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Kevin Hong

WELCOME TO THE 2020 DECEMBER ISSUE OF AIRSPEED! 75th Anniversary Tail Flash Jim Wilson Tail Flash History: 457th Fighter Squadron Jeremy Boyd A Tribute to the Blue Angels F-18 Hornet Tim Smith Jeff Krueger Patrick Comtois Larry Grace Rob Tabor Kevin Hong

The Watercolor Effect Gordon Court Rare Sightings Dragos Munteanu

A Tribute to Fat Albert Airlines Kevin Hong Larry Grace

Member Showcase Allan Nilson Geoffrey Arnwine Mike Hill Steve Zimmermann Patrick Comtois Scott Slingsby Dragos Munteanu Rob Tabor José M. Ramos

Warming Up With The F-16 Viper Demo Team Erik Kuna

Meet The Member Emily Wright

2020 Ft. Worth Alliance Airshow - A Very Different Animal Jim Wilson Kevin Hong David Walsh Larry Grace

Airplane Silhouettes John Ford

Wings Over North Georgia Airshow Matt Streit Wings Over Houston Drive-In Airshow Kevin Hong How Fast Can You Go SLOW! Gary Daniels

Mark Streit Rod Cromer Su Khoo Mike Bilek Keith Charlot Ian Glover Richard JackJames

FRONT COVER PHOTO: Jim Wilson 75th Anniversary F-16 commemorating the 457th TFS based in Ft. Worth, TX. Camera: Canon 5DSR Lens: Canon 200-400L at 400mm ISO 100 Shutter speed: 1/500 Exposure: f/6.3 Processed in Adobe Photoshop BACK COVER: Kevin Hong RC-135S “Cobra Ball” taking off from Barksdale AFB. Camera: Canon 7D Mark II Lens: Canon 100 - 400 mm f/4.5-5.6L ISO 100 Shutter speed: 1/1000 Exposure: f/5.6 Canon RAW file process using Photoshop CC 2021 and Camera Raw


Kevin Hong The goal of International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. The new Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP members and their photography, experiences, and their passion for aviation from around the world. From military and commercial aviation, you’ll be able to see it all while learning about aviation photography, post processing tips in Lightroom and Photoshop, aviation history, air show reports, aviation museums, and more. We look forward to sharing our members’ images and articles with everyone. Enjoy this issue of Airspeed! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, Airspeed Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg

NEW AND RETURNING ISAP MEMBERS Michael Pliskin

Dean Curry

Dane Wiedmann

Amy Stover

David Dow

Bonnie Kratz

Emily Wright

Mike Collins

Guillermo Anaya

Steve Zimmermann

Patrick Lalande

Shawn Malone

Timothy P Smith

Jeffrey Littell

Bob Driver

Ismael Abeytus

Kevin Robertson

Gary Sowa

Frank Crebas

Phil Fountain

Brent Clary

Scott Diussa

Taggart Gorman

S. Robert Sliger

Garret Moyer

Michael Jackson

Nir Ben-Yosef

Hicks Milner

Erik Simonsen

Matt McVicker

Sean Wills

Dave Madden

Derrick Waiters

Matt Booty

Peter Keller

David Walsh

Debra Hale

Liz Lutz

Cristian Schrik

Andy Lay

Dean Wingard

Mark Waddington

Mark Streit

Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


75th anniversary T A I L

F L A S H

Article and photos by ISAP Vice President, Jim Wilson


It’s always good to hear my good friend Lt. Colonel Jeremy “Boydo” Boyd’s voice on the phone but this time there was an extra measure of excitement when he popped up on my FaceTime, “Jim! I am jumping on my flight to Hong Kong in a few minutes so I have to ask you this quickly, are you available for a top secret assignment next week?” Jeremy and I have been friends for over a decade and he is truly one of the finest human beings I have been honored to call my friend , aside from that, we always find a way to have a great time when our schedules collide and this project promised to be fun, “historic” fun. When Jeremy could talk, at the other end of his long flight, he filled me in on the details. Seems that he has been putting his considerable talent to work designing an F-16 paint scheme to honor the 457th Fighter Squadron, “The Spads” based at The Joint Reserve Base in Fort Worth Texas. Coming up with a one of a kind scheme to honor his squadron was challenging on it’s own, Jeremy’s design was selected from a

number that were submitted, it was the hands down favorite, then the red tape began. One can imagine the hoops that must be navigated along the road from design to actual application on one of his squadron’s F-16 fighter aircraft, but he got it done and now he was asking me to capture it’s surprise arrival at the JRB. My grandson Chandler and I met Jeremy at the entrance to the base and a little while later we were escorted to a spot along the runway that we had decided would give us the best vantage point to capture this historic “Lone Star” F-16 as it arrived home. The plan was to have “Merge” do a few passes before bringing the aircraft to the 457th parking area and he graciously provided 30 minutes of opportunities to capture his beautiful aircraft in the afternoon Texas sky. Needless to say Lt. Colonel Boyd was beaming as his design roared over our heads, and justifiably so. Thanks Jeremy, for the honor and the privilege of being with you for the debut of your incredible design!


