Airspeed - The magazine for aviation photographers

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Photo Reviews of Fourth Quarter Airshow Season Meet New ISAP members and much more!


WELCOME TO THE 2021 DECEMBER ISSUE OF AIRSPEED! National Museum of the United States Air Force John Ford Wings Over Camarillo Bob Driver Tom Spanos Joseph Jenkins

Florida International Airshow Jason Skinner

Warbirds Over Monroe Richard JackJames

Stuart Air Show Jason Skinner

Bill LaFlemme

California Capital Airshow Larry Grace

Meet Our Members Deana Denlinger Ray Fuller

Kevin Barry Rick Gauthreaux

Member’s Showcase José M. Ramos CAF Corsicana Airshow David Walsh Wings Over Houston Kevin Hong The Second Life of “Lima Mike” Marc Schultz Bell Fort Worth Alliance Airshow Larry Grace David Walsh Wings Over Dallas Kevin Hong Mirage 5 BD-09 Nic Limbioul Thunder and Lightning Over Arizona Jeff Krueger Larry Grace

Lockheed Martin Central Florida Air and Space Show Jason Skinner

Marc Sherman

Tips and Tricks Jeff Krueger The Perfect Gift: Ghosts Calendars 2022 Review Kevin Hong Airplane Silhouettes John Ford FRONT COVER PHOTO: X-29 and experimental aircraft hanging from the ceiling of the US Air Force Museum. Photo by John Ford Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 24 - 120mm ISO 200 Shutter speed: 1.3 sec Exposure: f/16 Processed in Adobe Photoshop BACK COVER: L-39 at sunset. Photo by Bradley Wentzel Camera: Canon EOS-1DX MK II Lens: 70 - 200mm F2.8DG OS HSM Sports 018 ISO 200 Shutter speed: 1/200 Exposure: f/4 Processed in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom


NEW AND RETURNING ISAP MEMBERS Grayson Baum

Jack Fleetwood

Pierre Meilhac

Hayman Tam

Brent Blue

Bryn Forbes

Mike Miley

Rob Tabor

Nigel Bowles

David Garcia

John Mortland

Mark Streit

Gary Chambers

Taggart Gorman

Brent Ovard

Ozkan Uner

Michael Cozad

Dylan van Graan

Bill Pekala

David Walsh

Michael Corazzelli

Arnold Greenwell

Paul Pritchett

Jacob Welty

Larry Crain

Josh Hill

John Sepp

Yasuhiro Yama

Charles Daniels

Bonnie Kratz

Marc Sherman

Mike Young

Robert Eastman

Andy Lay

Steven Sliger

Paul Zeinert

Donalee Eiri

Patrick Lalande

Timothy Smith

Steve Zimmermann

Charles Favreau

Brent Marchant

Sean Stoltz

Albert Figuccio

Greg Meland

Steven Sumosky

The goal of International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. The new Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP members and their photography, experiences, and their passion for aviation from around the world. From military and commercial aviation, you’ll be able to see it all while learning about aviation photography, post processing tips in Lightroom and Photoshop, aviation history, air show reports, aviation museums, and more. We look forward to sharing our members’ images and articles with everyone. Enjoy this issue of Airspeed! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, Airspeed Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


NATIONAL MUSEUM

OF THE UNITED STATES

AIR FORCE Article and photos by John Ford

This is what I would think all aircraft museums want to be like. This place is amazing, from the variety of aircraft to the unbelievable amount of personal items and support equipment, it seems like they have it all. The staff are very helpful and will try to accommodate you in any way they can. The museum is open from 9a - 5p, Seven days a week, except the big holidays, and a week is what you need to see it all. Admission is free as well as parking. There are four main galleries and they are huge (over a million square feet) and full of the coolest aircraft that the USAAC through the USAF, ever flew with and against. One gallery is full of WWI aircraft and related historical items, the next gallery is WWII aircraft and equipment, yet another gallery is dedicated to the Cold War and there is a small area with rockets and yet another gallery with experimental aircraft. As for photography this is a great place, the lighting is a bit moody so being able to use a tripod is a great help. Suffice to say visiting this museum is well worth the time and effort, and after editing I have new ideas for my next visit.




John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford



John Ford


Bob Driver Camarillo Airport is located about 7 miles north of Naval Air Station Point Mugu in Ventura County California. The single runway airport is home to the American Aeronautical Foundation, Camarillo Composite Squadron 61 of the California Civil Air Patrol, Commemorative Air Force’s Southern California Wing and its museum, and the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Chapter 723. The airport has a long tradition of hosting airshows. After missing the 2020 season, the “Wings Over Camarillo” airshow returned for its 40th year with a theme of “honoring healthcare heroes”. The schedule included performances by aerobatic performers, classic warbirds from the CAF, military aircraft, experimental aircraft, antique cars, a war veteran’s tent, and a WWII re-enactment camp.

Aerobatic routines are a big part of the Wings Over Camarillo, more so than most air shows. 2021 included performances by Vicky Benzing in her 1940 PT-17 Stearman, John Colliver in his AT-6/SNJ “War Dog”, Judy Phelps in her Pitts Special, Sammy Mason his Pitts S2 and Aaron Fitzgerald in his Red Bull BO-105 aerobatic helicopter.

Wings Over Camarillo tends to be less about high speed, loud performances and 2021 was no exception. The two jets were the opening demonstration by an VFA-122 “Flying Eagles” F/A-18E Super Hornet from Naval Air station Lemoore and the late afternoon performance by the Camarillo CAF’s own Jason Somes in his rare Cold War MiG-17F.

Not all the action was in the sky, a crowd favorite was the pyrotechnics and wall of fire display integrated into the European Theater, Pacific Theater, Sammy Mason and Jason Somes portions of the flying schedule. Closing out the day was the Condor Squadron of T-6 Texans in a Missing Man formation in honor of veterans.

There were two segments of the flying schedule featured WWII aircraft from the Camarillo CAF and Chino Planes of Fame inventory. The European Theater fly-bys included a B-25 Mitchell, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang. The Pacific Theater comprised of P-51 Mustang, Grumman F6F Hellcat, PBJ-1 Mitchell, Mitsubishi Zero and F4U Corsair aircraft.


WINGS OVER CAMARILLO

Article and photos by Bob Driver and Tom Spanos, Joseph Jenkins



Bob Driver



Bob Driver



Bob Driver



Bob Driver


TOM SPANOS




Tom Spanos



Tom Spanos



Tom Spanos



Tom Spanos


JOSEPH JENKINS It was great to get out for a weekend in August to go to my first airshow in over 18 months. The weather was beautiful, but then what else do you expect for being right next to the ocean. Having never been to the Wings over Camarillo airshow I wasn’t really sure what I was in for. The airshow starts out fast and loud with the Navy’s F-18 Tac Demo opening the show and doing high speed passes. There’s never a dull moment in the show as you are sitting right on the flight line and as one act is staging to perform you can see the others landing. There was a good mix of different generations of planes out there performing. As if that wasn’t enough you also get the USAF parachute team out there dropping from C-47s and explosions to help you round out the day.




