__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

PREPARING FOR THE 2021 AIRSHOW SEASON USN BLUE ANGELS USAF THUNDERBIRDS USAF SINGLE SHIP DEMOS


Bob Driver

WELCOME TO THE 2021 APRIL ISSUE OF AIRSPEED! NAF El Centro: The Blues and the T-Birds Winter Training Johannes Winkelmann Rob Tabor Bob Driver Jeff Krueger Joshua Patterson Michael Bellinger Nick Nelson Tom Spanos 2021 Heritage Flight Training Course ISAP President Larry Grace Capital Helos Rick Charles Jumping at Dawn Gary Daniels Red Stars Over Altenburg Marc Schultz A New Generation of Commercial Adversaries Landing in Phoenix Nick Nelson Spotting 2020 Dragos Munteanu Shooting the Hondajet John Slemp

Member Showcase Dragos Munteanu Geoffrey Arnwine Kevin Hong Steve Zimmermann Patrick Comtois Scott Slingsby Rob Tabor Richard JackJames Meet The Members Jim Chung Joshua Patterson Sam Dammers Mike Harris

Mark Streit Mike Hill Keith Charlot Su Khoo

Rod Cromer José M. Ramos Ora Lassila Mike Bilek

Luis Sales

Airplane Silhouettes John Ford Book In Review: Ghosts - Aerial Photography Book Kevin Hong FRONT COVER PHOTO: Larry Grace 2020 and 2021 A-10 Thunderbolt II Demo Team jets cross at the 2021 Heritage Flight Training Course Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Canon 60 - 600mm at 600mm ISO 320 Shutter speed: 1/2000 Exposure: f/6.3 Processed in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom BACK COVER: Rob Tabor 2021 Blue Angels Super Hornet vertical climb Blue Angels Winter Training at NAF El Centro Camera: Nikon 850 Lens: Nikon 500mm f/4 ISO 280 Shutter speed: 1/3200 Exposure: f/4 Processed in Adobe Photoshop


Brett Schauf

NEW AND RETURNING ISAP MEMBERS Robert Allen

Mark Greenmantle

Joe Paul

Rich Spolar

Geoffrey Arnwine

Zachary Hajic

Joshua Patterson

Brandon Thetford

Matt Booty

Mike Harris

Vincenzo Pace

Hal Ticknor

Patrick Comtois

Kevin Hill

Tom Pawlesh

Steve Walter

Alexander Cook

John Joyce

James Robinson

Robin Wright

Rodney Cromer

Susan Koppel

Denis Rouleau

Emily Wright

Paul Csizmadia

Jan-Arie van der Linden

Luis Sales

Peter Yee

Roy Deters

Michael Manz

Sandro Sartori

Judd Slivka

Randall Dunn

Sergio Maraschin

Ryan Scottini

Stephen Butler

Chris Gernentz

Matt McVicker

Todd Schannuth

Philip Johnson

Adam Glowaski

Robert Moser

Arnoud Schoor

Norman Graf

John Nanartowicz

Marc Schultz

The goal of International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) is to bring together our members who share a love of aviation, and want to preserve its history through their images. Through our organization, members can seek to enhance their artistic quality, advance technical knowledge, and improve safety for all areas of aviation photography while fostering professionalism, high ethical standards, and camaraderie. ISAP continues to help our members to better their photography skills, workflow, and set up resources to help with business questions that our members have. Updates are being made to the ISAP website and member portfolio section, and we are showcasing ISAP members’ images and accomplishments on our social media pages. The new Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP members and their photography, experiences, and their passion for aviation from around the world. From military and commercial aviation, you’ll be able to see it all while learning about aviation photography, post processing tips in Lightroom and Photoshop, aviation history, air show reports, aviation museums, and more. We look forward to sharing our members’ images and articles with everyone. Enjoy this issue of Airspeed! Sincerely, Larry Grace, ISAP President Kevin Hong, Airspeed Editor International Society for Aviation Photography www.aviationphoto.org • www.facebook.com/ISAPorg Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography.


