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Larry Grace

WELCOME TO THE JUNE 2017 ISSUE OF ISNAP! 1929 Curtis Robin Scott Slingsby

FRONT COVER PHOTO: Anno Gravemaker Greek F-4 Retirement Colors

So The Show Can Go On! Steve Bigg

BACK COVER: Larry Grace USAF Heritage Flight F-35 and P-38 Lightning at the Planes of Fame Airshow 2017

Recce Phantom Pharewell Anno Gravemaker Phantom Pharewell Pilots Gary Edwards, Steve Zimmermann, Craig Swancy, Kevin Hong The End of The Philm Adrian Romang Patrouille de France magnifique à Maxwell Gary Daniels, Kevin Hong, Andy Smolenski, Pat Nugent Patrouille de France Comes Out West Hayman Tam 2017 LA County AIrshow Hayman Tam Melbourne Air & Space Airshow 2017 Luis Sales 14° Stormo Mike Green SARMEET 2017 Mark Schultz The Journey Back To Breckenridge Kevin Hong Planes of Fame Airshow 2017 Steven Lewis, Larry Grace Meet Our Members Brian Stockton. Rob Stapleton, Denis Rouleau, Matt McVicker, Lyle Devore, Patrick Nugent, Laura Falkner

ISAP’s goal is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. In this issue we are continuing to highlight ISAP members. I’m sure you will enjoy learning how your fellow ISAP members got started, as well as seeing some of their images and learning some tips. Remember that ISnAP is your publication to share your images, stories and tips with other members and the public. We look forward to each member sharing his or her stories with all of us. Enjoy this issue of ISnAP! Sincerely, Larry Grace, President Kevin Hong, ISnAP Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg isnap@aviationphoto.org


Larry Grace

w e l c o m e

n e w

a n d

r e t u r n i n g

i s a p

m e m b e r s

Jennifer Alderman

Laura Falkner

Charles Lai

Jason Skinner

Michael J Bellinger

John Ford

Steven Lewis

Steven Sumosky

Robin Blankenship

Douglas Glover

Mark Magin

Craig Swancy

Scott Bruce

Kenneth Hunt II

Gary Molenkamp

David Takahashi

Britton Brainard

Jeremy Humphreys

Van Han Nguyen

Jeff Welker

Sam Dammers

Scott Kelby

Patrick Nugent

Anna M Wood

Gary Daniels

Gary Kratz

David A Shirah

The ISnAP is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


Autumn in New England can be a magical time, the leaves start changing color, summer humidity abates and some of the best flying weather is upon us. This particular day was just one of those days and I was fortunate enough to get some time with a 1929 Curtiss Robin C-1 and its owner Chris Buerk.

170-185-hp Curtiss Challenger engine that has since been changed to the Wright J6-5 Whirlwind that produces 165-hp. According to Chris, the Wright burns about 13 gph at a comfortable cruise speed of about 80mph. It’s furnished with three original wicker seats, one up front and two in the back, that are surprisingly comfortable.

Chris has owned this classic from a bygone era for about three years. The airplane was built at the St. Louis plant of the Curtiss-Robertson Airplane Manufacturing Company, originally assembled with a

Based at the Windsock Village Airpark (NH69), nestled at the foot of the White Mountains in Ossipee, NH, Chris has the Robin tucked neatly in a period-looking hangar clad with corrugated steel walls, vintage lights


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N I B O R S I T CUR Article

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and an antique Curtiss sign over the hangar door. All this is next to a nicely manicured 4000ft grass strip that provided the perfect backdrop for a nice afternoon of flying and photography. One thing Chris said that struck me when we were making arrangements for the shoot, was that if the airplane comes out of the hangar it has to fly. I later found out Chris is a man of his word.

Scott Slingsby

When the day finally arrived, the winds were blowing at a brisk pace out of the northwest as a cold front had blown through the night before. Usually this means not a lot of flying is going on, especially at an airpark which is surrounded by tall trees and abeam the 2200ft Mt. Whittier. Landings can get pretty sporting under these conditions, I figured I’d get some ground shots and call it a day. Chris had other ideas. He said, “It’s just a big dumb airplane, the winds won’t bother it at all.” After all, the airplane was out of the hangar.

After a number of low passes up and down the runway Chris taxied back to the hangar, motioned me over and said, “hop in.” Who was I to say no? Acceleration was swift and we were in the air in no time. Sure enough, the big ole Curtiss handled the gusty wind with ease. While we were doing a couple of circuits around the patch, I noticed some oil smoke in the cockpit. At this time, I would normally be reaching for a checklist but, as Chris explained, It’s caused by the engine’s external rocker arms which is why he flies with the windows down all the time. Those rockers are also the reason for a complete wipe down of the fuselage and windshield after every flight. A small price to pay when flying a vintage airplane. We finished the day by pushing the Robin back into the barn and doing some hangar flying. All that was left to do was put his J-3 Cub back inside. I asked if he needed a hand and he “no, he was all set.” As we drove away we heard the Cub start up and taxi out for a sunset cruise. After all, it was out of the hangar.


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


SO THE SHOW

SPRING TRAINING WITH THE RCAF SNOWBIRDS AND CF-18 DEMONSTRATION TEAM Article and Photos by Steve Bigg


It’s a fairly strong understatement to say it takes practice to fly within a few feet of eight other jet aircraft in close formation during a giant barrel roll in the sky while executing multiple formation changes. Likewise, it’s obvious to pretty much anyone when they see a CF-18 Hornet crank into a 45 degree climb while still only several feet off the runway on takeoff and then immediately execute a 360-degree dirty roll, that it took practice to perfect the manoeuvres. But honing the flight skills of an air demonstration team’s pilots is just one aspect of the demanding training that teams undertake to prepare for an upcoming air show season. The two official air demonstration teams of the Royal Canadian Air Force are the CF-18 Demonstration Team and the 431 Aerial Demonstration Squadron-the Snowbirds. They head to Vancouver Island on Canada’s west coast in April each year for their final preparations before moving onto the air circuit for another season. 19 Wing Canadian Forces Base Comox is chosen to host the demo team’s final preparations for several reasons. Low airport traffic load, it’s shoreline location to allow for over-land and over-water practice for waterfront shows, and it’s typically good spring weather usually combine to make it an ideal location for the final two to three weeks of training. This year the weather during the first week and a half in Comox was uncharacteristically bad. Cold, wind and rain were frequent and some training days were a total scrub with no flying. With their first show coming up on April 30th, the weather certainly made it more difficult than usual for the teams to complete their training; but with extra effort once the weather improved, both teams were successful at completing their lengthy list of preparations. To be ready to hit the road for the season the teams have much more than their flying demonstration itself that needs to be practiced, checked and planned for. Spring training in Comox is the team’s first shot at tackling all the behind the scenes preparation, maintenance, organization and co-ordination that it takes to make their performances

look effortless away from the comfort and convenience of their home base. Skills for managing all aspects of their operations from ensuring the support trailers are completely equipped, to running through briefings and debriefings in unfamiliar spaces, maintaining the aircraft in harsh weather and getting familiar with life on the road are developed. Team support members have skills to develop as well. Public Affairs Officers for example receive coaching on narration of the air show routines from a veteran air show announcer to ensure their timing and delivery of the script is as smooth and polished as the flying demonstrations themselves. All in all, there’s a lot to accomplish in a short time and the team’s fans know that all this effort to prepare for the season creates a fantastic opportunity for them. For over 2 weeks with only a day or two off, both the CF-18 Demo Team and the Snowbirds fly twice a day working up to their full performances. The public are invited to access the base’s beach area directly next to the airfield fence line to watch them train. When the teams are doing over-land practice, the viewing area’s location offers up close perspectives of the shows that can only be viewed in Comox. And when the teams practice over-water and the weather co-operates, the British Columbia coastal mountains adds a spectacular backdrop to the performances. Sadly, during my visit to Comox this year to photograph the team work-ups, the mountains were obscured most of the time in cloud and haze due to the uncharacteristically poor weather. The Tuesday of my visit was an exception though and I managed to catch most what I was looking for in the performances on that day. The Snowbirds were in good form from all the training they had done prior to arriving in Comox. However, they only flew with a 6-plane formation on the Tuesday to complete formation checks. To do these checks experienced team members fly with, evaluate and mentor new team members.

CAN GO ON!