Joseph Jenkins



Joseph Jenkins



Joseph Jenkins


WARBIRDS OVER M O N R O E Article and photos by Richard JackJames

Scott “Scooter” Yoak performing in “Quick Silver” P-51 Mustang



Richard JackJames


Warbirds Adventures P-40 “American Dream”


Richard JackJames


Alex Newsome “Angels’ Playmate” P-51 Mustang


Richard JackJames


Air Heritage Museum C-123


Richard JackJames


Chefpitts Airshows Pitts Biplane


Lockheed Martin U-2 “Dragon Lady” From the 9th Reconnaissance Wing from Beale AFB. Sunset flyby during the 2021 California Capitol Airshow.

CALIFORNIA A I R S H O W

Photos by Larry Grace / ISAP President


CAPITAL


Chris Darnell in the Shockwave Jet Truck. Getting ready to race with Kirby Chambliss and the Red Bull Edge 540.


Larry Grace


Kent Pietsch - 2021 ICAS Foundation Air Show Hall of Fame! Flying his Jelly Belly Interstate Cadet.


Larry Grace


US Navy F-35C Lightning II from the Strike Fighter Squadron 125, the “Rough Raiders”.


Larry Grace


Sunset flight: USAF Heritage Flight: F-35 Demo Team Pilot and leader Capt. Kristin “Beo” Wolfe, and Steve Hinton flying the P-38 Lightning II making the heritage pass.


Larry Grace


US Navy F35C Lightning II from the Strike Fighter Squadron 125, the “Rough Raiders” showing off a rear profile.and vapors.


Larry Grace


Aaron Fitzgerald and Red Bull BO105 aerobatic helicopter and Luke Aikins from the Red Bull Air Force. A rare view underneath the BO105 helicopter seeing Luke Aikins jumping.


Larry Grace


Aaron Fitzgerald and Red Bull BO105 aerobatic helicopter and Kirby Chambliss flying the Red Bull Edge 540 wowing the crowds with an awesome performance.


Larry Grace


Chris Darnell in the Shockwave Jet Truck showing off the flames, smoke and power.


Larry Grace


RCAF Snowbirds showing the team aircraft CT-114 Tutor during their first show back in the USA after COVID cancel the team 2020 season.


Larry Grace


Follow the leader! Col. John Caldwell “Boss” bringing the team along during the Echelon Pass-In Review.


Larry Grace


USN F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet TACDemo and F-35C Lightning II from the Strike Fighter Squadron 125, the “Rough Raiders” heading towards show center. The first time the two aircraft flying formation for the airshow fans.


Larry Grace


The RCAF 2021 Snowbirds team pose for a group photo during their first show back in the USA.


Larry Grace


This year the California Capital airshow put together a Girls Only Aerospace & STEM Conference and Mentor program and invited a set of speakers for the young ladies to hear and learn about opportunities in the aviation and aerospace industry. This year’s speakers were: (From Left to Right) Steph Stricklen, Venice M. Goodwine, Paula McDonald, Cindy Nichol, Cherrianne Davis, Captain Alyse Adkins, Major Michelle “Mace” Curran, Major Kristin “BEO” Wolfe.


Larry Grace


MEMBER’S SHOWCASE Article and photo by José M. Ramos


Fini Flight Captain Mark “Casper” Brazelton takes off in Bandit 23, an F-5N adversary aircraft from VFC-111 Sun Downers at NAS Key West, for his final flight as a Naval Officer. Captain Brazelton’s naval career spans over 30 years and includes tours commanding Fighter Squadron Composite 111 and Tactical Support Wing prior to serving the last 3 years as Deputy Commander Naval Air Forces Reserve. Camera: Nikon Z6 Lens: 24 - 70mm f/4.0 ISO 160 Shutter speed: 1/5,000 Exposure: f/4 Processed in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom


CAF CORSICANA A I R S H O W Article and photos by David Walsh


Some of the best airshows are the small ones in Texas. Every year in Corsicana, Texas near Dallas, the CAF Coyote Squadron, hosts an airshow as a fundraiser supporting their wing. Last year many airshows canceled due to COVID and this was one of them.

David Walsh

This year the airshow returned and had local Texas warbirds like the B-17 Texas Raiders, B-25 Devil Dog, and C-47 That’s All Brother. The Trojan Phlyers performed as well as Jacquie B. Some acts were not able to perform due to high winds but you can always make the best of what you got especially when you hear the sound of radial engines.



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh


Every year at Wings Over Houston we offer a sunrise photo tour for Saturday and Sunday. Photographers from around the world come to this airshow and are always amazed at the amount of warbirds we have on the ramp. It’s an early morning that can always bring beautiful Texas skies or a dreary day with no sun. This year’s special warbirds that came in were the Spitfire and Hurricane from the Dakota Territory Air Museum. The airshow was a great success with record crowds. After coming back from a COVID year no one knew how the airshow would turn out going to a hybrid format. Last year we were fortunate to do a rare drive-in show only so this time we had a Friday drive-in show then shifted to a normal Saturday and Sunday show where people could walk around and see the static aircraft.

Article and photos by Kevin Hong / ISAP Editor

The airshow had a great turnout with the return of the Snowbirds being able to cross the Canadian border to our airshow. A car show, concert, and guitar show was added to the line up of events and worked out really well. It was great to see a variety of events at an airshow for the whole family. There was support from the military with the United States Air Force Thunderbirds, F-22 Raptor performing with a P-51 for the Heritage Flight, Coast Guard, and the US Navy F-18 Super Hornet with a F4F Wildcat for the Navy Legacy Flight.


Wings Over Houston Article and photos by Kevin Hong / Airspeed Editor



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong


Kevin Hong




Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong


The city of Cologne in Germany is commonly associated with the famous Cologne Cathedral, the hospitality of its inhabitants and, of course, the quite famous “Kölsch”-beer brewed here. But apart from this Cologne also has a long and fascinating aviation tradition that goes back far into the beginning of the last century. One of Germany’s first civil airports, the “Butzweilerhof”, was opened in 1911 in the Cologne district of Ossendorf. In 1922, the Instone Air Line started regular scheduled services from Butzweilerhof on the London-Brussels-Cologne route. In the course of the following years, the “Butz” was integrated into the route networks of numerous other airlines and became the air hub of the West until the beginning of the Second World War. It was also visited by many famous aviators like the English long-haul pilot Miss Amy Johnson made a stopover on the “Butz” on her flight to China in 1931. After the end of WW II hostilities in Europe, the airfield continued to be used for military purposes by NATO Forces. In 1960, it was the venue for the World Gliding Championships. The Belgian Air Component used the airfield until it was finally closed down in 1995. In the course of the following years, a mixed development of commercial and residential buildings developed on the site. Parts of the former reception building and of the apron have been preserved and are now listed buildings. A group of local aviation enthusiasts has recently managed to display a decommissioned Fokker F-27-600RF Friendship on the site and thus make it accessible to the interested public. The 11-tonne aircraft

was transported by land from it’s former storage place at Cologne/ Bonn Airport to Butzweilerhof. The aircraft, built in 1970, had an eventfully service life. “Lima-Mike” flew for WDL Aviation with the registration D-AELM until it was retired in 1997. Before that, it had been operated at numerous stations around the globe: • 16.12.1970: First Flight as PH-FTR • 1970: TU-VAJ with the Ivory Coast Air Force • 1977: TU-TIA with Air Ivoire • 1979: PH-FTR with Danish Aero Lease ntu • 1979: I-ALML with Aero Ligure ntu • 1980: PH-FTR with Fokker • 1983: 9M-MCY with MAS-Malaysian Airline System • 1986: EC-DSH with Aviaco • 1987: OY-CCL with Star Air • 1991: D-ARRS with Ratioflug • 1993: OY-CCL with Alkair • 1993: OY-CCL with Corporate Air • 1996: D-ARRS with Ratioflug • 1997: OY-CCL with BAC Express Airlines • 1997: D-AELM with WDL Aviation


