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WELCOME TO THE 2020 NOVEMBER ISSUE OF AIRSPEED! F-35 Demo Team: Flying In A New Normal Captain Kip Sumner Thunder Over Michigan Day and Night Scott Slingsby 2020 NAF El Centro Photo Call Nick Nelson Jeff Krueger Michael Bellinger Glenn Bloore A Flight Of A Lifetime: Commemoration Flight Over Arizona Staff Sergeant Alex Cook 2020 Surprises: Israel Air Force Over Germany Dragos Munteanu Visiting The Bell Helicopter Facility Bradley Wentzel A2A Briefing And Shot Info Card Matt Short Red Tail Honor Flight Keith Charlot Brad Lang

Rich Peace Clayton Cupit

Honoring Living Legends: The Tuskegee Airmen John Slemp Arsenal Of Democracy 2020: 75th Anniversary End of World War II Flyover Kevin Hong Riding With A Legend Brett Schauf How I Got The Shot Brett Schauf Geoffrey Arnwine José M. Ramos Mike Hill Josh Hill Mike Bilek Airplane Silhouettes John Ford

Mark Streit Rod Cromer Richard JackJames Rob Tabor

FRONT COVER PHOTO: Matt Short Capturing the first two T-50 trainers with the ROKAF in Sacheon, Korea. Camera: Canon 5D Mark III Lens: Canon 24-70mm f/2,8L II USM Exposure: f/14 Shutter speed: 1/500 ISO 200 Processed in Adobe Photoshop BACK COVER: Kevin Hong Commemorative Air Force Gulf Coast Wing warbirds B-17, JRB-6, and SNJ over Galveston Island at sunset. Camera: Canon 7D Mark II Lens: Canon 24-105mm f/4L at 45mm Exposure: f/7.1 Shutter speed: 1/320 ISO 100 Canon RAW file process using Photoshop CC 2021 and Camera Raw


Kevin Hong Wings Over Houston Drive-In Airshow

The goal of International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. The new Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP members and their photography, experiences, and their passion for aviation from around the world. From military and commercial aviation, you’ll be able to see it all while learning about aviation photography, post processing tips in Lightroom and Photoshop, aviation history, air show reports, aviation museums, and more. We look forward to sharing our members’ images and articles with everyone. Enjoy this issue of Airspeed! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, Airspeed Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


F-35 Demo Team F LY I N G I N A N E W N O R M A L Article and photos by Captain Kip Sumner


For many, an airshow season is the start of a normal year. Another day, another demo, another performance. But for our team, it was a little bit different. This was to be our first year as the Air Force F-35 Demonstration Team’s under Air Combat Command. The first year stationed at the only U.S. Air Force operations F-35 combat wing, the 388th Fighter Wing. We had proven the demo concept last year with the Luke AFB team, and the Fighter Wing had proven the jet in combat. We were ready to bring combat-ready jets to the frontline of airshows across the country to send a message. The U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II is here, it’s battle-tested, and it’s ready. Until this spring….


When “normal” became anything but. School visits, crowd interaction, even how we performed our demonstration changed amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Our team, brand-new and performance-ready, had to readjust ourselves and change everything we had planned in order to meet this new challenge. Our mission was still the same: to recruit, engage, and inspire the American public and to showcase the Air Force’s newest 5th generation fighter. How we did the mission just needed a new vector. While our team is the newest Air Force demo team out there, it also means we have the ability to adapt to what many call the “new normal”. We’re defining our tradition, and the legacy that we will leave, and our team is determined to make it a lasting one. We’ll still do the mission… we’ll just do it differently. We continued to practice at our new home with the 388th Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. In-person school visits turned into virtual Zoom calls. Public presentations became Q&A sessions on social media. Instead of reaching out to our local area, we began to interact with our audiences on an international level. We flew flyovers in support of those on the frontlines of COVID-19, and live-streamed demonstrations with behind-the-scenes narration. We brought heritage planes to Hill to practice in a new environment; and when we managed to get to an airshow, whether drive-in or virtual, we made it count. Regardless of how we do it, we’re here to fly the F-35 for the American public. We’re your F-35 Demo Team, and we’ll continue to adapt to meet every challenge. Many people are trying to adapt to this “new normal,” but for us, we’re trying to redefine it.


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


Capt. Kip Sumner


THUNDER OVER MICHIGAN DAY AND NIGHT Article and photos by Scott Slingsby

This year has been a tough time for airshows, and Thunder Over Michigan was no exception. I had planned on attending for the first time this year, but due to COVID-19, the weekend was now free and I was looking for something to do. ISAP President Larry Grace posted information about a photoshoot that same weekend at the Yankee Air Museum, in Detroit with Pete Lerro of Lerro Photography.

morning. This proved to be the right call, but more on that later. With Saturday morning off, first up was the mid-afternoon shoot with the re-enactors and pin-ups. Anybody who has ever worked with these folks at Oshkosh know how passionate they are, and that day was no different. They showed up in period correct attire, some of it dating back too WWII, with a Jeep, a 1942 Cadillac and many other props.

It was to include air-to-air photography, an afternoon session with re-enactors and pin-up models along with a night shoot. The weekend of aviation fun was now back on again.

Pete set up a number of different scenes, both inside and outside the aircraft, some big, some small. Everybody had plenty of time to roam from one to the other and get the shots they wanted before setting up other groups.

As everyone knows, weather plays an important roll in the aviation photography, and that weekend Mother Nature decided to throw a little curve ball or, more like a slider. The weather reports had a front with strong thunderstorms coming through Friday night so before I ever arrived in Detroit, my morning shoot was postponed from Saturday to Sunday

The afternoon session wrapped up and those us not on the evening airto-air shoot had time to grab a bite to eat and relax for a bit.


We came back for the night shoot and were greeted with the happy news that instead of three aircraft to photograph, the museum added an additional two. In total, the lineup consisted of the B-17 “Yankee Lady”, B-25 ‘Yankee Warrior”, C-47 ‘Hairless Joe”, UH-1 Huey ‘Greyhound” and the museum’s newest acquisition, the Ford Tri-Motor.

shots and move on to another spot. This allowed everyone in the group to get the requisite head-on photo and whatever else we desired. The night shoot finished just before midnight and call time for the morning air-to-air flight was at 5:50am. Just enough time to get back, charge batteries, download cards and catch a couple of hours of shut eye.