NAF EL CENTRO THE BLUES AND THE T-BIRDS W I N T E R

TRAI NI NG

Article and photos by Johannes Winkelmann


Ever since I joined the International Society of Aviation Photography, I’ve enjoyed reading the reports from the photo calls at the Naval Air Facility El Centro (NAFEC), and the great shots my fellow members took during the event. The winter/ spring photo call typically overlaps with the winter practice of the US Navy Blue Angels, and therefore offers a preview of the new season’s program. This year had two additional factors that made this even more special: first off, this season the Blue Angels are switching from the “legacy” F/A-18C models to the more modern F/A-18E Super Hornet; and second, due to COVID-19 precautions, a lot of air shows this year have already been canceled, so seeing them perform their routine during the base visit would potentially be one of the few chances for me to see them fly for the foreseeable future. So when I received the recent newsletter with the announcement of the February photo call, I sent out my application to attend right away, and was very excited when I got the email inviting me to a conference call to discuss the details! On the conference call, our ISAP President Larry Grace explained all the rules for the event, and he and the other experienced members gave great recommendations on how to be successful during the event. One of the other members also mentioned that based on a temporary flight restriction filed, the USAF Thunderbirds would likely make an appearance that weekend as well, and this was confirmed a few days later by the two teams’ social media teams!

In addition to the preparation call, I also re-read the reports from previous photo calls in Airspeed magazine, to have a better idea how the day would go down, as well as online spotting guides for NAFEC to get a lay of the land. The day of the photo call, I went out to the fence at the end of runway 30, a popular location for aviation fans since it is located in the direct flight pass of the jets taking off. As such, there were already a number of cars there when I arrived, with both photographers and air show fans preparing for a day of fun in the southern Californian sun. Here, I finally got to meet some ISAP members in person, and we started to ready our cameras for the morning practices of the two teams. The Thunderbirds went up first, followed by the Blue Angels roughly an hour later. This was a great opportunity to make sure all the camera settings were correctly configured for the event. At 11:30 am, we gathered at the parking lot of the base to prepare for the photo call. Kris Haugh, the Public Affairs Officer for NAFEC, went over the rules for the event, both for overall safety as well as COVID-19 specific regulations to protect both the base personnel and participants. Supporting him was US Navy mass communication specialist (MC3) Drew Verbis, who has produced both photo and video content for the US Navy and was a great resource to have with us on the tour.


After the safety briefing, we got onto two buses, and entered through the gate of the base. The visit itself was split in two parts: the first part was the shows of Thunderbirds and Blue Angels, which we got to experience from the helipad of the base, perfectly aligned with the show center point, allowing for great shots of the routines shown by the two teams. Before the show started, we got to meet the Thunderbirds’ Public Affairs officer, Capt. Remoshay Nelson, who answered our questions and gave us some insights about the show. Unfortunately, one of their pilots had suffered a minor injury, and therefore the team was one plane short, but they put on a great show nevertheless. After that, the Blue Angels did their routine, and here we were in the perfect position to see all the crossings of the solo pilots, one of my personal favorites of air demonstration teams. After another great show of the Blues, the jets taxied right by us, allowing for a very unique photo opportunity. The second part of the visit was at runway 08/26, where we were greeted by the Commanding Officer of the base, Capt. William A. Perkins, and got to hear his vision for photo calls like the one we were on, as well as some insights about the safety rules. At this location, we got to see a number of T-45 trainers take off and recover, as well as two F-35Bs from VMX-1 come in to refuel and take off again. We also had the opportunity to chat with PAO Haugh and MC3 Verbis as well as the other participants of the tour. We finally wrapped up around 5pm, when the warm sunlight started hitting the base. We got back on the buses, and were shuttled back to the parking lot to wrap the day up. On Friday, I left early to get set up at the fence again, and was greeted by a beautiful sunrise out east, and moonset over the base. A lot of familiar faces gathered at the end of runway 30, both ISAP members and other aviation fans, everybody excited to watch the morning practices of both the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels.