The second life of “Lima Mike” Article and photos by Marc Schultz

At the time of the photographs shown in this feature in August 2021, the aircraft is in the restoration phase at its new location and will shortly serve as a public attraction for the historic “Butzweilerhof” site, which is still worth seeing today. Shots taken in this feature with Sony Alpha 6400 and the new Tamron 17-70mm / f2.8 zoom lens. Text and photos by Marc Schultz / www.flugsicht.com Fokker F-27-600RF Friendship D-AELM on it’s new exhibition site at Köln-Butzweilerhof. The aircraft is undergoing an extensive restoration and will probably return to it’s former WDL Airline livery.



Marc Schultz



Marc Schultz


The historic reception building of the former airport is still largely in its original condition and now listed as a protected building.


Marc Schultz


Maj. Haden “Gator” Fullam A-10 Demo Team Viper Demo Team F-16 Viper Demo Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz with Air Force Heritage P-51 Mustangs with pilots Stuart Milson and Tommy Williams.


Larry Grace

BELL FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIR SHOW Article and photos by Larry Grace / ISAP President


Viper Demo Team F-16 Viper Demo Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz last Demo Flight.


Larry Grace


Brother and Sister sharing a fun moment after guiding back to the ramp the A-10 and F-16 after their demo flights.


Larry Grace


US Navy Blue Angels pilots sharing discussion before their demo flight. The team wearing their gold flight suitsto celebrate the Blue Angels 75 years of aviation excellence.


Larry Grace


BA#3 Maj Frank Zastoupil giving a wave before the start of the team demo.


Larry Grace


David Martin climbing into the blue skies in his Breitling CAP 232 aircraft.


Larry Grace


Bell Helicopter, title sponsor of the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show, showcases three of their helicopters for the airshow crowds.


Larry Grace


The many colors of Bill Stein’s Edge 540. Using cutting edge paint technology, Bill’s Edge 540 aircraft is using a paint that continuously changes color based on the constantly varying angles between the spectators, airplane, and the lighting. Imagine the visual impact of Bill’s airplane that is multiple colors at one time.


Larry Grace


David Martin showing off a high energy aerobatic move with his Beech Baron aircraft.


Larry Grace


USAF Heritage Flight: F-16 Viper, A-10 Thunderbolt, joined by the Air Force Heritage Flight P-51 Mustangs “The Brat III” and “Bum Steer”.


Larry Grace


CDR Ben Walborn BA#5 and LCDR Cary Rickoff BA#6 (In the two-seater F-18 Super Hornet) take-off climb.


Larry Grace


LCDR Cary Rickoff BA#6 (In the two-seater F-18 Super Hornet) coming around the corner marker.


Larry Grace


The C-17 West Coast Demo Team from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington displaying the C-17 Globemaster III.


Larry Grace


F-16 Viper Demo Team pilot Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz pulling vapor.


Larry Grace


CDR Ben Walborn BA#5 and LCDR Cary Rickoff BA#6 Opposing Minimum Radius Turn.


Larry Grace


DAVID WALSH




David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh



David Walsh


WINGS OVER DALLAS Article and photos by Kevin Hong / Airspeed Editor


The Commemorative Air Force’s Wings Over Dallas Airshow was the last CAF airshow of the year. This year’s theme focused on Texas Goes To War. Most of the planes participating were local CAF units in the Texas area however we did have a few planes come in from other parts of the country. It is a rare event where you will be able to see some of the veterans be reunited with some of the aircraft they used to fly in World War II. There were many things to do for families coming to the airshow this year including a STEM education area, and a Living history reenactors camp filled with reenactors and World War II vehicles that rolled out in front of the crowds. This year there were quite a few veterans that came out this year including Paul Hilliard, a SBD Dauntless bombardier that was able to see an SBD fly and talk to people about his missions in World War II. I spent some time talking to him about the procedures and angles of dive bombing. Needless to say when the veterans told their stories about the war over the loud speaker people were listening to every word.

One of the most touching moments was the VIP luncheon I was covering during the airshow. Private C.P. “Buck” Sloan with the 2nd Infantry Division showed up with a Belgian named Bob Sparenberg that was just a child when D-Day happened. He credits veterans like Sloan for saving his life during the Battle of the Bulge. Sparenberg claims, “If it wasn’t for the sacrifice they made, people like me – that were born in Europe and our families went through four years of Nazi occupation – we would not be here. Sloan said he’s always proud to share his story of D-Day when anyone asks. He believes people should understand what happened. During my time at the airshow I also had a chance to see the new CAF Henry Tippie National Aviation Education Center. The hangar is not just a hangar for the CAF bombers but also an education center to educate the next generation of aviators. The airshow had a lot of warbirds flying and giving rides but also had a lot to educate people about World War II and honoring veterans.


Paul Hilliard, a SBD Dauntless bombardier posing and recalling memories flying in the Dauntless during World War II over the Pacific.


Kevin Hong



Kevin Hong

Private C.P. “Buck” Sloan with the 2nd Infantry Division with his wife and a Belgian named Bob Sparenberg he had rescued as a child on D-Day.


Cavanaugh Flight Museum P-40 flying with the CAF P-40.


Kevin Hong


B-29 FIFI head on taxi.


Kevin Hong


Japanese Zero being chased by a T-6 painted as a P-36 Hawk during the Tora Tora Tora act.


Kevin Hong


P-51 Mustangs: Gunfighter, Charlotte’s Chariot, and CAF Tuskegee Airmen Red Tail


Kevin Hong


P-51 Mustangs Gunfighter, Charlotte’s Chariot, and CAF Tuskegee Airmen Red Tail fly top cover for B-17 Texas Raiders.


Kevin Hong


World War II vehicles drive in front of the crowd.


Kevin Hong


Japanese Kate, P-40, B-29 FIFI and B-24 Diamond Lil in the new Henry B. Tippie National Aviation Education Center.


