Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers

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Special Oshkosh Edition The Return of Air Tattoo Red Flag 22-3 and much more!


Mark Streit

WELCOME TO THE 2022 SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF AIRSPEED! EAA AirVenture 2022 Andy Lay John Love Peter Keller Jim Koepnick Jeff Krueger John Ford Flying With The Fagens Scott Slingsby

H Michael Miley Jim Froneberger Larry Grace

The Return of Air Tattoo Dragos Munteanu Rose City Airfest / Thunder Over Cedar Creek Lake Kevin Hong Duluth Air & Aviation Expo 2022 Larry Grace / ISAP President Red Flag 22-3 Rob Tabor Moody Gardens Air, Car & Boat Show Kevin Hong / Airspeed Editor ISAP Member’s Showcase Timothy Smith Mark Streit

Kevin Hong

Trying a New Style Hayman Tam Meet Our Members Larry Turoski John Love Airplane Silhouettes John Ford

Leeran Schwartz

Front Cover: Fireworks display at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2022. Photo by Jim Koepnick Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 70 - 200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM l Sports 018 ISO 640 Shutter speed: 1 second Exposure: f/8 Processed in Adobe Photoshop Camera RAW and Lightroom Back Cover: F-16 Aggressor taking off during Red Flag 22-3. Photo by Rob Tabor Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Nikon VR 500mm f/4G ISO 250 Shutter speed: 1/4000 Exposure: f/4 Processed in Adobe Photoshop Camera RAW


Timothy Smith

NEW AND RETURNING ISAP MEMBERS Ismael Abeytua

Mike Cox

Nicolas Limbioul

Douglas Sisk

Guy Adams

Deena Denlinger

Shawn Malone

John Slemp

Roland Ashby

Jose Fernandez

Ronald Marasco

David Stubbington

David Barrera

John Ford

Ricardo Padovese

Paul Stackhouse

Kevin Barry

Rick Gautheaux

Moose Peterson

Mark Streit

Tim Berry

Norman Graf

David Rizzico

James Tadlock

Stephen Bonhus

Mike Hill

Wesley Roberts

Larry Turoski

Kevin Brown

Ken Hunt

Denis Rouleau

Eric Wafford

Gary Chambers

Jonathan Little

Leeran Schwartz

Paul Zeinert

The goal of International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. The new Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP members and their photography, experiences, and their passion for aviation from around the world. From military and commercial aviation, you’ll be able to see it all while learning about aviation photography, post processing tips in Lightroom and Photoshop, aviation history, air show reports, aviation museums, and more. We look forward to sharing our members’ images and articles with everyone. Enjoy this issue of Airspeed! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, Airspeed Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


EAA AirVenture OSHKOSH 2022

Article and photos by Andy Lay

Last year was my first experience attending EAA AirVenture and this year was my second. I determined to take my lessons learned from last year to improve my experience and results in 2022. To do so, I set four goals for this year at Oshkosh. My goals were: 1) to take fewer photos but with a higher keep rate, 2) to explore more locations from which to photograph the air shows, 3) to evaluate the Sony 600mm f/4 lens and, 4) to capture an image of the fireworks with an aircraft in the foreground. When I reviewed my 2021 captures, I found that I had hundreds (or maybe thousands) of blurry, unusable images. Cursory examination indicated that I had been continuing to shoot well after airshow performers had passed my location resulting in numerous tail-on perspectives that I rarely used. I also found that my shutter speed was far too low for ground-to-air photography. Seeking the elusive prop circle that I had achieved in air-to-air scenarios resulted in a very low number of tack sharp airshow photos especially for reciprocating engine planes. To address this issue, I changed my default camera settings to higher shutter speeds, switched off the continuous capture mode and instead used the single-shot mode. This resulted in achieving my first goal as I took 1/3 fewer images (with the exception of the high-speed sequences I took of the F-35) and I could clearly see that my keep rate improved significantly as a result of the higher shutter speeds. For prop aircraft, I increased my typical shutter speeds that centered around 1/125 and 1/250 to a range

between 1/640 and 1/1250. For jet aircraft, I upped the shutter speed from 1/2000 to either 1/3200 or 1/4000. The culling process was vastly different this year because I had many more sharp images to choose from rather than trying to find the few that were not blurry. In 2021, I spent the vast majority of my airshow shooting from show center. This time, each day I chose a different location up and down the runway to find out what advantages and disadvantages each particular location provided. In general, I found closer to show center to be better for shows by the smaller prop planes and heritage flights. For the larger aircraft and the formation flights, I found that the end of the runway, where the seaplanes are parked, and about a half of the way up from that point (in the vintage plane area) yielded some nice banking shots as they negotiated their turn-arounds and base-to-final turns for landing. My longest lens is a Sony 200 - 600mm f/5.6-6.3 and this has been my primary airshow lens since 2019. In the never-ending quest for better gear, I considered Sony’s longest prime lens which is the 600mm f/4. Not yet convinced that the $13K price tag was worth it for my uses, I decided to rent the lens for Oshkosh. After some research on the EAA website, I discovered that UPS has a delivery and pickup site on the show grounds. This allowed me to have the lens delivered prior to my arrival, signed for and held for me to pick it up near the Exhibit Hangar A. I always shoot


with two camera bodies; my Sony A7RM4 (high resolution) and Sony A1 (high speed focus). With the 600mm f/4 attached to the A1, I started out attempting to hand-hold this combo for an afternoon show. Results were quite impressive, especially as the jets and smaller aircraft made their nearest pass by my position and were filling the frame. But, by the end of the day my right hand was developing callouses and my left arm was worn out from supporting the long and increasingly heavy 600mm. Thankfully, I brought a gimble head and sturdy tripod and using it on subsequent days saved me from getting totally worn out. My conclusion out of that experience was that the marginal increase in sharpness of the prime 600mm over my 200 - 600mm zoom was not worth the cost or weight of the 600mm. The wide f/4 aperture of the 600mm that yields a beautiful bokeh makes more sense for birding or sports where separation from the background is critical; not so much for flying aircraft. I also calculated that thirteen week-long rentals of the 600mm would still cost less than a new one. While I did get some decent photos of the spectacular fireworks last year, I didn’t have an interesting foreground aircraft that served to tell the story of fireworks at Oshkosh. The two twilight airshow and firework displays begin each night about 1½ hours after the afternoon airshow. During those interim times, while it was still daylight, I set out to find a good foreground subject for each evening show. I searched the area

around show center since the fireworks are set off directly across from the Boeing Plaza taxiway. The biggest challenge was locating an aircraft that did not have its cover on and didn’t have a crowd of attendees blocking the view. After locating and getting setup behind a small red Swearingen SX-300, the owner arrived and assured me that he was happy to have his plane in my composition. My fireworks image goal was met and in return I sent the owner a digital copy of the finished composite image. It turned out that our paths crossed after Oshkosh and I was also able to hand-deliver a 16x20 print to him and his wife in Denver. I used the experience from the first twilight show to capture a similar scene at the second twilight show but with a different aircraft, an RV-8 from my home state of Texas. In a photography blog published last year, the photographer postulated that it typically takes at least three visits to a site to get premium images. The first time, just getting there is the challenge. The second time, finding good locations at the site is the challenge. Then finally, the third time, you’re ready to use all that knowledge to capture unique and captivating images. I can certainly relate to this theory. I’ve been to AirVenture twice and although I feel good about meeting this year’s goals, I’m looking forward to my next visit. I’m finally feeling confident that I can make a detailed shot list and come home with the specific images I plan to capture.



