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WELCOME TO THE SEPTEMBER 2017 ISSUE OF ISNAP! EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2017 Scott Slingsby, Bonnie Kratz, Craig Swancy, Jim Koepnick, John Freedman, Steven Lewis, Gary Daniels, Vincent Trelut, Rod Reilly, Gary Edwards, Larry Grace, Chuck Burin, Adam Pethel, Kevin Hong, Peter Keller, Greg Drawbaugh How I Got The Shot! Dennis Biela Northern Wings at Sola Air Station Mark Schultz Tactical Weapons Meet 2017 Florennes AB Nicolas Limbioul Meet Our Members Adam Pethel, Steve Bondhus

FRONT COVER PHOTO: Dennis Biela Gene Soucy performing at EAA AirVenture 2017 at Oshkosh BACK COVER: Larry Grace Photography Bell 47 landing at EAA Airventure 2017 at Oshkosh ISAP’s goal is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. In this issue we are continuing to highlight ISAP members. I’m sure you will enjoy learning how your fellow ISAP members got started, as well as seeing some of their images and learning some tips. Remember that ISnAP is your publication to share your images, stories and tips with other members and the public. We look forward to each member sharing his or her stories with all of us. Enjoy this issue of ISnAP! Sincerely, Larry Grace, President Kevin Hong, ISnAP Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg isnap@aviationphoto.org


Kevin Hong

w e l c o m e Jennifer Alderman Jessica Ambats Michael J Bellinger Stephen Bondhus Scott Bruce Raphael L P Brescia Britton Brainard Marcelo de Barros Camargo Gary Chambers Mike Collins John Cottrell Paul Csizmadia Sam Dammers Joe Davis Thierry Deutsch 

n e w

a n d

r e t u r n i n g

Greg Drawbaugh Edward Faith Ed Faith Laura Falkner John Ford John Freedman Douglas Glover Kenneth Hunt II Jeremy Humphreys Jennifer Jensen Gary Kratz Charles Lai Steven Lewis Nicolas Limbioul Erich Linder

i s a p

Mark Magin Keith Meachem Steve Meredith Brian Mouat Gary Molenkamp Van Han Nguyen Patrick Nugent Milan Ovecka Moose Peterson Adam Pethel Nigel Quick Rodman Reilly John J Ringquist Wes Roberts Adrian Romang

m e m b e r s David A Shirah Erik Simonsen ThakurDalipSingh Douglass Sisk Ed Simmons Jason Skinner Chad Slattery Craig Swancy Robert Talarczyk David Takahashi Kelly Tarala Ismael Abeytua Vega Jeff Welker Anna M Wood

The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


EAA AIRVENTURE

O S H K O S H

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COME FOR THE PLANES, STAY FOR THE PEOPLE. Article and photos by Scott Slingsby


For me, Oshkosh starts around February with the booking of my flights and rental car. As it gets closer, momentum starts picking up with all the news releases from EAA announcing the different airplanes and acts that have been booked. This year looked to be a good one. The Blue Angels would be making their first-ever appearance at the show, the possibility of a formation flight with the sole remaining B-29s “Doc” and “FIFI”, and a whole lot of bomber action from B-25s to B-52s. But after it all was said and done and I was on the way to the hotel in Milwaukee before catching my return flight the next morning, I realized that it was the people I met during the week of AirVenture-everyone from show participants to fellow photographers-that really made a lasting impression on me. This year I decided to go even earlier than I had in past years arriving on Sunday to catch some of the early arrivals. What luck, Jim Tobul’s F4U-4 Corsair “Korean War Hero” was in and there were no crowds around it yet. I’ve been a Corsair fan since the 70s. I grew up watching Black Sheep Squadron on TV so I’ll take any chance to get some nice shots without crowds around. At this point Larry Grace said he knows Jim and if we can find him maybe we can get him to leave the canopy cover off for a possible evening shoot. About an hour later we spotted Jim and his wife buttoning up the plane for the night. After pleasantries were exchanged, along with the requisite quotes from ‘Blazing Saddles’, the question was asked and Jim couldn’t have been nicer about it. Instead of having to return to the airplane late at night to cover it up, he proceeded to show us how to remove and replace the cover so we could shoot at whatever time we wanted. Unfortunately, with all the activities going on throughout the week, that shoot never materialized, but you can bet with my newfound knowledge of how to cover up a Corsair I’ll be revisiting that one next year. As the week progressed, I made my way to the vintage area and found myself in the back of a beautiful Beech Staggerwing owned by the Morrison family, whom I met at last years AirVenture. While shooting some cockpit shots from the back seat I heard someone outside say the name Gene Kranz. So I cut my shoot a little short and hopped out only to find the NASA legend himself chatting with the owners, seems he’s a Staggering fan too. It wasn’t long before Mr. Kranz was in the back seat of the vintage biplane snapping some shots for his own photo album. Afterwards, he graciously took pictures with the Morrison’s and a couple of other bystanders before I got up the nerve to ask for a picture with him. He flashed a big smile and said, “Gimme some skin”! Thanks to Will Morrison for taking over photographer duties. That’s a picture that will hang in my office for a long time. As I said earlier, I had the opportunity to meet up with numerous other photographers during the week but it seems ISAP member Adam Pethel and I had a previous connection neither of us knew about. Prior to the Thursday show we all met up and were just relaxing before the afternoon festivities began when Adam and I started talking shop and comparing notes about our jobs, his as an airline pilot and mine as a Netjets pilot. He was explaining that he saw a Netjets plane land in the middle of a small airshow he was shooting and head right back out. I said that I had recently landed at a small show in Gainesville, GA and had seen a photographer shooting me. “That was you?”, he said! Well what do you know, the photographer I saw out of the corner of my eye on landing was Adam! I’m glad I didn’t bounce it on that day. His pictures of my arrival and departure that morning came out great, and will also be hung in the office because it’s not often I get a shot of myself flying the plane. With the week winding down, there was one shoot I had on my list I wanted to check off, and that was to find some re-enactors to pose in front of a warbird. I’ve been a fan of this type of photography for a while and thought it was time to give a try.