Steve Bigg


The day before on Monday, the CF-18 Demonstration Team demo pilot Captain Matthew “Glib” Kutryk, had flown his show routine in a combat grey, 2-seat Hornet bringing back bad memories of the previous year. In 2016, the yellow and black British Commonwealth Training Plan demo jet left Comox on the day I arrived for paint repairs and didn’t return until after I’d left. Seeing the grey jet in the sky on Monday this year left me with my fingers crossed that all was well with the 2017 demo jet. Turned out that they were using the 2-seat jet for Glib’s final altitude check with Captain Ryan “Roid” Kean, last year’s demo pilot, to clear him to run the routine at low level. The artwork for the team’s CANADA 150 jet created quite a buzz amongst air show fans when it was released at the International Council of Air Show convention in November of 2016. The red, white and grey paint scheme was designed to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday. I had covered the jets unveiling ceremony at 4 Wing Cold Lake earlier in April and after seeing the jet in person had been eagerly awaiting the day I’d see the jet in the sky. With clear blue skies over the field on Tuesday, Glib took to the skies in the 2017 CANADA 150 jet and I was far from disappointed. The topside maple leaf graphic on the red paint was simply striking against the sky and the red made for excellent contrast against the vapor squeezed out of the sky by the Hornet as Glib flew his show. Both the Snowbirds and the CF-18 Demo Team flew twice on the Tuesday but the weather on Tuesday was so poor, neither team could even fly a flat show so the Tutor jets were moved into the hangar and the teams got on with tasks to plan for the season other than flying. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday we’re flyable, but only just. With a full windsock most of the time and precipitation that varied unpredictably from drizzle to rain to boarder line ice pellets, flying and shooting was a challenge but both produced decent results as the teams moved slowly forward through their training plans and I managed to catch a few more keepers. With the show season now in full swing, the RCAF’s demo teams have moved on from Comox and hit the air show circuit. There’s no doubt that they’ll be running into maintenance, logistic and other issues as the season unfolds but the foundation of training and experience from their time in Comox sets them up to manage what comes their way; with the result being another successful season celebrating Canada’s 150th birthday and exemplifying the high level of skill, professionalism, teamwork, discipline and dedication inherent in the men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces. I’d like to thank the teams and especially Major Patrick “Paco” Gobeil-Snowbird 1, Captain Matthew “Glib” Kutryk-CF-18 Demo Pilot and the teams’ Public Affairs Officers and narrators, Lieutenant (Navy) Michelle Trembley, and Lieutenant Jennifer Halliwell, for their support and assistance in covering this year’s training in Comox.


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


Steve Bigg


RECCE PHANTOM

PHAREWELL Article and Photos by Anno Gravemaker


On May 5, 2017 the Greek air force officially disbanded 348 MTA (Mira Taktikis Anagnoriseos), the last tactical reconnaissance squadron flying the RF-4E Phantom II in Europe. After the official ceremony at Larissa airbase in the north of Greece, a formation of the last three remaining Phantoms, one Mirage 2000 and a F-16 Falcon made a break in front of the people that were invited to join the day. A day earlier, just over 500 aviation enthusiasts and photographers were invited by the squadron for a spotters day to make the final shots of these iconic recce fighters. All three Phantoms flew two missions, in the afternoon also rehearsing the break a couple of times with the other fighters. Also both demo teams of the Greek air force flew their rehearsals for the official event. Both “Zeus”, the Lockheed Martin F-16 demo and “Daedalus”, flying a Beechcraft T-6 Texan II showed us their moves. During the day, there was also regular flying activity by the locally based F-16’s from 337 Mira “Ghosts” that could be photographed as well. On the platform a small static display was presented including a immaculate looking RF-84F Thunderflash, the predecessor of the RF-4 that entered service in 1978. Initially the Greek air force received eight Phantoms straight from the USA in the traditional South East Asia color scheme that was maintained until the last day. In 1993 the unit was reinforced by the purchase of 27 ex-German RF-4E Phantoms in the typical darker greens colors that still is the basis for the last jet carrying a partial special color scheme. The last Phantom received a full special color based on a matte black basis. The tail showed all types the unit had flown (F-84, RT-33, RF-84 and RF-4) and the Greek flag combined with the squadron colors of green and yellow. The following photos give an impression of the day that I will remember for a long time. I would like to thank the organizers of this day for their hospitality.


Anno Gravemaker


Anno Gravemaker


M O T PHAN L L E W E R A PH

s t o l Pi in Hong wards ig Swancy, Kev Text by Gary Ed ra C n, an m er ve Zimm Photos by Ste


In the January 2017 ISnAP issue we shared the story of the final flights of US military F-4 Phantom II fighters. These are the last pilots who flew the Pharewell Phlight of the Phantoms.

Maj. Jim “Boomer” Schreiner (Retired)

Lt. Col. Jim “WAM” Harkins (Retired)

Lt. Col Ron “Elvis” King

Eric “Rock” Vold


THE END OF THE

PHILM LAST RF-4E RECONNAISSANCE PHANTOMS IN EUROPE RETIRED Article and Photos by Adrian Romang


The past few years have already seen three air forces fully or partially retiring their Phantoms. The Republic of Korea AF grounded their F-4D in June 2010, followed by Luftwaffe’s F-4F in June 2013, while the USAF retired the QF-4’s from service in December 2016. This time, it was the Greek’s RF-4E turn to shut down their engines forever. Therefore, an era lasting 64 years came to an official end on Friday, May 5, 2017, when the 348 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (Nickname Matia or Eyes), of the Hellenic Air Force was disbanded. On the same day, the last three flying RF-4E Recce Phantoms in Europe were retired as well, leaving only Japan and Iran operating that type in the reconnaissance role. To celebrate this long and glorious story and to pay tribute to the aircraft and men, the 348 TRS hosted a two-day ceremony at Larissa AB. On May 4, more than five hundred Phantom “phans” from 28 countries gathered along Larissa’s taxiway to shoot the last ever pictures of the three remaining RF-4E. From a photographic point of view, it was rather difficult to shot quality action images, as the photo point was quite aways from the active runway, and heat haze present made things worse. Even though the sun was in the back, it was still a challenge to get decent colored pictures. Nevertheless, it was quite an honor for all present to be part of this historic and emotional event. Of the three remaining RF-4E’s, two liveries were well known. Serial 71765 was the last one of an initial batch supplied from the US and still carried the three tone South East Asia camo schema, while serial 7450 wore the special livery it got for the Squadron’s 60th anniversary in 2013. The dark green two camo scheme that aircraft wore under the special livery identifies it as the ex German AF RF-4E serialled 35+03.


Adrian Romang Everybody present was eager to spot and see the 3rd Recce Phantom, s/n 7499, as a special livery was applied to this aircraft in honor of the farewell ceremony. The aircraft was only revealed on May 4 and it turns out that 7499 was actually the very same aircraft the German Air Force choose in 1994 for the Phlyout ceremony of Aufklärungsgeschwader 52 at Leck AB. Back then, the aircraft already had a complete black livery and was christianed “Schwarzer Panther” (Black Panther). Its serial in German AF service was 35+52 (ex USAF 69-7499) but this time, the aircraft was a lot more colorful, with the blue-white Greek flag and orange text applied giving the aircraft a respectful appearance. Actually, the 348’s complete history has been summed up on the plane’s airframe, with all four aircraft types including hours flown per type and in total between 1953 and 2017 painted on the aircraft. The theme of the event, “The end of the film’, has been applied in English on the right hand side, while the same text was mirrored in the Greek language on the left hand side of the fuselage. In the morning of May 4, the three mentioned RF-4E took off together for their very last recce mission, returning after one flight hour to then taxi past the excited photographers. The Phantom pilots were quite happy to stop every few meters while taxing past us, letting us “phans” unleash our shutters one more time to record the last close-up images of those unforgettable machines. The afternoon treated us with another Phantom wave, with the same three aircraft rehearsing the flight passes for the official ceremony to take place the following day, together with a Mirage 2000EG and an F-16D. The Zeus and Daedalus demonstration teams (with one F-16C Block 52+ and one T-6A Texan II respectively) did also run through their aerobatic program. Photo opportunities during the flight display were almost NIL, unfortunately.