All aircraft were externally lit and the ramp hosed down with the cooperation of the Detroit Airport Fire Department. Pete has been running the night shoot at Thunder Over Michigan for the last couple of year, so he’s got his workflow down to a T: light the plane, hose down the ramp and shoot the engine run for five minutes. Rinse and repeat for each successive aircraft. He also suggested we should set up, get a couple of

As I said earlier, the Saturday morning weather was less than stellar, low clouds and high winds, not good for doing air work. Sunday on the other hand dawned with clear skies and calm winds. Our photo ship was the museum’s C-47 “Hairless Joe”, painted to represent the plane flown by Lt. Col. Dick Cole (Jimmy Dolittle’s co-pilot)


of the Flying Fortress before having the spotlight all to itself to finish up the shoot.

There wasn’t a ripple in the sky all morning allowing for great shooting opportunities with the planned aircraft. We joined up with the UH-1 Huey first, followed by a nice long time with the B-17, moving from side to side around the C-47. At one point the crew of B-25 “Yankee Warrior” wanted in on the action and joined up in loose formation on the left side

This weekend was just what the doctor ordered for those of us longing to get back to some kind of normalcy and hear some good old round motors.

Capt. Kip Sumner

when he was with the 1st Air Commando Group in the China-Burma-India theater. Originally we were informed that one window on each side of the Douglass would be removed to shoot through but the fine folks from the museum removed three on each side. The plan was to rotate in groups of two from window to window (masked of course) making sure everyone got plenty of time at an opening.

Scott Slingsby

And just to cap off the morning, the crew of “Hairless Joe” performed a greaser of a landing back at the Willow Run airport before returning the airplane to the barn.


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


Scott Slingsby


2020 NAF EL CENTRO PHOTO CALL Article and photos by Nick Nelson

Flight-line photos social distancing style.


The year is 2020. Covid-19 is still a threat and masks and social distancing are still the norm. Airshows across the country have been canceled or postponed. Things seem dire in the world of aviation and for us aviation photographers. That is until I received a text message from Larry Grace, “NAFEC photocall next week”. “What is this?”...I asked myself. “This has to be some sort of mistake” I thought. Then the reality set in, “AWESOME!!!”. It was a beacon of hope for 2020, a bright light at the end of what had been a very dark tunnel. “NAFEC Photocall was on baby!!”. Though this year would be a little different. To minimize risks, participants were limited to a 300-mile radius to avoid possible contraction of the virus from traveling. Masks and social distancing were also the theme of this photocall with a limit of no more than 20 photographers per day (spanning multiple days) in attendance. These measures were put in place to protect and keep safe everyone involved while allowing the privilege of the photocall to continue as scheduled. My day to attend was on a Thursday. It was a hot, hazy, 100-degree day in El Centro. As we all arrived at the briefing area, we were all required to wear our masks and to submit to a temperature check. Once that was out of the way Kris conducted a brief Covid-19 questionnaire and then began the standard briefing of the event. We had nine people attend on the Thursday I was there and the nine were split up between two buses to adhere to the social distancing measures. Once on the buses we were back out onto the airfield headed to the approach end of RWY 26. “Here we go!”

The boxes were drawn up a little differently this year with the arrestor cable area off limits for obvious reasons but this did not impede access at all. We were greeted by the sweet smell of JET A as a squadron of T-45’s (VT-21 Redhawks from NAS Kingsville TX) roared down the runway. They were equipped with training ordnance and were heading out to the range for some fun. Kris even summoned the infamous fire truck to stop over and give us a show. As the Redhawks were coming and going we also noticed a squadron of Hornet’s from MCAS Beaufort SC being loaded up with live ordnance for an afternoon flight. Unfortunately for us we only got to witness one F/A-18 depart from the field. As Larry always says, “It’s feast or famine out there”. Before the photocall came to a close we were treated to some afterburner action from the Gladiators; a Rhino out of NAS Oceana VA. I had a grin from ear to ear as it roared down the runway shaking the ground around me. As we headed back, we were able to capture some static aircraft which was great. One of them was an RAF Chinook on the ramp. They even fired up the engines which we felt like it was for us but I’m sure was just a maintenance run-up. It was a wonderful experience as always and I would like to thank Captain Bill Perkins and Kris Haugh for finding a way to make this photocall possible while keeping everyone safe. A special thank you goes out to Larry Grace for the privilege and opportunity to attend. Let’s hope 2021 brings us all back to the airfield.


Nick Nelson


Mike Bellinger getting his temperature checked before the morning briefing.


Nick Nelson


Navy T-45 “Redhawks� Squadron VT-21 departing with training ordnance.


Nick Nelson

NAF El Centro fire truck having fun with the nozzles.


Nick Nelson


Navy T-45 “Redhawks” Squadron w/special Texas flag design.


JEFF KRUEGER Photographically, it’s been a long dry spell for aviation! It was great news that NAF El Centro’s PAO Kristopher Haugh was setting up a photo call. If you have ever been to a photo call at NAFEC, it’s usually a one-day event with a pretty large number of photographers invited. This one was quite different in how it was organized, but with the same flight line access and a bonus. The photo call was actually 5 individual days with small groups, and a bit shorter in duration. I attended my assigned day, Wednesday, but was also able to go standby the next day. As always, Kris had the call well-orchestrated and the two days I attended went smoothly. We were on location by 1000 hours and at 1400 hours a bonus of being able to do some static shots around the hanger area. It was probably a good thing that we were on the flight line for a reduced time while the weather was clear, but a bit hazy, and about 105 degrees.

Nick Nelson

This was the first outing with my new Canon mirrorless R5 which did an outstanding job. After having rotator cuff surgery a few months ago, I decided to look into some lighter gear. A number of the photos here were shot with the R5 and either the RF 70-200mm or my trusty 100400mm with the RF adapter. I found that the adapted lens worked flawlessly with the R5. More on that in the future when I have a bit more experience with it. I did hedge my bet and had my 1DX as a backup so I used both. On both days we were visited by the new base commander, Captain Bill Perkins. He spent time with us and was very supportive of NAFEC Photo Calls and was very open to suggestions and ideas to make the photo calls even better. On Thursday, Capt. Perkins was accompanied by the base Chaplin and the Navy Regional Chaplin.