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay



Andy Lay


JOHN LOVE This was my third time attending EAA’s AirVenture. Three friends and I try to attend a few airshows each year, and we had gone to Oshkosh in 2012 and 2016. We were going to go in 2020 but the pandemic scuttled those plans. We made plans for this year, but it looked like some personal obligations might prevent me from being there. Happily things worked out, and it sure was nice to be back! We left Minnesota’s Twin Cities on Wednesday morning, got to Oshkosh that afternoon, dropped stuff off at the house we had rented and made it to AirVenture in time for the evening airshow. We stayed in town until Sunday morning and saw as much as we could, including five airshows in four days. The weather was great, and the light and sky were wonderful for photography. This was my first AirVenture shooting with two cameras: my ‘newer’ Canon 7DMkII, and my ‘old’ Canon 50D. Lenses were my Canon 100-

400mm IS Mk1, and a Canon 18 - 135mm IS Nano USM. The lenses sometimes got swapped between cameras depending on what was going on around me. It may not be the newest technology, but the flexibility of two cameras was wonderful. I especially like photographing planes with props. When they’re in flight I work at portraying a sense of speed and motion. Recently I’ve experimented with a monopod and gimbal head when panning during relatively level passes, and for bird photography, but everything you see here was shot handheld. While I generally prefer props that doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy the jets. The military demos were wonderful, but for me it was also special to see the older jets like the MiG-17, T-33 Shooting Star, and F-86.



Of the four friends two of us do aviation photography but I’m currently the only ISAP member. I had hoped to meet some other ISAP members this trip like I had at the Fagens’ airshow in Granite Falls, MN, earlier this summer. However, given the uncertainty of attending and how much was going on, the best I did was swap some messages with Larry and later see him in the distance on the far side of a ‘do not cross line’. Hopefully I’ll meet some of you next time!


John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love


H MICHAEL MILEY The National Guard’s KC-135 from the 128th Air Refueling Wing made a tremendous background in Boeing Square for Wednesday night’s airshow. Perhaps not the sexiest plane at the show, this 50-year-old workhorse proves its worth every day as the Brew City Tankers keep the fleet full of gas. Standing literally in the shadow of the V-22 Osprey behind me, I tinkered with ISO and shutter settings to get what I hope is a worthy celebration of this underrated plane. Shutter speed: 4 seconds at f/2.8 ISO: 100 Camera: EOS 5D Mark II Lens: Canon EF 24 - 70mm f/2.8L USM



During Tuesday’s airshow, I set up near the south end in Vintage Camping to try and capture some nice landings. For some reason, I love the challenge of capturing the orange dot as a reflection on the bottom of aircraft passing overhead, but I wasn’t expecting to be chasing the orange dot that day. It is often easy when a polished World War II bomber like Doc comes over, but the real challenge comes from the fast movers. In this case, Major Kristin “Beo” Wolfe’s F-35A Lightning II and its flat grey paint surprised me by turning orange. Kudos to this rented lens for getting a shot at that distance. I see why Jim Koepnick uses them! Shutter speed: 1/640 at f/9 ISO: 320 Camera: EOS 7D Lens: Sigma 150 - 600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S


H Michael Miley


The A-26 Invader Silver Dragon flew in Tuesday’s airshow with its stunning nose art in all its glory. I wish I had a recording of its engine sounds! Shutter speed: 1/160 at f/20 ISO: 320 Camera: EOS 7D Lens: Sigma 150 - 600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S


H Michael Miley


H Michael Miley


I was lucky enough to catch the Douglas AD-4N(A) Skyraider “Naked Fanny” as it touched down on Tuesday. My goal that day was shot like this, but I wasn’t sure I’d get it as that lens is a beast and needed a tripod for support. Fortunately, the panning worked out this time. Shutter speed: 1/100 at f/22 ISO: 320 Camera: EOS 7D Lens: Sigma 150 - 600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S


H Michael Miley


While most people think of AirVenture as one big airshow, it’s really about the people. Tuesday’s show included a parade of amazing homebuilt aircraft, but this EAA volunteer quietly stole the show with his best Navy carrier operations launch signals. I wish I knew who Shooter was to thank him for the laugh. Shutter speed: 1/250 at f/16 ISO: 320 Camera: EOS 7D Lens: Sigma 150 - 600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S


PETER KELLER Year five for me at EAA AirVenture and Oshkosh never disappoints! Last year’s attendance may have been impacted by a storm that went through the area, but the weather was near perfect for this year’s record attendance, with only minor bout of rain just before the Wednesday night show. I was lucky this year to meet up with a friend and fellow ISAP member and glean from him a lot of info, experience, and stories of working on aircraft and from his 45 years of attending the shows at Oshkosh. The performers this year were again incredible to watch and a fun challenge to photograph. Of course, the military aircraft, both modern and the old warbirds, are fascinating. Other highlights for me however included the mass flyovers, all the individual performers, and the Red Bull Air Force. Then there was the U-2 flyover, a first for me. What an incredible aircraft! I took a trip over to the seaplane base where the whole tone of the environment is completely different and just much

A snapshot of the shells fired in a 5.7 second window!



The relaxed atmosphere of the sea base area.


more relaxed. I got a personal tour of the harbor and watched a father and son interaction as a dad turned his young son loose for his first solo flight in a seaplane. And then the event that is a must for me each year, the night show! This year’s fireworks may have been the best yet. So many shells going up at once; One of my own favorite shots was a single 5.7s exposure that was completely filled with colorful displays in just that amount of time.

Peter Keller

I’m sure I’m probably no different than other photographers when I say that I’ve still got lots of shots to get through. These photos are some of the captures that stuck out captured some of the emotion for me.


An early morning stroll through Warbird Alley with a gorgeous sunrise as a backdrop.


Peter Keller


Peter Keller

One of the several mass flyovers of the various Warbird trainer aircraft.



Adam “Shake-n-Bake” Baker in his Extra 330. It was interesting to notice his bright red gloves grabbing the stick of the aircraft!


Peter Keller


Dell Coller flying the Jet Waco, looking like the Red Baron coming at you with a jet upgrade between his wheels!


Peter Keller


The U-2 making one of his three passes before heading out again.


Peter Keller


The Red Bull Air Force team giving a friendly wave as they head upward.


Peter Keller


Getting up close and personal with the pilot of the U-2.


Peter Keller


Feeling the rumble of the Grumman F7F Tigercat as it taxis on by.


Peter Keller


JIM KOEPNICK B-25 Panchito makes a pass of the Oshkosh crowd after a pyro explosion. Shutter speed: 1/320 at f/8 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport



Vicky Benzing in her 1940 Stearman at the top of a hammerhead during the Oshkosh air show. Shutter speed: 1/320 at f/8 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Shutter speed: 1 second at f/8 ISO: 640 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 70 - 200mm Sport

Jim Koepnick

Wednesday night fireworks viewed from the north side of the Oshkosh airport.