Kevin Hong


MIRAGE 5 BD-09 Article and photos by Nic Limbioul


This a story about passion, emotion and…preservation. A group of friends composed by a former Belgian Air Force pilot, technicians and enthusiasts are performing visits of the legendary two-seater Mirage 5. The BD-09!

was stored again until 2017. Former Mirage Pilot Marcel De Petter (callsign : Celle with 3,200 flight Hours) and former Belgian Air Force CO Jack Waldeyer inspected the bird for a potential acquisition. It was still in very good conditions.

This aircraft flew under Belgian Air force colors from March 1971 till January 1994. It logged 3,846 flight hours and made 3,930 landings.

Following long transactions, the former Mach 2 Jet arrived in Brustem (Sint-Truiden) in February 2018. After a period of maintenance, the BD-09 team started their presentation of the aircraft to former pilot and technician. The goal was and is still to preserve and show what was the « Delta Era ».

The 13th of January 1994, Cpt Avi Th.Dupont and Adjt BOOF. Willem made the last flight of this beautiful bird. Henceforth, the aircraft was first stored at Weelde AB, waiting for a potential new operator. In 1998, the two-seater was sold to a French company called « Société d’application générales d’électricité et de mécanique », Sagem. In February 2013, the aircraft was proposed and exposed for auction in Paris, but never found a buyer. Back to Bordeaux, BD-09

The team welcomes you two times a month at Brustem AB and regularly makes some presentation for spotters. Depsite the fact that the aircraft isn’t airworthy, you can enjoy a 3-D flight on board. A « must see » if you come visit Belgium! I express a big thanks to the BD-09 team for making this photo report possible.


Nic Limbioul



Nic Limbioul




Nic Limbioul



Nic Limbioul



Nic Limbioul


Thunder and Lightning Over Arizona Article and photos by Jeff Krueger


Davis-Monthan Air Force Base pulled out all the stops for the 2021 Thunder over Arizona Air Show the first weekend of November. Static displays included everything from WWII warbirds to some of the most advanced technology aircraft. They had US Customs and Pima County Sheriff Department helicopters, USAF UAV’s and lots of displays for all ages. Plenty of food concessions too! We were treated to a number of aerobatic acts such as Red Bull’s Kirby Chambliss, Vicky Benzing, and Kent Pietsch’s Jelly Belly along with many others. We also saw Aftershock jet truck burning down the runway… How cool. Of course, the USAF A-10 and F-35 demo teams were there as well as the US Navy Parachute team, the Leap Frogs and F/A-18 Super Hornet

demo team. The USAF Thunderbirds did their thing on the ground and in the air to perfection. The bottom line is there was a lot to see and there were great crowds to do just that. The warbirds salute and the heritage flights were perfect and it was fun to see the F6F Hellcat fly as it is a favorite of a friend of mine. Got a few photos for him and of course my favorite WWII “heavy” a B-17. Having Tom Larkin fly right at me in his mini jet was a thrilling experience and fun to see. Even though I was only able to attend on Saturday, it was a fantastic airshow and appeared to be a whopping success. I even ran into several ISAP members along the way. It was a great way to close out the 2021 airshow season for me. Can’t wait for 2022!



Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



Jeff Krueger



LARRY GRACE - ISAP PRESIDENT

Capt. Haden “Gator” Fullam A-10 Demo Team, and Maj. Kristin “BEO” Wolfe F-35 Lightning II Demo Team, with Air Force Heritage P-51 Mustang with pilot Tommy Williams.



EC-130H Compass Call flying overhead cover for Combat search and rescue (CSAR) demo.


Larry Grace



Larry Grace A member of the US Navy parachute team Leap Frogs with the Navy Seal Team Trident flag.


Capt. Haden “Gator” Fullam showcases the A-10 head-on gun run during his demo.


Larry Grace


Aftershock jet truck and Mini Jet flown by Tom Larkin getting ready to race each other.


Larry Grace


CAF B-17 Sentimental Journey leading the F6F hellcat and B-25 “Semper Fi”.


Larry Grace


Tom Larkin Mini Jet Flyby pass for the Thunder and Lightning over Arizona crowds.


Larry Grace


HH-60W Jolly Green ll Combat Rescue Helicopter part of the Combat search and rescue (CSAR) demo show pass for the airshow fans attending.


Larry Grace


HH-60W Jolly Green ll Combat Rescue Helicopter and C-130 showcasing the air to air refueling between the aircraft.


Larry Grace


Gregory “Wired” Colyer flying T-33 Shooting Star “ Ace Marker II”


Larry Grace


Kent Pietsch flying his Jelly Belly Interstate Cadet to a truck top landing.


Larry Grace


Vicky Benzing flying her Boeing 1940 Stearman in an inverted roll.


Larry Grace


West Coast Rhino F/A-18 Super Hornet Demo Team waving back to the airshow crowd during the Thunder and Lightning Over Arizona.


Larry Grace


USAF Thunderbirds Crew Chiefs marching to their starting position to get their aircraft ready for the demo.


Larry Grace


Thunderbirds #5 Maj Michelle “Mace” Curran #6 Maj Kyle “Gumbo” Oliver performing the Reflection Pitch / Reflection Pass with their teammates in the background.


Larry Grace


Florida

I N T E R N AT I O N A L A I R S H O W Article and photos by Jason Skinner


The Florida International Air Show took place over the 16th and 17th of October this year. It was held at the Punta Gorda Airport in Florida. The show opened with a flag drop by the SOCOM Paracommandos. Scott Farnsworth flew with the L-39 QYON racing jet, part of the first Brazilian air sports team. The Commemorative Air Force brought an SBD Dauntless and FG-1D Corsair. Dropping SOCOM this year was the East Coast C-17 Demo Team from South Carolina. Also from South Carolina, the F-16 Viper Demo Team with Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz. Patty Wagstaff flew her high energy low level acrobatic performance. She has been coming to Punta Gorda for over twenty years. Keeping the Southern/Florida connection going, Clemens Kuhlig,“Chef Pitts”, came in low for a ribbon cut during his show. Jim Peitz showed that all acrobatic airplanes are not equal putting on a display with a Beechcraft Bonanza. This was the 40th year of the Florida International Air Show. As always money collected over expenses was used to support local charities. We have moved to the West Coast of Florida and this has become our “hometown” show. I’ve been coming now for several years and it is always a great time.



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



Jason Skinner



LOCKHEED MARTIN CENTRAL FLORIDA AIR AND SPACE SHOW Photos by Jason Skinner

MV-22 Osprey from VM-266 “The Fighting Griffins” from MCAS New River, NC.


F-18 Rhino Demonstration Team VFA-106 “Gladiators”.


Jason Skinner


John Black going vertical in the Super Decathlon.


Jason Skinner


F/A-18 Super Hornets from NAS Lemoore join F4U-4 Corsair “Korean War Hero” flown by Jim “Torc” Tobul in a US Navy Legacy Flight.


Jason Skinner


Major Joshua “Cabo” Gunderson in the F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia.


Jason Skinner


The United States Air Force Thunderbirds F-16s perform the 5 card loop.


Jason Skinner


ATTACK!! The A-10C Thunderbolt II Demonstration Team from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Arizona.