As we know, the activity at NAFEC varies, but both days that I was able to attend, we had a lot of T-45’s and were treated to some touch and goes. There was also a Marine F-18 squadron there and a couple Navy Super Hornets buzzing around. We had a flyover of a Navy Osprey one day which was interesting and as he has done in the past, Kris arranged a fire truck demo for us which with the back lighting made for some good photography. After leaving the flight line, we were able to get some good photos of Navy Seahawks and even a Chinook which was a fun change of pace. Being smaller groups, 8 to 10 max gave us the opportunity to do some things that would not be possible during a normal photo call such as the static shots closer up to the helicopters. We were also able to interact with the staff and each other, trading stories, sharing techniques and maybe even build some additions to our networks. Bottom line is this was a great opportunity the folks at NAF El Centro gave us to get out and do what we love to do, photograph aircraft, and do it in a safe and efficient way. I think we all came away with some good images.


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


MICHAEL BELLINGER

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge effect on many aspects in the world, with the idea of gatherings of hundreds or thousands of people in one place something to be avoided. Of course a photocall at NAF El Centro wasn’t that big, but even a few dozen photographers together would constitute a possible major health risk for both the participants and the organizers. So instead this meet was a lean version, slimmed down in numbers to just twenty, and geographically limited to a three hundred mile radius of the base. While this did cut down of the normally festive feeling of meeting a large numbers of fellow aviation enthusiasts, it did give the tour a much more personal feel, and allowed the PAO Kris Haugh stretch the shoot over a number of days instead of just one, and even include some time to grab some opportunity to shoot on the ramp.

Over the two days that I was able to attend I was able to capture a number of T-45 Goshawks as usual, then some bomb-laden Marine F/A-18 C’s from VMFA(AW)-224, F/A-18 E/F’s from VFA-106, my first look at a Navy CMV-22B Osprey, an E-2 Hawkeye, a C-40A Clipper, and even a visiting Royal Air Force Chinook. It’s possible that this might be a glimpse into the future of the photocall at El Centro – a smaller number of attendees, but more events spread out throughout the year, even after the effects of the pandemic have passed.


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


GLENN BLOORE


Glenn Bloore


Glenn Bloore


Glenn Bloore


A FLIGHT OF A LIFETIME COMMEMORATION FLIGHT OVER ARIZONA Article and photos by USAF Photojournalist, Staff Sgt. Alexander Cook


Recently, I was given the opportunity of a lifetime to take part in a photo mission capturing air-to-air images of a farewell flight over Arizona in the back of an F-16D Fighting Falcon celebrating the U.S. Air Force’s partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force in training the world’s greatest fighter pilots at Luke AFB. The one-hour photo mission, consisted of four F-35A Lightning II’s; two U.S. Air Force and two RAAF jets all assigned to the 61st Fighter Squadron that flew over iconic locations in Arizona. Our primary shooting locations were downtown Phoenix, Luke AFB, Sedona, Flagstaff, and of course the Grand Canyon. On the way back to Luke AFB, we planned to get dynamic formations of the four ship over the training airspace in Bagdad, Arizona. As I peered through my viewfinder during the flight, I was in absolute awe at what I was seeing and capturing. All of the colors and canyons along the way were beautiful. As we approached Flagstaff, I spotted Humphrey’s Peak which is the highest point in Arizona at 12,635 feet. I captured images of the formation as we flew alongside the mountain with the golden Aspens in the background.

We flew at 14,000 feet above the Grand Canyon passing over the Colorado River. I could see we were coming up close to the Colorado River, so I told my pilot to go inverted so I could get shots of the formation from the top down perspective. He couldn’t have timed it better. As we went upside down, I could see the formation of F-35s fly directly over the river and was able to come away with good images of the moment. It was a remarkable flight. One that I’ll never forget. I’d like to thank the Top Dogs at the 61st Fighter Squadron for trusting me to capture this moment in history and a special thanks to my pilot, Lt. Col. Wiley O’Reilly at the 309th Fighter Squadron for getting me in position to get the shots. Gear used: Nikon D850 w/24-120mm F/4 lens Backup: Nikon Z6 w/24-70mm F/4 UHL Lens Hood


SSgt Alex Cook


SSgt Alex Cook


SSgt Alex Cook


SSgt Alex Cook


SSgt Alex Cook


SSgt Alex Cook


2020 SURPRISES

ISRAEL AIR FORCE OVER GERMANY Article and photos by Dragos Munteanu


Yes 2020 is a strange and difficult year. For the spotters in Europe it means cancellations of virtually all airshows – in a part of the world where each weekend from May to October would bring different wonderful airshows and lots of headaches to plan attendance to so many of them. So, what did the spotters do? Instead of going to the airshows they picked up their gear, the ladders and headed to the fence of the airbases…In their country or around their country driving for hours to catch some military planes and hear some afterburners. Not really like the airshows but still photo opportunities so 2020 would not be a total loss. I think many would agree that the spotting event of the year in this context was in Europe the deployment of six (6) Israeli Air Force F-16s Barak in Germany at the Norvenich airbase – close to Bonn. For two weeks in the second half of August the jets trained with the

German Air Force and other NATO assets in the Blue Wings 2020 and MAGDAY exercises. Norvenich is an EF 2000 Eurofighter airbase – the home squadron being Luftwaffe’s Taktisches Luftwaffengeschwader 31 (Tactical Air Wing 31) “Boelcke”. The 6 Baraks C/D were drawn three each from 101 Squadron “The First Fighter” and 105 Squadron “Scorpion” all based at Hatzor Airbase. The F16 were accompanied by a Gulfstream G550 AEW - “Nachshon-Eitam” with a Conformal Airborne Early Warning (CAEW) system and by two Boeing KC707 tankers “Re’em”. Every day two missions were flown one in the morning and one in the afternoon. The deployment had a strong historical significance but also it was a statement that even with Covid19 – life goes on and airforces need to train. For spotters in Western Europe it was a great opportunity to get pictures of some unique aircraft.