Air Force Heritage Flight with three P-51a and a F-35. Shutter speed: 1/500 at f/8 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


A Curtiss P-40 Warhawk glistens in the light of sunset in the Warbird area of AirVenture. Shutter speed: 1/1600 at f/22 ISO: 400 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


Ultralight after the air show in the EAA Fun Flight Zone. Shutter speed: 1/640 at f/29 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


A skydiver jumps from the Red Bull helicopter during the air show at AirVenture 2022. Shutter speed: 1/200 at f/7.1 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


Matt Younkin flies the Twin Beech 18 during the afternoon air show at AirVenture in Oshkosh. Shutter speed: 1/500 at f/11 ISO: 100 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


Nathan Hammond of Ghost Writer Air Shows gives a spectacular performance during the Saturday night air show. Shutter speed: 1/250 at f/2.8 ISO: 16,000 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 120 - 300mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


The iconic EAA Brown Arch lit by fireworks from the Saturday night air show. Shutter speed: 2 seconds at f/10 ISO: 320 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 24 - 105mm Art


Jim Koepnick


Biplane arrival in the Vintage area. Shutter speed: 1/400 at f/8 ISO: 250 Camera: Canon R3 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm Sport


Jim Koepnick


JIM FRONEBERGER Kyle Franklin’s wingtip-dragging comedy act is always a crowd favorite. Kyle plays Ben Whabnoski, an obnoxious drunk who steals a Super Cub at airshow center and proceeds to show everyone how not to fly a Cub. Shutter speed: 1/320 at f/10 Focal Length: 400mm Camera: Canon 7DMkII Lens: Canon EF 100 - 400mm MkII f/4.5-5.6L



Major Kristen “BEO” Wolfe performs her demo in the USAF F-35A Lightning II. Shutter speed: 1/640 at f/6.3 Focal Length: 321mm Camera: Canon 7DMkII Lens: Canon EF 100 - 400mm MkII f/4.5-5.6L


Jim Froneberger


Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator departs Oshkosh. The ecoDemonstrator is a Boeing-owned 777-200ER designed to test about 30 projects that can make aviation safer and more sustainable. Shutter speed: 1/800 at f/7.1 Focal Length: 95mm Camera: Canon 7DMkII Lens: Canon EF 100 - 400mm MkII f/4.5-5.6L


Jim Froneberger


The Yellow Ribbon Honor Flight took a group of Vietnam veterans from Oshkosh to Washington, D.C. and back in American Airlines’ “Flagship Valor”, an Airbus A321 with a Medal of Honor paint scheme. On their return to Oshkosh, they were greeted by a water cannon salute, complete with a double rainbow. Shutter speed: 1/640 at f/9 Focal Length: 28mm Camera: Canon 7DMkII Lens: Canon EF 100 - 400mm MkII f/4.5-5.6L


Jim Froneberger


Adam “Shake-n-Bake” Baker performs in his Extra 330SC. Shutter speed: 1/320 at f/10 Focal Length: 340mm Camera: Canon 7DMkII Lens: Canon EF 100 - 400mm MkII f/4.5-5.6L


Jim Froneberger


JEFF KRUEGER Over the years I have attended hundreds of airshows. Always with camera in hand and an eye for the aircraft, static and flying. Each show has a little different flavor, even the same show year after year. In the case of EAA AirVenture, or “Osh”, another part of the event, and a big one is the hundreds of private pilots flying in for a week of aviation activities. As I said, my concentration has always been the aircraft and the show. This year I decided along with that to look for what makes an airshow work. It’s amazing how many moving parts there are in the production. From the morning show briefing for the pilots, to the logistics of fuel and smoke oil. Even the launch and recovery have to be part of the plan. The interaction between the air boss and the pilots is much like that of a

conductor and the musicians, setting the timing of each act and insuring safety and a great show for the public. What really makes the show are the pilots and their crews as well as the airshow operations team. I have had the opportunity to meet many of them and they are all fun, fascinating and talented folks that enjoy what they do. This includes the military demo teams who show us the awesome capabilities of their respective aircraft. This year’s event was very well attended and the weather was about as good as it gets, with only one storm rolling through overnight earlier in the week.


There were a number of commercial jetliners this year from three major airlines. Who knew that Delta has a dedicated USA Olympic Team jet. The show performers did a great job each day as did the military demo teams. Along with the airshow, having the entire week to attend, it was nice to check out all the static displays and the Warbird reenactment camp. It’s always amazing to see the variety of private aircraft fly in for the week. Lots of vintage planes and some pretty cool private jets! This year there were four ISAP members sharing a house rented in Oshkosh. We spent nine days at the show and attended both night shows. Long days, followed by long nights downloading and looking at our work. It was a great opportunity to exchange shooting locations, image detail and post processing workflow ideas. Plus, it’s nice to catch up with other ISAP members.

While I’ve been attending EAA for over 25 years, last year and this year were the only times I went to the night shows and I’m especially glad I did this year. The fireworks were great and we found a couple of unique locations to shoot from. As always, the hardest part is going through and selecting from the thousands of images. On the upside, it gave me something to take my mind off my sore feet, legs and shoulders from nine days of walking, kneeling, and holding my camera up to shoot the show.


Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger




Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



JOHN FORD This year I used the same plan as last year, only less. My plan is simple go out early in the morning shoot for 2 or 3 hours go back to the RV, eat, edit, shower and sleep till late afternoon then go back out and shoot again. My knees however are starting to give me fits, in fact at one point I had to ask for help getting up after shooting a low angle shot. The weather

this year was fantastic and for the first time since I have been going to Oshkosh it did not rain during the show. Bottom line I had a great time meeting new people and actually meeting friends from San Diego by chance. As for the photography, this show is so awesome, everywhere you look there is a great shot. This year was no exception and I‘m very happy with what I created. I hope that everyone else had as good a time and photographic success as I did.



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



LARRY GRACE - ISAP PRESIDENT Father and son enjoying time together during EAA Air Venture. Shutter speed: 1/80 at f/22 Focal Length: 70mm ISO: 320 Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm



Larry Grace


F-35C and EF-18 Growler Demo Teams comes together for a team group photo. Shutter speed: 1/1250 at f/5.6 Focal Length: 32mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm


Flag waving greeting the returning flight of the American Airline “Flagship Valor” with Veterans from their honor flight to Washington D.C. Shutter speed: 1/500 at f/5.6 Focal Length: 125mm ISO: 250 Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm


Larry Grace


Flight display and demo of personal eVTOL Aircraft. Shutter speed: 1/100 at f/14 Focal Length: 600mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Airbosses directing air traffic during the airshow. Shutter speed: 1/200 at f/13 Focal Length: 60mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Larry Grace Nathan Hammond showing his excitement before his airshow demo. Shutter speed: 1/200 at f/10 Focal Length: 155mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm



Larry Grace Matt Younkin and Doug Rozendaal flying in formation “Twin Twin Beech” aircraft demo flight. Shutter speed: 1/160 at f/14 Focal Length: 600mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm



Larry Grace


Bruce Winters aircraft Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 and P-51D Mustang “Happy Jack’s Go Buggy” in Black and White. Shutter speed: 1/3200 at f/4.5 Focal Length: 60mm ISO: 500 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace Polaris Dawn L-39s doing it halfway right. If you have a back seat open, a photographer will definitely appreciate it. Shutter speed: 1/3200 at f/4.5 Focal Length: 60mm ISO: 500 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm



Larry Grace EAA attendees enjoying the sights and sounds of the afternoon airshow. Shutter speed: 1/3200 at f/6.3 Focal Length: 600mm ISO: 72 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm



Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 Pilot/Owner: Bruce Winter, retired U.S. Navy F-18 pilot. Air Force Heritage Flight Pilot The Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 was pulled from its watery grave after 46 years before making the journey from Moscow to Midwest Aero in Danville, Illinois. Shutter speed: 1/50 at f/8 Focal Length: 32mm ISO: 640 Camera: Nikon 850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm f/3.5 - 5.6


Larry Grace



US Customs & Border Protection Air and Marine Patrol Pipes and Drums pose with B-29 “Doc” in the background.