First thing Friday morning fellow ISAP members Craig Swancy, Gary Daniels, Gary Edwards and Stephen Lewis joined me in Warbirds and the hunt was on to find willing subjects to pose for us. The search led us to Ryan Knapp and Steven “Zippy” Zahares, two veteran re-enactors who take their job very seriously. After a brief discussion of what we were looking do and what type of airplane we desired for a backdrop both men changed into period flight gear and we were on our way. For the next half hour, Gary Daniels took over as art director and set Ryan and Steven in numerous poses. We started in front of John Fallis’ P-40 Warhawk “Suzy” with the hero pose and went from there. At one point a crowd of about 20 people gathered around behind us and

started shooting as well. The hot summer sun looked to be taking its toll on our subjects so we were contemplating calling it a day when one of them suggested another plane. They said the heat wasn’t bothering them, that’s what they’re there to do. So off we went to Paul Ehlin’s P-51 Mustang, “Sierra Sue II”. To give you a little idea of how seriously they take re enacting, the conversation between planes was whether or not the mae west would’ve been worn during the time period in which the airplane operated in the European theater. I’m no expert, but the decision was made that it wouldn’t have been worn, so off it came.


Before wrapping up the shoot, we exchanged information with Steven and Ryan so we could also send them some images. Apparently they had as much fun as we had so they invited us to their USO show next year. So the calendar is already filling up for ’18.

A quick fist bump from Gene Soucy before his afternoon routine put the finishing touches to an extraordinary week for me. I took home 20,000 images and a lifetime of memories from this amazing trip. It’ll probably be next February by the time I’m done culling all the pictures, just in time to start making plans for AirVenture ’18. Scott Slingsby

We started setting up around the Mustang when a golf cart pulled up and a voice asked if we had permission from the owner to use the Mustang. Turns out, this was the owner. He smiled at us and said it was his and to have fun. Again, another person making this a memorable week. Before he departed though, we obtained his contact info so we could send along some pictures, it was the least we could do considering he let us play around his multi-million dollar fighter.


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Bonnie Kratz


Bonnie Kratz


Bonnie Kratz


Bonnie Kratz


Craig Swancy

EAA 2017 was the best of all the Oshkosh events I’ve ever attended. Proud to be a member of both the EAA and ISAP this year’s Air Show provided all those items I had on my wish list. If I had to title my comments it would be “Bombers, Bombers, Bombers”. With the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo, Wittman Regional Airport held a reported 25 North American B-25 Mitchell Medium Bombers in all variations. The last remaining Doolittle Raider, Dick Cole attended this year’s events. A rare Douglas A-20 Havoc Light Bomber made it to Oshkosh and was featured in the War Birds area. Beautifully restored, this was the first A-20 I can recall seeing in my 67 years. The War Birds area was well represented with P-39’s, P-63’s, P-51’s and a P-40 or two. A lone Spitfire came in as well. A few Grumman F4-F’s Wildcats and a awesome Grumman F-8F Bearcat represented the Cat Family. The Vought F-4U was represented with just a few aircraft. This year we spent some time with the USAF Re-enactors in their are and got some great WW II Pilot shots against a P-39 and P-51. The Highlight of this 2017 AirVenture was the debut of “Doc”. A completely restored Boeing B-29 Bomber. Flying in and landing on Wittman’s runway was well documented. But when both “Doc” and the CAF’s “FiFi” took to the skies featuring a pair of B-29’s in flight formed up together, it was indeed a sight for sore eyes. Historically no one knows if these two will ever fly together again. Scott Slocum captured the most definitive photos of the B-29’s flying together. A very special Thank You to the USAF for flying in three Bombers in a wingtip to wingtip formation. The Rockwell B-1B Lancer “Bone” Bomber, the Northrup-Grumman B-2 “Spirit” Stealth Bomber, and the Boeing B-52 H “BUFF” Bomber circle the field several times while

individually making photo passes for the 590,000 in attendance. Each aircraft made several passes making sure everyone with a camera or an iPhone was able to get a good clean picture. For several years we had suggested an “All Boeing Heritage Flight” with a B-17, B-29, and a B-52. Think about that for a moment. Sadly our “Dream Heritage Flight” did not occur. But the seed has been planted. EAA AirVenture 2017 also brought in the United States Navy Blues Angels for the main act. As always the Blue Angels put on a superb show and closed out the show on Sunday. The precision flying of the Angels is always worth waiting for and watching. A special thanks to Larry Grace, Bonnie Kratz, Kevin Hong, Mike Collins, all the ISAP Staff Members and all the ISAP Members that attended this year’s event. Enjoyed the time we had together and the Brats were great! It’s rare that we all get to sit down together and have a cold adult beverage in the same room with each other. See you next year at EAA 2018.