Jim Wilson


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T A I L

F L A S H

H I S T O R Y

457TH FIGHTER SQUADRON Article and photos by Jeremy Boyd


In 2018 I was approached by our Squadron Commander with a special request. The Wing was having a competition to redesign our Heritage Tail and he wanted me to take a stab at. His advice was “Don’t Suck”. And so began the adventure of a lifetime. The end vision was to properly represent the men and women who have made this Fighting Squadron so incredible. No small task and the CC’s advise would repeat in my head over and over. I started as most people do with some paper and a pencil (color to be exact). I went through design after design until I though a concept looked half way decent. From there try to fine tune it only to scrap most of the work. I researched which aircraft we had flown since our inception as well as the history of our patch and it’s origins from World War 2. Each idea had to be incorporated in some way.


You can’t imagine how much Red Tape is involved in getting something like this accomplished. Once approved it basically went as follows:

It took almost 2 years from start to finish. Many people along the way did incredible work to keep it moving down the line. Without their help this could not have been accomplished. It is an honor to be apart of the 457th Fighter Squadron!

Capt. Kip Sumner

In the end I offered 3 different versions. One with just the tail painted, one with the Texas flag on top and finally the whole aircraft painted as you see it. Then the waiting game started. The whole aircraft painting was selected as the winner and was sent out into the contracting world.

contracting, funding, redesign, scalable file required, contracting, runway requirements, contracting, natural disaster, contracting, approval, preparation, transportation, and then completion. Each one of those words has a fascinating story behind it…and yes, you can see that contracting was engaged on more than one occasion.

Jeremy Boyd

Often I found myself talking to the Commander to see if I had made it to the “Don’t Suck” level yet. To make sure that level was exceeded I added the Texas Flag to the top and bottom of the aircraft. Finally it was complete.


Jeremy Boyd


A Tribute to the Blue Angels LEGACY F-18 HORNET

Article and photos by Tim Smith The Naval Flight Demonstration Squadron, The Blue Angels hit a milestone in their 2020 season. Following 34 years of service and performing for literally millions; the Legacy Hornets used by the squadron made their final launch and recovery from NAS Sherman Field, Pensacola, Florida. Like many aviation enthusiasts, I’ve never seen The Blues in anything but the Legacy Hornets. To see the end of the season is bittersweet for me. November 4, the team announced one last legacy tribute flight and final farewell for the Pensacola area. I chose the Pensacola Beach Fishing Pier as the backdrop for this final salute. I’ve seen the blues return home many times from this spot. For many, the team “smoking the beach” upon return from air shows over the years is a Sunday tradition. As the team approached I heard Boss Kesselring call “Smoke on” for one last pass over the pier. It was a sight to take in. Perfect Sky. Perfect Delta. The perfect way to say Goodbye.


Tim Smith


LARRY GRACE - ISAP PRESIDENT As the end of the F/A-18 A/B/C/D platform’s 34 years as the Blue Angels’ aircraft, the team transitions to newer, larger Boeing F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet for the 2021 flight demonstration season. The move to the Super Hornet will mark the first time the elite Navy and Marine Corps demonstration team has changed aircraft since it moved from the A-4F Skyhawk II to the Hornet back in 1986. In addition to being the Super Hornet’s first show season with the team, 2021 will mark the Blue Angels’ 75th anniversary.


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JEFF KRUEGER


What can you say about the US Navy Blue Angels that hasn’t been said. The precision, the timing, the dedication to a team, the whole team. I think a tribute to all of the men and women that currently, in the past, and in the future is well in order. I hope the photographs we have had the privilege of taking can be that tribute well deserved.


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


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Jeff Krueger


ROB TABOR For me, one of my favorite Blue Angels memories was from this year’s El Centro spring Photocall. When I signed up for the Photocall, I had no Idea just how special it would turn out to be. As it turned out the Blues were hosting the Thunderbirds for a few days joint practice. While this photo is a pretty standard Blues photo, the red helmet in the back of seven is what makes it unique for me.


PATRICK COMTOIS You could feel the anticipation build. Fathers putting their sons and daughters up on their shoulders to get a better look as the United States Naval Aerobatic Squadron, better known as the Blue Angels, began taxiing out on the tarmac. Poised along the flight line, I set up with my long lens and began clicking off pictures in anticipation. As the F/A-18 Hornets throttled up, the show was underway. First up was the famed diamond pass. Flying just inches from each other they come right down the flight line. Catching my breath from that, they form up and come around again in an echelon again, almost touching. The precision and concentration is incredible. To showcase the maneuverability of the Hornets, they fly by again in diamond formation with the arrestor hook down to simulate approach for a carrier landing. Now the solos flying in carrier landing configuration with No. 5 inverted, establishing a “mirror image� effect slowly fly across show center much to amazement of the crowd. They continue to showcase many other formations all of which are military maneuvers that are used during combat situations delighting the young and old alike. Seeing pictures is incredible but cannot take the place of seeing these incredible pilots in action.