The following day, Friday May 5, exactly 62 years after the 348’s upgrade to Squadron status, the public had the chance to attend the official closing ceremony. It was luckily held under a glorious sun, while snow covered Mount Olympus provided a scenic background. After the speeches of the Chief of the Hellenic Armed Forces, Admiral Evangelos Apostolakis, and the Chief of the Hellenic Air Force General Staff, Lt. General Christos Christodoulou and in the presence of a number of high ranking officials, representatives of the local political, religious communities and public guests, the three Phantoms took off for the official last time to perform some passes escorted by the already mentioned F-16D and Mirage 2000EG. After landing, only the specially painted 7499 taxied back to the apron, to be exhibited together with a well-preserved RF-84G Thunderflash and an F-16C Block 52, a visual representation of the history and the future of the HAF recce capability. The ceremony ended after the well appreciated exhibitions of the Zeus and Daedalus demo teams. It was then possible to visit in a nearby hangar a small but interesting exhibition of the hardware used in reconnaissance missions and the result of those flights. Several panels displaying hundreds of pictures related to the activities and the results achieved from 348 MTA during its 64 years of service. History of 348 TRS The 348 MTA (Mira Taktikis Anagnoriseos or Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron) was established on November 26th 1953 at Eleusis as a Flight, operating as part of 112 PM (Pteriga Machis or Combat Wing), equipped with nine F-84G Thunderjets whose downward looking cameras were installed in the front section of the left wingtip tanks. In the summer of 1954 the Flight redeployed to Larissa, transitioning from 112 PM to 110 PM, and the following year, on May 5th 1955, it was upgraded to Squadron status. By then, the first Thunderjets started to be retired and where replaced by twenty-one RT33-A, a clear improvement of


the recce capabilities for the HAF. The RT-33A fleet was, like the F-84G Thunderjets, only in service for some two years and was already withdrawn from use in 1957, after having flown some 1600 hrs by then. In August 1956 the first RF-84F Thunderflash was delivered to the Squadron, and it took one year to replace all Lockheed RT-33 planes with the new model. The new aircraft played a significant role in the recce missions, totaling over 80,000 flight hours over its 35 years of service - a real workhorse! Besides flying over hostile countries like Albania, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia, the RF-84F had been intensively used to map the entire national territory, helping to complete and improve the overall mapping of Greece and to thwart illegal building. RF-4E Phantom in Hellenic AF service After the entry into service of the McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom II in 1974, the need to replace the aging Thunderflash was obvious, so a batch of six new built RF-4E was included in the Peace Icarus II program, with the first being delivered on November 3rd, 1978. Besides those initial six aircraft, another two planes were soon after delivered under the Military Assistance Program. Of those eight originally delivered, only one “made it” all the way to May 5, 2017, serial 71765 already mentioned above. The introduction of the new airplane brought consistent advantages; bi-sonic flight, adoption of the LOROP technique (Long Range Oblique Photography), which allowed taking hi-res pictures using the KS-127A camera with a focal length of 66 inches, while flying some 30 miles from the target. The AN/AAD-5 system was used to obtain infra-red images. The eight Phantoms formed a new independent Squadron under the direct command of 110 PM (Combat Wing). The first task was to train

and convert pilots with considerable experience on the Thunderflash or other legacy aircraft to the RF-4E, and then to develop new tactics in order to exploit the potential of those new powerful machines to their fullest extent. During these years, the squadron regulary hosted American instructors, whose task was to share with their Greek colleagues the “lesson learned” during the operations in the Far East. In July of 1987, almost nine years after the first Phantom landed in Larissa, the two Recce Squadrons (348 MTA with RF-84F and the independent sibling with RF-4E) were merged into just one unit, flying both Recce models over the next four years. In March 1991 the venerable RF-84F was finally retired from active duty, having gloriously served for 35 years. Meanwhile the initial eight Recce Phantoms were reduced to five; three planes had been written off in accidents in 1979, 1985 and 1987. So, in May 1993, the chance to receive 27 ex Luftwaffe RF-4E was a welcomed boost. After being thoroughly inspected by HAF technicians, twenty of them joined the flightline of 348 MTA, while the remaining seven became the source of spare parts. The German Phantoms were of previous production blocks (43 up to 47), while the initial American batch were of Block 66; they had no RWR (radar warning receivers) and couldn’t be equipped with Sidewinder missiles. Their older wings allowed Angle of Attack (AoA) maneuvers of just 19.2° versus 25° for the newer design, but were more stable in low level flight, obviously an advantage for recce missions. In 2003, a new mission was assigned to 348 MTA: SIGINT (SIGnal INTelligence). The Thomson CSF ASTAC (Analyseur de Signaux TACtiques, Tactical Radar Signal Interceptor and Analyzer) pod was


added to the panoply of recce tools for the Phantoms, allowing to obtain an enemy’s Electronic Order of Battle scanning and locating the position of emitters in ranges up to 500 miles. Recce missions are among the most demanding, dangerous and risky missions flown. Unfortunately, over the course of 348 TRS 64 years of active duty, twelve HAF airmen lost their lives. One pilot perished while flying a RT-33A, seven men died in RF-84F Thunderflash accidents and four when two RF-4E crashed in 1985 and 1987. Those 12 men were remembered and honored in a silent moment during the ceremony on May 5, 2017. 348 MTA / TRS aircraft spent a total of 181’000 hours in the air, of which more than half, some 98’000 flight hours, were carried out by the RF-4E Phantom fleet alone. It should not be forgotten that this would not have been possible without many more working hours maintainers and technicians spent on the airframes, engines and equipment. “The RF-4E was a complex jet and access to it’s systems quite demanding. The two basic qualities ground crews should have (had) was will and patience”, explains Major Georgios Katsaros, the last Chief Maintenance Officer of 348 TRS. “The relationship with the Phantom was one of love and respect. If you looked after the Phantom, it did never let you down”. Therefore, a big tribute does not only go to the air crews and those giving their lives, but also to the many ground crews working countless hours on the different reece aircraft types.

The future It has been reported that two of the three remaining RF-4E’s took off again for the very final flight on May 10, 2017: serial 7450 did head to Tanagra AB while serial 71765 flew to Andravida AB, leaving serial 7499 at it’s home base in Larissa, to be remembered “phorever”. The end of a chapter…and yet, recce missions continue. Indeed, Recce Phantom “phlyouts” mark the end of wet-film recce technology, whose pictures can only be developed after landing, but they also mark the beginning of the latest state-of-the-art hardware. Having said this, HAF recce operations will from now on be performed by Lockheed Martin F-16Cs assigned to 335 Mira based at Araxos, carrying the UTC Aerospace Systems DB-110 day/night reconnaissance pod. The author thanks Lt Col Ioannis Tsitoumis (HAF Spokesperson), Major Lambros Tolias, Mr Ioannis Lekkas and Mr Sotos Kakaletris and their team to make the visit to Larissa and this report possible.


Adrian Romang


Patrouille de France magnifique à Maxwell

Article by Gary Daniels Photography by Gary Daniels, Kevin Hong, Andy Smolenski, Pat Nugent

When Andy Smolenski proposed going to Maxwell Air Force Base for an airshow, I have to admit, the thought of a 20-hour round trip drive from Dallas, Texas to Montgomery, Alabama had the same effect on me as drinking a glass of sour milk. But, Andy sold the trip when he told me that Maxwell was one of the few airshow venues for the visiting French aerobatic team, Patrouille de France. I said, “I’m in!” And, am I glad I did! The Maxwell Open House and Air Show, April 8-9, had a fantastic line up of performers including the USAF Thunderbirds. But, the French Air Force’s Patrouille de France precision aerobatic demonstration team clearly took top billing. April 2017 marked 100 years since the United States entry into World War I. To honor this occasion, Patrouille de France arrived in Canada on March 19 for its 2017 North American Tour and performed at airshows and fly-overs across the United States and Canada through early May. It had been 31 years since the team last visited the United States. Maxwell Air Force Base was their third airshow performance in the states.

Kevin Hong

First, a few words about Maxwell Air Force Base. This base got its start when the Wright Brothers created the Wright Flying School on the site in 1910. The school operated until 1916, training some of the world’s very first aviators. The base served as an aircraft repair depot during World War I. Between the wars, Maxwell went through many changes as the Army Air Corps tried to find a useful purpose for the base. During World War II, the base served as a pilot training center. Maxwell became home to six different training schools including bomber training with the B-29 Super Fortress.

In 1946, the Air University was created, and that set the course for Maxwell AFB for the next seven decades. (Find out more about the Air University at the link provided at the end of this article.) Air University is what makes Maxwell AFB a truly unique base. The base feels more like a college campus than a military base. And, the base has maintained much of its early 20th century architecture, as well as the beautiful 1920-30’s homes for the base commanding officers and families. That, coupled with large old growth trees, makes for a very attractive base. We arrived Friday evening so that we could attend both days of the airshow. And, Kevin Hong arrived in style in the CAF A-26 Invader “Night Mission.” The weather could not have been better, and very rare for Alabama. Earlier in the week, a cold front had blown out the heat and humidity and left behind a light north breeze, temps around 80 degrees, and ‘severe clear’ blue skies. Perfect airshow weather! Andy and I met Pat Nugent on Saturday morning. He had already had an eventful two days at Maxwell covering press events. Pat is a USAF veteran of 23 years, retiring as a Senior Master Sergeant (E-8). He served as a photojournalist and photographer covering operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Provide Hope, and Operation Just Cause…the Panama invasion. He even had a two-year stint as the USAF Thunderbirds photographer from 1982 to 1984. His last air show deployment with the Thunderbirds was the 1984 European tour with the British Red Arrows, the French Patrouille de France, and the Italian Frecce Tricolori.