Larry Grace

Shutter speed: 1/500 at f/8 Focal Length: 36mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon 850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm


Airshow Kings of Comedy A meeting of airshow pilots that feature comedy as part of their flying shows. Left to Right: Kent Pietsch, AJ Gritier, Mark Nowosieiski, Kyle and Liz Franklin, Greg Koontz and Fred Masterson and on the ground, Erik Edgren.

Larry Grace

Shutter speed: 1/160 at f/8 Focal Length: 36mm ISO: 320 Camera: Nikon 850 Lens: Nikon 28 - 300mm



Larry Grace


Total aircraft: More than 10,000 aircraft arrived at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh and other airports in east-central Wisconsin. At Wittman alone, there were 18,684 aircraft operations in the 11-day period from July 21-31, which is an average of approximately 121 takeoffs/landings per hour when the airport is open Total show planes: 3,226, including 1,375 registered in vintage aircraft parking, 1,156 homebuilt aircraft (up 6 percent over 2021), 369 warbirds (up 5 percent from ’21), 137 ultralights, 87 seaplanes, 77 aerobatic aircraft, and 25 rotorcraft. Camping: More than 12,000 sites in aircraft and drive-in camping accounted for an estimated 40,000 visitors. Forums, Workshops, and Presentations: More than 1,400 sessions are hosted throughout the week. Social Media, Internet, and Mobile: More than 10.6 million people were reached by EAA’s social media channels during AirVenture, with an engagement of 1.1 million; More than 83,000 hours of viewing EAA video clips online also occurred during the event.

International guests: International visitors returned in a big way in 2022, with attendees from 92 countries outside the U.S., just one behind the record total from 2019. The Gathering shines The EAA Aviation Foundation’s annual event to support its aviation education programs attracted more than 1,000 people and raised more than $2 million dollars that will be focused on EAA’s mission of growing participation in aviation. Media: 797 media representatives on-site, from six continents. Economic impact*: $170 million for the five counties in the Oshkosh region (Winnebago, Outagamie, Fond du Lac, Calumet, and Brown). * - based on the 2017 University of Wisconsin Oshkosh economic impact


Flying with the Fagens Article and photos by Scott Slingsby


If the there is one word to describe what it takes to do an air-to-air shoot, it’s “flexibility”, because things can change in a moment’s notice. It may be a last minute change in aircraft due to a mechanical issue, weather or even a different airport altogether. Such was the case for this shoot with Scott Slocum and his Air2Air Adventures. On paper, we were scheduled to shoot The Fagen Fighters latest acquisitions, a Grumman Hellcat and Japanese Zero in formation along with their P-51 Mustang “Twilight Tear” prior to their airshow on Father’s Day weekend. The plan was to shoot the Zero and Hellcat on Thursday evening, followed by the Mustang Friday morning, then relax and take in the Pride in the Pacific airshow on Saturday.

This was all well and good until the weather reared it’s ugly head. My expectations for June Minnesota weather was calm winds with temperatures in the 70s. What we were greeted with were temps in the mid-80s and gale force winds gusting to 30 knots with occasional gusts to 40. So, before I even checked into the hotel the mission for Thursday was postponed until Friday. With Thursday free, we were able to tour the Fagen’s world class museum. More about that in another article… Friday now became the day to shoot, but another issue was put on the plate. Because it was arrival and practice day for the airshow, possibly we’d have to change airports to stage out of, because of a lack of ramp space. They were expecting 40 warbirds for the show, so spots were going to be tight. Also, timing was up in the air because of show practice.


The change of venue never materialized as they found space for Scott Slocum’s Beech Baron. So the original plan to stage at the Fagen’s fields was back on.

Scott Slingsby

A couple of things I’ve learned over the course of time is to check the phone often for last minute texts and don’t stray too far from the photo ship. Sure enough, timing changed and the shoot started with a moments notice. While the Hellcat and Zero went out for practice, we were going to go airborne and wait for them at a predetermined spot until they’d join up for the first of three hops. I was on the second hop, so time was on my side to gear up and plan of how I’d set up the cameras.



Scott Slingsby


It was 4 o’clock in the afternoon, sun was high and we were shooting a two ship formation. Therefore I set both bodies to f/16 and 1/160th to start and I’d just work my way down to lower shutter speeds after getting a few keepers in the can. After conferring with the rest of my colleagues, I decided to throw my 3-stop ND filters on to cut down some of the midday glaring sun. My game plan set, I’m ready to go, right? Wrong! As the first group exited the plane the look on their faces was evident, it wasn’t what we were expecting. The turbulence from the midday heating of the ground was bad. They went to 4,500 feet and still couldn’t find smooth air and got bumped around pretty good. As I strapped in, time to regroup with another game plan. I’d start at 1/160th and work my way up in shutter speed. Scott found a slightly smoother altitude at 1,800 feet, but not by much. Within moments, our targets were forming up on the Baron, and the shoot was on. Game plan number two was the way to go and the idea of getting the illustrious prop arc was out the window. No matter, because I’ve got an original Japanese Zero and Hellcat in my sights with memory cards filling up of the iconic fighters glued to our wing. Soon the shoot was over and

it was back to the field. Many thanks to pilots Bernie Vasquez in the Zero and Evan Fagen in the Hellcat for job well done. Now on to planning the second shoot with “Twilight Tear”. As soon as Scott shut down both Connie Bowlin and Ray Fowler walked up. Great, two accomplished Mustang pilots, surly one of them would like to fly with us. Well, plans changed again. Instead of one P-51, we’re now shooting two, Connie in “Twilight Tear” and Ray in “Sweet Revenge”. This time the flight was planned for 7pm. We’d have better light and much less turbulent air from the heating of the day. My original plan of f/16 and 1/160 with no ND filters was on, but this time I was able to work my way down to 1/50 with great results. After myself and my shooting partner got out of the plane we decided to hang around to thank our pilots for filling our cards with more wonderful memories. We exchanged emails so I could send them a couple of prints in appreciation for all their hard work, and as quick as the day started, it was over and time to see what we captured for images.



Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby




Scott Slingsby



Scott Slingsby


After a 3 year gap, the famous RIAT - Royal International Air Tattoo airshow was finally organized in person in the weekend 15 - 17 of July 2022 at its usual location RAF Fairford. RAF Fairford is located one hour west of London and it is in fact a reserve airfield for USAF heavy bombers. Throughout the year the airbase sees a few deployments of US heavy bombers that operate from Fairford for joint training with the European NATO allies. Each year in July the airfield is released for the organization of the biggest military airshow in the world – RIAT. The maximum experience for a spotter can last a full six days - arrivals happen on Wednesday and Thursday the airshow public days are from Friday to Sunday and the fullest day is Monday when all the aircraft leave the airfield in a space of seven hours. And there are many spotters doing the full week! For the arrivals and departure a feature called “Park and View” is offered where spotters can choose to be at the two runway ends. During the public days several enclosures are offered and the most appreciated by the spotters is the Friends of RIAT (FRIAT) which is located right at show center. It has many facilities as well as elevated grandstand seats.