KEVIN HONG - ISAP EDITOR


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Kevin Hong


In this issue we are not only paying tribute to the Blue Angels but also a very integral part of the team called Fat Albert Airlines. We are saying goodbye to the Legacy Hornets but also the aging world famous C-130T Fat Albert. For many years Fat Albert Airlines has been a part of the Blue Angels Demonstration Team and will continue the legacy with a newer C-130J and paint scheme for the upcoming airshow season along with the Super Hornets in 2021. Fat Albert’s priority mission is to logistically support the team, movement, personnel and equipment to ensure the team demonstrations happen. In years past the JATO (Jet Assisted Take Off) high energy demonstration was amazing to watch as the C-130 rocketed off the ground. However after a supply of the rockets were depleted by a hurricane the Blue Angels were not able to use the rockets during Fat Albert’s demonstration. After many demonstrations in the C-130T without the rockets, Fat Albert still performed around the world showcasing the capabilities and versatility of the Lockheed Martin C-130T. With the extended range and power of the new C-130J we hope the Blue Angels will continue to fly around the world representing the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps as ambassadors for the United States military.

A Tribute to Fat Albert Airlines Article and photos by Kevin Hong and Larry Grace


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LARRY GRACE - ISAP PRESIDENT


Larry Grace


It’s 2020, and I’m getting a little rusty. I’m sure we all can relate. Typically by now I would have covered numerous launches, airshows and aerospace events, but we all know 2020 hasn’t been a “typical” year. So, when I was offered the opportunity to work with the F-16 Demo Team, I jumped on the chance. It happened to be that my friend and colleague for years in the spaceflight photojournalism, Matt Haskell, invited me along to help cover the practice session for the F-16 Viper Team. As luck would have it I was also testing out the new Canon R5 as well as the new RF 100-500mm lens. We met the team that atypical morning since due to Covid the practice day wasn’t open to media and started right in. For the day I just stuck with the R5 and the 100-500mm as opposed to my typical two body 1DX setup for a typical event. I started off a little nervous since it was a new body and wasn’t sure how the (electronic viewfinder) EVF would handle the airshow, however, that quickly faded. The EVF kept up with everything I threw at it and it turns out the combination was a match made in heaven. While out with the team, I pitched them an idea. I had scouted beforehand with PhotoPills and saw that we’d have an almost full moon at twilight and it would line up perfectly with how the jets were positioned on the tarmac. So, I mentioned the idea to the team and they sounded interested. At that point I realized I had their curiosity, but then I hit that magic Augmented Reality button on PhotoPills and showed them the F-16 we’d shoot and the moon at the exact time to get the shot. Now I had their attention! We proceeded to figure out when we could meetup later tonight. Needless to say, it was one of those one of a kind shots that I love to get. As for the settings, for most of the practice day shooting I kept it simple. Aperture Priority with a half stop underexposure with Auto ISO, the everyday photojournalist settings I keep and then adjusted aperture and exposure value as I saw fit. For the actual show, I used the Custom Modes C1-C3 for the various settings I flip between. C1 is setup for Jets, Aperture Priority with a minimum shutter speed of 1/1000th, and usually wide open with the 100 - 500mm and C2 setup for fast props or heritage passes in Shutter Priority at a speed of 1/125th of a second and then C3 setup for slow props and helos at 1/30th. I customized some other functions between the modes but I found that’s best to manage my settings just based on what I’m shooting especially since once the show getting rolling, it’s constant fun. That way settings get out of the way and I can just focus on techniques, framing and composition. The only thing that varied was that night shoot with the moon. Those are all shot manual, and customized for the lighting at the time. At the end of the day, it was great getting back out to cover an event, and a Airshow nonetheless. Here’s hoping for a return to more shows in 2021.


Warming Up With the F-16 Viper Demo Team LOCKHEED MARTIN SPACE AND AIR SHOW

Article and photos by Erik Kuna


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2020 FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIR SHOW

A VERY

DIFFERENT

ANIMAL! Article and photos by Jim Wilson, David Walsh, Kevin Hong, Larry Grace


This year’s Fort Worth Alliance Air Show, like so many others, was in jeopardy. I was heartened to learn that the dedicated team that has produced this incredible air show for 30 years met, brainstormed, and made the gutsy decision to go ahead with the event, win, lose or draw. The realities that faced them were formidable, a worldwide pandemic, operating a huge Industrial airport which means accommodating numerous arrivals and departures from clients like Fed Ex and Amazon. Additional challenges were keeping Amazon’s new facility running at peak efficiency while making sure the air show airspace requirements and safety concerns were addressed. The team decided that they were not going to have three decades of successful air show events be marked by silence for their 30th anniversary. Fifty four days, that was the time envelope they had to plan, produce and execute the nation’s first “Drive In Air Show”, a daunting challenge for certain, but just another day in the life of this group.