Craig Swancy


Craig Swancy


Craig Swancy


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


Jim Koepnick


John Freedman

The aircraft we were all waiting for, the two Boeing B-29 Superfortresses to fly in formation.


Fellow ISAP members; well AirVenture 2017 Oshkosh was another great year. We all happily filled up numerous memory cards in a quest to get that perfect image. There was plenty to photograph too. For the first time since the 1950s there was two Boeing B-29 Superfortress aircraft flying together. The USAF sent up their current bomber fleet, with a formation of the B-52, B-1B and B-2A, what a sight. The US Navy Blue Angels performed for the first time in perfect afternoon light. There was a flight of twelve North American B-25 medium bombers to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo. There were A-1s, A-4, A-10s, A-20, A-26, B-17s, Navy aircraft, rows AT-6s, rows of T-28s, T-34s, P-51s, F4Us, L-birds, T-birds, and Astronauts. There were warbirds, jet warbirds, aerobatic acts, and fields and fields of camping aircraft. There were re-enactors, antiques, ultralights, seaplanes, and helicopters. If you could not find something to fill your lense, you just weren’t trying! So if you did not get there this year, book now, there is a happy band of ISAP members that get together throughout the show to share the experience. Only 11 months to go!!


John Freedman

Boeing B-29 ‘Doc’ appeared at Oshkosh for the first time, the 17 year restoration was rewarded with the Best Bomber and Phoenix awards.

The USAF brought along the supersonic Rockwell B-1B Lancer, better known as the Bone!


The venerable Boeing B-52H passes the moon. These amazing aircraft have been in since before their crews were born, the last rolling off the production line in 1961.

The super secret Northrop B-2A Stealth Bomber makes a low pass.


John Freedman

Kirby Chambliss dives towards the runway during his routine.

Just as the first fireworks went off on Wednesday night, the skies opened up and a deluge set in. To begin with I thought hey look at the reflection, then it was preservation mode, run and get shelter!!


Three North American Aviation F-86 Sabres in formation featuring the rare F-86A.

David Martin flies his Bucker Jungmeister inverted and raises his hands to demonstrate the handling of the aircraft.


John Freedman

The USAF Heritage Flight varied each day, Thursday’s included the F-35A, A-10C and two P-51 Mustangs.

The Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II flies past on arrival to Oshkosh. The F-35A was part of the USAF Heritage Flight display.


The Blue Angels performed for the first time at Oshkosh 2017. Here they do the break.

The two Blue Angels solos perform a formation slow pass.


John Freedman

Steve ‘Zippy’ Zahareas poses in front of B-25 ‘Georgie’s Girl’. The re-enactors are great, they bring along period uniforms and have a camp next to Warbirds, and are always willing to do a photo shoot.

Sean D. Tucker


One of the spectacular night performers is Gene Soucy in his Showcat.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the NASA Apollo Program EAA assembled Astronauts, including Apollo 11 veteran Buzz Aldrin.


John Freedman


The Wall of Flame lights the night sky, and B-29 Doc as the finale of the Saturday night show.


John Freedman


David Hartman chairs the Theatre in the woods with Apollo program astronauts; Al Worden, Joe Engel, Buzz Aldrin, Fred Haise, Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, Walt Cunningham and Mission Control’s Gene Kranz.


Steven Lewis

AirVenture

Oshkosh 2017 and the Land of 10,000 aircraft!


Being new to ISAP and never gone to AirVenture before, the unknowns were two-fold for me. I was growing tired of going to the same airshows and my photography was not growing in the way I wanted it. Joining a group of photographers that share the same passion about aviation photography as I do just makes sense. For AirVenture, ISAP rents a house from a local resident so that members can stay during week. I found It was a wonderful place to stay. The other members of ISAP members were inviting, friendly as well as knowledgeable about AirVenture. The house was a place where we all could unwind after the day’s event, share stories and meals and pass along tips and techniques. I stayed there Tuesday night until Sunday morning when all left. Each day at AirVenture offers something different. Along with the daily airshow is different each day. The night shows are just as spectacular. The night show on Wednesday was anything short of amazing. It started with the 10 B-25 parked in Warbird Alley just like on the deck of the U.S.S Hornet for the 75th Anniversary of Doolittle Raid. The B-1 also flew during Wednesday’s night show. With the late afternoon light, the fiery glow of the afterburners and the vapor! It was truly remarkable! Venturing into the countless rows of aircraft, one could easily find great subjects to photograph. I found most of favorite images from AirVenture was when I wondered into the sea of aircraft. Very much a target rich environment. Saturday was the most memorable day during my stay. That morning ISAP members Gary Edwards, Craig Swancy, Gary Daniels, Scott Slingsby and myself went over to the re-enactors camp, to see if we