Dragos Munteanu


Dragos Munteanu


Dragos Munteanu


Dragos Munteanu


Dragos Munteanu


VISITING THE BELL HELICOPTER FACILITY Photos by Bradley Wentzel

I’ve spent a lot of hours shooting from the 407, so it was a blast to visit the Bell facility in Fort Worth, Texas and get some more time in the AH-1G Cobra.


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


Bradley Wentzel


A lot of planning goes into an aerial shoot. This one was no exception. I traveled halfway around the world to fly with the ROKAF in Sacheon, Korea to capture the first two T-50A trainers. Originally I was told I would have two flights but when I got there the plans had changed. The ROKAF wanted to fly one of their combat camera guys on the second flight. He had never been in a fighter aircraft so he shadowed me in prepping for my flight. Unfortunately he came back with only a couple of photos and a full bag of puke. Never the less, I was able to get all of my shots (except one) in the 45 minutes we were airborne. I filmed in 6k on the RED Dragon (with a 1/500th shutter) so I could pull stills from the video. We did each setup twice so I could film the first and shoot stills on the 5D MkIII on the second pass. If a setup took too long we’d skip the stills pass to cover as much as possible. The briefings usually take about an hour and a half. I go in with about 15 cards (storyboards) and we narrow it down to about 10 based on safety and practicality. Here’s a few of them


A2A

BRIEFING AND SHOT INFO CARD Article and photos by Matt Short


Matt Short


Matt Short


Matt Short


RED TAIL HONOR FLIGHT

Article by Keith Charlot, Brad Lang, and Rich Peace Photos by Keith Charlot, Clayton Cupit


Clayton Cupit

The Idea In spring of 2018 while looking at the airshow calendar I saw that the Alabama Air National Guard at Dannelly Field in Montgomery, Alabama home of the 187th Fighter Wing/100th Fighter Squadron Red Tails was scheduled to have an open house, and listed as one of the featured performers was the F-22 demonstration team out of Langley Air Force Base flown by Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez. An idea popped into my head with thoughts of this could be an opportunity to put together a dissimilar red tail photoflight, while all being flown by African American pilots.


Keith Charlot

KEITH CHARLOT


I reached out to a good friend, Brad Lang of the CAF Red Tail Squadron, and Major Rich (Sheriff) Peace, ANG F-16 Viper pilot with the 100th Fighter Squadron, whom then reached out to Major Lopez regarding my idea and it’s historical significance, with the question of the possibility of what would it take to make a legendary flight honoring the Tuskegee Airmen. Fast forward a few months later with DOD approval and everyone on board, a target date of September 6th 2018 was scheduled and, we were all set to go. The plan was for me to fly with Brad Lang in the P-51C to document the mission and also there would be a photo Chase F- 16D with USAF combat camera photographer Clayton Cupit occupying in the backseat. The mission was to rendezvous above Moton Field in Tuskegee Alabama (the original training site). I dedicated this mission to my late grandfather Sgt Harold Charlot US Army Pacific Theater World War II whom I first learned about the Tuskegee Airmen as a child. A photo of my grandfather was flown in the subject F-16 for the flight that we would never forget.


Clayton Cupit

BRAD LANG


Rising above African-Americans are still a rarity in aviation. Many people know the success of the Bessie Coleman (the first U.S. black woman to hold a pilot’s license in 1921). She had to move to France to do so. Eugene Bullard (WW I) was the first African-American fighter pilot, he was not allowed to fly in the US military due to the racism of the time, so he moved to France to fly and fight. Most African-Americans had limited exposure to aviation...just not a priority when you can’t sit down at a restaurant or buy a house due to redlining. Even with the success of the Tuskegee Airmen, U.S. airlines would not hire African-Americans until Marlon Green sued Continental in 1963. When I started my airline career in 1986, African-Americans (civilian and military trained) represented 1/2 of 1% or 700 of the 60,000. Today, 32 years later, this number has increased to approximately 2%. Fortunately, the discrimination element is less of a factor. In the civilian warbird world, I’m aware of 3 or 4 civilian African-Americans that have flown the P-51 in the past 75 years. Three of us did this in the last ten years. This is an improvement.

Our 2018 Red Tail Honor flight was a significant for several reasons: • As noted, there are very few African-American civilians flying World War II warbirds. • Military African-American fighter pilots flying current aircraft representative of the 332nd FG are rare. Finally, The likelihood of this ever happening again is remote. Our flight over Moton Field, in Tuskegee, Alabama, one of the initial training bases for the Tuskegee Airmen was where my father, Donald W. Lang, Sr., a Tuskegee airman, spent time as a cadet. After the flight, it was time to reflect on the achievements of the Tuskegee Airmen and then our mission, three black aviators, rolling in on Moton Field, 75 years later in aircraft representative of the Tuskegee squadrons. A mixture of the old guard with the new guard. For several minutes I had to shake my head while I looked left and right, with a big smile on my face. If I thought about it for more than a second, emotions began to swell…so I didn’t. I’ve been flying for 43 years, 33 years professionally with Delta. The 2018 Red Tail honor flight with “Loco” and “Sheriff”, representing the Tuskegee Airmen, was priceless and a flight I will never forget.


RICH PEACE Flying the mission On 06 September, 2018, I had the absolute pleasure to participate in one of the most historical flights that no one has ever heard about. The CAF P-51C has a composite (332nd FG) livery representing the 99th, 100th, 301st and 302nd FS, an F-16 with a red tail, representing the 100th fighter squadron, and an F-22 representing the 302nd fighter squadron, flew in tight formation over Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama. Those aircraft were piloted by Mr. Brad Lang, Major Rich Peace, and Major Paul Lopez, respectively. Here is how it happened: That Thursday morning started out like most summer mornings in central Alabama; humid. Though the morning air was just cool enough for one to be mildly comfortable under a tall shade tree, there was no doubt that the day would end up a scorcher. That morning, however, I paid little attention to the muggy heat. I was more interested in the scattered to broken layer of puffy white clouds that lay serenely, just few thousand feet above me. I had little concern about the ability of the F-22 Raptor and the F-16C+ Fighting Falcon (Viper to those of us who fly it) to maneuver effortlessly through, around or over such a menial cloud deck, but I had no idea if it would affect the red tailed P-51C flown all the way across the CONUS just to participate in this historical day. As it would turn out, the P-51C could operate in the VFR scattered/broken cloud formations like his jet-aged little brothers. So it was settled… the flight would proceed as scheduled. Writing the phrase “proceed as scheduled,” does a tremendous disservice to the amount of mission planning required to pull off this relatively simple forty mile round trip flight from Montgomery, AL (Dannelly Field) to Tuskegee, AL (Moton Field) and back. One would think the most likely threat to successfully completing such a historic flight would be bad weather, or possibly an aircraft malfunction. To those with that thought, I can safely say you have not seen much time in the military. The highest threat to our unprecedented flight was the most dreaded thing in the United States Air Force: the approval process.