I’ve been shooting this event for most of it’s 30 year history and 2020 was indeed very different, but it “WAS” and it was a testament to the can do spirit that is characteristic of this team and it’s leader, Ross Perot Jr. Our vantage points were a bit restricted due to the fact that the airport remained open for the entire show. The father and son air boss team of Ralph and Russell Royce seamlessly integrated dozens of “heavy” arrivals and departures as if they were part of the show. We have been a team for years and trust runs deep, but this year everyone was respectful of the circumstances and we all gave up some freedoms in order to insure that The 2020 Fort Worth Alliance Air Show would be yet another one for the record books. Social distancing was observed, everyone was masked up, all the time, no complaints. The organizers, sponsors and underwriter would never say it, but it was a near impossible undertaking, with huge downside risks, which made the success of the event all the sweeter.


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KEVIN HONG - ISAP EDITOR


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LARRY GRACE - ISAP PRESIDENT


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Wings Over North Georgia A

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Article and photos by Mark Streit All were shot on Friday 10/23/2020 which was CLOSED to the public and restricted to Media-Credentialed photographers. Thunderbirds and Viper teams staged out of Dobbins ARB in Marietta, GA, and flew into the Airshow site for rehearsal at Richard B. Russell Airport in Rome, GA (KRMG). The runway length at KRMG, at 7,000 ft does not meet the requirements of the F-16 Fighting Falcons used by both teams and thus they had to stage from Dobbins to KRMG. I was not able to get any static shots of any of the F-16s on the ground. Media Day was limited so no crowds but as I understand it, the Saturday/Sunday drive-in format provided by JLC Airshow Management, John Cowman’s company responsible for WONG every year, was quite well-received.


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Article and photos by Kevin Hong / ISAP Editor


2020 is definitely a strange year and unpredictable due to the Covid outbreak. With a few weeks before the Wings Over Houston Airshow was going to take place amidst the pandemic, airshows across the country were making hard decisions and coordinating with city and federal guidelines whether to have events and how to make them safe. After careful consideration and working with city and state officials the airshow in Houston was approved and the show was able to go on. However, in order for the airshow to move forward the event morphed into a drive-in airshow. Wings Over Houston became one of the first airshows to go into this new format and it was quite a unique experience. The week before the show started the normal prep of setting up tents, concessions, VIP areas and watching static aircraft flying in was non-existent. In some ways the airshow was definitely easier to set up but the Covid protocols made up for the normal problems the airshow has never faced before. Throughout the three day show I had to document the traffic flow and parking of the cars. From the tower I could get a bird’s eye view of the vehicles and get some pretty unique views of the airshow. Thousands of cars in the parking lots were cut down to a few hundred cars on

an airport tarmac was a rare sight considering they had to be parked socially distanced apart. Instead of rows of static aircraft on the ramp there were cars, SUVs, and people sitting in truck beds looking up to the skies. Watching the cars line up and move into position was a dynamic show of its own. Temperature checks for everyone had to be done every day and masks were definitely a must. With all of the challenges presented to the airshow there were some really great outcomes that were unexpected. For the first time, Wings Over Houston had all five US Air Force Demo Teams at the show. The A-10, F-16, F-22, F-35 and C-17 Demo Teams, warbirds, and civilian performers did a great job and for a weekend the world seemed normal to hear the sounds of radial engines, jet noise, and even pyro fill the air. It was a great success and a great job by the Wings Over Houston Airshow. Even though the airshow was only for a weekend I believe everyone who attended had a great time to experience the sights and sounds of an airshow once again. The drive-in airshow experience was proven and was a successful event but I think like many others we all agree that we never have to do this again and can go back to a normal airshow format in 2021.


Kevin Hong

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How fast can you go SLOW! A unique STOL event in Arkansas could be the start of a new sport! Article and photos by Gary Daniels

Late summer, I had the opportunity to help cover a unique flying event at the Byrd’s Adventure Center in northwest Arkansas. The inaugural ArkanSTOL Ozark Backwoods Challenge took place September 10-13, 2020. There were 26 competing in this challenging STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) competition! The Bryd’s Adventure Center is located in the beautiful and rugged terrain of the Arkansas Ozarks. And, they have four grass runways graded out of the bottom land along the Mulberry River that makes this very unique STOL race possible. The runways are named the River Strip (the longest and the start and finish runway), Traveler Strip and Grit Strip (these two runways cross each other), and the Restaurant Strip located over the ridge from the other three. See the aerial photo that shows the locations of the runways. How does the race work? The competitor takes off from the River Strip tripping the timer. They have to land and take off from the other three runways returning back to land on the River Strip and trip the timer to record their time. The best time wins. The competition tests not only the pilot’s skill, but also demands extreme knowledge of their equipment and unparalleled judgment. The terrain involves

actual backwoods flying while adding the exciting elements of time trials with unpredictable river valley winds. All of these aspects combine to make this experience more complex than your average STOL competition. Aircraft were divided into three categories; Touring, Bush, and Light Sport. The best times were in the ‘Light Sport’ category. Steve Henry flew his hotrod Just Aircraft Highlander for a best time of 2:38.2 minutes. The second-place time was flown by 17-year-old Jayden Newman. Jayden just earned her pilot’s license in January of this year! She aggressively flew her Carbon Cub Sport for her best time of 2:38.7 minutes…just 5/10’s of a second behind seasoned flyer Henry! This was truly a unique event and could be the start of a new motorsport competition. The event is currently in planning for 2021. Visit www.arkanstol.com to find out more. Watch this video of John Young flying and explaining the course. http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5