Pat Nugent


accent, “This is my first time ever in the United States. What a magnificent way to visit your country!” Our time up close with the Patrouille de France aircraft and crew was much too short. With a handshake, we said goodbye to Capitaine Tardif and Aspirant Jourdan. I have to admit I was envious, but very happy for them. What an extraordinary way to see America. A trip they’ll never forget! About the aircraft of the Patrouille de France: The team flies the Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet, a light attack jet and advanced trainer co-manufactured by Dassault Aviation of France and Dornier Flugzeugwerke of Germany. The aircraft have a specially designed smoke generator attached to the bottom fuselage centerline to create their signature blue, white and red smoke. They brought 10 aircraft on the tour, eight for performances, and two spares supported by a ground crew of 30. During the performance they fly at 185 to 500 mph, g-range from -3 to +7, with six to nine feet of separation between aircraft. How impressive it was to see eight Alpha Jets flying with blue, white, and red smoke tracing the path of their elegant formation.

The Patrouille de France team arrived earlier in the week for various press activities. But, the most important pre-airshow event was to honor the twenty French aviators that died during World War II in flight training accidents at Maxwell (then named Gunter Field). 4,110 French airmen earned their wings in the United States during WWII, most at Gunter Field. But, 20 were lost and are interred in the French Army Pilot Cemetery in the Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery. On April 6, Patrouille de France attended a memorial service at Oakwood to lay a wreath in honor of their fallen French brothers. Fortunately, Pat was present to document the touching ceremony.

Due to Pat’s PR contacts on base, he was able to secure press credentials for Andy and me. This allowed all of us on the hot ramp to meet the Patrouille de France team at their aircraft. Our contact was Aspirant Emmanuelle Jourdan, public affairs officer for Patrouille de France. She escorted us to the aircraft and arranged an interview with the pilot of #6 aircraft, Capitaine Bertrand Tardif. Tardif has more that 3200 hours flying various aircraft and one deployment to Afghanistan. He told us that to be considered for the Patrouille de France team you must have at least 1500 hours of fighter time; in his case, he qualified in the Mirage. Tardif is now in his third year on the team. A typical team stint is two to four years. When asked if he is enjoying the tour, he said in his heavy French

For the 2017 North America Tour, their support aircraft was an Airbus A400M Atlas from the Escadron de Transport 1/61 Touraine based at Orléans-Bricy Air Base. This aircraft transported 25 tons of equipment and 60 personnel to each tour location. With four massive 11,000hp engines spinning eight-bladed props, the A400M was phenomenal during its flight demonstration. As the Thunderbirds were spooling down from their last performance, and tens of thousands were beginning the long walk back to their cars, Andy and I were facing a 10-hour return drive back to Dallas. But, now it all seemed worth the effort. We had witness something special. Although this article focused on Patrouille de France, the impressive airshow lineup made for one of the best airshows of the season. Enjoy the images. Airshow attendance estimated at 130,000 Airbus A400M Atlas Demonstration Bill Stein Airshows Cavanaugh Flight Museum WWI Aircraft Display Eglin AFB F-35 Fly-By Greg Colyer Ace Maker Airshows T-33 Greg Shelton Airshows 450hp Super Stearman Heritage Flight: P-51C Tuskegee and Alabama Air National Guard 187th Fighter Wing F-16 Jeremy Holt Airshows Jerry Conley DeHavilland Vampire Maxwell AFB 908th Airlift Wing C-130 Cargo Drop Demonstration New York Air National Guard C-17 Fly-By Patrouille de France Rob Holland Ultimate Airshows Tora Tora Tora Airshows Wings of Blue Parachute Team USAF Thunderbirds Various Static Aircraft Displays Whiteman AFB B-2 Fly-By Resources: 1. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_University_(United_States_Air_Force) 2. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrouille_de_France 3. www.patrouilledefrance.fr 4. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dassault/Dornier_Alpha_Jet


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels

Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Pat Nugent


Pat Nugent


Andy Smolenski


Andy Smolenski


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong


On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany, marking America’s entry into the three year old conflict. Shortly thereafter, the first U.S. troops landed in France to fight alongside our Allies.

It was extremely fortunate for me that one of the nine airshow stops on the tour (and the only West Coast performance) took place in Sacramento, CA. This was a mini-airshow built up around the star attraction, the Patrouille de France (French Acrobatic Patrol) and limited to 7,000 airshow fans.

The French have never forgotten the help we provided. To mark the 100th anniversary of that act, the French aerobatic jet team, Patrouille de France, embarked on a tour of the U.S. (March 19 - May 4). It has been 31 years since the team last appeared here in North America and this was one way to reaffirm the historic ties between France and the United States.

While the show was almost all about Patrouille de France, the French consulate took time to honor Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos and Spencer Stone – the local Sacramento heroes that thwarted a 2015 terrorist act aboard a French train. After playing of both national anthems, in which the French Consul sang the French one, the show commenced with a flyover of two black T-38 Talons from nearby Beale AFB.

Patrouille de France COMES OUT WEST!

Article and photos by Hayman Tam


As an opening act, the team’s Airbus A400M Atlas support aircraft performed a flight demonstration routine. Similar to a C-17 demo, this was the first ever performance by an A400M in the US and was an exciting addition to the airshow. The Atlas is accompanying the team during their tour to transport their crew and equipment, and also serve as a photo platform during their planned flyovers of various US landmarks, such as the Statue of Liberty, Grand Canyon and Golden Gate Bridge. Dating back to 1931, the Patrouille is the world’s oldest aerobatic demonstration team. Pilots currently fly the Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet, a forty-year-old light attack/training aircraft that the team has been using since 1981. With eight aircraft, the team’s show routine is markedly different than those of the US Navy Blue Angels or US Air Force Thunderbirds. While there are many similar elements such as formation aerobatics and opposing flybys, the tempo and execution are noticeably different. Because the Patrouille performs with eight jets instead of six, they have larger formations and utilize multiple groups of aircraft in a similar fashion to the Canadian Forces Snowbirds, who perform with nine jets. There was an unmistakable sense of grace with this performance, maybe it’s the additional aircraft, or the slower speeds, or the distinctive French soundtrack (accordion music at an airshow?) For those used to the heart-thumping, high-energy show of the U.S. teams, the Patrouille is balletic in comparison. Several times the eight-ship formations would split in two, drawing attention to one group while the other one would split further into two-ship pairs that would perform opposing passes. The French team makes excellent use of colored smoke, which really adds to the performance and not used as much in American airshows.


Hayman Tam


Hayman Tam


2 017 L A C O U N T Y

A I R S H O W

HIGH FLYING OVER THE HIGH DESERT

Denis Rouleau

Article and photos by Hayman Tam


The sounds of high performance jet aircraft are commonplace in the high desert of California, home of Edwards Air Force Base and the civilian activities at nearby Mojave. With the cancellation of the popular Edwards AFB Open House events however, local airshow fans were left wanting. After several years of concerted effort, and the lead sponsorship of Lockheed Martin, the Los Angeles County Airshow was born. Now in its fourth year, tens of thousands of folks flocked to the city of Lancaster to attend the event held at General William J. Fox Airfield (Fox Field). To set the right tone, this airshow started off with a sonic boom high over the growing spectator ranks, one of the perks of an airshow over sparsely populated desert. While the US Air Force Thunderbirds received top billing, there was a fair selection of aerobatic, military and warbird performances on the daily schedule.

The civilian acts started off with Rob Holland, Bill Stein, and Matt Chapman performing together as “The 4CE” (actually ¾ of The 4CE for this show), with their individual performances later in the schedule. Airshow veteran Rob Harrison “The Tumbling Bear” performed in his Zlin 142C followed by Vicky Benzing putting her immaculate red Stearman thru its paces. Jet fans were not forgotten as Paul “Sticky” Strickland demonstrated his Czech L-39 Albatros jet trainer and Greg “Wired” Colyer put on a great performance with his Lockheed T-33 “Ace Maker”. One unique item on the show schedule were a series of flybys from a NASA Lockheed ER-2, a derivative of the classic U-2, based at nearby Armstrong Flight Research Center (formerly known as Dryden) and used for high-altitude civilian research. Besides the Thunderbirds, the only other military performer was a powerful Super Hornet demonstration by the US Navy West Coast Super Hornet Tac Demo Team (VFA-122 Flying Eagles, NAS Lemoore).


Warbird lovers were rewarded with a selection of aircraft provided by Planes of Fame and the Commemorative Air Force. We were treated to performances by the CAF’s Spitfire Mk-XIV and Yak3, along with a F4U Corsair, P-51 Mustang, P-38 Lightning, B-25 Mitchell and F-86 Sabre from the PoF collection in Chino. The P-38 got a little more airtime as it, flanked by two A-10 Thunderbolt II’s, performed in the Heritage Flight salute to Air Force veterans and service members. The B-25 Mitchell performed some bombing runs synchronized with pyrotechnics to create crowd pleasing explosions. Planes of Fames own Steve Hinton traded the P-38 for a gleaming F-86 to put on a graceful demonstration of what the 50’s-era Sabre was capable of. One non-flying performer this year was Bill Braack with “Smoken-Thunder”, a highly modified 1957 Chevy pickup powered by two jet engines salvaged from a US Navy T-2A Buckeye jet trainer. With 25,000 HP on hand, plus afterburners, this custom truck reaches speeds over 350 MPH and put on quite a show for the fans.