Normally, the approval to takeoff from the base on a simple training mission would require a sloppily scribbled signature from the supervisor of flying (SOF) that morning. Unfortunately, this was not a normal flight. This historic day was almost derailed a dozen times or so just trying to get the approval for the flight in the first place. There is a saying in the military: ‘It’s easier to get forgiveness than permission.’ Like most platitudes, this one is absolutely true. While I could probably write a small book about the issues we faced getting this flight approved, let me just say there were a lot of PowerPoint presentations, memorandums for record (MFRs), and more Colonel and General Officer signatures needed for this flight than for any other flight in my career (including five combat tours). Fortunately, those PowerPoint presentations were presented, modified, and presented again and again. Those MFRs were written and generals were chased about during their busy schedules until all the approvals had been granted and all dotted lines had been signed (thank you to Major Lopez for doing 99% of that work). It was time to take to the sky. To be good stewards of taxpayer dollars as well as the donations to the Commemorative Air Force, we decided to complete our formation flight at the beginning of other training events. We all started our respective combat aircraft, and taxied down to the end of the runway (EOR) for last chance. It was decided that Mr. Lang would take off first in his Mustang, that Major Peace would depart second in his Viper, and Major Lopez would blast third in his Raptor. Immediately after liftoff the first error in mission planning became apparent. The P-51C is a very small plane and surprisingly difficult to acquire visually from a rear aspect. Especially with the occluded background of scattered towering clouds. It took quite a bit of communications and radial callouts for the unpleasantly surprised Viper pilot to finally acquire the Mustang first with the radar, then (using the helmet mounted sight)


visually with a Mark-1 eyeball. Luckily for Major Lopez, he had no issue tracking both preceding aircraft with the powerful AESA radar in the F-22.

Squadron flies F-22s at Tyndall AFB; and the 302nd Fighter Squadron flies F-22s at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

Before long, the three aircraft were flying in close formation. Mr. Lang and his P-51C Mustang flying proudly in the lead, while Major Peace on the left wing, and Major Lopez on the right, held on to their formation positions precariously, due to the high angle of attack and unusually low airspeed for modern high performance fighter jets. Flying barrel rolls around this historic formation was a 2 seat F-16D model, sporting a red tail of it’s own, with a combat photographer in the back seat, snapping high definition photos of this unlikely trio.

Since the famed original Tuskegee Airmen squadrons were inactivated in 1949, never have the squadrons taken flight together. In all of the deactivating, reactivating and shuffling around of the four squadrons over the decades to follow, the bond between them was first loosened, then broken, and finally forgotten as the Air Force and the nation worked to achieve racial integration. With a few phone calls (and a few dozen MFRs) Mr. Lang, an African-American pilot, took to the skies in the P-51C of the 99th Fighter squadron. In the back seat of the Mustang sat Keith Charlot, warbird photographer and son of an Original Tuskegee Airman. Adorned with the red tail, yellow trim tabs, and the name ‘Tuskegee’ emblazoned on the nose, the 99th Fighter Squadron represented our past.

In the beginning of this story, I mentioned that this was the most historic flight that no one has heard about. Allow me to explain why. During World War II, the 332nd Fighter Group, also known as the Tuskegee Airman, was comprised of four different Fighter Squadrons: the 99th, the 100th, the 301st and the 302nd. Those four squadrons flew a variety of aircraft, including the P-40 Warhawk, the P-39 Airacobra, the P-47 Thunderbolt, and most famously, the P-51 Mustang. As WWII came to a close, the 332nd was disbanded. The four fighter squadrons were closed down, but eventually were reinstated at various bases around the nation. Today, the 99th Training Squadron flies the T-1 Jayhawk at Randolph AFB; the 100th Fighter Squadron flies F-16s at Dannelly Field; the 301st Fighter

On the left wing of the P-51C flew Major Rich Peace. Major Peace, an African-American pilot, was at the controls of an F-16. The Viper, with it’s bold red tail, and painted on black trim tab (the F-16 is a fly by wire aircraft that does not have an actual trim tab) of the 100th Fighter Squadron was representing our present. On the right wing of the P-51C flew Major Paul Lopez. Major Lopez, an African-American pilot, slipped the surly bonds in an F-22. The Raptor from the 301st and 302nd Fighter Squadrons, coated in a special paint that helps it evade enemy radar, represented the future. On 06 September 2018, three black fighter pilots took off in three separate fighter jets, representing the entire 78 years of African-American aviation in the United States Armed Forces. The P-51C out front, blazing the trail for the next generation to follow, much like the original Tuskegee Airman of the 1940s did for aviators like Lopez and Peace. The F-16 on the left flank, the bridge between past and future, the link between generations.

Clayton Cupit

The trip to Moton Field and back to Dannelly Field went off without a hitch. Stunning photos of the three aircraft were captured over Moton Field, the birthplace of African-American military aviation, and over Montgomery, the locale of some of the most vicious struggles for civil rights during the 1950’s and 1960’s. Post formation, the F-16 proceeded east to the Military Operations Area, The F-22 practiced the demonstration profile, and the P-51C was to be positioned for a static display. All aircraft landed safely back at Dannelly Field, and prepared for each respective role in the upcoming air show to take place in two days time.