could get a couple of re-enactors to pose for us around a few warbirds. Ryan Knapp and Steven “Zippy” Zahares were willing to take part and were absolutely incredible to work with along with Gary Daniels was masterful when it came to directing our two re-enactors. Photographers and re-enactor alike, we all have enjoyed ourselves. The airshow on Saturday was special for aviation enthusiasts. That day we got to see nearly all the iconic WWII bombers we love. Flying in formations that has been seen in well over 60 years, with Fifi and Doc, the last two flying B-29s. Like me, this was Doc’s first time at AirVenture after a malicious 16-year restoration. Which was followed by a parade of bombers with 2 B-29 Superfortresses, 4 B-25 Mitchells and a B-17. The United States Air Force(USAF) had all 3 of its heavy hitters in a rare formation to celebrate the 75th anniversary of 8th Air Force and the 70th anniversary USAF. Leading the formation was the stealthy B-2. On one side was the aging B-52, soldiering on with over 50 years of service. And one the other side was the B-1, also known as the Bone. In the over 60 years of AirVenture history, 2017 was the first time the U.S. Navy Blue Angels had performed there. The team arrived in grand fashion on Thursday with 5 F/A-18 Hornets and the 6th Hornet showed up early Friday morning. The Blues performed both Friday and Saturday during the daily airshow. This is just a small glimpse of my 2017 AirVenture visit. To see and read more about my stay, visit my blog at anadventureinawesome.com/


Steven Lewis


Steven Lewis


Steven Lewis


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Vincent Trelut


First of all, I want to thank deeply Larry Grace and the ISAP team for having accepted me for the whole week at the house. It was very nice and very convenient. I am not a professional photographer, just a “froggy” amateur, passionate about aviation history and flying. I felt very comfortable while being at the house, despite being the sole foreigner. Bonnie Kratz was very helpful and in particular, she managed very well a key point: supply of critical materials – olive oil, pork meat, mozzarella cheese, tomatoes - for my cooking experiments, which went very well thanks to the quality of ingredients found in Wisconsin, as well as the patience of everyone. Oshkosh takes energy, and food supplies are essential to keep going for the whole show! In terms of aviation photography, I had a great week owing in large part to the gorgeous Wisconsin summer, and because each day was full: I had a real blast with many different activities. I tried to achieve many things and overall I could do almost all those I had planned: fly, attend airshows, meet people and friends, learn about aviation history, and always take pictures during such activities. I flew twice: once in a Cessna 172 with my friend Guillaume, which enabled us to see the Wittman airfield from above and to experience a unique way to land at the busiest airport in the world, and once in the CAF P-51 “Gunfighter”, which made me realize a kid’s dream: fly in a high performance fighter, especially the iconic Mustang. I attended all airshows, and my favorites were the warbirds and the military formations, especially the bombers. History was made when 2 B-29s flew together for the first time since the fifties on Tuesday, and when we saw them on Saturday together in the blue skies of Oshkosh with a B-52, a B-1, a B-2, a B-17 and B-25s. What a sight! Of course the Blue Angels were a highlight as well. I also enjoyed some unique formations, such as 3 Bell P-63 Kingcobra or 3 North American F-86 Sabre.

Regarding people I was very impressed by the last surviving Doolittle raider Dick Cole, who was warmly welcomed by all B-25 crews at the Warbirds area: one of those wonderful moments which have become institutional at Oshkosh. There was also the Bob Hoover tribute with Clay Lacy and Sean D. Tucker, the international parade with all nationalities represented and greetings by Erik Lindbergh, grandson of Charles Lindbergh. The gathering of Apollo Astronauts attracted a huge crowd on Friday night. On Saturday I was lucky to witness a unique moment: after his presentation at the Warbirds, colonel Frank Borman, mission commander of Apollo 8 in 1968, and now 89 years young, walks out of his chair 49 years after going to the moon, and after doing is preflight check, climbs in his Beech T-34 Mentor, then taxis to fly alone back home, in Montana, 5 hours away from Oshkosh! It appeared then that going to space and flying make men healthy for decades: it encouraged me. It was a brief but magical moment, typical of Oshkosh where we should always prepare for the unplanned touch. I also enjoyed listening to Colonel Clarence “Bud” Anderson, still going strong at 95 years young, when telling his WWII air combat stories. Another moment to remember was on Tuesday: I just happened to be there when the crew of a Mil Mi-2 Russian helicopter took off. They explained that they were going back to Iowa. It is quite unusual to see a Russian helicopter flying in a US Airshow, although this one was very discrete! I also learned new things about aviation history, for instance about the homebuilt Delta Dyke designed by John Dyke, which flew on Wednesday, and through the visit of the Poberezny residence on Sunday, now open to visitors. I admired the very expensive – $400,000 helmet of F-35 Lightning II pilots, through their canopy… Overall it was a very rich week, full of flying, watching, meeting, learning, enjoying, photographing… and FUN!