Kevin Hong


Gary Daniels


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This image, a watercolor effect rendition in Photoshop and it’s original were taken at the Fargo Airsho in 2018 when the featured performers were the Navy Blue Angels. I have seen the Blue Angels on many occasions but am always impressed with their precision and professionalism. To get this image, I arrived several hours before the gates opened with my camp chair and my backpack full of camera gear, along with several batteries and my trusty Sony a6500 camera and 100-400 Gmaster Zoom lens. When the gates were opened, my first priority was to get to show central and have a great view for the performance. I picked my spot, set up my chair and umbrella and then went to see some of the other display aircraft and other attractions. As the show approached and the excitement built, I wanted to make sure to get a shot of them coming straight at me. I also wanted to make sure to get the underside of the wing with the Navy logo on it. I think I achieved both with this photo and am very happy with it. I then took the original and applied a photoshop action that I learned on a YouTube video to make it into a piece of Aviation Art. I hope you like it.


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Gordon Court

The original was taken at the Hector International Airport in Fargo, North Dakota of comings and goings at the airport.


Gordon Court

The original was taken at the Gerry Beck Memorial Fly-In in Battle Lake, Minnesota.


Gordon Court

The original was taken at the Fagen Fighters Museum Air Show in Granite City, Minnesota.


Gordon Court

The original was taken at the Gerry Beck Memorial Fly-In in Battle Lake, Minnesota.


S G N I T H G I S RARE

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In early October 2020, several Aeronautica Militare (Italian Air Force) jets deployed to Nörvenich Air Base (ETNN) in Western Germany very close to Cologne. It is quite interesting that the Italians deployed not less than 3 different types of jets: the Eurofighter, the Tornado and the AMX. The AMX is a quite rare aircraft being operated only by Italy and Brazil. The Tornados belong to the 6 Stormo based at Ghedi and the AMXs and Eurofighters to 51 Stormo from Istrana airbase. All aircraft flew daily in Germany with the Luftwaffe to train various types of missions. As Europe this year had no airshows due to the pandemic, this exercise was a good opportunity for spotters to have some 2020 photos and catch some Tornado as the type becomes quite “exotic” since the UK retired it in 2019.


Tornado final approach at ETNN.


Two Italian AMX A-11 Ghibli prepare for takeoff from ETNN.


Dragos Munteanu


Italian Eurofighter EF2000 at ETNN.


Dragos Munteanu


Tornado afterburner takeoff at ETNN.


Dragos Munteanu


Italian Tornado approaching ETNN.


Dragos Munteanu


Italian Tornado approaching ETNN.


Dragos Munteanu


Geoffrey Arnwine

MEMBER SHOWCASE!


Allen Brian Nilson

Thunder over the boardwalk, Atlantic City air show featuring the Blue Angels. Marine Capt. Katie Higgins at the controls of the C-130 Hercules known as “Fat Albert� as they pass between the buildings of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church, Taj Mahal and Resorts casinos heading towards the ocean and the spectators. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 5D Mark III Lens: Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM ISO: 400 Shutter speed: 1/2000 Exposure: f/10 Processed in Adobe Photoshop


Dragos Munteanu

On the 6th of June 2020 on the occasion of D-DAY 76 years celebration two USAF C130Js performed touch and goes at the Chievres Airbase in Belgium. Here is 65840 special stripe painted from the 2019 celebrations of D-Day; the aircraft belongs to the 37th Airlift Squadron, based at Ramstein, Germany – 86th Airlift Wing. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D500 Lens: Sigma 150 - 600C ISO: 125 Shutter speed: 1/320 Exposure: f/14 Processed with Adobe Lightroom and NIK Collection


Mark Streit 2019 MCAS Beaufort Airshow, Marine Corps Air Station, Beaufort, SC. USMC Major Frank Zastoupil, VMFAT-501, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron, pilots the Marine Corps variant of the Lockheed-Martin F-35 Lightning II (F-35B) and demonstrates its STOVL and hover capability, over show center. Camera equipment and settings Camera: EOS 5D Mark IV Lens: Canon EF100-400mm L II IS USM ISO: 500 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/10 Image processed in Adobe Lightroom CC 2019 with the Topaz DeNoise AI plugin


Mike Bilek Captured over Naval Air Facility El Centro August 2020. VMA-311 ‘Tomcats’ AV-8B Harrier II. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Sony A9 Lens: Sony 100 - 400mm GM + 1.4x Teleconverter ISO: 640 Shutter speed: 1/2000 Exposure: f/11 Sony RAW processed in Adobe Lightroom Classic, opened as smart object in Photoshop CC 2020 then applied DFine2 and Color Efex Pro 4 filters using the Nik Collection. Sky replacement using Luminar 4.