The F-22 on the right wing, the position of distinction, taking African-American aviation into the future, to greater heights than our grandfathers could have imagined. As I sit now, reflecting on this historic flight, I find that I am filled with a wild mix of emotion. I feel completely blessed and honored to be a part of the Tuskegee legacy. Wearing the patch of the 100th Fighter Squadron on my sleeve, the same patch worn by those who fought fascism in Europe while simultaneously fighting racism in America, brings a feeling of pride but also one of responsibility. I am proud to represent the courage and sacrifice of the Tuskegee airmen, many of whom I have had the pleasure of knowing. I am humbled to be responsible for such an awesome legacy, and to be entrusted to uphold that legacy and share it with future black aviators.

Clayton Cupit

This history inspires me to work harder, to be better, and to reach out and develop the next generation of Tuskegee airmen to take my place. This history also saddens me. Reading and learning about the treatment

of American warfighters in the Jim Crow south, who were second class citizens based solely on the color of their skin leaves me hurt and confused. White enemy prisoners of war were treated with more respect than the black officers in the US Armed Forces. How does a middle-aged, middle rank, African-American Air Force Officer even begin to process something like this? The unfortunate answer is that I don’t process it. I try my best to not even think about it. Putting the past discretions out of mind and moving on to the task at hand is a daily occurrence for a fighter pilot, so doing the same with historical social injustice happens relatively naturally. While my brown skin in the predominantly white world of aviation definitely makes me an anomaly, it slips into my conscience mind on only the odd occasion, to be quickly lost in the constant din of daily life. Today it is difficult to turn on the television without hearing the names of Americans like George Floyd, Ahmad Arbery, Philando Castile, and far too many others. We, the historically disenfranchised have come a long way since the Jim Crow and lynchmobs, but there is still much work to be done. However, its


Clayton Cupit


good to stop every once and awhile and really examine our progress. 06 September was an occasion to do just that. From the humble beginnings of the African-American struggle for civil rights, the Tuskegee Airmen and their P-51s kicked down the door of segregation. The F-16 flown by General Lloyd Newton, the first black Thunderbird pilot and General Charles Brown, the first black Chief of any branch of the US Military, taking the legacy of excellence to new heights. The F-22, the most dominant and technologically advanced air superiority fighter ever devised, poised to lead us home to “double victory�. While the struggle for true equality in the military and in the nation continues, I know we are on the right track. Looking out of the bubble canopy of the F-16 and seeing that P-51 out front, eyeing the F-22 43 feet to my right, and looking down on Moton Field below, I know we are going to be ok. 996 Tuskegee Airmen blazed the trail that I walk on today. While that trail is not without its hazards, it pales in comparison to the road faced by the 996. For that I am eternally grateful. Without their courage,

struggle, and sacrifice, I would have no opportunity in the military of today. Without the Tuskegee Airmen, I could not be the man I am today. Honored by their sacrifice I am challenged with improving the path for the future. The injustices of today are the battles bestowed upon me to fight for the generation of the future. This very moment there are young students flying airplanes at Moton Field. They long to be the fighter pilot of the future. Today they study, chair fly, and review procedures in their Cessna 172s and Piper Cubs, counting on modern day Tuskegee Airmen to pave the way for their opportunities. 06 September 2018 reminded me to remember and honor those who were here before me. That day encouraged me to be the best airman, officer, and person that I can be today. Most of all, 06 September 2018 taught me that I am the keeper of the torch and the one responsible for mentoring the Tuskegee Airmen of the future and teaching them the importance of our past.


John Slemp

HONORING LIVING LEGENDS: THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN


Six original Tuskegee Airmen, photographed during the Atlanta Warbird Weekend, on 6 October, 2017. L to R are LTC Harry T. Stewart, Mr. Lawton Wilkerson, LTC Robert Friend, Dr. Hillard Pouncy, Brigadier General Charles McGee, and LTC Harold Brown.


ARSENAL OF DEMOCRACY 20

75TH ANNIVERS

END OF WORLD W Article and photos by Kevin Hong, Airspeed editor


Five years ago in 2015, over 70 warbirds performed a flyover in Washington DC over the National mall commemorating the 70th Anniversary, End of World War II. In 2020 to mark the 75th Anniversary World War II Victory Commemoration Flyover, the event was going to take place on May 8, 2020. Years and months of planning leading up to the event seemed very grim and had a lot of uncertainty on whether or not we were going to pull this historic flyover off was yet to be revealed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Day by day we would constantly check emails to see if the event was going to happen and like other events the no one knew if the state would come in and shut us down. The great news was that the event was rescheduled for September 25, 2020 however the 100 planes scheduled to appear dwindled down to 70 warbirds. Regardless, planes from all over the country came to the event to honor the veterans and commemorate the end of World War II once again. The CAF FM-2 Wildcat returned from Hawaii’s End of World War II flyover from a carrier and was able to make it all the way to DC including other rare aircraft such as the Fairey Firefly from California. Throughout the week media had a rare opportunity to interview some of the people from the Greatest Generation that ever lived. Veterans and people who supported America in World War II still came out to speak with the media and tell their stories even amongst the Covid-19 pandemic. Of course all the necessary and CDC guidelines were in place to

protect them and everyone involved with this great tribute to honor the fallen. World War II B-29 pilot Lt Col Bob Vaucher and Connie Palacioz, an original Rosie the Riveter, were some of the veterans in attendance for the media day and practice day. As planes arrived throughout the week, the sound of radial engines filled the air as formation of warbirds circled the skies above Virginia preparing for the massive flyover. For a few days the depression of the coronavirus went away when you were able to hear the sweet sounds of World War II fighters and bombers, and yes even a DeHavilland Mosquito. It was a great sight to see a ramp filled with warbirds since many airshows were canceled this year due to unfortunate circumstances with the Coronovirus. Due to the pandemic visitors and aviation enthusiasts were not allowed to view the aircraft like the last time. Only people working the event were allowed onto the premises with the exception of the media flying on the warbirds for the event. On Thursday’s practice day, clouds began to move into the DC area. Having escape a hurricane down in Texas the day before I flew up to DC coming from Houston, somehow the weather was following me. The morning started off with an extensive pilot brief talking about the numerous formations from trainer parades to bombers highlighting the different battles thoughout World War II. There were 19 different types of formations for the flyover and all were time sensitive to hit their

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continued to spin in my brain as I continued to shoot dark silhouettes of planes in the sky. Eventually all the planes got into the air and there were some fantastic opportunities to catch the warbirds take off and capture some great video. The situation did not get me down considering I was surrounded by so many historic aircraft and people. At least I was not sitting at home doing nothing. Instead the sounds of Mustangs running up and watching the lineup of warbirds taxi out was just enough to take some of my pain away as sweet smell of 100 low lead filled the air. Ah yes I was home and enjoyed every minute of the experience.