STUART AIR SHOW Photos by Jason Skinner


Aaron Fitzgerald, Luke Aikins, Mike Swanson, Sean MacCormac and Jeff Provenzano share a light moment before the group jump on Saturday.


Jason Skinner


Aaron Fitzgerald in his favorite position, inverted, flying the BO-105.


Jason Skinner


Joining Red Bull is Kevin Coleman, a super accomplished racer and acrobatic pilot.


Jason Skinner


Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz in his penultimate performance as Commander of the F-16 Viper Demo Team.


Jason Skinner


A pair of P-51’s prepare to join the Air Force Heritage Flight.


Jason Skinner


Major Haden “Gator” Fullam recovering from his demonstration.


Jason Skinner


Major Joshua “Cabo” Gunderson in the F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia.


Jason Skinner


The Air Force Heritage Flight.


Jason Skinner


The Aeroshell Aerobatic Team turning in formation to close the show on Saturday.


Jason Skinner


BILL LAFLAMME


Dr. Joseph Masessa’s BAC 167 Strikemaster. Dr. Masessa was a local dermatologist, who was killed during a practice session flying another aircraft at the Stuart Air Show in 2019. This aircraft followed a “missing man formation”, which was dedicated to Dr. Masessa.


A-10C Thunderbolt II, piloted by Captain Haden “Gator” Fullam.


Bill LaFlamme


Drug Enforcement Agency & the Martin County Sheriff’s Office demonstration.


Bill LaFlamme


Shockwave Jet Truck, driven by Chris Darnell.


Bill LaFlamme


Bob Carlton night show.


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MEET OUR MEMBERS


Coronado Bridge at sunrise. The early morning mist envelops the Coronado Bridge as the sun attempts to break through. Canon 5d MkII, 70mm, f/9 @ 1/125 sec.


DEANA DENLINGER I currently reside in Orange County, California. I’ve recently acquired the tax practice of where I was employed for 27 years. Needless to say, any playtime and photography has to be scheduled when there isn’t a tax deadline looming in the near future. I’m an advanced amateur in photography and enjoy it as a hobby and have for many years. Besides photography, I enjoy creating leather goods and pine needle basketry. I decided to join ISAP in August after watching an older episode of “The Grid” with Scott Kelby this month. A member of ISAP had submitted photos. They were stunning. I decided to see what the ISAP was all about after that. My first experience with a camera was in the late 1970’s with a Kodak pocket camera. Since then, I’ve always taken photos but never learned anything more than just pushing the button. Even when I had the Canon Rebel film and digital cameras, I only used the auto setting. After receiving the Canon 7D Mk II as a Christmas present, I decided it was time to learn more. I took a few evening classes 3 or 4 years ago at the local college. It was there where I learned to get off the auto button and move into manual. I also took a few full semester photography classes at the local college and learned quite a bit. I became involved in the South County Photo Club during this time. I volunteer to lead photo outings for the club. I discovered it can be fun to scout a location prior to an event for reference to meeting places, directions, and where the sun is rising and setting. I’m always looking for something different or unique for the club to photograph. I enjoy shooting in raw and JPEG simultaneously. It’s nice to have the JPEGs available for viewing on a computer prior to processing the raw images. Once a year, a large group of friends and family rent a house at Bass Lake for the week. I photograph the water-skiers and tubers from the boat. The kids enjoy looking at the images at night each day and have some great laughs at their expressions and possible wipeouts. This year I decided to challenge myself and pan a water-skier while riding in the boat. Challenging, but successful. I currently shoot with the Canon 7D Mk II. My go-to lenses are the Tokina 11-20mm for wide angle, Sigma 100-400mm for zoom,

Canon 24mm and 50mm prime lenses for the in between shots. I use Lightroom for post processing and very little Photoshop since I’m not very familiar with this program yet. My love of aviation photography started with a client back in 2019 when he showed me a YouTube video of a quarter scale warbird he had built and flown. A few months later, I went to the RC Warbirds Classic event in June 2019 at the modeler’s flying field. That’s where it began. If someone would have said I would be into aviation photography prior to this, I would have thought they were crazy. I discovered how exciting it is to capture the plane in action. The warbirds are my favorite. They’re beautiful planes. I like to get “up close and personal” with the planes too when photographing. I really enjoy the tail shots and where the wheel meets the gravel. The builders of the planes are truly artists. They’ve created a flying replica of a warbird all the way down to the weathering from a box of wood and a set of plans. Except for a few items necessary for remote control, it’s hard to tell it’s not a full-scale plane. Even the pilots look realistic. For ground shots, I use the Tokina 11-20mm wide angle. For ground-to-air shots, I use my Sigma 100-400mm lens. I’m usually laying on the ground for the wide-angle shots since they’re one-quarter and one-fifth scale planes. When I first started photographing the remote-control planes, I was very happy with a sharp image. Then I read Moose Peterson’s Book, “Takeoff: The Alpha to Zula of Aviation Photography,” and read about blurred propellers. It’s opened a whole new chapter in photography for me. It’s challenging since the number of blades, the speed, and the uncertainty of the direction of the remote-control plane all come into play to be successful in obtaining the full circle propeller. A great way to practice aviation photography throughout the year is to find a local RC modelers club. There are quite of few of them nationwide. It’s a great place to practice the skills needed for aviation photography. You’ll also meet a lot of nice people who enjoy aviation on a smaller scale. The pilots are grateful for any photos taken of their planes. The fields are open 365 days here and only closed for maintenance or if another event is taking place in the area. If the field is open only to members, see if you can join as a non-flying member. I will be going to the Huntington Beach and the Chino airshows this year. It’ll be exciting to photograph the full-scale planes for the first time.




Deana Denlinger



Deana Denlinger



Deana Denlinger

TUBE FULL OF BOXES: A Prime Air plane departs Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport during the gloaming in June 2020. (Sony RX-10IV/220mm/ 1/500 f/4)



Deana Denlinger TUBE FULL OF BOXES: A Prime Air plane departs Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport during the gloaming in June 2020. (Sony RX-10IV/220mm/ 1/500 f/4)


KEVIN BARRY


Kevin Barry is an amateur photographer who has been lucky enough to photograph some interesting events over the last few decades. His interest in photography and aviation merged together when he earned his pilots license in 1979 at Zahn’s Airport in New York and wanted more than his Kodak Instamatic camera could offer. He began using a Ricoh XR-1 and shortly after a Ricoh XR-P camera during his flights, including photographing his first major airshow in 1981. After getting married and becoming a father, photography centered around family events, landscapes, and volunteer positions with Civil Air Patrol and Rombout Fire Company with a variety of film and digital point and shoot cameras. As the Public Affairs Officer for Civil Air Patrol and the Public Information Officer for Rombout Fire Company, JPG was the mode he used because it was easy to use and needed to quickly post to social media, attach photos to news releases and emails. Typically he would be photographing motor vehicle accidents, aerial reconnaissance, structural fires, parades, groundbase and aerial training exercises. He sometimes thought of himself as a photojournalist and would question his photos, “Did I capture

the action?”, “Does the picture help tell the story?” His photos and stories were regularly published in local, regional and national newspapers and magazines, as well as on social media. Having no formal photography training, he is mainly self taught from Tough Luck University, the internet, and some friendly advice. His first DSLR was a Nikon D5300, which he uses the Nikkor 10-20mm lens for aircraft displays. Not needing to carry a speedlite, the pop-up flash and the wide angle lens allows for easier internal aircraft photos. The main airshow camera is a Nikon D500, with the Nikkor 55-300mm lens on the flight-line during the show. He finds that lens is light weight for carrying all day at an airshow, besides covering the range that he needs. The Nikkor 200-500mm lens covers the long distance shots. The Nikkor 18-140mm is for everyday carry, due to its adaptability for all situations. He getting acquainted with his newest acquisition, the Nikon Z6II with a 24-70mm lens. With a full frame camera he is curious what differences between that and the DX sensor camera he will see at the next airshow.


