a much-cherished Argus C44, my first camera with interchangeable lenses, what a thrill that was. One of my Grandfathers was an engineer in the aviation world and an amateur photographer in his spare time, the other was a detective and crime scene photographer for the LAPD. I learned mostly from my engineer grandfather since he lived on the same street as my family just three houses away, which was extremely convenient. I went into high school with an abundance of photographic knowledge and was immediately selected as the yearbook photographer for the next four years. Went on to a junior college to study photography and Technical Illustration and then to night school at ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, to study Advertising Design. I had various jobs during this time including working and managing a couple of retail photography stores (where I saved up to purchase my first Employee Discounted Nikon), an intern photographer for a U.S. Senator, then teaching photography, technical illustration and print shop at my alma mater high school. After those temporary experiences, I took on a job with Lockheed as a Tech Illustrator on the L-1011 Program. Shortly after proving my capabilities as a Tech Illustrator I was transferred to another program that turned out to be the F-117 Stealth Fighter Program. There I continued my career under the cover of darkness for the next 10 years, or so, adding a few more responsibilities along the way. During this time, I got married and walked into a readymade family with two great young sons and wonderful wife. This was a new and huge lifestyle change for me and photography now took a backseat, except for the family shots everyone needs to have. That is, until I was asked to assist with the art direction for a Lockheed photo shoot with two Lockheed photographers, Denny Lombard and Eric Schulzinger. These two photographers are my heroes to this day, they changed my life. They inspired me to pick up my camera again and start shooting things that I wanted to shoot, they always encouraged me to push the envelope, bring twice, or three times as much film as I thought I might need for any given project, that would be Eric. I was asked to assist on many more projects, every one of them was a huge learning experience for me. I got to participate; not just watch these two masters at work. Working with them, and now other Lockheed Martin Photographers (you know who you are) I have gained experience and confidence to take on projects and succeed in my own right. I’m still at Lockheed Martin, at least for a few more years, leading the Graphics Group at the Skunk Works. One of my passions for the last six years has been being a Board Member for the Los Angeles County Air

Show based out of Fox Field in Lancaster, CA. I started out with them on day-one and have helped produce that show ever since. One of the tasks I perform for LACAS is to coordinate the Photo Tour. I think we do a pretty good job in getting the participants in good locations at the right times and we do have fun. We also have a High school mentoring program where we take the best photo & video students in the Antelope Valley (really the Aerospace Valley) and match them up with working pros during rehearsal day for mentoring. A program that’s as rewarding for the pros as it is for the students. Being a Nikon guy, the two cameras I reach for most shooting air shows are the D5 and a D850, lenses vary, but I seem to always have the 200-500 on one of the cameras, and a 70-200 on another, with various wide-angle lenses in my bag. RAW files are always a must, and I lean toward Adobe Photoshop and NIK plug-ins to finish my images. I first joined ISAP many years ago because of Eric Schulzinger and Denny Lombard, although I’ve not been a member continuously, I have re-upped for the long term. I would love to spread my wings a bit and do more air-to-air work in the future and as time permits, and attend more air shows and aviation events around the country. The people I’ve met through ISAP, Lockheed Martin, and in general the air show community are some of the best. If anyone cares, I’ve been a Nikon guy for over forty years, but it’s just the set of tools I started building on many years ago and they seem to work for me. Thank you for taking the time to read about me.