This year, even with the aftermath of Covid and with the complex international climate, still the show saw more that 250 aircraft flying and on static. The show was sold out on all days welcoming over 200,000 visitors over the weekend. RIAT is the highlight of the year for all European spotters (there are also spotters from all over the world coming to RIAT). The show is very diverse and has a lot of unique flypasts and surprises. The highlight of this edition were the Black Eagles - the demonstration team of the Republic of Korea Air Force. Their planes, the KAI T-50s were brought from South Korea and featured in all days of the show. They were a nice addition to the European airshow scene regulars and their demos are very energetic and powerful. In terms of demo teams we had the home team - the Red Arrows, the Swiss PC-7 Team, the Italian Air Force with the Frecce Tricolori and a few others. In terms of fast jet displays we had the pleasure of the main European acts - the UK Typhoon solo display in a very UK flag livery, the Spanish F-18 Hornet, the Swiss F-18, the Greek F-16 team Zeus, the Belgian F-16

THE RETURN OF

AIR TATTOO Article and photos by Dragos Munteanu


solo demo (by Vrieske - one of the few pilots to have more than 5000 flying hours on the F-16 in the world), the Italian Eurofighter Typhoon solo display, the Hungarian SAAB JAS39 Gripen, the Swedish Gripen solo display and many more. Helicopters were also well represented in the flying display - Hungarian Mil Mi-24 Hind, the Czech Air Force with a dual Mi-24 and Mi-17 demo, the RAF Chinook Solo Display, the German Army NH90 new demo. Warbirds were mostly present on static but we had the BBMF - Battle of Britain Memorial Flight showcasing in flight the Lancaster bomber, the Spitfire and the Hurricane.

Among the “rare” aircraft we managed to see at RIAT were: A-4N Skyhawk of Top Aces, SAAB Lansen, Draken and Viggen of the Swedish Air Force Historic Flight, the C-2 cargo plane of the JASDF, the German CH-53 Stallion, the Romanian Air Force An-30 Clank, the Brazilian KC-390 and so many more. RIAT22 managed to bring a very strong line-up after a 3 years gap from its previous edition - it was a delight for spotters and aviation enthusiasts and for sure we are counting the days until 2023.

The show was also used to mark the USAF 75 years celebration. Although the only presence in the flying display was the V-22 Osprey, the static presence of US Air Force aircraft was massive. The highlight was the E-4B which arrived on Friday (the first day of the airshow) and left on Monday. A beautifully painted F-15E of the 48th Fighter Wing (“Liberty Wing”) stationed at RAF Lakenheath and an F-35 from the same wing - the newly formed Valkyries squadron, and two Aviano F-16s were the USAF fighters present in the static display.

USAF E-4B


Romanian Air Force An-30 Clank


Dragos Munteanu


USAF F-15E - 48th Liberty Wing and F-35A 495 Sqn Valkyries


Dragos Munteanu



Dragos Munteanu ROKAF Black Eagles and RAF Red Arrows demonstration teams.


RAF Eurofighter Typhoon solo display


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Force F-16 solo display team.


Dragos Munteanu


Royal Air Force F-35B


Dragos Munteanu


Captain Steven de Vries - Vrieske - Belgian Air Force F-16 demo pilot


Dragos Munteanu


Hungarian Air Force MiL Mi-24 Hind


Dragos Munteanu


Airbus Beluga XL


Dragos Munteanu


ROKAF Black Eagles


Dragos Munteanu


German Army NH90 TTH demo


Dragos Munteanu


USAF U-2 Dragon Lady


Dragos Munteanu


USAF F-15E - 48th Fighter Wing


Dragos Munteanu


Top Aces A-4N Skyhawk


Dragos Munteanu


Aeronautica Militare AMX


Dragos Munteanu


USAF F-16C - Aviano airbase


Dragos Munteanu


There’s nothing better than having not one but two airshows on Independence Day weekend. The Rose City Airfest takes place on Friday and Thunder Over Cedar Creek Airshow takes place on Saturday evening every 4th of July weekend in the Tyler area in Texas hosted by Camp V and the Cedar Creek Veterans Foundation. It’s a rare occasion where Rose City Airfest takes place at the Tyler Airport and the Thunder Over Cedar Creek Airshow shifts to Cedar Creek Lake the following evening. Both of them are twilight shows but always has warbirds on static display and offer rides throughout the weekend. Even though the same acts perform at both show sites, the photos you can grab can be phenomenal. As the official photographer for both airshows I get the opportunity to shoot one traditional show at the airport and the other at the lake in a boat that can be challenging due to the waves. If you have never photographed a twilight show before there are some amazing opportunities to catch some beautiful sunsets with the planes flying. This year had a variety of performers including the A-10 Demo team, B-29 Doc, Randy Ball in the Mig-17, other local performers and warbirds based here in Texas.

This year we were fortunate to have veterans from World War II, Korea, and Vietnam as honored guests and a reminder why we celebrate Independence Day from their service to this great country. Colonel Joe McPhail, World War II Marine Corp Corsair pilot, PFC James Krodel, Korean War Marine veteran that survived Iwo Jima, and Major General Paul Landers flew O-1 Bird Dogs in Vietnam was able to have one available for him to take another flight. Even though the heat was brutal during the day, by the time the airshows started the temperature went down and the golden hour was upon us. The show started with the traditional US flag drop by the ReMax Skydiving team. Then Randy Ball and Bill Culberson opened the show with a two-ship Mig-17 formation. There’s nothing like having jet noise and afterburners to open the show at twilight. Following them was B-29 Doc flying with the sun reflecting off the polished aluminum was something to see followed by B-25 Devil Dog and a salute to the Doolittle Raid. For the Vietnam segment of the show, a O-1, O-2, and T-37 took to the skies showcasing their roles they played during the Vietnam War. It was a great way to educate the crowd on what they did during the war. Bill

ROSE CITY

AIRFEST 2022 Article and photos by Kevin Hong


Culberson hopped into a beautiful Black Knight black and gray painted T-33 performing a graceful aerobatic performance. Representing the United States Air Force was the A-10 Thunderbolt II Demonstration Team with Major Haden “Gator” Pullam flying the camouflage A-10 during the show with a P-51 Mustang for the Heritage flight. With all of the military jets you can always look forward to capturing some vapor. Steven Covington from SRC Airshows performed his high energy aerobatic act flying his awesome Raptor Pitts wowing the crowd with his routine. By this time the sky was more illuminated by the sun and clouds. The sunset made a beautiful backdrop for his act. As the sky got darker Randy Ball in the Mig-17 lit up the sky with his afterburner and high speed passes. Day or night Randy knows how to entertain the crowd with that fighter.

To close the show this year was the amazing Aeroshell Aerobatic Team, one of my favorite and most impressive formation teams. Watching four T-6s in formation flying in the darkness and smoke is always a crowd pleaser and with their ground finale 360 turn in front of the crowd was definitely the perfect way to end the airshow. Even though the airshows are not as big as the more popular airshows, the people love the venue and hope these two shows can continue for many years to come. Both airshows are fundraisers for the veterans organizations and hope the events will continue to raise money to support the veterans and the City of Tyler community.