After moving from New York to Florida for a new job, he joined the Spring Hill Camera Club. His interest for airshow photography was rekindled after attending Sun N Fun Aerospace Expo for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has joined Sun ‘n Fun as one of their airshow photographer. The Sun ‘n Fun photographers will get together for shooting of other airshows, rocket launches, balloonfests, and the Milky Way. One of his favorite events was the 2018 Great Southern Warbird Fly-In where he participated in a basic aerial photography class and flew T-6 backseat to photograph a formation of T-6’s. Some of his and the other photographers’ photos from that event were published in EAA Warbirds magazine.

Kevin Barry

Just like with pilots, the aviation photographer brotherhood is strong. No matter what level of experience and expertise you have, all are welcomed. Shooting next to a professional photographer whose work

has been in various aviation magazines raises his creativity and expectations that he wants for his photos. To improve his photography results, he started shooting in RAW and editing in Lightroom Classic. He looks forward to seeing everybody at the next airshow.



Kevin Barry



Kevin Barry



Kevin Barry



Kevin Barry



MARC SHERMAN I live and work in New York City, where I’m a proud dad, dedicated lawyer and passionate advanced amateur photographer. Although I have no formal training in photography, I got off to a very early and eager start in it when my dad gave me my first Nikon for my 12th birthday. My enthusiasm for aviation took root even earlier. During yearly summer trips to Israel, I loved seeing IAF jets coming and going (Phantoms, Skyhawks, Mirages, Kfirs, back then; and later F-15s and F-16s), and I remember waking up on the morning of July 4, 1976, and seeing everyone celebrating – not the US bicentennial, but the return of the hostages from Entebbe aboard Hercules aircraft. In sum, I love aviation, aviation history, watching aircraft, reading about them, flying in them, and, most of all, shooting them with my camera. I shoot with a Nikon D850. At an airshow, I use a Nikkor 80 - 400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR lens during the flights. For ground exhibits, I use a Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED. I always shoot RAW so I have more to work with when editing. I edit in Photoshop, which I have used for years and know better than any other program. I joined ISAP after going to this year’s airshow in Orange County, New York. I felt like I didn’t want the show to end, and I wanted to stay active in aviation photography throughout the year – not just when there are shows. To that end, I searched for blogs, Facebook groups, etc. in which to share my passion with like-minded enthusiasts, contribute whatever I can to them, and learn from them. When trekking around NYC, people often comment on my equipment, and I’m always happy to talk to them about what I’m doing and how. For someone new to aviation photography, I strongly recommend investing in powerful, high-quality long glass. I like to get so close that I can smell the jet fuel when looking at my pictures. Also, free your mind artistically and go for unique perspectives.




Marc Sherman



Marc Sherman



Marc Sherman


RAY FULLER


I am Ray Fuller, located just outside of Boston, Massachusetts, USA. My fascination for aviation and photography stems back fond memories of attending air shows as a young boy with my father, who served in the Royal Air Force. I am an instrument rated private pilot and, at the time of this writing (October 2021), I am working on my commercial and certified flight instructor (CFI) ratings. I have some limited aerobatics experience with time in both the Super Decathlon and the Extra 300. I have dabbled in photography for many years but only recently became more serious about honing my aviation photography skills and working towards becoming what I would classify as a “serious” or “advanced” amateur. In that sense, I am a developing amateur. I only recently learned what it means to shoot RAW and was only then introduced to the magic of Lightroom. So began a climb up the learning curve of truly understanding what my camera is capable of doing when not in “auto” mode! I learned what post processing means and what Lightroom can do to help me develop my images. I only shoot RAW. I want to process the raw image and be able to draw out as much detail as possible. I am very much a Lightroom person and rarely, if ever, use Photoshop. I see Lightroom as a development tool and my RAW images are like undeveloped film, waiting for the detail and colors to be pulled out in post-processing. For me, Photoshop is more of a manipulation tool that allows one to add things to an image that were not there (e.g., a sky replacement) or remove things from an image that

the photographer doesn’t want. I am a purist at heart and where Lightroom enables me to develop my undeveloped RAW images, Photoshop enables the manipulation of an image to the point that the image may barely resemble the event as it was captured. The distinction for me is that Lightroom is a powerful tool for developing images and Photoshop is a powerful tool for creating images. I am a Canon user and I currently shoot with a Canon T6s and, more recently, a Canon 90D. These are both crop sensor cameras and, when I feel like my ability has grown to the point I can justify the upgrade, I will upgrade to a full frame camera. I have a number of lenses, ranging from 10mm to 600mm. I am also learning that one of the most powerful and overlooked cameras I own is my iPhone…it takes stunning images and is pretty much always with me. I shot my first airshow using RAW in late 2019 and, as Covid spread across the world in early 2020, it would turn out to be the only airshow I have shot in RAW. While there is very little positive to have come out of the Covid pandemic that swept the world at the beginning of 2020, one such positive was the evolution and explosive growth of online training. People were forced to isolate and they adapted. Classes and courses that would previously have been available only in person, moved online. Classes that would historically only have been offered locally were suddenly available around the world. Ironically, in the locked down world of Covid-19, barriers came down and opportunities to learn expanded.


For me, these opportunities included attending a webinar on “How to Take Great Airshow Photos, Regardless of Your Equipment,” which was hosted by Plane & Pilot Magazine and presented by Jim Koepnick. This is where I first heard about ISAP, which I joined in August 2021. I also subscribe to COAP (Centre of Aviation Photography) Online, which is the brainchild of UK-based aviation photographer Rich Cooper. COAP Online was also born out of the world moving from in-person to online during the pandemic and is both a resource for aviation photographers and a place where like-minded photographers can learn and share their ideas, tips and tricks. During the summer of 2021, I participated in an intense 5-day online aviation photography challenge hosted by Tom Dalt, another UK-based aviation photographer and, following the success of the 5-day challenge, Rich Cooper and Tom Dalt teamed up to offer an in-depth course focusing on aviation photography consisting of close to 40 live online lessons, covering everything from hardware and editing to printing images. The learning curve was significant but I learned so much. Ironically, these learning opportunities only opened-up in the locked-down world of the pandemic.