DenisDriver Bob Rouleau


DenisDriver Bob Rouleau


MEET OUR MEMBER

Dean Curry

Hello, my name is Dean Curry. I am a semi-professional photographer from the San Diego Area. I have been involved in photography off and on since I was a young boy. I had a green box type camera where we bought and processed the film by mail. Speaking of film, I got my first paying photography job photographing class reunions with a Pentax K-1000 on the weekends. I was making money and feeling good. So good I moved up to a medium format camera where I photographed weddings and portraits for years before digital came along. Now days I prefer to keep a distance from wedding photography, but I do still enjoy taking portraits. I did not go to college for photography, but I have taken many classes over the years to get me where I am today. Within the last few years, I have begun photographing aviation. I have been interested in photographing this for years as I live ten miles from MCAS Miramar and I worked two blocks away from the base for sixteen years, however, the time wasn’t right for me to purchase longer lens until a few years ago. I currently use Canon and have a 5D MKIII, 70D, 24-70 f/2.8, 70-200 f/4.0 and 100-400 f/4.0. Depending on the photograph I am looking for I use the 70D and 70-200 because of the size and weight. I prefer shooting RAW because it gives me more control over my image as needed; sometimes I adjust the brightness or contrast in Lightroom and/or Photoshop as well as giving the image a little help because I didn’t see a garbage can or some unwanted object in the final image. In January 2019, I joined ISAP from the high recommendations of other photographers. I met ISAP President Larry Grace at my first Photo Calls and have followed him on Instagram as well as ISAP. I met quite a few ISAP members at the last Photo Calls in November and everyone shared how much they liked ISAP. The photographs in the magazine as well as the photographer profiles are incredible. In addition to ISAP, I also belong to Pacific Photograph Society and Professional Photographer of America. Currently, I am learning more about off camera flash in studio and outdoors. I would love to do a night time shoot with aircraft sometime. I am always willing to help if I can. Although I am newer to aviation photography, I would suggest knowing your surroundings when you photograph - especially the background of where you are planning to photograph the aircraft; it will help your photograph in the long run. I included a photograph of the Vietnam Veteran’s War Memorial that is located on Camp Pendleton. I had the honor and privilege to photograph the ground-breaking ceremony to the dedication on Memorial Day 2018.


Dean Curry


Dean Curry


MEET OUR MEMBER

Gary Buzel

My name is Gary Buzel, I’m a professional photographer, videographer, and pilot based in the San Diego area. I specialize in General Aviation photography and work as a Vice President of King Schools, a national online General Aviation training provider where I oversee the course and curriculum production staff along with the photography, video production, and cinematography operations of the company. Prior to becoming an executive at King Schools, I was an Emmy Award winning TV reporter/one man band journalist in San Diego for CW6 News, where aviation stories was one of my specialties to report. I hold an FAA ATP pilot certificate, certified flight instructor, instructor instrument, and instructor multi engine certificates. I obtained my pilots certificate at age 17, about the same time I fell in love with film photography after taking a photography course in high school. As for gear, I went 100% Sony Alpha mirrorless after switching from Canon about 4 years ago. It was a big leap when many pro photographers at the time were still unsure about how mirrorless was evolving. I was drawn to Sony because of its wonderful hybrid capabilities which were surpassing Canon’s slow innovation with 4K video at the time. We are now in a time I can go from high quality stills to high quality cinematography in the flip of a switch. No need to carry around a separate DSLR and Pro video camera in the same bag. I love the Sony 100-400 GM f4.5-5.6 GM zoom, great for airshows and great for air-to-air too!. Very sharp and the lens stabilization is great. I do want to get my hands on the new 400mm Prime GM f2.8 someday!! My camera bodies I use today are an A7RIII, A7III, and A7SII. I shoot 100% RAW. RAW has been my workflow for since I started digital with my old Nikon D1X back in 2002. I feel RAW gives you the maximum latitude in post for highlight/shadow recovery and other tweaks. I do all my post processing in Lightroom, although I have been tempted by the others to switch, but none of them have won me over yet. I do use Photoshop occasionally when I want to do some heavy lifting with a shot. One of my 2019 goals is to advance my Photoshop skill set above the “basics.” To be frank, I find Photoshop at times not to be very intuitive to use, so that challenge makes this goal even more wanting me to pursue and capture. I joined ISAP for the ability to network, collaborate, and have camaraderie with other aviation imaging professionals. It is an organization I have heard about from other people I have been working with at the airport. Besides ISAP, I am also members of PPA (Professional Photographers of America), AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association), NAFI (National Association of Flight Instructors), and Sony Pro Support.