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Vincent Trelut


Rod Reilly


Rod Reilly


Rod Reilly


Rod Reilly


Rod Reilly


Rod Reilly


Gary Edwards


It had been 25 years since I’d come to AirVenture (was it even called that then?). So, this year was almost like a first time. This event is perhaps the most target-rich environment an aviation photographer will ever find. Staying the week takes lots of stamina and memory cards. Perhaps the best part of the Oshkosh experience for me was sharing it with old and new friends. Other ISAP members were generous with inside information, introductions to people who had aviation stories to tell, shared meals and drink, and even use of a washer and dryer! I’ve been contacted today by an ISAP friend for the scoop on camping on-airport for next year. He also will be returning to AirVenture after a lapse of years. I’m already looking forward to next year!

We don’t see many float planes in Texas. A visit to Seaplane Base during AirVenture is a must.


Gary Edwards

It’s a big show with lots of people but there is room for everybody if you shift your composition a bit.

The dusk skies changed rapidly before the night airshows giving us lots of variety in backgrounds. Ear plugs are strongly recommended for B-1B afterburner flyovers.


Get there early to stake out a spot for the fireworks. And bring rain gear - we got soaked during the first night show.

Night shows are challenging but great opportunities.


Gary Edwards

A Cub on floats and a grand Wisconsin barn; icons of Seaplane Base.

One young rider waved to us from the DHS Make-A-Wish ride-hopping Blackhawk.


AirVenture is unique in the number of opportunities to shoot rare aircraft at dusk. There were 15 B-25s at Oshkosh to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid and they flew a lot.

We were blessed with great skies for AirVenture 2017, especially at dusk before the night airshows.


Gary Edwards


The Canadian registration demonstrates the international flavor of AirVenture.


Gary Edwards


Thanks Commemorative Air Force Tora Pyro Team!


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Chuck Burin


B-2 pass


Chuck Burin

18 T-6’s – count ‘em

A different way to get a picture


A-10C Fort Wayne

A-20 Havoc


Chuck Burin

B-1B pass

B-25C take-off


Bomber line crew

ISAP member Scott Slingsby


Chuck Burin

F4U-4 Corsair

TBM the rear office


Howard DGA-15P

P-63F


DOC up close after touching down for first time at EAA AirVenture


Chuck Burin


Adam Pethel


Adam Pethel


Adam Pethel


Adam Pethel


Adam Pethel


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Peter Keller


Bombers creating a bit of excitement. Everybody’s a photographer!


Peter Keller

Something a little different from the “average� aircraft.

Maybe just one shot of the Blue Angles. Capturing the moon in shots during the show became an extra challenge.


Didn’t get the afterburners & vapor cloud but this silhouette against the sky lit by evening sun looked kind of cool.

Noooo… It’s not gonna rain for the night show. Look how nice the evening sky is!


Peter Keller

Personal hot air balloon takes flight

Doc is taking notice of his caretaker!


Commemorative photograph. “You are not forgotten.”

A friend of a friend works at RARE AIRCRAFT rebuilding vintage aircraft for sale as essentially “toys” for those with pockets deep enough. They build to order but this Waco UPF-7 was put back up for sale and sold at the show for over $300,000.


Denis Keller Peter Rouleau

My first night show ever. With a little help from fellow photographer, Vincent Trelut, I was able to capture a couple shots successfully!

Shooting the moon.


Just a biplane (Piedmont) highlighted a little differently.

Ok, there’s probably a bunch of these shots. But it’s unique for me mostly because of the, “In Memory of Vlado Lenoch” written on the bottom of this F-35. And I saw this even before it was noted in the fantastic blog posted by Steve Lewis!


Peter Keller


I have a friend that flies one of these. I took this for him as a “suggestion�.


Peter Keller


Making good use of bad weather. The front of this looks as threatening as the weather!


Greg Drawbaugh


Mig-17 with picture-perfect clouds during the Friday airshow


Greg Drawbaugh

Ever since I heard the B-1B would be at Oshkosh, this was the shot a had dreamed about, dusk fly past in full burner

B-17 “Aluminum Overcast� with an escort of CJ-6s fly past no less than 21 T-34s


“Fire in the Hole”

“Yankee Warrior” B-25D in the Wednesday evening airshow


Greg Drawbaugh

Right place at the right time, with a lot of luck, my very first full-vapor cloud shot


B-29A “Doc� was more than worth the wait to see in the air


Greg Drawbaugh


A quartet of WASP cadets from the Warbird Living History Group with BT-13 “Lucky 13”, L-R Andrea Toussaint, Jennifer Sustar, Jackie Dethloff and Angie Goessner.


Greg Drawbaugh


From the from the Warbird Living History Group , the flight instructor is having a hard time convincing these WASP cadets to see it his way, L-R Jennifer Sustar, Jackie Dethloff and Angie Goessner.