Hayman Tam

The theme of the show, evident in the ground displays and airshow performance narrative, was STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math). Northrop Grumman had a large tent filled with STEM activities for the young and young-at-heart. Other tents contained very interesting panel discussions on the F-117 Stealth Fighter, Women in Aviation, Virgin Galactic Space Travel, the Vietnam Air

War, and Free Falling from Space. To go along with the ultra high-altitude skydiving panel, the Red Bull Stratos capsule was on display. This was the pressurized capsule that took Felix Baumgartner to an altitude of 127,852 feet before he stepped off into the history books. As for the static displays, the number of aircraft was less than expected for a show of this size, but the variety was good. California Aeronautical University brought one of their Cessna 172s. There was a NASA King Air, Globe Swift, Piper Apache, Diamond TwinStar, Civil Air Patrol Skylane and a showroom condition Howard DGA (“Damned Good Airplane”). Scaled Composites displayed their ARES, a prototype for a low cost close air support aircraft displaying Rutan design philosophy. The LA County Firehawk, USCG Dolphin and LA Sheriff Eurocopter balanced out the fixed wing displays. The most popular static display was the Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II, a flight test aircraft (“AF-01”) performing missions at nearby Edwards AFB. The largest aircraft there was a Boeing C-17 Globemaster III, but the strangest one had to be the kite-winged Northrop Grumman X-47A Pegasus Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle. Opened in 1959, General William J. Fox Airfield (WJF) was constructed by the County of Los Angeles who still operates the facility. Located in Lancaster, this is the only general aviation airport in the Antelope Valley.


Hayman Tam


Hayman Tam


Hayman Tam


MELBOURNE AI R & S PA C E

S HOW

2017 Article and photos by Luis Sales

Here, in Florida, we’re lucky enough to have several Airshows every year. I usually start planning every season the year before, as soon as the dates get published. Some shows happen every other year but most of them are on a yearly basis. Such is the case of Melbourne. Although I’m not a professional photographer, I like to tell people that “I spend the year driving all over Florida, chasing Airshows.” The 2017 Melbourne Air & Space Show took place on April 1st and 2nd at the Orlando Melbourne International Airport (MLB) in Melbourne, Florida. This show is very popular because of its performers variety and the fact that it happens during the spring season guarantees blue skies and lots of sun. I always bring my two Canon 7D Mark II, one with the Canon 24-105 mm and, my absolute favorite, the Canon 100-400 mm Mk II. That way I can switch from wide to zoom and vice versa at any time without changing lenses in the middle of the action, avoiding not only getting dust on my sensors but, more important, missing shots. Melbourne is one of those “backlit” shows where the Sun is always behind the performers, which makes it easy to “silhouette” the planes. I’ve found that what works better for me in many cases is to dial +1 Exposure Compensation and go Evaluative Mode, rather than Partial or Center-Weighted, as I’ve read on some articles. I’m also shooting RAW all the time, on Auto Servo and I always favor the 9 points AF Expansion mode. After many Airshows, this combination has proven a winner for me. Denis Rouleau

The morning started with the crew of the B-25 “Panchito” offering rides to the public, which proved to be a popular option and gave photographers several opportunities of shooting this beautiful bird, taking off and landing every 20-30 minutes for almost two hours before the Show officially started.

As in previous years, there was a good variety of performers. The SOCOM Para-Commandos, Kent Pietsch on his picturesque Interstate Cadet, the Geico Skytypers, Gregory Colyer on his T-33 “Ace Maker II” and the F-18F Super Hornet Demo Team were part of the program. A special moment was the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Heritage Flight with the P-51 Mustang “Bum Steer”. A solemn moment to remember and salute all our men and women who have served and still serve on our armed forces. This year the main reason for many to make it to the Show was the presentation of the Patrouille de France (French Acrobatic Patrol), back in the United States after almost 30 years of their last appearance. Celebrating the partnership between the French and American Air Forces, their performance was impeccable. They use red, white and blue colors on their smoke which make their different formations and maneuvers very colorful and exciting to watch and, of course, shoot. Just minutes before they started their presentation, it was announced, as a “special bonus”, that the Airbus A400m, part of their Support Team, would fly as well. That made this the first performance ever of this new Airbus Airplane on an Airshow in America. Closing the Show, and its “main attraction”, were the USAF Thunderbirds. Always a crowd pleaser, the Team’s performance was the perfect finale to a great Airshow. The 2018 dates were already announced for March 17 and 18 and I’ll be back, for sure, taking advantage of their “Photo Pit” ticket which makes it easier to shoot these beautiful machines and, at the same time, meet and share tips and experiences with other fellow Aviation Shooters.


Luis Sales


DenisSales Luis Rouleau


14°


Most of you who have either looked at my website or read some of my previous reports in ISnAP, will know I have a passion for modern military aircraft. Moreover, I love to fly and get the opportunity to shoot air-to-air images with the military air arms I report on. One of the countries I have worked with on a fairly regular basis is Italy. Back in early 2016 I made a request via the British and Italian Embassies to fly with the Italian Air Force’s Boeing KC-767 tankers. My request was authorized fairly quickly, as they know me quite well, but due to 14° Stormo’s current commitments, they couldn’t accommodate me for some months; they were just too busy! Eventually I got an email from them informing me that they could get me on a mission, but with only about two weeks’ notice. So, get some flights, hotel and rental car booked ASAP and off to Rome. After arriving at my hotel just outside Rome-Ciampino airport just after midnight, it was straight to bed for an early morning start; I had to be at Pratica di Mare Air Base by 8am the following morning. Pratica is located some 15 miles south of the Italian capital, and as the largest air base in the Aeronautica Militare Italiana (AMI-Italian Air Force), it house’s a number of different air force units, together with some from the Guardia di Finanza, Carabinieri and Polizia di Stato.

14° Stormo took on its air-to-air refueling role in 1992, when the unit received four second-hand Boeing 707T/T (Tanker/Transport) aircraft, profoundly changing the projection capability of the Italian Air Force. 8° Gruppo Volo ‘Cavalieri’ (Knights) is the subordinate unit that provides the aerial refueling, and also an additional transportation capability to the AMI. The first of the Boeing KC-767s, which are based on the civilian Boeing 767-200ER (Extended Range), was delivered on 29th December 2010, with the second aircraft being delivered on 10th March 2011. The AMI wasted little time in getting the 767s operational, with their involvement in ‘Operation Unified Protector’ over Libya as early as June 2011, just one month after their official acceptance into the fleet on 17th May. Having flown on many KC-135 Stratotankers, I would now have the opportunity to participate in an air-to-air refueling mission on board a KC-767, a far more modern aircraft with. Witnessing first-hand the air-to-air refueling procedure when supplying much needed ‘gas’ to Italian fighter aircraft, I wasn’t o be disappointed. The AMI’s KC-767As are known as ‘convertible-combis’, meaning they can carry either a full passenger load, convert to a full cargo configuration, or carry a combination of passengers and cargo. In any configuration, the aircraft retains its aerial refueling capability using either the high-speed boom, which has a remote aerial refueling operator station;

STORMO Article and photos by Mike Green, ISnAP International Editor


or using the two wing-mounted refueling pods; or the single centreline hose and drogue system. This mixed configuration allows for the refueling of all types of aircraft, both fighters and transports. The Italian Air Force KC-767A can also be refueled by another tanker thanks to its refueling receptacle located on top of the aircraft near the cockpit. The hose and boom operations, together with the refueling process, are controlled from two rearward facing consoles mounted aft of the flight deck. The operators can observe, control and monitor approaching receiver aircraft, and complete the refueling from the consoles.