Helping other photographers with the art and skill of the craft is a passion of mine. Part of my responsibilities at King Schools is training of our camera operators, editors, and multimedia artists. It’s fun to see the “ah ha” moment in a creative person’s eyes when they learn something new and fun. When I’m not working, I enjoy attending the local photography meetup groups and helping out newbies with landscape and portrait photography events they do. In closing, I’m very excited to take the fun of photography and combine with another passion of mine – aviation. 2019 will be a year I want to grow as a photographer, embracing new concepts, making new friends, and think outside the box. You’ll always find me outdoors out and about, or at my local airport always having some type of camera with me.


Gary Buzel


Gary Buzel


MEET OUR MEMBER

Geoffrey Arnwine

I am from Concord, CA living nearby in Benicia, CA. I am a pro photographer who has been involved in the industry for nearly 8 years now since high school. I have shot product pictures for companies as well as taken portraits at graduation events. I’ve taken photography classes at community college to further enhance my experience. My desire to photograph aviation started as a kid. I’ve always loved aviation since I was little and seeing pictures of aircraft in books, calendars, and other media inspired me to start the passion. I currently use the Canon 7D Mark II camera which I have had for about a year and a half now. For airshow photography I use the Canon 100400mm lens with the body. I always shoot in RAW because it gives me a larger variety of editing abilities. I prefer using Lightroom when editing my photos because it is

a very easy and well organized program with just about all the photo editing tools that are included in Photoshop. I wanted to join ISAP to get more exclusive access into airshows and other aviation events as well as getting closer into the aviation community. I learned about ISAP through internet sources and learned more about the benefits on the website. I have been a part of The Aviation Magazine for 3 years now and am thinking about quitting this year to start a new chapter with ISAP. I am always open to helping others when they ask for photography tips. As far as tips, I would share with them the settings I use for certain aircraft (jet, prop, etc.) as well as choosing good areas to stay at during an airshow for the best images possible with the way sun lighting would work at certain venues.


Geoffrey Arnwine


Geoffrey Arnwine


MEET OUR MEMBER

Steve Walter

I had always liked photographing people and places. I started with simple box cameras and then moved on to 8mm movies. In 1980 I bought my first 35mm camera, a Canon AV-1. After that, my interest in photography really “took off”. A lifelong interest in 19th & 20th Century history coupled with a love for aviation related subjects led me to start attending and photographing local air shows. I now use six different Canon 35mm cameras, a Bronica ETRS 6x4.5 medium format camera, and Mamiya C-330S & Graflex C-22 6x6 medium format cameras for my activities. Over the last 5-10 years I have accumulated an extensive photographic array of pre World War I and newer aircraft. The photos are in black & white or color. As I am a confessed “low tech person” I do not photograph using digital cameras. All photos are on analog media (film). I feel

that film reveals richer color and better detail resolution. Using analog media also makes each photo unique and one of a kind. My collection of images increases every year and I am sure that there is a photo to fit your needs. I also photograph landscapes and, what I refer to as, general subject matter. Examples are included in this display. This exhibition is dedicated to my beautiful wife Donna, who lost her battle with cancer June 21, 2015. She always told me that my work is good and should be on display. I hope that you agree.


Steve Walter


MEET OUR MEMBER

Tyler Hernandez

My name is Tyler Hernandez, I’m an Aviation student and currently hold a private pilot certificate. I am based out of the San Francisco Bay Area and I would say that when it comes to photography, I am an amateur. I don’t have any formal photographic training, I’m kind of just figuring it out as I go. I started photographing aviation because I love to share it with my friends and family.

I joined ISAP to meet more of the Aviation Photographer community and to learn more about photography from others. I learned about ISAP via Instagram; I kept seeing it in very talented photographer’s bios. I am very involved with organizations in my University such as the Precision Flight Team, and Alpha Eta Rho (National Aviation Fraternity), but I do not belong to any other photography groups.

I currently use a Canon Rebel T5 with the kit lenses, as well as a Sigma 50-500mm lens. Since purchasing it, I have pretty much exclusively used the Sigma lens for the extra zoom. I am currently working on saving up enough to upgrade to a more intermediate level camera like an 80D.