Around noon, all ISAP members met up at the parking lot of the base to take a few group photos, and I decided to go standby for the Friday tour, in case there was a no-show from any of the other photography groups that day…which turned out to be the case, so I had the privilege to join a second photo call, and managed to get a few shots I wasn’t able to get the day before. Again, we got a lot of T-45 trainers out at the airfield, as well as two F-35Bs from VMX-1. At the end of our time out at the field, we got a demo of the flying capabilities of the MH-60S Seahawk (Knighthawk unofficially), before getting on the buses to end the day. To me, my first photo call was an incredible opportunity to learn more about the operations on a Naval air base, and to get photos closer to an active military airfield than I ever had before. Furthermore, getting to meet fellow ISAP members, sharing tips and tricks and learning from each other was almost as valuable to me on my first photo call. I hope to be able to pay this forward, and support new members the same way I was helped during this event! At this point, I would like to thank our ISAP President Larry Grace for making this visit possible and organizing the event, NAFEC PAO Kris Haugh and MC3 Verbis for making these photo calls possible, as well as Jeff Krueger for being the point person locally. Finally a big thank you to all the ISAP members that I met during the event, and I look forward to meeting up again in the future!


Johannes Winkelmann


Johannes Winkelmann


Johannes Winkelmann


Johannes Winkelmann


ROB TABOR Given the events of the past year and the Blues’ conversion to the Super Hornet, I was looking forward to the trek down to NAF El Centro more than I have looked forward to any other photo opportunity in recent memory. I had chosen the dates of this visit based on the hopes that there would be daily over the field practices from the Blues, a possibility of a visit from those white jets from Nellis AFB and the Spring Photo Call. As fortune would have it, once again, the stars all aligned and all came to fruition. Well, sort of, as it turned out, since I reside outside the threehundred-mile radius, I was deemed Persona non grata, excluded from consideration from the Photo Call and relegated to shooting outside the wire. Didn’t quite hit the trifecta this time, but as the old Meat Loaf song goes, “Two out of three ain’t bad”. Actually, it turned out be exponentially better than “ain’t bad”. Seeing the Super Hornet up close and personal was a real treat. I was always more of a fan of the lines of the Legacy Hornet, but I have to admit that the Supers look great in their new paint and I don’t think that I can adequately put in to words what it is like to have eight GE 414’s in blower departing low overhead, it just has to be experienced. I would also like to say that it great to have the Thunderbirds drop by, I wish I would have stayed longer to witness the joint formation. And Finally, the real highlight of the trip was seeing and catching up with all my friends from ISAP. I’m already looking forward to next year!


Rob Tabor


Rob Tabor


Rob Tabor


Rob Tabor


BOB DRIVER I jumped on the chance to participate in the February 2021 El Centro photo call, partly because I’ve been missing my aviation adventures, and partly because I’ve never been to that facility and looked forward to what it had to offer. Just after being accepted in to the ISAP group of eight, we learned it was confirmed the USAF Thunderbirds would be joining the US Navy Blue Angels for a joint training event while we were there. That made this event all the more special. Tom Spanos and I had already planned to be there coincidently during the “pop-up” ISAP photo call so we spent a few additional days outside around the fence line. Tom had worked the facility in the past and was a wealth of information going in. He was more than happy to share his experience with the rookie, and for that I’m extremely grateful. The event was all the more interesting with the various COVID restrictions in place, but everyone was responsible and played well with one another. Kris Haugh, our PAO host, made sure everyone stayed safe, but at the same time positioned us to obtain the shots we all came for. He was a great resource for information and a touch of humor as well.

Once we arrived at our shooting location, we were pleasantly greeted by the base Commander, CAPT William Perkins, who welcomed and thanked us for participating in the photo call and our help in showcasing his base to the outside world. We had the regular routine take offs and landings of a gaggle of T-45C Goshawks and were treated to a pair of Lockheed Martin F-35B variants as well. Toward the end of the photo call we also had opportunity to shoot a very entertaining HH-60H Seahawk helicopter working the pattern. ISAP photo calls are an excellent opportunity to meet up with fellow ISAP members whom you might have only seen on the ISAP FB page, Instagram, or met on Zoom previously. It’s great to match up a face with their work.