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong


DULUTH AIR &

A V I AT I O N E X P O 2 0 2 2 Article and photos by ISAP President Larry Grace


Minnesota’s largest air show returned to the Duluth International Airport on July 16 - 17 2022! The Duluth Air and Aviation Expo Airshow, presented by Essentia Health featured the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and the F-35A Demonstration Team and also featured the YAK 110 flown by Jeff Boerboon and

presented locally by Cirrus Aircraft, Craig Gifford presented locally by Super One Foods, Kent Pietsch, Mike Wiskus, Jessy Panzer, Hayden Priffitt driving Hot Streak II, Minnesota CAF squadron B-25 “Miss Mitchell”, The Vanguard Squadron, KC 135 Demo team from MacDill AFB, A-1 Skyraider, Randy Ball MiG -17 Demo, Demonstration flight from Cirrus Aircraft and Flyby from the USAF F-16 Vipers from the 148th FW “Bulldogs”.


Larry Grace


Maj Kristin “BEO” Wolfe showcases the speed of the F-35 during the demo bringing up vapor clouds on the wings of her aircraft. The photo insert showcases her aircraft crew chiefs in a send-off dance at the start of her demo flight for the Duluth airshow crowds. Shutter speed: 1/2500 at f/6.3 Focal Length: 36mm ISO: 640 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Rob Rider narrate Kent Pietsch’s dead stick landing in which he will bring his Jelly Belly aircraft to a full stop to a waiting person with their back turned away from the aircraft and he will stop in the palm of their hands. Well a first for me was that Kent ran out of steam before reaching his target, so Kent jumped out of his aircraft and pushed it to his target. Waiting for him is the new 57th Wing Commander Brig. Gen Richard “Face” Goodman. BGen Goodman is a former Thunderbird pilot #5 during the 2009/2010 team. When with the Thunderbirds he flew at the Duluth Airshow and was a welcome return back to the city. BGen Goodman is responsible for 36 squadrons at 12 installations constituting the Air Force’s most diverse flying wing. The wing flies and maintains more than 182 aircraft of the following types: A-10, F-15C/D, F-15E, F-16C/CG/CJ, F-22A, F-35A, and HH-60G.



Larry Grace Thunderbirds #5 Maj Kyle Oliver and #6 Capt Daniel Katz meet at show center for the cross-over pass. Shutter speed: 1/2500 at f/6 Focal Length: 600 mm ISO: 320 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm



Hot Streak II is a twin jet engine 57 Chevy Pickup capable of speeds of 350 + MPH entertaining fans across the country for over 20 years. Driving Hot Streak II is Hayden Proffitt II is the grandson of legendary hall of fame drag racer Hayden Proffitt, who was a 4-time national champion in NHRA and a 2-time national champion in AHRA.

Larry Grace

Shutter speed: 1/2500 at f/6.3 Focal Length: 185 mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


The Vanguard Squadron flies a dazzling four-ship formation aerobatic airshow powered by ethanol. The Vanguard Squadron has been ethanol powered since the team began flying together in 1993. Shutter speed: 1/160 at f/10 Focal Length: 600 mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Craig has been flying general aviation aircraft his entire life and has over 4500 hours in dozens of different types of aircraft. He is a returning member of the 2017 US Unlimited Aerobatic Team that won Bronze in South Africa, and a three-time member of the US Advanced team, having won numerous team and flight medals, as well as placing in the top 10 worldwide twice. Craig flies an Extra 330SC which he has flown for three years. Originally from Texas, he now lives and works in Minneapolis. Shutter speed: 1/250 at f/10 Focal Length: 600 mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Randy Ball flying his MiG-17 racing with Hayden Proffitt “Hot Streak II Jet Truck. Shutter speed: 1/2500 at f/6.3 Focal Length: 600 mm ISO: 1100 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Douglas A-1 Skyraider The tail code and paint scheme are represents the 602nd Special Operations Squadron of Nakhon Phanom, Thailand. On September 1 of 1968 LTC William A. Jones who was the commander of the 602nd, located a downed F-4 Phantom crew. Under the name “Sandy One” he directed the search and rescue operation of the crew. As he determined the crew’s location, his Skyraider was hit with heavy and accurate gunfire. Jones then lost the ability to transmit from his radio. Rather than lose the position information, he flew his Skyraider back to NKP and refused medical treatment to provide information to the debriefing officer. LTC Jones was awarded the Medal of Honor. Nakhon Phanom airbase or NKP was known by the troops as “Naked Fanny”. Hence the name of the aircraft. www.skyraidershows.com/naked-fanny Shutter speed: 1/160 at f/11 Focal Length: 64mm ISO: 64 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


F-16C Falcon from The 148th Fighter Wing is a unit of the Minnesota Air National Guard located at Duluth Air National Guard Base, MN Shutter speed: 1/2500 at f/6 Focal Length: 450mm ISO: 320 Camera: Nikon Z9 Lens: Sigma 60 - 600mm


Larry Grace


Hell ain’t so bad if you’re with good people; that was definitely the theme for Red Flag 22-3. I was not originally planning on attending this flag, but the confluence of an unexpected opening in my schedule and the desire to press my new Z9 into further service, made the decision easy. And as an added bonus, my good friend Judd Slivka was able to make the trip as well and spend a few days shooting with me. If you’ve ever experienced Vegas in July, then you are well aware that hot is an understatement, the coolest day that week was 105 and the highest was 115. The shooting conditions were challenging at best, heat haze was heavy and ever present, except in the early part of the day and even in the shade my camera was hot to the touch. This Flag seemed a bit lighter on participants and activity than usual, I was told one of the regulars referred to it as “Half Flag”. The fast movers for the Flag were F-16’s, F-15E’s, F-22’s and F-35’s. The heavy contingent was comprised of the KC-135, B-52, E-3, E-8 and RC-135. There were no foreign participants in 22-3, but it was good to see the Navy F-35C’s and EA-18’s in attendance. I would like thank Judd for dragging me out to shoot the night launch. While there were no B-2 silhouettes or B-1 burner shots to be had this time, I am still happy with the shots I got and now have points of reference for the future. Nellis AFB always seems to be a hive of activity and while most the Red Flag is usually the primary draw for most people, I have found that some of the best light and shooting opportunities come from the local flight activities that take place before and after the Flag activities. As with most all of my trips, one of the common threads is the great people I meet and this trip was no exception. I was able to put some faces to names and make some new acquaintances. Due to the heat, and harsh shooting conditions, I doubt I’ll make a habit of attending the -3 Flag. That being said, it was a great time and happy I was able to make the trip. I am certainly looking forward to future Flags and crossing paths with ISAP members.


red flag 22-3

Article and photos by Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor



Rob Tabor


It’s always fun shooting a new airshow and catching up with airshow performers and the ICAS family. Moody Gardens in Galveston, Texas held their first Air, Car, and Boat show. I was fortunate to have some friends come down to shoot some photos and video of the new event. Some of the performers I had never met while others I’ve been friends with over the years. Moody Gardens is an entertainment center for the whole family with tropical gardens in a glass pyramid and other IMAX venue. The event was split into a twilight airshow, and two day airshows all over the water where people could watch from the shoreline. There was an indoor car show and boats were at a nearby dock for people to board and get a taste of the luxurious life at sea. Since this is the first time Moody Gardens created this event they wanted start off small and have only five flying acts. Clemens Kuhlig of Chef Pitts Airshows, Patty Wagstaff, Craig Hutain flying the CAF P-63 King Cobra, Jerry Conley flying the DeHavilland Vampire jet, and Nathan Hammond of Ghostwriter Airshows flew an amazing night show with his pyrobatics act. Kellie Hudson was the Airboss, Herk Strumpf was the announcer and Frost Airshow Rescue was on location in case of an emergency in the water.