If I have any information that would help someone’s understanding of photography I always try to help. I am still learning a lot myself, so I don’t have a ton of advice to give; but the thing that I have learned is to plan shots. Photographing Aviation is very challenging in that anything can change, and you have to adapt; but a fair amount of planning will help you get the shot you want.

I prefer shooting RAW, just because I feel that I get better quality out of my camera; but sometimes I do shoot JPEG because my camera’s burst performance is much better on JPEG. I prefer to use Lightroom just because it was easier for me to pick up than Photoshop, but I’m sure eventually I will learn to use both.


Tyler Hernandez


Tyler Hernandez


MEET OUR MEMBER

Andrew Burnham

My name is Andrew Burnham I currently live in Herndon, Virginia and work as a Ramp Tower Controller at Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD). I would consider myself as an advanced amateur as I have studied photography for about 3 years now on my own. I started photography as a means to help capture the moments I experienced flying and being in the aviation industry instead of using my phone camera. I have been fascinated with aviation since I took a discovery flight back in 2009. Now being in the industry as a Ramp Tower Controller and having experienced as a licensed FAA Dispatcher, I have seen a plethora of aircraft and really wanted to capture them in a better format than a small phone camera. The major spark was images from my last cross-country flight for my private pilot certificate, I printed the crude phone images at a FedEx and framed some in my college dorm room. That feeling of seeing a photo I took physically printed was really satisfying and made for neat interactions sharing friends about the story behind the photo. Currently when I am not controlling aircraft at IAD I am out with out “spotters” taking pictures of the numerous international aircraft on the field and also enjoying the close-up views of Gravelly Point Park just outside Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Virginia. I currently use a Canon EOS 77D with an EF 70-300mm f4-5.6 IS USM. I also carry a Canon Rebel T5 body which I started my photography with. The Canon 77D with 70-300mm is my bread and butter when I’m out shooting commercial/general aviation aircraft or attending an airshow. I used to prefer shooting JPG as my older camera body was able to keep up with the continuous mode shooting that aviation photography can entail. Now with my Canon 77D I shoot RAW as it can handle the much larger file format. I prefer using Adobe Lightroom for editing as a majority of my edits take place right on my phone. I started editing from my phone since most images were for social media and seeing it on the phone meant I had a good idea of how it would look for others seeing the image on their phones. I am more open now to editing on my desktop and have been working to learn more about Lightroom and Photoshop. On occasion I will use Photoshop to utilize the color isolation feature as it can really bring emotion or evoke an interesting presence in an image. I joined ISAP February 19th 2019 because I saw the president of ISAP in a YouTube video from Ted Forbes, whom I am learning more about photography from. I saw ISAP and knew that this society could help me become a better photography and wet my appetite for more knowledge and improvement in my work, even as a recreational photographer.

I currently don’t belong to any other professional photography associations, but I have been a long-standing member with the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) for 10 years now. I definitely help others learn about photography because it’s what every photographer should do! It’s a passion and if you aren’t sharing your passion with others and inspiring them to go out and shoot then why are you a photographer? In the short time I have been photographing my advice for a photographer new to aviation would be to KEEP SHOOTING. There have been many times where I have surprised myself with a shot that is a whole new perspective because I kept shooting through the patches of light or shot pictures all the way until touchdown. Keep shooting and be open to different weather while shooting as you can capture rare moments and interesting weather phenomena associated with aircraft aerodynamics.