Greg Drawbaugh


At ease before the USO show at the Warbird Living History Group camp


HOW I G OT T H E SH O T Article and photos by Dennis Biela


How I started shooting remotes For me one aspect of my photography is how to be different, how to capture that unique view that has a person thinking WOW how did he do that. I love doing camera remotes but in the beginning I did not try it too often since you would be placing a large, heavy and expensive DSLR on the exterior of an aircraft. Then Sony came out with a mirrorless camera called the NEX. This was a game changer for me, an interchangeable lens camera in a small and relatively inexpensive package. I went out soon after they were available and bought both a NEX3 and NEX5 and since there were many camera adapters to use for the different brand of camera mounts I started using them for remote photography of the Space Shuttle launches with Minolta 50mm f2 lenses that even then you could buy for $20. Eventually I tried doing a camera remote on an airplane with Sean Tucker and his Challenger III aircraft during Fleet Week in San Francisco. The camera worked great and I was off on to the next level with my photography. At first people wonder how good the images would be using such a small camera but the early Sony cameras had very good image quality. Even today with the GoPro being mounted everywhere the current Sony Alpha cameras offer me way more control and much higher image quality that you don’t have with a POV camera. Now I use the Sony a6000 or a6300 for the remotes the image files size is larger and both cameras offer better performance and much higher image quality.


Dennis Biela


About “How It Was Done” 1. The camera is a Sony a6300 with fisheye lens. The lens is manually focused and the focus ring is taped so it will not move during flight. For this night time shoot the camera ISO is set to auto with Shutter priority and the lens F Stop set to f4. Camera is shooting in raw file mode to have additional control over exposure selection in post processing. 2. The clamp is modified with the jaws being able to attach to a wider object and a more secure padding replaced the original pad inside the jaw. 3. The jaws are tighten and I used 2 zip ties to criss cross the jaws around the aircrafts “N” strut. These are Industrial Zip Ties with a tensile strength of 300pounds and not easy to cut. 4. The extension arm has a small tripod head that uses 2 Allen screws to keep the camera pointed in the correct direction, Once the camera is attached and the head is tighten I wrap the head with gaffers tape. 5. Not seen here are 2 large zip ties that extend from the camera strap lug to the aircraft flying wires and keeps the camera from rotating off the ¼ 20 attachment screw on the tripod head. If the camera cannot rotate it will not be able to come off. Last step is to attach a small shorting pin that will make the camera fire continuously. Using a large capacity 128GB Sony SD card I will turn the camera on just as the pilot starts the aircraft engine. The camera will shoot at about 2 frames per second for the duration of the flight.


Dennis Biela


NO

S G N I W N R E RTH

AT S

Article and photos

N O I T A T S R I A OL A

by Mark Schultz

One of the most popular participants to the European Airshow Theater is this beautiful PBY Catalina G-PBYA, based at Duxford, UK.


It had been “Showtime” again on June 10 and 11, 2017 at the Sola Air Station near Stavanger in Norway. The station is operated by the Royal Norwegian Air Force. Air Wing 134 is based at Sola along with helicopter Squadron 330. Also located at Sola is Stavanger Airport, Sola and an interesting aviation museum. Near Sola, at Jåttå in Stavanger lies the homebase of NATOs Joint Warfare Center. The United States Air Force 426th Air Base Squadron provides support to 220 U.S. service members working in support of NATO’s Joint Warfare Center. The 2-day Norwegian Airshow combined a stunning static and a flying display with a huge variety of modern and historic aircraft such as the Bell UH-1E Huey (Aircraft is actually based at Sola), Sea King, Safir Formation from the Sola Flystasjon Flyklubb, Black-shape formation operated by Air Combat Europe, DH-82 Tiger Moth from Kjeller, Sola based aircraft like the Fieseler Storch, Boeing Stearman and YAK-52, a Harvard Formation from the Norwegian Flying Aces and Wings of Freedom Organization. Further participants included the PBY-Catalina and Spitfire formation, a Pitts Python from THOR Scandinavian

Airshows, the Norwegian Dakota display (Dakota Norway), a Mustang and a Spitfire from the Norwegian Spitfire Foundation and a T-28 Trojan from Norwegian Flying Aces. Also a wonderfully restored Noorduyn Norseman Mk VI R-AF and two DeHavilland Vampires took part in the event. The more modern “Heavy Metal” section was re-presented by types such as 2 RNoAF F-16 Vipers, the Italian Frecce Tricolori Display Team, the Breitling Jet Team and finally a Boeing 737-800 that is operated by “Norwegian” Airlines and that also took part in the flying display. All shots in this set were produced with Panasonic FZ2000 and FZ1000 bridge cameras. Text includes some information based on Wikipedia. All images in this article were taken between June 10 and 11, 2017. Camera: ISO Settings: Focal Length: Post production:

Panasonic LUMIX FZ2000 and FZ1000 200 - 800 24 - 480mm Adobe Lightroom 6


Denis Schultz Mark Rouleau

Powered by a 430 hp Vedeneyev M-14P fuel injected engine, the Scandinavian Airshow THOR belongs to the world’s most powerful air show aerobatic biplanes.

The Douglas C-53D Skytrooper, registered as LN-WND is operated by „Dakota Norway, a Norwegian foundation that owns this military variant of the Douglas DC-3 which was built in 1942 / 1943 . The aircraft has 19 passenger seats and is based at Torp Airport at Sandefjord.


The Royal Norwegian Air Force „Yellow Sparrows“ Display Team on the Saab MFI-15 Safari Trainer Aircraft.