After the informative and entertaining briefing it was time to fly. We walked out of the hangar to overcast skies and not a hint of sunlight came out. Oh yes welcome to 2020 as I thought to myself. Everyone’s attention turned to their phones to look at the weather and what may come to a disastrous end of what was supposed to be an awesome day of flying. The weather remained stable as we continued to get the planes ready to taxi out. The Stearmans taxied out and the creativity in me

Watching the heavy bombers come over the top while the fighters flew underneath was like watching Fantasia with airplanes. The airboss was a director orchestrating all the aircraft into different orbits and hold positions. After the planes landed they taxied by the media and I was able to capture some great audio of the Mosquito and TBMs taxiing by. Over all it was a great day despite the overcast skies. Little did we know this would be the only day we would get to fly.

Kevin Hong

mark over the National mall. During our time at pilot brief, Lt Col Bob Vaucher was presented with a renewed Pilot’s license at the age 102. He was the first pilot to deliver the B-29 to the US military. Witnessing this special occasion was a reminder why we were really there for the flyover. It wasn’t about the aircraft, or flying at that moment, it was about the veterans and the sacrifices made to protect the freedom we have for this great country. Congressman Sam Graves was also in attendance and on hand to present US flags for us to fly in each aircraft participating in the flyover.


The next morning as I drove to the airport overcast skies continued to plague us. It was not looking good for the flyover however while everyone was scrambling to get all the crews gathered and screened by TSA a slight mist showed up off and on. We continued our routine to prep the planes for the flyover and watch the first wave of Stearmans takeoff heading out to the National Mall. As we continued to brief and talk to the crews about where and what I’ll want to shoot the bad news came down the line. The marshallers became the bearer of bad news that the ceiling had dropped between the airport and the National mall. The Stearmans were coming back and we were done for the day. It was heart wrenching and disappointment set in but we still had a rain day for tomorrow and we all seemed optimistic. The Arsenal of Democracy team took advantage of the rainy afternoon and we gathered all of our images and videos from all different angles including an R-44 that caught incredible video of the planes taking off down the runway following behind them and aerials that were breathtaking.

Our final day on Saturday came and the weather got worse. Once again we were faced with a challenge of weather and the call went out at 6:30a the flyover was canceled. Even though we did not fly, everyone involved with the program made an outstanding production to showcase the victory and celebrate the end of World War II. The 75th Anniversary Arsenal of Democracy was a special reminder to the soldiers who never came home from the war. It was about the veterans and honoring the people who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Some people commented and said you guys flew all the way there and didn’t fly. Doesn’t that upset you? Of course it’s discouraging not to fly but for me to shake the hands of veterans and spend just a few minutes thanking them for their service was worth it and would do it again.


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Riding With A Legend Article and photos by Brett Schauf


Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Robert (Bob) Vaucher, born December 3,1918 in Mission, Texas, is one of the living legends to be honored by the Arsenal of Democracy Flyover. The original plan was for the Colonel to act as a Grand Marshall for the flyover and ride in B-29 Doc, but due to weather conditions on the scheduled date and backup date, the flyover was not able to occur. The crew of Doc still felt it was necessary to find a way to honor the Colonel and give him a ride on a B-29. During his military service Lt Col Vaucher was the recipient of two Distinguished Flying Crosses, five Air Medals, eight Battle Stars & thirteen War Time Commendations and Citations. In July 1943 Bob piloted the first B-29 Superfortress accepted from Boeing delivering the aircraft to the United States Air Corp in Pratt, Kansas. He flew 117 missions including the first B-29 strategic combat mission against mainland Japan on June 15, 1944 and was mission commander for the Yokohama mission on May 25, 1945. Lt. Col Vaucher was also selected to be the mission commander for the Show of Force Fly Over of 525 B-29’s over the Japanese surrender ceremony aboard the battleship, USS Missouri on September 2, 1945. After two flight cancellations due to weather conditions, and the canceling of the AOD flyover, B-29 Doc’s crew was finally able to give the Lt Col one more ride in a B-29. The flight, although short, was very emotional. During the engine starts you could watch the Colonel going through the hand motions he had performed so many times, counting the blades as the engines were pulled through, reaching for the throttles as we began our take off roll, and giving a thumbs up to the crew after smooth landing. As he looked out the window during flight, you could almost see the many memories of his proud service coming back to him. Thank you Lt. Col Vaucher for your service, it was an incredible honor to fly with you.

Lt Col Vaucher enjoys the view from the navigator’s seat on B-29 Doc.


Brett Schauf

Col. Vaucher waves to members of the media as he tours the cockpit of B-29 Doc the day before he is scheduled to ride in the Arsenal of Democracy Flyover.


Brett Schauf

Col. Vaucher reminiscing with Doc’s Flight Engineer Donnie Obreiter.


Brett Schauf Col. Vaucher is able to spend some time in the cockpit of B-29 Doc with his daughter.


Brett Schauf


Col. Vaucher with some of the flight Crew of Doc B-29. Pictured from left to right. Frank Berry, Scott Sarver, Pete Leidich, Donnie Obreiter, Ken Newell, Brett Schauf


HOW I GOT THE SHOT!