Andrew Burnham


MEET OUR MEMBER

John Little

I am a resident of Colorado and have been taking photographs for nearly 55 years. I worked for many of those years as a professional photographer, which is more accurately described as a person who is in a continuous, lifetime learning mode! My passion in Aviation began nearly 50 years ago and is still the “pleasure of my art”. I currently use the Sony platform for my hardware, with a range of lenses that crosses over well for aircraft, landscape, and wildlife imaging. The 70-300mm is the best go to in aviation and airshow work, with the 28-70, and the 35 to 105 as the intermediate ranges. I started with a Nikon F, then moved to the F2, and F3HP, the then hit the digital world with the Nikon D1X, and the D3. A few years back, Sony made a good impression on me, and I moved over. But I have nothing but great memories in my years with the Nikon product. My normal workflow is using RAW as the output. Colorado skies are difficult to predict, and with a significant ozone issue especially during the fall and winter months, I need to adjust some of the photographs to return my blue skies. I am using Photoshop to the conversion process, but I am by no means a professional at Photoshop. I use it in the Photography mode, which reduces the learning curve I went through, and left me just the right tools. I would say that each person should decide which process works best for them. There is no one right product for everyone. Joining ISAP was an easy choice. I met Jay Miller at the Breckenridge, Texas airport a number of years ago with the Red Bull P-38 coming out party, and he invited me to join and it was a no brainer for me. Watching and learning from others that had the same interest was a perfect vehicle for improving my work (thanks again for the invitation Jay). I am always open to talking about and working with other photographers in the aviation community. I have a number of outstanding friends here in Colorado who share the interest, and we always talk shop when given a chance. The only tip I can offer is to “enjoy” yourself. Never take yourself to seriously and pick the gear that satisfies your needs. It really is not a competition, it is only about self-improvement, and having a good day at the field. And never be afraid to go out and just take a day trying new things with your camera, you never know what you will end up seeing in your final work product.


John Little


AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

Identify these aircraft. The answers are found next to the Kenyon Gyro Ad.

1


2


3


4


RICH BLACK CMYK 75 68 67 89 White CMYK 0 0 0 0 Pantone 186 2 100 85 6 Pantone 287 100 72 2 12 Pantone 348 96 2 100 12

www.delkindevices.com/xqd/


“A family-owned and operated equipment rental company, Lensfly was founded in 2012 to provide high quality photographic and video equipment rentals for industry professionals and enthusiasts who require professional-level lenses, lighting or cameras without the expense of large upfront investments.� 20% off of rental charges for ISAP members. For details visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.


©Moose Peterson

The Art of Air to Air

Aviation Photography: Post Processing

Aviation Photography: Warbirds and the Men Who Flew Them

VISIT WWW.KELBYONE.COM TO VIEW ALL INSTRUCTORS, GET MORE INFO & BECOME A MEMBER Adobe, Photoshop, and Lightroom are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems, Incorporated. All images courtesy of Moose Peterson.


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150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Case, hood (LH1050-01) and Tripod Socket (TS-71) included.

120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Case, hood (LH1220-01) and Tripod Socket (TS-51) included.

100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Hood (LH770-04) included.

SIGMA USB Dock The ultimate tool for the modern photographer. From focus, to AF & OS- customization never thought possible. Sold separately.

Learn more sigmaphoto.com/usb-dock

Handcrafted in Japan. Our entire line-up on sigmaphoto.com. USA 4-Year Service Protection SIGMA Corporation of America | 15 Fleetwood Court | Ronkonkoma, NY 11779, U.S.A. | Tel: (631) 585-1144 Follow us on Instagram @sigmaphoto and Facebook.com/sigmacorporationofamerica


$3.50 OFF DISCOUNT TO ALL ISAP MEMBERS

LCD Screen Protector

High-quality screen protectors

Custom-fit Japanese technology

I know, I know. Some things just shouldn’t be talked about in polite society. They’re too horrific to contemplate. But that’s why we exist. At Expert Shield, we looked closely at the screen protector market. Then we recoiled in horror.

But here’s why you should be telling your Aunty Mabel about us. We offer a lifetime guarantee. Whose life? The life of your phone, camera or tablet. If you scratch your screen protector, send it back. If you scuff it, send it back. If it’s rude to its elders, cut off its pocket money and send it back. That’s a no small print, no-scratch, no-bubble, no-quibble guarantee.

You paid a penny or two (probably three) for your Canon 5D Mark III, Nikon D800, Sony A7R II or Olympus OM-D. So how would you feel if you scratched the screen just a few weeks ?

The options seemed to be cheap screen protectors that doubled as clingfilm or expensive screen protectors affordable only by those listed on Forbes. There had to be another way.