Bob Driver


Bob Driver


Bob Driver


Bob Driver


JEFF KRUEGER Rumors were flying and then confirmed that the USAF Thunderbirds were flying out to the Naval Air Facility-El Centro for a week or two of joint training with the Blue Angels. The Blues arrived for practice in their new F/A-18 Super Hornets along with the new Fat Albert C-130J model. The NAFEC PAO Kristopher Haugh organized a Photo Call using the new, smaller format over a two-day period. I must admit the new format is much better than the traditional larger photo calls and under the new CDC protocols and Executive Orders relating to the pandemic, much easier to control and ensure compliance. We all took this seriously and complied with the directions given. That said, I got to the facility late morning the day before the call and was able to watch the Thunderbirds arrive and do a fly over the base. Later that afternoon the Blues did a practice run and shooting from outside the fence line I was treated to my first view of the new aircraft. After the practice session normal flight operations resumed and as usual, we were treated to a number of aircraft, including a number of USMC Harriers and a pair of F-35’s. A great first day. Thursday was my day to attend the photo call on base which was an 1130 hours gathering. Deciding to get up and go early, which turned out to be a good idea, and shoot again outside the fence line, I saw there was a huge full moon over the station, but by the time I got parked, the moon was behind the mountains…so much for a great landscape photo op. Being the hosts, the Blues let the T-Birds take off and practice first at 0800. The Blue Angels followed and the sound of the four birds taking off overhead at the end of the runway was definitely different than the old Hornets, louder and more thunder than whine. I had to grab my teleconverter as it vibrated across the top of my Jeep where I was perched. After a full practice, and landing, we watched as Fat Albert took off for parts unknown. He did a nice flyover on his way out and I actually remembered to switch from “Jet mode” to “Prop mode” and took a few frames of his departure. At the appointed time, we gathered for transit onto the facility. A total of 20 photographers, three of them ISAP members attended the first day. The PAO, and his able assistant, MC3 Verbis, a reservist and accomplished photographer in his own right, assembled us and after taking our temperatures, provided the briefing along with the new restrictions. Transiting onto the base to our position, show center, we were able to photograph both the T-Birds and Blues throughout their afternoon practice. Our group also got a visit from the Thunderbirds PAO who spent quite a bit of time talking with us about the T-Birds. From there, Kris took us over to photograph flight operations for a couple hours which included T-45’s and a pair of F-35’s in transit. Lots of helicopter activity was also fun to see and photograph. We were visited by NAFEC commander Capt. William Perkins who spent time talking with each of us and making us feel welcome. Friday dawned and I again went out early. As with Thursday, I got there around 0615 and it was already pretty well populated outside the fence at the end of the runway. Several ISAP members were already there and we settled in for the morning practices. I shot from outside the fence all day Friday and as the day progressed, as with Thursday, more and more people showed up to watch. There were more people there both Thursday and Friday than I have ever seen but most were pretty conscience and considerate of others in front and behind them so there didn’t appear to be any issues, but I was sitting on top of my Jeep for the most part…

After the afternoon practice runs, the field opened up again and the helo pilots were having some fun playing to the crowd along the fence. It was a long 2 and a half days, but well worth the trip. NAF El Centro was a great host as always, and the photo call both days went perfectly providing some special and outstanding photo opportunities for us.


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


Jeff Krueger


JOSHUA PATTERSON The 2021 spring photo call was my first time attending a NAFEC photo call, and what an experience it was! There were highs, like watching a pair of VMX-1 F-35Bs stop in, and lows, like seeing a four ship of VMA-214 Harriers arrive and depart from the opposite side of the field through a never ending layer of heat haze. But when the low of your day is seeing Harriers, even if you can’t photograph them, you know it must be a good day indeed. I spent the afternoon enjoying the unique views offered to us by the NAFEC team and trying to capture not just the aircraft, but also the individuals around me. It was an incredibly encouraging experience to see like-minded people in one place enjoying a shared passion for aviation. Something that wouldn’t have been odd at all a year and a half ago, but one which in today’s coronavirus world is all too uncommon. The PAO Kris Haugh and his staff arranged the event in accordance with all COVID-19 regulations and created a safe and positive environment which benefited everyone in attendance.