I just got a Canon R6 and this was the first show to test out the camera and their features including the eye tracking and vehicle tracking I’ve heard so much about. Earlier this year borrowed a R6 from a friend and completely blown away with the 102,000 ISO and low noise. Although I’m still learning about the camera and doing some trial and error studies, there was definitely some things to get used to and figure out not just shooting photos but videos as well. So with the twilight show and Ghostwriter filling the sky with fireworks I knew this would be a great opportunity to test the limitations of this new mirrorless camera. So how did the camera perform? I was very impressed with some of the tracking and played with the vehicle tracking vs animal tracking. The eye tracking I ended up taking off since there were so many birds in the area. At certain times the camera would lock on to other things rather than on the planes and just used the center target zone that worked a lot better. Shooting the night show was amazing. I hardly saw any noise until I got to about ISO 12,000. I tried a little bit of video but didn’t get to test it out as much. I’ll do more of a review in the next issue of Airspeed. The crowd was small in comparison to big airshows and wished there was less cloud cover but overall I’m sure if Moody Gardens has another event next year it will be even better.


Article and photos by Kevin Hong

Patty Wagstaff performs a vertical climb at sunset.



Kevin Hong Kevin Hong Jerry Conley in the DeHavilland Vampire comes in low over the water.


Craig Hutain flying the CAF P-63 King Cobra down the shoreline.


Kevin Hong


Nathan and Kellie Hammond of Ghostwriter Airshows spend quality time together loading the fireworks for his pyrobatic night show.


Kevin Hong


Frost Fire Rescue were getting suited up to launch out for the airshow.


Kevin Hong


Clemens Kuhlig of Chef Pitts Airshows starts his routine.


Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong Nathan Hammond of Ghostwriter Airshows performing his pyrobatic night show.


Kevin Hong


The kids are following the planes flying instead of looking at the photos they just took. Great job kids.


Airboss Kellie Hudson and announcer Herk Strumpf enjoying the show.


Kevin Hong


The crowd enjoying Ghostwriter Airshows in the Super Chipmunk from the shore line.


Kevin Hong


ISAP MEMBER’S SHOWCASE Article and photo by Timothy Smith

Douglas AD-5W from Military Aviation Museum at Good Neighbor Day Air Show 2022 DeKalb Peachtree Airport, GA. Camera: Canon R5 Focal length: 500mm Shutter speed: 1/160 Processed in Adobe Photoshop 2022



ISAP MEMBER’S SHOWCASE Article and photo by Mark Streit

USN Blue Angels, CMDR Ben Walborn, Lead Solo 5 - Jet - Sneak Pass maneuver. Camera: Canon R5 Lens: Canon RF 100 - 500mm ISO 640 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/14 Processed in Adobe Photoshop 2022



ISAP MEMBER’S SHOWCASE Article and photo by Airspeed Editor / Kevin Hong

SRC Airshows Stephen Covington flying the Raptor Pitts takeoff at Rose City Airfest 2022. Camera: Canon 7D Mark II Lens: Canon 100 - 400mm f/4.5 - 5.6L IS USM ISO 100 Shutter speed: 1/160 Exposure: f/8 Processed in Adobe Photoshop Camera RAW and Photoshop 2022



Trying a

new style Article and photos by Hayman Tam


As aviation photographers, we strive to improve our images, whether by refining our technique or with equipment upgrades. In the post-processing workflow, the matter of style takes shape. I know my style has been evolving constantly, and one recent style phase I’ve been exploring is black backgrounds. A black background does wonders for truly focusing the viewer on the subject. Issues with color balance can be dealt with by converting to monochrome. I look for subjects with nice even lighting. Canopies and windows can be tricky depending on the light, reflections or visible background through the glass. These images were processed using Luminar, adding a black image layer and then editing the inverted mask. Editing can be tedious, especially on biplanes with all the flying wires or the Beaver with an abundance of struts. Use of a Wacom tablet and pen simplifies that process significantly.


Hayman Tam



Hayman Tam



Hayman Tam




Hayman Tam


I

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MEET OUR MEMBERS


John Love


LARRY TUROSKI

Thanks for accepting me as a member. I’m honored to join such an elite group.

So when it comes to aviation photography, you can best describe me as an “advanced amateur.”

Currently I live in Bakersfield, California, USA, but I’ve lived in various other places, such as southern Nevada which put me within easy driving distance of great photography grounds such as Nellis AFB, Edwards AFB, NAWS China Lake, NAWS Pt. Mugu, MCAS Miramar, McCarran, LAX, and others.

I studied photography at California State University Bakersfield with a degree in Fine Art with a concentration in Photography, with supplemental instruction at Bakersfield Community College (“BC,” we call it).

Like nearly all photographers I can claim “pro” status because I resorted to the horrible, miserable, deplorable profession of photographing weddings. I gave it up in 2003 after the most disastrous (among others) wedding photo experience of my life. Ask me about it sometime.

Why do I photograph jets? Like all of you, I love them. My angle? As you may have seen from my portfolio, I took my education in fine art photography and applied it to aviation. I simply asked myself, “How would Ansel Adams have photographed a jet?” and proceeded from there. I wish Ansel could have gone to the moon. He would have loved Apollo 15.


I was a C-130 loadmaster in the USAF and California ANG. I’m a civilian commercial pilot with instrument and multi-engine ratings. I think I stumbled into ISAP on Facebook, and was impressed. Seems like a good outfit. I don’t belong to any other professional photographic organizations, except some aviation photography “Like” pages on Facebook. Don’t really recall which ones. I do everything I can to help others with aviation photography, and photography in general. After graduation, I spent many years tutoring photography at California State University Bakersfield, and doing everything I could to help the up and coming students. What advice would I share? Easy. “Don’t use a tripod or monopod for aviation photography.

It won’t work.” And, “Buy your equipment used on eBay. It works as well as overpriced new stuff.” I also impressed on the students not to worry about pleasing all other photographers. I told them, “The only photographer you have to please is the one in the mirror.” I hope they took that to heart. Myself, for the most part I use a couple of Nikon D7100 DSLRs, with a Tamron 200 - 500mm lens. I find I rarely need to go out all the way to 500mm. Haven’t felt a need to upgrade lens or camera body. And once again, thanks for accepting me into the Society. I’m honored.