The Norseman / Harvard Formation, operated by the Norwegian Spitfire Foundation.


Denis Schultz Mark Rouleau

The Norwegian Air Force Historical Squadron owns a number of classical first generation jet-fighter aircraft and presents these unique machines at airshows around Europe. The inventory covers this De DeHavilland Vampire T.55.

This Bell UH-1E Huey, registered as LN-OUS, is actually based at Sola. This aircraft served with the US Army in DaNang, Vietnam between 1967 and 1970.


Westland Sea King Mk. 43B „322“ is operated in SAR-mission role at Sola Air Station.

Supermarine Spitfire MK. XVI, SE-BIR, operated by the Norwegian Spitfire Foundation.


Mark Schultz


Close Formation of two Norwegian Air Force F-16 Vipers. Norway currently operates some 56 F-16 at various bases around the country.


From Wednesday 7th until Friday 16th of June 2017, 1st Squadron Stinger has organized the 2017 TWM (Tactical Weapons Meet) at Florennes AB in Belgium. Florennes is one of the airbase in Belgium which hold jet fighter (F-16MLU). It is situated in south part of the country. During many years Florennes was holding the TLP (Tactical Leadership Program) which has been transferred to Spain. Many Air Forces were represented for 2017 edition: 6 Eurofighters from Italy and Spain 3 Hawks from UK 2 F-4 Phantom from Greece 3 Mig-29 from Poland 2 Mirage 2000 from France. (only coming for Spotter’s day) And a lot of F-16MLU (A and B version) from Belgian Defense 1st Squadron celebrates his century this year and due to that occasion an F-16MLU has been painted with a special « deco » representing the Scottish Stinger…their official emblem. Squadron motto: Nemo me impune lacessit: No one causes me with impunity. TWF main goal was to share experience acquired during real ops abroad (Afghanistan, Iraq, Mali and many more) and international deployment.

First week concentrated on dog fights between all participants. Diversity in type of aircraft is an advantage and give more opportunity to acquire experience. Second week showed more complex missions including COMAO (Combined Air Operation). CAS (close Air Support), Interdiction and Electronic Warfare led to a very high level. Those exercises requested many hours of preparation and conducted to very realistic scenario. TFW2017 was a rare chance for Belgian pilot to practice at home. Usually they need to go abroad for such exercises. June 15th was the spotter’s day and not less than 1000 photographers, amateurs, journalists came to Florennes AB for this exercise. Many aircraft with special color scheme flew from different bases to Florennes. Mirage 2000 (Le Grand Charles), F-16MLU (Stinger Century), F-16MLU (30 years of OCU) with F-4 from Hellenic Air Force were specially appreciated. The twin engine from McDonnell Douglas becomes a rare occasion to see the fabulous Phantom.


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Denis Rouleau Nicolas Limbioul


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MEET OUR MEMBERS


MEET OUR MEMBER

Adam Pethel

My name is Adam Pethel and I live in Pendergrass, Georgia, a rural area of northeast Georgia, approximately an hour drive from Atlanta. I am a pilot for a major US airline. I shoot with Canon. I typically carry two bodies to air shows (5d4 and 5d2) and a number of lenses (24-70, 70-200, and 100-400). I shoot in RAW. I use the standalone version of Lightroom 6 on a Mac to process my RAW images. While the Canon 5d4 does an admirable job creating a JPEG file, it cannot compare to a processed file from Lightroom. I joined ISAP in June 2017 after learning about the society from a friend and aviation photographer who has been a member for years. I joined the society to learn more about the art of aviation photography and to have an opportunity to network with and learn from a very talented group of photographers. This has already proved true in the short time that I have been a member in making new friends at Oshkosh 2017. As a pilot, I love to teach and learn aviation; as a photographer, I love to teach and learn photography. Together, my love of aviation couples with my passion for photography in a way where I can have a lot of fun doing something I love. My best advice for any photographer is to practice as much as possible by taking every opportunity you have to shoot, no matter the subject.


Denis Rouleau Adam Pethel


Denis Rouleau Adam Pethel


Denis Rouleau Adam Pethel


Adam Pethel


MEET OUR MEMBER

Steve Bondhus

Steve lives in Arizona and is an advanced amateur and up to this time has specialized in landscapes and wildlife photography for several decades. His training has been mainly self training with going to seminars and reading various periodicals. He worked at Wings field witch is a small airport south of Chicago with his brother who was a flight instructor at the time and be came familiar with many types of small aircraft. His job included fueling aircraft. Pulling them in and out of hangars and taxing them around and anything else that was needed. Part of the job included flying in most or the aircraft on the field. This was the start of his love of aviation. After college and a career of 48 years in pharmacy he found aviation again when Larry Grace moved in up the street and that’s when he learned about ISAP. After shooting the Planes of Fame airshow in Chino this year he is hooked on aviation photography. He shoots with a Nikon D500 and D810. At the show the D500 was paired with the 80-400 for almost all of the air shots and the D810 with a 24-120 was used for shots on the ground. All shots were captured in RAW for more information and for the ability for flexibility in work flow. Lightroom is used as the starting point for work flow and ON1, Luminar, and Aurora HDR are also used depending on the shot and effects desired. Since aviation photography is new one must look at what others have done and listen to them and learn as much as possible to those who have experience. Above all get out and take more pictures whenever you can.