Ray Fuller

Eventually, I plan to combine my interests of flying and photography with writing and would love to write articles for aviation publications. I love to teach and, as I develop and hone my photography skills, I look forward to passing on to others what I have learned. For now, I still feel like I am very much a budding amateur at the very early stages of my own photography journey. I am eagerly looking forward to seeing where it takes me…



Ray Fuller



RICK GAUTHREAUX

San Diego Bay at sunrise. A sunrise shot with the skyline of San Diego in the background. The long exposure smoothed out the water to a mirror finish. Canon 5D MkII, 28mm, f/14 @ 20 seconds.


I began a serious passage into photography about 10 years ago. My wife and I were going to Kenya for safari and I was determined to come back with stunning photos. I embarked on a self-taught journey attempting to learn about exposure, F-stops and a variety of other foreign terms. The resulting images were not what I was hoping for, but that disappointment fueled within me a desire to learn more. By reaching out to fellow photographers, joining camera clubs and a lot of trial and error, I now consider myself a serious advanced photographer. I am located in southern California. I have always loved aviation, and having photography as a hobby (obsession) is wonderful to be able to match the two together. I am a Canon shooter, for no other reason than I had a very early Canon camera. For airshows, my favorite combination varies with my intentions. I like having a wide-angle lens (usually 24-70mm) for the static and ground shots, but when there is flying involved, I prefer to use my Canon 1Dx MkII or R6 with a 100-400mm lens. The frame rate of both cameras is very desirable. I have thought about using the same bodies with my 500mm f/4, but that requires a tripod and the requirement to stay in one place. I enjoy being mobile, but may have to give the longer lens a try some day, if I can find someone willing to stay with my tripod!

I prefer to shoot in RAW and take advantage of the more detail available to me. If there is any data to be left out of the image, I want to make that decision. For editing and processing, I use both Lightroom and Photoshop. I mostly use Lightroom for my data asset management and will do some edits there, but rely on Photoshop for the heavy lifting. I recently joined ISAP after watching Scott Kelby and ISAP President Larry Grace discuss it on a KelbyOne channel. An organization about aviation photographers sounds just like it would be a perfect fit! Besides this group, I do belong to NANPA (North American Nature Photographers Association). I also belong to several camera clubs in my local area. I try and help others with photography. I will answer questions and give advice if asked. I do not hold secrets back either for techniques or processing, though in some cases, wildlife areas are not revealed. If someone was starting out in aviation photography, the first tip would be to practice. Learn the blur prop rotation, anticipate where the action might be. Shoot at a local airfield..shoot airshows..and be prepared to delete a lot.


Rick Gauthreaux


Golden Gate and the city of San Fransisco at sunrise. This is taken from the north side of the headlands, looking back across the bay towards the city. Being in position for 30 minutes prior to sunrise meant for a very early wake up, but often the reward is the view itself. Canon 5D MkII, 35mm, f/11 @ 8 secs.


Rick Gauthreaux


Beautifully restored C-47 located at March ARB. I love the clean lines and the non-distracting background. Titled “When boys were men”, it speaks of the Greatest Generation. Canon 5D MkII, 63mm, f/5 @ 1/1000.


Rick Gauthreaux


Early morning sunrise at La Jolla, California. Though on the west coast, parts of the coast face south and catch the sunrise as it happens in the east. The long exposure for the water softens the scene. Canon 5D MkII, 35mm, f/8 @ 1.3 seconds.


Two Harris Hawks vie for position. One is caught by the other talon as it relinquishes its position. Canon 7D MkII, 312mm, f/6.3 @ 1/5000.


Rick Gauthreaux


Catching the action at motocross with the dirt flying and the intense look on the rider’s face. Canon 1Dx MKII, 200mm, f/4 @ 1/1250 sec.


Rick Gauthreaux


Two fox kits at play, taken in Washington State. The playful ambush technique teaches them how to hunt. Canon R6, 700mm, f/10 @ 1/1000.


Rick Gauthreaux


This was shot during the nationals for high school rodeo. I was unaware that this sport held competitions at the high school level. This individual was a few seconds short of completing his ride and did not suffer a broken arm. Canon R6, 135mm, f/9 @ 1/1000.


Rick Gauthreaux


This was shot in Montana under controlled conditions. I just the love the intensity in the eyes of the wolf. Canon 7d MkII, 100mm, f/4 @ 1/800.


Rick Gauthreaux


S K C I R T D N A S P I T eger

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f o r t h eR 5 M I R R O R L E S S CANON

I have been a Canon shooter since day one in 1968. About 1999, I transitioned from film SLR’s to digital DSLR’s. I’m now in the process of moving from DSLR’s to mirrorless and recently bought a Canon R5 and some RF series lenses. Shooting mirrorless does have some real differences that have taken me some time to get used to. Over the last couple months, I have been learning the camera, controls and menus which in many ways are similar, and while the R5 has many more menu options, luckily they are in similar order as Canon’s DSLR’s. One of the biggest differences is the EVF, or electronic viewfinder. As there is no mirror, you are seeing an electronic rendition of what the lens is seeing. During my learning period, with no air shows available to practice on, I spent much of the time doing landscapes, static objects and even a few group shots and portraits. One thing I noticed was there was a momentary blackout in the viewfinder between shots obviously due to the electronic simulation versus real time mirror. This was not a big issue and I didn’t pay much attention to it at the time. Now, here we are at EAA AirVenture. As expected, lots going on and time for making use of the smoking fast frames per second this camera allows. Well…not a great experience the first day. The blackout or delay in the electronic viewfinder really made high-speed panning a problem. The delay messed up my timing and ability to track the aircraft in real time. BOO…results not so good! Talking with a photographer shooting near me, who was shooting Sony, I mentioned the issue and he said that Sony didn’t have that delay issue. I was bummed, but then thought about it and decided that Canon must have addressed this in some way, so the internet search began. Yes, indeed there is a fix for this delay issue. There is a menu option in the first menu, Camera Settings, Menu 8, Disp. Performance that fixes the delay. By default, the EVF is set to Battery Saving, which makes sense. There is another option, Smooth, that eliminates the EVF delay and provides high speed real time viewing. Bingo, I made the setting change and was a happy photographer for the rest of my time at EAA AirVenture. Many of you Canon R5 users may have already figured this out, but I thought perhaps this tip might save some teeth grinding and frustration for others.


With the Canon R5 set to the default “Battery Saving” setting, the viewfinder blackout makes tracking rapidly moving objects difficult due to the delay between frames.

Switching to the “Smooth” mode in the viewfinder setting virtually eliminates the blackout delay through the viewfinder making tracking a moving subject just like a DSLR.


The Perfect Gift for The Holidays is Here! Review by Kevin Hong

For the past 42 years, world renowned aviation photographer and ISAP member Philip Makanna, has been creating a work of art with his GHOST calendars and books. They have appeared in many publications around the world showcasing some of the rarest vintage military aircraft from World War I and World War II.

for both their premium quality and, of course, for their magnificent images. In fact they are so good that, unlike with most calendars, people tend to save them beyond their intended period of use – and whom among us hasn’t clipped a favorite image from the binding to frame or pin up somewhere we enjoy spending time (I know I have!).