Mike Hill

This lucky shot was caught while I was at CFB Trenton watching the runway action. The CH-146 Griffon helicopter (in SAR livery) began training nearby on winch drills with a SAR Tech. The aircraft, callsign Tiger 491 is from 424 (SAR) Squadron, RCAF. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon EOS 6D II Lens: Canon EF 100-400 f/4- f5.6L IS USM II ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/60 Exposure: f/13 Shot in Canon RAW (CR2) - colors and detail have been slightly enhanced with Aurora HDR.


Patrick Comtois

Banana passes are the pilots bread and butter not to mention a coveted shot for photographers. This pilot was well aware of this and navigated his Sabre Jet to perfection over my location. He made several passes for us and I wanted to capture his concentration in the cockpit as he was holding his line along the designated show route. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D4s Lens: Nikkor 200 - 400mm f/4 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/8 Processed in Photoshop and Lightroom


Richard JackJames Shooting photo of American Airlines taking off at Los Angeles International Airport from helicopter. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 1D Mark IV Lens: Canon 100 - 400mm f/4.5-5.6L ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/6.3 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Rob Tabor

Refueling Hawaii ANG F-15s over Utah, en route to Keflavik, Iceland. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D200 Lens: Nikon 28-70mm f/2.8D ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/500 Exposure: f/7.1 Edited in Lightroom, Photoshop, Nik Software Color Efx Pro 4


Rod Cromer

On 24 October at the South Mississippi Light Plane Fly-in held in Agricola, MS. Flying machines from ultralights to a fully instrumented Cessna 172 came to visit the grass strip to enjoy the burgers, hot dogs, cold drinks and fellowship. When Thomas Ellis departed, he HAD to make one smoke pass or the field in his Van’s RV-8. To me this is aviation photography...up close, planes flying low, smoke on, where you can see the excitement on the faces of the pilots and passengers. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 1Dx Lens: Canon 100 - 400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM ISO: 250 Shutter speed: 1/200 Exposure: f/13 Edited in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018


Scott Slingsby

Having the opportunity to photograph this rare warbird was a dream come true. The airplane is a North American A-36 Mustang, only 500 examples were built during WWII and only three remain today. One is on static display at the Air Force Museum in Dayton, OH. Another resides in Houston, Texas with Comanche Fighters and this particular airframe with the Collings Foundation in Worcester, Massachusetts, both of which are flyers. This shoot came awfully close to being scrubbed. As we taxied out Rob Collings was unable to get the tail wheel to lock, a necessary item for takeoff. We turned around and headed back to the hangar and as we did the photo gods smiled on us, the tail wheel locked! The shoot was back on and minutes later we were airborne with this rare piece of history. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D3s Lens: Nikon 70 - 200mm f/2.8 ISO: 1000 Shutter speed: 1/60 Exposure: f/11 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Steve Zimmermann

This image of the late David Vopat flying Planes of Fame Museum’s Northrop N9M Flying Wing came from a photo mission that included the museum’s P-26 Peashooter. Both aircraft were, at the time, the only flying examples of their types in the world. A year later, the N9M crashed and David was killed, making this a particularly poignant memory. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D500 Lens: Nikon 24 - 120mm f/4 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/80 Exposure: f/16 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Su Khoo

Historic fly-past of a Battle of Britain memorial Flight Avro Lancaster, an RAF Tornado and F-35 Lightning, to commemorate the reformed 617 Squadron and 75th Anniversary of the “Dambusters Raid�; taken at the Royal International Air Tattoo 2018. Camera equipment and settings Camera: 6D MkII Lens: Canon EF 70-300mm f/4 - f5.6L IS USM ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/250 Exposure: f/13 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Ora Lassila

Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (KMHT), August 15th, 2020: Due to the pandemic, the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire was closed part of the spring and all of the summer. To celebrate a partial re-opening, as well as the museum’s online educational program that has featured a virtual around-the-world flight using a DC-3 simulator, an actual DC-3 was flown in and received a water cannon salute from the airport’s fire department. The aircraft is a Douglas DC-3A (N61981, c/n 2216), and is the former N35PB of the Provincetown-Boston Airlines. She is also one of the last remaining Douglas DSTs, possibly the last flying one. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T1i Lens: Canon EF 70-300mm f/4 - f5.6L IS USM ISO: 400 Shutter speed: 1/1000 Exposure: f/5.6 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Geoffrey Arnwine