We use Japanese Optical Grade CrystalFilm™ technology that comes in three scratch-repelling layers and offers a custom fit that’s as precise as cosmic molecular geometry. Which we made up, admittedly.

Visit ExpertShield.com and select your items. Click “View Cart” before checkout and click “Use Coupon Code” For the coupon code visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

www.ExpertShield.com


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LIOE Design is a product company that manufactures their own product designs. Located in Seattle, WA all their products are aviation inspired from their Aero Ti Chopsticks Every product has a story. A reason why a product looks the way it does from function and practicality to aesthetics. All our products are designed with the belief that everyday goods can be extraordinary. We strive to ensure the user is getting the most unique experience and to create a everyday item in a completely re-imagined way. We design to spark imagination and creativity even in the most creative people. Creating products that inspire design. 1) Air Squadron playing cards This deck of cards has artwork of modern jets and aircraft. The inspiration was to create a deck of cards unlike other cards, the Kings and Queens are B-2 Bomber and SR-71. The Jokers are the A-10 and F-22. Every card is unique creating the perfect deck for an aviation enthusiast or card collector! 2) Stealth Pen The Stealth Pen has a unique, aluminum uni-body design with four total components making it lightweight as well as easy to assemble and disassemble. The slotted design offers a futuristic touch and cuts down on the weight of the pen while allowing the user a glance at the inside ink cartridge. 3) Titan Business card holder The Titan is aero-inspired minimalist light-weight card holder. The pattern on the front of the card holder is reminisce of a futuristic space door and inspired by the nose of the B29 Super Fortress. Titan has a dark gunmetal gray color and is made from aircraft grade 6061-T6 Aluminum.

LIOEDESIGN.COM Visit their website to learn more about their products

15% discount for ISAP members

For details visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

Jim Wilson Photography International Distributor for Kenyon Stabilizing Products 214-796-9743 JW@JIMWILSONPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Answers to Airplane Silhouettes 1. Fairey FD-1 2. Fane F1-40 AOP 3. Fiat G 55A* Italy FP’54 4. Heinkel He -119 V3


Special Offer for ISAP Members

For the special offers visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/HelpCenter/NYSuperStore08. jsp?About_Us-The_Professionals_Source pays tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices, as we moved to our SuperStore: www.bhphotovideo.com/find/HelpCenter/NYSuperStore08. jsp?About_Us-History on 34th Street and opened our cyber-doors at www.bhphotovideo.com. We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.


ISAP Merchandise

If you wish to purchase any ISAP merchandise please email info@aviationphoto.org Send your name and current address and you will be invoiced via PayPal. Shipping cost will be added to your invoice. Members with an international address will have a higher shipping rate. ISAP Challenge coin - $10 + shipping ISAP safety vest (Small to X-Large) - $38 + shipping (An additional $10.00 will be charged for a 2X-4X size vest) ISAP membership patch - $5 + shipping Limited patch version with Velcro backing - $10 + shipping


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ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards Past Treasurer Bonnie Kratz Secretary Mike Collins ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller ISnAP Editor Kevin Hong ISnAP International Editor Mike Green The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at info@aviationphoto.org, isnap@aviationphoto.org or isappresident@aviationphoto.org ISnAP is a publication to showcase our members work in capturing aviation events. Anytime you have images or would like to inquire on doing an article for ISnAP contact us via email at isnap@aviationphoto.org Images should be sized at 3600 x 2400 @ 300 dpi (12� x 8�) in a landscape format only. Submit up to 10 images per article and submit your text in a word document and email a link by using www.wetransfer.com and send to info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). You can also submit images for review for a future cover or back page display. If any questions you can email us as well to isnap@aviationphoto.org. We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


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Profile for International Society of Aviation Photography, Inc.

ISnAP April 2019  

International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) January 2019 issue of ISnAP. (Magazine by International Society for Aviation Photograp...

ISnAP April 2019  

International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) January 2019 issue of ISnAP. (Magazine by International Society for Aviation Photograp...

Profile for isaporg