Inside the calendar you will not only find photos and dates but also historical information of events that took place on a certain day in World War I and World War II depending on which calendar you purchase.

The beautiful landscape and sunlight really shows the essence of a true artist at work. Growing up I have always admired his work and picked up the calendars every year.

To many aviation enthusiasts the beautiful photography is more than just photos they are a record of some aircraft that are no longer in existence. Printed on thick, glossy paper, these full-sized calendars are renowned

Visit www.ghosts.com/ to purchase your copy of these great aviation calendars featuring some of the most beautiful aircraft still flying today.


The GHOSTS WWII Calendar is the 42nd edition of this, the Ultimate Aviation Calendar, and features the following… GHOSTS – The Ultimate WWII Aviation Calendar 12 magnificent air-to-air Color photographs of the combat aircraft World War II by Master Aviation Photographer Philip Makanna Each month is suitable for framing Plus our unique chronological history of the aviation events of the war Plus specifications and silhouettes Each page 20” x 14” – Opens to 20” x 28” Aircraft Included: HAWKER “HURRICANE” Mk.XIIa POLIKARPOV I-16 “ISHAK” (LITTLE DONKEY) SUPERMARINE “SPITFIRE” PR Mk. XI BRISTOL “BLENHEIM” Mk.IVT WESTLAND Mk.IIIA “LYSANDER” CURTISS P-36C “HAWK” NORTH AMERICAN “HARVARD” Mk IIA SUPERMARINE “SPITFIRE” LF Mk. IXe NORTH AMERICAN P-51B-10NA “MUSTANG” CURTISS P-40N-5-CU MESSERSCHMITT Me 262 B-1c “SCHWALBE” (SWALLOW) CA-18 Mk. 21 (NORTH AMERICAN P-51-D) “MUSTANG” BELL P-63A “KINGCOBRA” BOEING B-17G “FLYING FORTRESS”

GHOSTS, THE GREAT WAR 2022 – The Ultimate WWI Aviation Calendar 12 Magnificent Color Photographs by Philip Makanna Each month is suitable for framing Plus our unique chronological history of the aviation events of WWI Plus specifications and silhouettes Each page 20” x 14” – Opens to 20” x 28” Aircraft Included: AIRCO DH.4 AVRO 504 ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY RE.8 ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY BE.2c ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY BE.2f ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY SE.5a ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY FE.2b SOPWITH CAMEL HANRIOT HD.1 ALBATROS D.II ALBATROS D.Va FOKKER Dr.I FOKKER D.VII FOKKER D.VIII


Delkin’s New BLACK CFexpress™ Type B Cards Deliver Up to 1700 MB/s Sustained Speeds

POWAY, CA, MARCH 30, 2021 – Delkin Devices, a manufacturer of flash storage solutions and camera accessories, announced today the newest addition to their top-selling line of memory cards: BLACK CFexpress™ Type B memory cards. Specially designed to meet the ever-growing demands of today’s broadcast, cinema and photography industries, Delkin’s BLACK CFexpress™ cards leverage today’s latest technology in order to provide the fastest speeds on the market. Other competing CFexpress™ Type B cards may state a maximum write speed, but BLACK takes things further with sustained sequential write speeds of at least 1400 MB/s (higher depending on capacity). This sustained speed versus potential write speeds is what guarantees flawless cinema-quality video capture, including DCI 8K RAW 12-Bit @ 30fps (2600 Mbps) in the Canon R5. This is especially valuable during events like weddings, sport meets, concerts and other situations you cannot redo. The cards are also capable of offloading data at speeds reaching up to 1730 MB/s, ensuring the quickest, most efficient data transfer from card to computer for immediate file access and sooner post-production.

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AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

Identify these aircraft. The answers are found next to the Kenyon Gyro Ad.

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LIOE Design is a product company that manufactures their own product designs. Located in Seattle, WA all their products are aviation inspired from their Aero Ti Chopsticks. Every product has a story. A reason why a product looks the way it does from function and practicality to aesthetics. All our products are designed with the belief that everyday goods can be extraordinary. We strive to ensure the user is getting the most unique experience and to create a everyday item in a completely re-imagined way. We design to spark imagination and creativity even in the most creative people. Creating products that inspire design. 1) Air Squadron playing cards This deck of cards has artwork of modern jets and aircraft. The inspiration was to create a deck of cards unlike other cards, the Kings and Queens are B-2 Bomber and SR-71. The Jokers are the A-10 and F-22. Every card is unique creating the perfect deck for an aviation enthusiast or card collector! 2) Stealth Pen The Stealth Pen has a unique, aluminum uni-body design with four total components making it lightweight as well as easy to assemble and disassemble. The slotted design offers a futuristic touch and cuts down on the weight of the pen while allowing the user a glance at the inside ink cartridge. 3) Titan Business card holder The Titan is aero-inspired minimalist light-weight card holder. The pattern on the front of the card holder is reminisce of a futuristic space door and inspired by the nose of the B29 Super Fortress. Titan has a dark gunmetal gray color and is made from aircraft grade 6061-T6 Aluminum.

LIOEDESIGN.COM Visit their website to learn more about their products

15% discount for ISAP members

For details visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

Jim Wilson Photography International Distributor for Kenyon Stabilizing Products 214-796-9743 jw@jimwilsonphotography.com

Answers to Airplane Silhouettes 1. Bell X-5 USA 2. Blohm & Voss P 179 German



Larry Grace The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore We pay tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices at our location or online at www.bhphotovideo.com We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.


ISAP Merchandise

If you wish to purchase any ISAP merchandise please email info@aviationphoto.org Send your name and current address and you will be invoiced via PayPal. Shipping cost will be added to your invoice. Members with an international address will have a higher shipping rate. ISAP Challenge coin - $10 + shipping ISAP safety vest (Small to X-Large) - $28 + shipping ISAP safety vest 2XL - $31, 3XL - $34, 4XL - $38 + shipping ISAP membership patch - $5 + shipping Limited patch version with Velcro backing - $10 + shipping


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www.aviationphoto.org

WWW.KELBYONE.COM

WWW.REDRIVERPAPER.COM

WWW.FULLCOLOR.COM

WWW.SIGMAPHOTO.COM

WWW.BHPHOTOVIDEO.COM

WWW.THINKTANKPHOTO.COM

WWW.DELKINDEVICES.COM


ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller Airspeed Editor Kevin Hong Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at info@aviationphoto.org Airspeed is a publication to showcase our members’ work in capturing aviation events. Images should be sized at a minimum size of at least 5100 x 3300 (17” x 11”) @ 300 dpi. We would like your largest landscape file size format for our full page spread in our featured magazine. Please submit up to 10 images per article and your text in a Microsoft Word document. Email your article and images by using www.wetransfer.com and send to info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). Members can submit images for review for a future cover or back page display or would like to inquire on doing an article for Airspeed contact us via email at info@aviationphoto.org We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


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