While this year has been decimated by the novel coronavirus pandemic, I have had the opportunity to look back and cherish the many great things that came out of last year, from meeting new people to finally seeing the Red Arrows fly. However, the highlight of 2019 for me was when I had the grand opportunity to go aboard a KC-10 Extender during a media flight for the Travis AFB “Thunder Over The Bay” Open House. During the flight, me and a couple fellow aviation photographers got to see 2 A-10 Thunderbolt II’s as well as an E-3 Sentry make a pit stop en route to the show. It was a moment like no other as I got to get in close proximity to take pictures of flying aircraft over the Mojave Desert. Unlike taking pictures of flying aircraft on the ground at airshows where you’re constantly twisting back and forth as they pass by, it was easier to track these jets refueling as they stayed idle through the boom window. However, one thing that doesn’t change is that it is unpredictable what they will do next. Whenever a plane is finished receiving fuel, it is important to be prepared for whenever they prepare to bank away from the tanker. It was quite a ride for a first time experience, and I definitely look forward to another one like this in the future. Media flights are typically offered at Air Force Bases which operate a tanker aircraft including the KC-10, like Travis. A-10C Thunderbolt II makes a sharp bank away from a KC-10 Extender after being refueled over the Mojave Desert en route to the 2019 Travis AFB “Thunder Over The Bay” Open House. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 7D Mk II Lens: Canon EF 24-105mm ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/7.1 Edited in Lightroom Classic


Keith Charlot

This shot was taken over St George Utah in Oct. during our Warbird & Jet Gathering hosted by the Western Sky Aviation Warbird Museum located at the St George Regional Airport in St George, Utah. Mustang Highflight’s former West German Air Force Dassault-Breguet/ Dornier Alpha Jet N120AU with Mark Peterson at the controls and Vince Moore occupying the rear. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D300 Lens: Nikon 18 - 200mm f/3.5 - 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/7.1 Edited in Lightroom Classic


Ian Glover

In the summer of 2019, I was given the opportunity to assist with photographing the memorial service of Lt Col Robert Friend, a well-known Red Tail pilot who had recently passed at the age of 99 years-old. There were other Tuskegee Airmen at the service, among them were the gentlemen shown here, Capt Rusty Barnes, USAAF and Lt Col Harry Stewart, USAF (ret) who have known each other since they met 77 years ago at flight school in Tuskegee, Alabama. Captain Barnes was a flight instructor at Moton Field and Lt Col Stewart would deploy to Italy as part of the 332nd Fighter Group. Lt Col Friend was a mutual friend, fellow Tuskegee Airmen and indeed, LT Col Stewart’s brother-in-law. At one point before the service began, Lt Col Stewart wheeled his old friend, Rusty, over to the F-16 from Alabama’s 187th Fighter Wing (whose aircraft pay homage to the Red Tails) and they talked and pointed for about 20 minutes. I kept a respectful distance and thus couldn’t hear what they were saying, but it was a special moment for me and I felt blessed to be in their presence. A special thanks to Palm Springs Air Museum for hosting the memorial and for asking me to help document the event. I was using two cameras on this day, one of which was a 10-year-old Nikon D80. I’d wanted to get the highest quality picture possible but the lens that I would’ve preferred to use (due to it’s minimum aperture of 2.8) was on my other camera and I feared that switching them out would cause me to lose the opportunity. I made one adjustment--increasing the ISO to 800--- and took a few pictures. The moment passed quickly, and I was glad that I captured it as best as I could given the situation, as it is an occasion that won’t be repeated many more times. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D80 Lens: Nikon 18 - 140mm f/3.5-5.6 ISO: 800 Shutter speed: 1/50 Exposure: f/6.3 Edited in Photoshop


JosĂŠ M. Ramos

Ambush 47 sporting the camouflage known to VFC-12 as Wet n Wild, designed to replicate the one worn by the Russian Su-57 Felon, poses for the camera over the Whiskey 174 Warning Areas near Key West in June of 2019. Taken while flying in another F/A-18D from The Fighting Omars for features in several publications, I knew I wanted this scheme to pop so it was a matter of getting the pilot to step up above us and dip the wing in order to get as clean a background as possible with nothing but sky behind it. After we hit the tanker as a section, the controllers split us up and we never rejoined again during the flight. Good thing we shot as much as we did on the front side of the event as it was the only sortie we were scheduled to fly with it. If you seen an opportunity - Shoot it. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon Z7 Lens: Nikon 24 - 70mm f/4S ISO: 160 Shutter speed: 1/500 Exposure: f/9 Edited in Photoshop