Brett Schauf

Two P-51 Mustangs in formation with B-29 Doc over Beaver Lake. Image taken from tail gunners window on B-29. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Tamron SP 24-70 2.8 @ 58mm ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/160 Exposure: f/13 Processed in Adobe Photoshop


Geoffrey Arnwine

Many of my favorite airshows that I have gone to in the past have taken place at military bases, more specifically ones that have fighters stationed there. These types of shows are not only great to catch fighter jets in the skies, but they are also great for catching them deploying flares. Depending on the base, you will see fighters launch flares during a demonstration that typically consists of Air to Air, Air to Ground, and Rescue simulations. When a plane deploys flares, they can do it in different variations, from just a few at a time to a full burst. But keep in mind, if you were to ask someone in the crowd who is familiar with the airshow circuit when or if they will be launching flares, the answer is “I don’t know.” That means you must be prepared for when they come by tracking the jet on camera, which can be physically demanding at times. The strain on the arms though does pay off, because at the end of the day if lucky, you can end up with a really incredible shot of a fighter deploying flares. Attending multiple days of a show is also good, since the first day you are more familiar with when to expect the moment for the following day. From my experience, I have gotten pictures like this at Nellis, Luke, and Mountain Home. F-15E Strike Eagle deploy flares while banking away from the crowd during the Combined Arms Demo at the 2018 Mountain Home AFB Gunfighter Skies Open House. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 7D Mk II Lens: Canon 100-400mm ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/6.3, Manual Edited in Lightroom Classic, Used Photoshop 2020 for sky


Mark Streit 2018 Wings Over North Georgia event at Richard Russell Airport in Rome, GA. Two of the Air Combat Command demo teams were there. The F-22 Raptor Demo Team with the demo flown by Lt. Col. Paul “Loco” Lopez. Was my very first time getting to see the F-22 team. I caught this image as “Loco” brought the Raptor from directly behind us on the flight line and began his climb as he passed overhead shedding some major vapor vortices. Camera equipment and settings Camera: EOS 5D Mark IV Lens: Canon EF100-400mm L II IS USM ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/1000 Exposure: f/6.3 Image processed in Adobe Lightroom CC 2019 with the Topaz DeNoise AI plugin


Josh Hill US Air Force F-35A Lightning II Demonstration Team pulling some vapes in a tight turn at the 2020 OC Airshow in Ocean City, MD. The shot was taken from the beach at show center. Just days before the show the city required the show organizer to eliminate the VIP seating areas from the beach, leaving the space available on a first come first served basis. To ensure getting a good spot, I left the house at about 5am, arriving in Ocean City around 8am, and the beach around 8:30a. The show did not start until noon, so there was time to kill, and fortunately my spot was close enough to pick up WiFi from a nearby hotel. This also provided time to test settings in the overcast environment, using the USCG cutter anchored just offshore, marking show center. I made some mistakes with this shot (and most during this particular demonstration). The F-35 demonstration immediately followed the Heritage Flight, and my camera was set to get some prop blur on the P-51. There was not much of a break between the two performances and I neglected to adjust my settings for jets‌I was fortunate to get a fairly sharp shot. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 90D Lens: Sigma 150-600C F5-6.3 @ 347mm ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/200 Exposure: f/11 Processed in Photoshop, Denoise with Topaz Denoise AI


Mike Bilek

United Airlines 737 “Star Wars - “The Rise of Skywalker” livery captured while aircraft spotting at John Wayne Airport (KSNA) in Orange County, CA. Due to the lack of air shows as a result of COVID-19, I have found myself chasing special aircraft liveries that have been produced by some of the major commercial airlines. I find and track these liveries using the Flight Radar 24 on my smart phone. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Sony A9 Lens: Sony 100-400mm GM + 1.4x Teleconverter ISO: 320 Shutter speed: 1/2000 Exposure: f/6.3 Sony RAW processed in Adobe Lightroom Classic, opened as smart object in Photoshop CC 2020 then applied DFine2 and Color Efex Pro 4 filters using the Nik Collection. Sky swap using Luminar 4.


JosĂŠ M. Ramos

Operating in the Jax MOAs, Ambush 40 of VFC-12 Fighting Omars awaits the setting sun to begin hostilities against the Eisenhower Strike Group during training exercises prior to the carrier’s deployment in January of 2020. I was fortunate to be invited to participate in a couple of events with VFC-12 to see first hand the complexity of these exercises from the adversary side of the house. Flying in an F/A-18D, we orbited a few times with Ambush 40 as the sunset, capturing the Hornet is some incredible light prior to turning to our own CAP station and doing our part in the night time scenario. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon Z6 Lens: Nikkor 24-70mm f/4 S @ 46mm ISO: 500 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/6.3, Aperture priority Edited in Photoshop


Mike Hill Late final in bright sunshine with clouds behind - this J model C-130 Hercules is a staple of the Canadian Forces long-haul fleet. Just missed the full prop disk that would have required 1/90th. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon EOS 6D II Lens: Canon EF 100-400 f/4- f5.6L IS USM II ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/125 Exposure: f/16 Shot in Canon RAW (CR2) and enhanced with Aurora HDR


Richard JackJames Shooting photo of KLM 747-400 taxiing at Los Angeles International Airport from helicopter. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 1D Mark IV Lens: Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/5.6, Shutter priority Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Rob Tabor

Refueling VMFA 533(AW) Hornets over the Pacific Ocean. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D2Xs Lens: Nikon 28-70mm f/2.8D @ 229mm ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/1000 Exposure: f/4.5, Manual Edited in Lightroom, Photoshop, Nik Software Color Efx Pro 4


Rod Cromer

During the 2019 Heart of Texas airshow in Waco, nothing went right. It rained for two and a half of the three days. Nothing flew as scheduled. Weather forecast was not good and people were getting cranky. Looking out across the ramp, I spotted this Mustang. By itself, nothing around it. The low clouds and wet tarmac gave the scene that “England 1940� look. It was one of those infrequent moments where I saw the image as if looking through the camera, and the result was exactly as I saw it. This image was taken in Waco, Texas on 7 April 2019. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 7D Mark II Lens: Canon 70-200 mm f/2.8L ISO: 500 Shutter speed: 1/125 Exposure: f/4, Manual Edited in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018


AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

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ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards Secretary Mike Collins ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller Airspeed Editor Kevin Hong Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at isap_info@aviationphoto.org or isappresident@gmail.com Airspeed is a publication to showcase our members’ work in capturing aviation events. Images should be sized at a minimum size of at least 5100 x 3300 (17” x 11”) @ 300 dpi. We would like your largest landscape file size format for our full page spread in our featured magazine. Please submit up to 10 images per article and your text in a Microsoft Word document. Email your article and images by using www.wetransfer.com and send to isap_info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). Members can submit images for review for a future cover or back page display or would like to inquire on doing an article for Airspeed contact us via email at isap_info@aviationphoto.org We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


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Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The November 2020 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world....

Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The November 2020 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world....

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