DenisGreen Mike Rouleau

There are six Air-to-Air Refueling Areas (AARA) located around the Italian mainland that are used on a regular basis by the AMI. On 27th February, myself and the crew of ‘Alpha 600’ departed Pratica di Mare at 10.37 local time on board #MM62228/14-03. Our five- hour mission saw us depart to the southwest of Rome, to an Air-to-Air Refueling Area known as LID84C, located roughly midway between Pratica and the island of Sicily. Here we refuelled Eurofighter Typhoons from 37° Stormo, based at Trapani; and 36° Stormo Typhoons based at Gioia del Colle. Operating at a steady 18,000 feet throughout the mission, we later

moved position to ‘Romeo 21A’ (R21A), another AARA located off the northeast coast of Italy, close to the city of Rimini. Our ‘traffic’ here consisted of 4° Stormo Typhoons based at Grosseto and Panavia Tornados from 6° Stormo at Ghedi. We had initially planned to also complete a ‘buddy-buddy’ refueling with another KC-767, demonstrating the aircraft’s ability to extend its already impressive range and capabilities, and something I was looking forward to shooting. Sadly however, this was canceled due to other operational commitments of the 767 fleet and we had to return to base without that opportunity; maybe something for another time? Once again I’d like to thank the AMI for their hospitality and assistance in letting me experience another mission with them and add another aircraft type to my military flying log. If you would like to see more images of 14 Stormo, including the Piaggio P.180 Avantis that they operate, they can be found on my website at www.jetwashaviationphotos.com


Mike Green


DenisGreen Mike Rouleau


Mike Green


SARMEET 2017 JOIN THE FAMILY OF RESCUERS

Article and photos by Mark Schultz


The following aircraft were presented on static display: Country Unit / Service Type AUSTRIA Österreichisches Bundesheer Alouette III BELGIUM 40 SQN NH-90 Caiman LITHUANIA Lithuanian Air Force Eurocopter AS365 - Dauphin POLAND 43rd Naval Air Base W-3RM USA 3-10 GSAB US Army HH-60M Blackhawk GERMANY TrspHubschrRgt 30 Bell UH1D GERMANY IntHubschrAusbZ Bückeburg EC135 GERMANY IntHubschrAusbZ Bückeburg NH-90 TTH GERMANY RK Flugdienst / Appen DO-28 GERMANY Marinefliegergeschwader 5 Sea Lynx Mk88A GERMANY Marinefliegergeschwader 5 Sea King Mk41 GERMANY Marinefliegergeschwader 5 EC135 GERMANY HeliService International GmbH AW139

Nordholz Naval Air Station near Cuxhaven in Northern Germany was the place to be at the end of May 2017. For the second time at Nordholz, national and international SAR Helicopter Crews came together to exchange experiences and skills in the 9. SAR-Meet. The event was hosted by German Navy Marinefliegergeschwader 5 (MFG5) which is based on the station. The meeting of the “Family of Rescuers” usually takes place every second year. The exchange was attended by several nations including France, Belgium, Poland, Austria and Lithuania. The collection was completed by a number of fixed winged aircraft like the Lockheed P-3C Orion of Marinefliegerschwader 3 (MFG3) “Graf Zeppelin”, a Dornier DO-228 (MFG3) and a privately owned Dornier

DO-28 Skyservant, which is no longer active in the German Services. All shots in this set have been taken on May 20, 2017. Camera: Panasonic LUMIX FZ2000 ISO Setting: 200 Focal Length: 24 - 480mm Post production: Adobe Lightroom 6 Text and Photos by Marc Schultz / www.flugsicht.com


Mark Schultz

PZL W-3RM Anaconda from 43rd Naval Air Base, located at Gdynia in Poland

SAR line-up: A Sea King Mk41of German Navy MFG5 is followed by a German Army NH-90 TTH from the International Helicopter Training Center based in Bßckeburg. Poland’s W-3RM completes this interesting sequence.


Lithuanian Air Force Eurocopter AS365 - Dauphin

Stunning “100 Jahre Marineflieger” color scheme on this Westland WG-13 Super Lynx Mk88A


Mark Schultz

Still going strong: German Army (Heeresflieger) Bell UH-1D of „TrspHubschrRgt 30“, based at Nie-derstetten

Remarkable colors on this Austrian Alouette III. The helicopter will soon receive a new paint-scheme to celebrate it’s 50th anniversary in service with Austrian Bundesheer.


Belgian’s 40 SQN NH-90 Caiman. The unit is based on Koksijde Air Base

Lithunanian Air Force Eurocopter AS365 - Dauphin


Mark Schultz


Chartered by German Navy Marinefliegergeschwader 5 (MFG5) as a training aircraft is this Euro-copter EC-135 with the civil registration D-HDDL


The Journey Back to Breckenridge Article and photos by Kevin Hong


The last airshow in Breckenridge, TX was in 1996. It was one of the best warbird airshows in the country years ago. People from around the world would come to the little town of Breckenridge for a weekend of fun with warbirds and flying. The show was a smaller version of the old Confederate Air Force days at Harlingen. For years I’ve always heard great stories about the airshow and for the first time in 21 years the airshow returned to Stephens County Airport this past Memorial Day weekend.

After arriving at the airport you could see the big hangar owned by Nelson Ezell, owner of Ezell Aviation - one of the best places in the world to repair or restore warbirds. In the hill country of Texas you could clearly feel the heat and weather change throughout the weekend. P-38s, P-51 Mustangs, Corsairs, Sea Furys, C-47s and many more warbirds came into the show with an adequate number of trainers parking in the grass all over the airport. This was going to be great.


With no tower at the airport planes were coming in all day long and buzzing the field. The ramp and the grass were starting to fill up with planes. As the day went on towards the evening people were out flying and going up on photo flights.

Denis Hong Kevin Rouleau

The actual airshow on Sunday came with a surprise. The weather turned from hot and humid to overcast skies and a light sprinkle of rain. With the occasional lightning in the distance we were able to have a great show and hear some great stories about the old glory days of the Breckenridge airshow. Special thanks goes out to the Chamber of Breckenridge and Ezell Aviation for hosting a great airshow. I look forward to going back next year and catching up with everyone in 2018.


Denis Hong Kevin Rouleau


Denis Hong Kevin Rouleau


Kevin Hong


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The Planes of Fame(POF) airshow draws two things, warbirds and photographers. Since I been coming out to Chino, it seems there are more and more people shooting the show. Canon, Nikon, Sony, DSLR’s, point and shoot and a bunch of iPhones along with iPads, out and about shooting away. It’s a wonderful show for any type of photographer to hone their eye as well as skills shooting aircraft. From WWII reenactors to pilots and crew, and you got to love the all-day photo passes! You’re in a target rich environment, so shoot away!

This year’s show almost didn’t happen due to Yanks Air Museum filed a lawsuit against Planes of Fame trying to stop their annual airshow because of lost income during the show weekend. Which sparked outraged in the warbird community and Planes of Fame started a petition that quickly grew traction. along with all the negative attention they were getting from Facebook and various online outlets, ultimately caused Yanks to drop the lawsuit for now but a new hearing is scheduled in September of this year.

In the sea of photographers, I happened to run into Larry Grace, which I met years ago and because of his images left such impression, it inspired me to shoot images to his likeness. Unfortunately, we lost contact with one another over the years. We promptly exchange information and since than he has encouraged to join the ISAP.

Despite the lawsuit, over 40 warbirds manage to attend the show. For their 60th anniversary show it focused on the F4U corsair and had 5 beautiful examples present, Planes of Fame’s F4U-1, Erickson Aircraft Collection’s F4U-7, Chuck Wentworth’s FG-1D, Dan Freidkin’s F4U-4 and Rod Lewis’s FG-1D.

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Article by Steven Lewis Photos by Steven Lewis and Larry Grace


Steven Lewis


POF AT-12, P-26, N9M flying wing, Val (replica), TBM, T-33, Mig-15, and F-86 3 Zero’s (POF, CAF SoCal, and Masahide Ishizuka) 3 P-40’s (POF/ Dan Friedkin/Paul) 2 SBD’s (POF/Erickson) 3 Tigercats (Rod Lewis, Dan Friedkin, and Joe Clark) 2 Yak-3 (Steve Barber/POF) 2 B-25’s (POF/B-25 MITCHELL LLC) 2 C-47(Lyon Air Museum/Gooney Bird Group Inc) 2 Sea Furies from Sanders Palm Springs P-63 CAF Wildcat Dan Friedkin’s Skyraider CAF SoCal Spitfire and Hellcat along with a herd P-51’s. The non-warbird acts were Rob Harrison (“The Tumble Bear”), Kent Pietsch Jelly Belly Interstate Cadet and Philipp Steinbach Gamebird GB1. From the list above, it’s easy to say that Planes of Fame airshow is for warbird lovers. Known for its wide variety along with the large number of attending warbirds. The flight display is broken up in different groups. Army Air Corps Flying Display, Korean War Era Flight Display, Korean War Era Flight Display along with a bomber flight. The shows’ finale was the USAF heritage flight with a P-38 leading the formation and two P-51 on each wing and a F-35 in the slot position.