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MEET OUR MEMBER


MEET OUR MEMBER

Emily Wright

Greetings! My name is Emily Wright. I am an advanced amateur photographer, currently living in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. My background is in wildlife biology, specifically with birds of prey. Doing research on bald eagles, I would constantly bring my camera with me to document the eagles and their young. This led me to taking a few classes to help gain more knowledge on how to effectively use my “starter” DSLR, a Canon Rebel XSi. Having then moved to some of the most diverse wildlife areas in the United States, such as Marco Island, Florida, and Jackson Hole, Wyoming, I spent more and more time on photography. Three years ago, I moved to Tucson, Arizona. Driving home after a hike, I passed a large group of photographers standing in a dirt field. All of them had large telephoto lenses. My curiosity took hold and I stopped to inquire what they were up to. They were all there waiting for the planes, participating in the Air Force Heritage Flight Training, to take off. I then spent the next three days in that same field, trying to use my bird experience on planes. That one random experience, then led to more and more photography opportunities with a variety of aircraft. During one such opportunity, I met a female pilot who encouraged me to get my pilot’s license. She set me up with an instructor and I started taking lessons. After my first lesson, I instantly wanted to make this a career. Within a few months, I quit my job, packed up my house and moved back to Florida to start year-round training to become a commercial pilot. I am currently working on my single engine commercial license. My hope is to be able to incorporate my photography in with my aviation career. My current cameras are a Canon 7D and a Canon 80D, with my primary lens for aviation being a Tamron 150 - 600mm. I always shoot in RAW to get the best quality out of an image. Most of my post processing is through Photoshop, but I just started learning how to use Lightroom and hope to gain more insight to start using Lightroom more. I have been published, with most of my work being wildlife. As what happens with most people with a large camera and lens, I attract a lot of attention. The attention almost always results in a wide variety of questions being asked. I enjoy taking the time to answer people’s questions, whether it be about my camera or the subject I am shooting. It is extremely rewarding to be able to meet and share my knowledge with others. When helping others pursue their photography interest, I always recommend starting small and to not rush to get the biggest and most expensive equipment there is. You will learn more and not be overwhelmed by having a “starter” camera.

While standing out in that same field in Tucson for one of the Heritage Flight Training events, I met several members of ISAP. It was encouraging to see that others had the same amount of passion and enthusiasm for aviation as I did. I want to belong to a group of like-minded individuals who help each other expand their knowledge and reach their goals. I am looking forward to participating in events and meeting more members in the future!


Emily Wright


Emily Wright


AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

Identify these aircraft. The answers are found next to the Kenyon Gyro Ad.

1


2


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| where photography clicks

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LIOE Design is a product company that manufactures their own product designs. Located in Seattle, WA all their products are aviation inspired from their Aero Ti Chopsticks. Every product has a story. A reason why a product looks the way it does from function and practicality to aesthetics. All our products are designed with the belief that everyday goods can be extraordinary. We strive to ensure the user is getting the most unique experience and to create a everyday item in a completely re-imagined way. We design to spark imagination and creativity even in the most creative people. Creating products that inspire design. 1) Air Squadron playing cards This deck of cards has artwork of modern jets and aircraft. The inspiration was to create a deck of cards unlike other cards, the Kings and Queens are B-2 Bomber and SR-71. The Jokers are the A-10 and F-22. Every card is unique creating the perfect deck for an aviation enthusiast or card collector! 2) Stealth Pen The Stealth Pen has a unique, aluminum uni-body design with four total components making it lightweight as well as easy to assemble and disassemble. The slotted design offers a futuristic touch and cuts down on the weight of the pen while allowing the user a glance at the inside ink cartridge. 3) Titan Business card holder The Titan is aero-inspired minimalist light-weight card holder. The pattern on the front of the card holder is reminisce of a futuristic space door and inspired by the nose of the B29 Super Fortress. Titan has a dark gunmetal gray color and is made from aircraft grade 6061-T6 Aluminum.

LIOEDESIGN.COM Visit their website to learn more about their products

15% discount for ISAP members

For details visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

Jim Wilson Photography International Distributor for Kenyon Stabilizing Products 214-796-9743 jw@jimwilsonphotography.com

Answers to Airplane Silhouettes 1. Swiss Federal Aircraft Factory C-3604 Switzerland 2. Yakovlev UT-3 copy 3. Yakovlev Yak 17 copy


Kevin Hong

Special Offer for ISAP Members

For the special offers check out the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore We pay tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices at our location or online at www.bhphotovideo.com We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.


ISAP Merchandise

If you wish to purchase any ISAP merchandise please email info@aviationphoto.org Send your name and current address and you will be invoiced via PayPal. Shipping cost will be added to your invoice. Members with an international address will have a higher shipping rate. ISAP Challenge coin - $10 + shipping ISAP safety vest (Small to X-Large) - $28 + shipping ISAP safety vest 2XL - $31, 3XL - $34, 4XL - $38 + shipping ISAP membership patch - $5 + shipping Limited patch version with Velcro backing - $10 + shipping


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ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards Secretary Mike Collins ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller Airspeed Editor Kevin Hong Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at isap_info@aviationphoto.org or isappresident@gmail.com Airspeed is a publication to showcase our members’ work in capturing aviation events. Images should be sized at a minimum size of at least 5100 x 3300 (17” x 11”) @ 300 dpi. We would like your largest landscape file size format for our full page spread in our featured magazine. Please submit up to 10 images per article and your text in a Microsoft Word document. Email your article and images by using www.wetransfer.com and send to isap_info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). Members can submit images for review for a future cover or back page display or would like to inquire on doing an article for Airspeed contact us via email at isap_info@aviationphoto.org We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


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Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The December 2020 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world....

Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The December 2020 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world....

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