Larry Turoski



Larry Turoski



Larry Turoski



Larry Turoski

TUBE FULL OF BOXES: A Prime Air plane departs Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport during the gloaming in June 2020. (Sony RX-10IV/220mm/ 1/500 f/4)


JOHN LOVE I was introduced to aviation and photography at an early age. I grew up on the San Francisco Peninsula under the flight path of Navy P-3 Orion sub hunters, my dad worked in aerospace for Lockheed, and the family enjoyed photography as a hobby. I even have a photo of my dad showing me his camera when I was 2 years old, the same year I took my first commercial flight. I’ve always enjoyed watching anything that flew, and we always took cameras when we went on vacation. My parents taught me the basics of photography. I started with a Kodak Instamatic and received my first SLR as a teenager. I have continued learning through reading, classes, and webinars, and I enjoy learning from and sharing with others. I considered a career in the Air Force, but my vision wasn’t good enough to be a military pilot. My interests in design and how things are built led to a career as an architect, with photography continuing as a hobby. My architectural work often involved photographing construction conditions and progress. This eventually led to providing employers with photographs of completed projects for marketing and other uses.

I typically shoot RAW, currently with a Canon 7DmkII, and 100 - 400mm, 18 - 135mm, and 10 - 22mm lenses. I made the transition from film to digital about 15 years ago, around the time friends and I started regularly attending regional airshows. We’ve had a lot of fun doing this, and eventually it led to my meeting Larry Grace and learning about ISAP. My photographic interests include aviation, wildlife (especially birds), and travel photography. My wife also enjoys photography, and we learn from each other. She’s got a good eye. We joke that I get to shoot anything that flies, and she gets to shoot everything else! A suburb of St. Paul, Minnesota has now been home for over 30 years. Living in the upper Mid-West has provided wonderful and varied opportunities for seeing and photographing interesting aircraft, great airshows, and wonderful people in the aviation community. My advice to others is to experiment with your camera, stay aware of your surroundings for safety, and as others have said, check the view behind you – there might be a good shot. I am a member of, and contributing photographer for, the Minnesota Wing of the Commemorative Air Force. In addition to CAF websites and social media, my photography has appeared in architectural marketing and awards publications, Smithsonian’s Air & Space magazine web pages, and the CAF’s ‘Dispatch’ magazine.




John Love TUBE FULL OF BOXES: A Prime Air plane departs Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport during the gloaming in June 2020. (Sony RX-10IV/220mm/ 1/500 f/4)


John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love



John Love



LEERAN SCHWARTZ My name is Leeran and I’m based out of Los Angeles. I briefly studied film and digital photography back in my high school years, but would still consider myself to be an advanced amateur photographer. I’ve always been an aviation geek with a passion for photography, which is what drove me to join ISAP. I currently use two different configurations, one being a Nikon D7500 with a Nikkor 70 - 300 mm lens and the other a Nikon D7200 with a Sigma 150 - 600mm lens. I tend to switch between the two depending on the image I want to capture. I don’t use any kind of editing tools at the moment other than when I post on Instagram. I just recently joined ISAP after traveling for back to back airshows (Seafair in Seattle and Kaneohe bay air show in Hawaii) - I go to plenty of air shows and want to start working with others who share the same passion that I do.




Leeran Schwartz



Leeran Schwartz



Leeran Schwartz



Leeran Schwartz


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Delkin’s New BLACK CFexpress™ Type B Cards Deliver Up to 1700 MB/s Sustained Speeds

POWAY, CA, MARCH 30, 2021 – Delkin Devices, a manufacturer of flash storage solutions and camera accessories, announced today the newest addition to their top-selling line of memory cards: BLACK CFexpress™ Type B memory cards. Specially designed to meet the ever-growing demands of today’s broadcast, cinema and photography industries, Delkin’s BLACK CFexpress™ cards leverage today’s latest technology in order to provide the fastest speeds on the market. Other competing CFexpress™ Type B cards may state a maximum write speed, but BLACK takes things further with sustained sequential write speeds of at least 1400 MB/s (higher depending on capacity). This sustained speed versus potential write speeds is what guarantees flawless cinema-quality video capture, including DCI 8K RAW 12-Bit @ 30fps (2600 Mbps) in the Canon R5. This is especially valuable during events like weddings, sport meets, concerts and other situations you cannot redo. The cards are also capable of offloading data at speeds reaching up to 1730 MB/s, ensuring the quickest, most efficient data transfer from card to computer for immediate file access and sooner post-production.

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1000 MB/s

500 MB/s Minimum Write Speed (Other Cards)

“With more camera manufacturers deciding to integrate support for CFexpress™ Type B memory cards into their new camera models, we Maximum Write Speed – Defined as the Maximum felt the need to provide camera owners with a card that they could trust Capable Write Speed – Potential Peaks & Valleys to protect and preserve their precious memories” says Jenn Sherry, Sustained Sequential Write Speed – Defined as Delkin's Retail Sales & Marketing Manager, “As cameras continue to the Continuous Write Speed – No Peaks & Valleys advance and new data-heavy modes are introduced, it has become even more important for storage mediums to be able to keep up. We believe that BLACK CFexpress™ is the solution for complete video capture, just as the creator envisioned.” Each BLACK CFexpress™ Type B memory card has undergone extensive testing to ensure full functionality and performance in today’s high-end cinematic hosts, including ones from Canon® (C300 Mark III, C500 Mark II, 1D X Mark III & R5) and Nikon® (D6, Z6 II & Z7 II). Select hosts originally designed with native support for XQD cards can also accept CFexpress™ Type B cards via firmware upgrade. In addition to their “Lifetime Warranty” policy, Delkin continues to offer a unique built-in insurance policy for their BLACK memory cards, known as the “48 Hour Replacement Guarantee”. Delkin will replace any non-working BLACK card within 48 hours or less (not including weekends - in the US and UK), prior to receiving the non-working card. Cards can also be replaced over-the-counter at any authorized Delkin BLACK reseller. Additional information on Delkin BLACK can be found here: www.delkindevices.com/delkin-black/. ABOUT DELKIN DEVICES, INC. Delkin Devices’ consumer group manufactures storage devices and digital accessories for the photography market. Delkin has been in business since 1986 and has offices in both the US and UK. If you would like more information regarding this product or any other Delkin product, please contact Jenn Sherry at jsherry@delkin.com.

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SUPERIOR MEMORY TRUSTED BY CAREER PHOTOGRAPHERS www.delkindevices.com | 800.637.8087 | 858.391.1234


AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

Identify these aircraft. The answers are found next to the Kenyon Gyro Ad.

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Jim Wilson Photography International Distributor for Kenyon Stabilizing Products 214-796-9743 jw@jimwilsonphotography.com

Answers to Airplane Silhouettes 1. Experimental Aeroplane #115 UK 2. Fairey FD-1 UK 3. Focke Wulf TA 183 German 4. Ikarus Orkan Yugoslavia 5. Ilyushin IL-10 USSR

The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore We pay tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices at our location or online at www.bhphotovideo.com We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.



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ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller Airspeed Editor Kevin Hong

Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at info@aviationphoto.org Airspeed is a publication to showcase our members’ work in capturing aviation events. Images should be sized at a minimum size of at least 5100 x 3300 (17” x 11”) @ 300 dpi. We would like your largest landscape file size format for our full page spread in our featured magazine. Please submit up to 10 images per article and your text in a Microsoft Word document. Email your article and images by using www.wetransfer.com and send to info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). Members can submit images for review for a future cover or back page display or would like to inquire on doing an article for Airspeed contact us via email at info@aviationphoto.org We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


Rob Tabor

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