Denis Rouleau Steve Bondhus


Steve Bondhus


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ISAP XIV

SYMPOSIUM MARCH 15 - 17

2018

TUCSON, AZ

You can make your hotel reservations now at group.doubletree.com/isapsymposium to get the ISAP discount rate. Hotel: DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Hotel Tucson Airport Group Name: ISAP Symposium

For details visit aviationphoto.org or facebook.com/ISAPorg


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Jim Koepnick to speak at ISAP XIV Symposium The International Society for Aviation Photography is pleased to announce that Jim Koepnick has been confirmed as a speaker at the upcoming ISAP XIV Symposium. The event will be held March 15-17, 2018, in Tucson, Ariz. Koepnick is one of today’s leading aviation photographers, shooting for Cirrus Aircraft, Flying magazine, Plane and Pilot, Air & Space Smithsonian, AOPA, EAA, and Sigma. He also shoots for the USA Today Network-Wisconsin in the Oshkosh area, specializing in sports and action. His freelance clients include Ripon College and Our Wisconsin Magazine. He is a Sigma Pro photographer. Previously, Koepnick served as the Experimental Aviation Association’s chief photographer for 28 years. In that role, he photographed more than 1,000 aircraft during air-to-air missions, landing more than 500 covers on various EAA publications.

Koepnick’s photography has consistently won awards from Aviation Week and Space Technology, Wisconsin Imaging Photographers Association, American Advertising Federation, and Calendar Marketing Association. His photojournalism has been recognized by the Wisconsin Newspaper Association, Wisconsin Press Photographers Association, and Inland Press. He received ISAP’s prestigious George Hall Lifetime Achievement award in 2012. Koepnick’s presentation will emphasize his recent career transitions, shifting from a staff photographer position to freelancing, and evolving his aviation photography to emphasize people, lighting, and other elements instead of focusing primarily on air-to-air imagery.


George Hall Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

JAY MILLER

The International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) has announced that Jay Miller of Fort Worth, Tex., has been selected to receive the organization’s 15th George Hall Lifetime Achievement Award. The award, which will be presented at the ISAP XIV Symposium in Tucson, Ariz., March 15–17, 2018, recognizes outstanding individuals whose initiative and dedication to aviation photography throughout their careers have improved the profession and positively influenced others. Miller began photographing aviation subjects nearly 50 years ago and, in addition to countless shoots for a wide variety of editorial and commercial clients; he has authored or co-authored 36 books and more than a thousand magazine and newspaper articles; and has served several aviation museums in a variety of roles, including as the director of both the American Airlines C.R. Smith Museum and the Flying Heritage Collection, amassed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and today displayed at the Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum.

Denis Rouleau

Over the years Miller assembled one of the world’s most significant aviation and aerospace reference libraries, consisting of approximately 10,000 books dating to 1765, more than 100,000 periodicals, and some 1.2 million photographic images. His collection was acquired by the Aerospace Education Center in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1992, and was transferred to the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2015.

In addition, Miller co-founded ISAP in 2001 and led the organization until 2013. ISAP established the Lifetime Achievement Award to recognize outstanding individuals whose inventiveness and dedication to the field throughout their careers have improved the profession and positively influenced others. They are, quite simply, aviation photographers’ role models. The award is presented to professionals, living or deceased, in the fields of photography, publishing, aviation, or space technology who have had a significant impact on the photography of aviation or space subjects. In 2006, the ISAP board voted to name the award in honor of George Hall, a widely respected aviation photographer who had served on the ISAP board since its founding, but passed away in 2006 just two days before he was to receive this same recognition. In naming the award, the board said Hall “exemplified the very best our profession has to offer. He was talented, bighearted, and a mentor to all of us who aspired to be an aviation photographer.” Jay Miller built his own legacy of mentorship and dedication to the history of the aviation industry, and to the images that preserve that history. That legacy continues and the ISAP board, on behalf of the organization’s members, is proud and pleased to honor him for it.


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ISAP Member discount on Moose Peterson book Book publisher Peachpit Press is offering ISAP members a special 40 percent discount on Moose Peterson’s recently published aviation book, “Takeoff: The Alpha to Zulu of Aviation Photography.” In the book, Peterson takes readers from the basics of aviation photography and using light to creating the illusion of flight and speed. He talks about photographing air shows and shooting ground to air, working up to air-to-air photography. The book is available in print and digital versions. The discount code was emailed to all ISAP members and in the member’s section of the website. If you did not receive the discount code you can email us at info@aviationphoto.org Peachpit website http://www.peachpit.com/store/takeoff-the-alpha-to-zulu-of-aviation-photography-9780134609478 Members can view a video on Scott Kelby’s blog on this new book about aviation photography. https://scottkelby.com/announcing-takeoff-amazing-new-book-teaches-aviation-photography-moose-peterson/


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ISnAP Sept2017  

International Society for Aviation Photography September 2017 issue of ISnAP (Magazine by International Society for Aviation Photography-I...

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