Denis Rouleau Steven Lewis


Denis Rouleau Steven Lewis


Steven Lewis


Denis Rouleau

Larry Grace


DenisGrace Larry Rouleau


DenisGrace Larry Rouleau


Larry Grace


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MEET OUR MEMBERS


MEET OUR MEMBER

Brian Stockton

I am a professional photographer living in Des Moines, Iowa. Having been involved with photography since high school where I had a high school newspaper sponsor with a passion for photojournalism and black and white work, I spent countless hours learning the art of processing and printing to bring my scenes to life. To this day the smell of stop bath will immediately take me back to those days in the darkroom. It was during those formative years that I quickly learned that having a critical eye while chasing the perfect light to tell the story through my lens would always be both my craving and my torment. I had caught the bug. My interest with aviation photography likely stems from myself and other family members serving in the U.S. Air Force. Some of my earliest memories are from airshows and sitting near an airport at night watching the planes come and go. It seems like aviation has always been in my blood. I am currently shooting Nikon (D5, D810, D750). I typically use my 80-400 for air work and generally a wider lens like the 24-70 2.8 for static work. With crowd views, it is hard to beat the trusty 70-200 2.8 for great candid shots. I generally shoot in RAW to give myself the most flexibility for adjusting in post if needed. My workflow is usually culling the rough keepers with PhotoMechanic due to its quick preview rendering. I then import into Lightroom to catalogue, get my initial picks and do some light editing. Any moderate to heavy adjustment is usually brought into Photoshop. I joined ISAP last year when I decided to work towards doing photography full time. I am also a member of the Professional Photographers of America (PPA). I have found that sharing knowledge with other photographers has always blessed me with far more in return and I make great friends along the way. My advice would be to get out there and shoot as much as your schedule allows and practice your panning as much as possible. Get your eyes on other photographer’s work and share with others.


Denis Stockton Brian Rouleau


Denis Stockton Brian Rouleau


Brian Stockton


MEET OUR MEMBER “When I look at the ISAP member portfolios, and the images that other ISAP members make it is inspiring, and a learning process for me,” Stapleton says. “I scour aviation magazines looking at beautiful images credited to many of the member names of this organization.” Stapleton also has a weekly Aviation Link TV package shown on the Wednesday night newscast of Fox KTBY and KYUR ABC Statewide. Rob also recently scripted and directed a short film Through Northern Skies about the Lake Hood Seaplane Base in Anchorage, AK. (https:// youtu.be/1CaFAdTiEYA)

Rob Stapleton

Rob Stapleton has always had an eye out for aircraft stemming from his love of anything that flies. Working as a photographer for four decades in Alaska as a magazine photographer has also given him a grand appreciation for aircraft and flying in the North. “I use aircraft to make pictures of Alaska as well as of aircraft,” says Rob. His credits include covering the Anchorage to Nome, Iditarod Sled Dog Race for 20 years, Climbing Denali (20,320 ft. Mt. McKinley) twice, covering the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, and documenting the lifestyle of Alaska Natives for over 40 years. Based in Anchorage, Stapleton operates Alaskafoto a photo/film assignment business that specializes in aviation imagery. “Travel anywhere in Alaska will include a flight from a Super Cub to Boeing 737s and every type of aircraft in between,” says Rob. “Many of the photographs I make are of rare and highly modified aircraft.” Stapleton is currently on contract with the Alaska International Airport System where he photographs cargo aircraft coming and going from Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. Rob currently uses Canon digital cameras, lenses and strobes to shoot RAW and JPG images concurrently. For 4K film work he uses GoPros and Lumix GH4s for aviation action projects. Stapleton offers photographic advice online, and will soon offer personalized photo guiding at some of Alaska’s special places. His first advice to anyone wanting to photograph aircraft is simple. “The combination of high shutter speeds, long lenses and stabilized zooms are important factors in achieving good aviation images, but the use of spectacular backgrounds and good lighting really make a better image of an aircraft,” said Stapleton. Stapleton’s website www.alaskafoto.com hosts an “aviation image of the day” post, and offers readers examples and advice about photographing aircraft as part of the blog posts. Rob says that his interest in joining ISAP is to meet and confer with “the best of the best” aviation photographers, and to share with other photographers.

Rob is a current board member of the Alaska Aviation Museum, and the Chairman of the Board of the Alaska Moving Image Preservation Association. Stapleton is also former board member of the Alaska Airmen Association, EAA Chapter 42 and the Ultralight Flyers of Alaska.


DenisStapleton Rob Rouleau


Rob Stapleton


Rob Stapleton


MEET OUR MEMBER Just last weekend, I gave a few tips to a man who wanted to photograph players at a badminton tournament. I told me later that those tips helped him. For aviation photography, there is always the advice to use slow shutter speed for propeller planes. Then comes the need to hold the camera in a stable way while panning. The other important tips are related to the auto focus mode to use depending on the context. Selecting the right aperture is important because of the depth of field required to get the plane (which is a large object) in focus.

Denis Rouleau

I am Denis Rouleau from Montreal, on the Eastern side of Canada. I am an advanced amateur who has several interest in photography but aviation photography is the top one. My first camera was a Diana F, a plastic 35 mm camera that I got IIRC - by collecting coupons from boxes of Corn Flakes. Nowadays I am shooting with Nikon cameras; some Canon shooters are probably going to say that it’s not much of a step up but I like Nikon! I stated to learn how to use cameras by reading books but around 2000 I did a few classes at Dawson College in Montreal to learn the basics as well as film development. That helped a lot on the technical side. I started to take pictures of planes at airshows because I thought planes were cool! There were not many airshows in my area and that did not change much but now I am willing to travel to attend airshows. I started this around 2010. In 2017, I am planning on attending less standard public airshows and more military events like NATO Tiger Meet and Army 2017 in Russia. I have a Nikon D810 and a D500 that I bought while waiting for the D810 successor. I love pixels! My usual lenses are the Nikon 24-70 f/2,8, 70-200 F/2,8, 80-400 f/4,5-5,6. For Christmas, I bought myself the Nikon 400 mm f/2,8. In low light, I also use a Sigma 50-100 mm f/1,8. During airshows, I wear a harness so I can have both cameras, usually the 24-70 on one camera and a longer zoom or the 400 mm on the other. I shoot RAW exclusively. I make mistakes and sometimes I prefer to underexpose or overexpose. I always see a great deal of change between the out-of-camera picture and the processed one and I find that satisfying! I use Photoshop and Bridge latest version thanks to Creative Cloud. I may be old fashioned but I prefer to manage my folders and copies myself. My workflow is pretty well defined and I have a few tools to automate things. A the California Capital Airshow, I met a photographer from Paris who told me about ISAP and the advantages I could get by joining. I joined a little later, I think that was in 2015. And that is the only photography group I belong to.


Denis Rouleau


Denis Rouleau


MEET OUR MEMBER

Matt McVicker

My name is Matt McVicker and I am based in my favorite fly-over city, Des Moines, Iowa. My love for aviation and reverence for history started well before I knew what a camera could do. Once I picked up a camera it became the tool through which I learned to express myself and share my passion with others. I would consider myself an advanced amateur though I have traded photos for 100LL on occasion. I shoot Nikon equipment for stills. Typical show load out is probably a 24-70 and 80-400. Always RAW. The cost may have been too high for storing and processing RAW files in the past, but not now. Why not take advantage of the technology? I organize and do lightweight work in Lightroom. Photoshop is pulled up for the heavy lifting. I joined ISAP because I felt stuck creatively and was looking for opportunities to move forward. Networking, learning from, and working with others in the organization has helped me progress. Outside of ISAP I belong to AOPA, EAA, and other aviation related organizations and museums. Definitely! I have been helped by so many people and I look to return the favor. One of my favorite quotes from Chuck Yeager is “The best pilots fly more than the others; that’s why they’re the best.” The same holds true for photography. Set goals, push your skills, seek to share, and learn from critique. Above all keep shooting.


DenisMcVicker Matt Rouleau


Matt McVicker


MEET OUR MEMBER As for shooting format I use both RAW with a jpeg format both. The RAW format preserves more of the information for editing. The JPEG easy for quick view and for give to the customer. Of times the easier to display. The Canon 5D accommodates capturing both formats with two slots one memory SD and one SF. For photo editing I use Photoshop, Lightroom, Topaz and a free editing program from Google – NIK collection Everyone is a photographer. Every person has a camera now. What is different about a picture produced by you carrying thousands of dollars worth the camera verse a cell phone? What in the picture sets it apart and make it worth your effort? A picture should tell a story, have emotion, record action, be unique or have a sense of awe, otherwise it is just a pretty picture bound for postcard.

Lyle Devore

For more than 50 years I’ve enjoyed photography as a hobby and now as an aviation photographer. I’m living a dream, flying and photographing. Thanks Dave and John. Photography for me began with a Browning box camera and over the years graduating to the Canon model 5D and 70. The media has developed from the film size 620 to 35 mm size film and is now defined by megapixels. Dallas-Fort Worth area presents a wealth of opportunities for photographers interested in aviation. The numerous air museums, schools, and aircraft companies in the local area are accommodating. Aviation photography for me began with Airborne Imaging. Airborne Imaging flies from Midway regional airport with three DC-3, T33, Commander 500, Saberliner, BO-105 Twin Turbine Helicopter and other aircraft. Airborne Imaging flies three DC3 daily. It has been a tremendous experience photographing vintage aircraft. Additional opportunities have been with transit aircraft or plane being serviced at the airport FBO. Midway airport is near my home, as well as being in the flight path for numerous airports. So sometimes my subjects come to me. A small 3 leg fold up chair or a “walker” that accommodates carrying equipment, provides a seat and can be adapted with an umbrella for shade. Caution the “walker” will detract from the macho photographer image, but will provide more endurance for those of us who need it. Plenty of water. Canon camera (7D and 5D) and Canon lenses. Often I rent the higher end lenses like the 2.8/400MM. A tripod gimbaled assembly that I have developed for airshows or missile launches etc. The gimbaled assembly reduces the stress of physically supporting the camera equipment i.e., telephoto lenses. The gimbal assembly is mounted on a tripod. With a range of motion of 360 degrees and 70 degrees respectfully it is ideal for supporting large lens in anticipation a photoshoot of a surprise flyover by a Thunderbirds or Blue Angel jet. The gimbal assembly is inexpensive and easy to build.

To improve your photography pursue mentors that will relate experiences that may have cost them greatly but given to you for free. Consider joining organizations that will fascinate this learnings. Attention to detail, observe longer, shoot photos more deliberately and less random, observe lighting, seasons, different angles and different perspectives etc. Know your limitations – determine if is enduring or worth the investment or overcome the limitations. Take the time to look at details. Try different photo situations i.e. underwater, sports, telephoto, macro etc. Review the photo metadata of your success as well as your culled picture. Join yourself to persons with like passions thus will enable you to learn more. Knowledge is often “caught” more than it is “taught.” Carry a note book and be sure to keep handy updated business cards. Invent. Be creative, and enjoy.


DenisDevore Lyle Rouleau


DenisDevore Lyle Rouleau


MEET OUR MEMBER I just recently joined ISAP due to my friends and fellow photographers in the Cavanaugh Flight Museum Photo Squadron in Addison, Texas; who also introduced me to the Dallas Aviation Photography Meetup group that fills my need for speed and expanding my photography skills.

Patrick Nugent

I currently live in Allen, Texas and I am a retired Senior Master Sergeant who joined the Air Force wanting to become a jet engine mechanic, but I quickly found out that Air Force needs came first and I was sent to school to become a parachute rigger. With a passion for photography that began in high school and in time I was able to cross-train and became a photographer, enjoying assignments in Nebraska and Colorado before getting assigned to the Air Force’s Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” as the team photographer on the first F-16 team. That assignment led to a competitive selection as a photojournalist and resulted in advanced Department of Defense training at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. Air Force Photojournalists were responsible for documenting military “Real World” events and training exercises while doing the aerial photography. As a photojournalist stationed in Germany, Nugent covered the Rhein-Main Air Base bombing and the return of hostages Father Martin Jenco and David Jacobson, as well as those kidnapped from the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro. I also covered Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Provide Hope and the Panama invasion. I supervised the “Prototype” Electronic Imaging Center during the early and groundbreaking days that introduced digital photography to the Department of Defense. I retired in 1992 after 23 years of service, using that experience while I worked for Kodak and then with Nikon, in their Federal Government Sales & Marketing divisions. Both corporations supported and allowed my representative participation in military photography workshops and the Military Photographer of the Year program. I use a Nikon D750 and the D7200 DSLR’s with a variety of Nikkor lenses along with a Sigma 150-600mm lens. At an Airshow my combination is the D750 with the Sigma 150-600mm lens and the D7200 with the Nikkor 10-24mm and the 18-300mm lenses. I shoot RAW files due to their high resolution and file flexibility; also I use the camera’s Wi-Fi capability to my phone in order to have additional social ability; while processing my imagery in Lightroom. Now fully retired, I can concentrate on my Aviation and Landscape photography while pursuing personal photographic projects that involve past military assignments and organizations; along with joining my wife with our family genealogy research.


Denis Rouleau Patrick Nugent


Patrick Nugent


MEET OUR MEMBER I am often asked at work about cameras and gear, and will try to help new folks out. Mostly my coworkers are looking to photograph children and grandchildren. When I am at local festivals, I will help folks if I see them struggling with a camera and give them some quick tips. If someone were to ask me for tips on shooting moving aircraft, I’d advise them to set up their camera’s Aperture Mode and Shutter Mode ahead of time, so they can quickly spin the dial to move between modes faster. Be prepared to have very few keepers at first, just have fun with it. Accept critiques of your images and if you don’t understand the lingo, ask what it means.

Laura Falkner

I am definitely an amateur. Currently living in Dayton, Ohio, the birthplace of aviation, having been dropped here by the USAF as the last stop in our family’s military journey. I was born and raised in the Boston area. I am definitely not comfortable in front of the camera, much preferring the behind the eyepiece point of view. Got my start shooting aviation when my dad trusted me with his Nikon F and his brand new 50-300 f/4.5 zoom lens enough to shoot the Goodyear Blimp that was flying overhead. Military aviation became a way of life after my husband joined the United States Air Force, and continues past his retirement. Photography came back into my life as a hobby with the advent of digital cameras, and I took the plunge into DSLR’s with a Nikon D50 in 2005. Cats, kids, concerts, festivals, landscapes, nature, and aviation make up my portfolio. Mostly self taught, but while attending school, I took a couple of photography classes, one on black and white film, and another that taught Photoshop. I’ve also attended a few seminars locally for shooting other subjects. I have also learned a lot by reading the Mustang Air to Air thread. Since it’s so close to me, a lot of my shots are taken at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Occasionally I get out to shoot moving airplanes. I shoot Nikon cameras, and will take the V1 with FT1, D3, D700, D300s, and D200, or D2x, to an air show. I’ve shot with manual focus lenses as well as autofocus lenses. I’ll take the 80-400 VR, 70-300 VR, 70-200, 300 f/2.8 AI-s, 200 f/2, 24-70, 28 f/2 AI-s, and a 16mm f/3.5 AI. In the past, I have rented the 200-400 f/4. I shoot RAW, and process in Photoshop CS6 currently. I also have Lightroom 4, but I miss the brush for plug-ins. I joined ISAP in 2012 to learn better ways to shoot moving aircraft, and to get to know others interested in aviation photography. I also belong to a local artists group that isn’t strictly focused on photography.


Denis Falkner Laura Rouleau


Laura Falkner


M U I S O P M Y S P I SA K O O B P A R SC Since 2001, the ISAP organization has held symposiums around the country. It is a gathering of photographers from all over the world who share the love of aviation. We come together to learn techniques, reconnect and build friendships that last for many years. Our next symposium will be in Tucson. More details and photos from past symposiums to come. We’ll be there. Will you?


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ISAP XIV

SYMPOSIUM MARCH 15 - 17

2018

TUCSON, AZ

For details visit aviationphoto.org or facebook.com/ISAPorg


The Air Squadron playing cards are designed by LIOE Design and printed by the United States Playing Card Company. Made in the United States. One deck has 56 uniquely designed playing cards plus custom tuck box and seal. LIOE Design is a product company that manufactures their own product designs. Located in Seattle, WA all their products are aviation inspired from their Aero Ti Chopsticks (successfully funded on Kickstarter in 2013) to the Stealth Pen. LIOE Design decided to create a deck of custom cards to showcase their passion for aviation. Through the Air Squadron deck of cards their designer John Lioe is able to explore the artwork of airplanes. Each aircraft has its own unique bodylines which are highlighted in the cards. This deck of cards has artwork of modern jets and aircraft. The inspiration was to create a deck of cards unlike other cards, the Kings and Queens are B-2 Bomber and SR-71. The Jokers are the A-10 and F-22. Joker #1 is the A-10 Warthog, has a legendary 30mm Gatling-type auto cannon that makes a very distinct sound on the battlefield. When the A-10 shows up for air support it is no joke. Joker #2 is the F-22 stealth fighter. The F-22 has many trick up its sleeve, one of them is taking on 5 or more F-15's in training exercises and wining. Aces are the main attractions, inspired by patterns formed in kaleidoscopes. The F-117, F-14, Osprey and X-29 have beautiful lines that are showcased. When combining the 2 aircraft shapes together it makes up a new interesting shape of its own. For the index cards they wanted to go against the conventional suits representing numbers. Instead they wanted to find modern day aircraft's that would look close to the suits shape. For the spade they chose the F-117, the hearts is the F-14, clover is the Osprey and the diamonds is the X-29. The planes look like they are flying in formation, with exception of the number 2 card all the aircraft are flying in the same direction. Underneath the planes are geometric line patterns representing them flying over abstract topographical landscape. Air Squadron is now available on Kickstarter if you’re an aviation enthusiast or like uniquely design original items this maybe be the playing card deck for you. Visit http://www.lioedesign.com/shop/


MYSTERY PLANE

SILHOUETTES By John Ford

Name the plane silhouettes. Answers are on bottom of the Kenyon Ad Gyro page

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MYSTERY PLANE

SILHOUETTES Answers

1 I.A.R.80 2 IAI Kfir-C2 Israel 3 Kawasaki Ki-64 Rob-Japan JSB 4 McDonnell XH-20


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ISnAP June 2017  

International Society for Aviation Photography The June 2017 issue of ISnAP (Magazine by International Society for Aviation Photography-ISA...

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