The Blue Angels put on a great show in their “new” Super Hornets, as did the Thunderbirds, even with what ended up being a 4 jet show for them. The afternoon light was perfect as the field reopened and the T-45s of TW-1 resumed their sorties over the desert ranges. The near continuous Goshawk flights were interrupted only by VMX-1’s Lightnings and HSC-3’s Seahawks. The spring photo call was a great event put on by the exceptional personnel of NAFEC as well as the USN Blue Angels and USAF Thunderbirds. Hopefully we all get to see more of these demonstration teams at airshows across the country this year as they put the skills learned in the sky above Imperial County to good use.


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


MICHAEL BELLINGER


Continuing with the format from last year, once again the El Centro Photocall was limited to residents within a three hundred mile radius of the base, and twenty photographers per day. The big two draws of the event were 1 - the newly acquired F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets that the Blue Angels are transitioning too, and 2 – the return of the USAF Thunderbirds to train alongside them for the second year in a row. Excitement was running high on both sides of the fences, and the Saturday morning after the photocall I saw the biggest crowd I had ever seen outside the fence. Photocall members were able to shoot both the Thunderbirds and the Blue Angels’ practice from show center, right next to their ground control crews. And then afterward move onto being positioned next to the LSO shack at runway Two Six. Along with the F-18 and F-16’s on the field, there was a brace of T-45’s doing bombing practice, the return of the Angel’s C-130 “Fat Albert”, SH-60 Seahawk’s, and visits of F-35B and AV-8B’s that dropped in from MCAS Yuma. With the current cancellation of airshows until some unforeseeable point in the future, plus the obvious damper on travel, El Centro and Red Flag has been my only opportunity to scratch my combat aircraft photo itch!


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


Michael Bellinger


NICK NELSON The USN Blue Angels winter flight training at El Centro always gets me excited for the upcoming air show season. But with a pandemic still looming and a mask mandate still in effect in most states it’s hard to say how this year’s air show season will play out. Nevertheless, the Blue Angels flight training is always a special time of year. It was even made more special when an email came through from ISAP President Larry Grace that included the NAF El Centro photocall. This year would again be a change on how things are usually run at the photocall. Two days with 20 people/day; this means only four ISAP members per day. The schedule was also different from past photocalls in which the briefing would start in the afternoon instead of the usual morning briefing. That change in the schedule worked out actually well because it meant you can catch the morning practice session outside of the fence before meeting-up for the photocall. We all met up in the parking area masked-up for the afternoon briefing with our PAO Kristopher Haugh. Kris was also accompanied by MC3 Andrew Verbis which was there to help keep us all in-line and take photos in the meantime. After a thorough briefing and quick temperature check we were loaded up onto the two buses and headed out to the flight line. We were pleasantly surprised to see the USAF Thunderbirds made it back to NAF El Centro for a few days. Once we parked by the old helo ramp we were greeted by Thunderbirds PAO Captain Remoshay Nelson. Capt. Nelson took good care of us, leading us to our shooting area and answering any questions we had.

We watched the Thunderbird flight demonstration then it was time for the Blue Angels flight demo. After the demo teams had completed their flights we loaded back onto the bus and headed out to Rwy 26 where we were greeted by Commanding Officer Captain Bill Perkins. We had a number of T-45s from VT-7 based at NAS Meridian departing and landing. We were also able to capture a couple of F-35B’s from VMX-1 based out of MCAS Yuma that stopped in for some gas and boy were they loud. As the day was coming to a close an SH-60 Seahawk moved over to Rwy 26 for some practice and he really put on a show for us wrapping up a wonderful day. It was a very special time for me as I got to see the new Fat Albert C-130J, the Thunderbirds flying in the Imperial Valley, the Blue Angels new Super Hornets and catching up with old friends and making new ones. I would like to thank Captain Bill Perkins, PAO Kristopher Haugh and ISAP President Larry Grace for organizing the photocall and for continuing on this privileged access for us photographers.


USN Blue Angels delta head-on pass.


An F-35B of the USMC Flying Lions VMX-1 departing Runway 26.


Nick Nelson


USN Blue Angels delta flying overhead.


Nick Nelson


USAF Thunderbirds morning take-off.


Nick Nelson


Blue Angels Pilots Lcdr Cary Rickoff #6 & Lcdr James Haley breaking from a maneuver.


Nick Nelson


USAF Thunderbirds PAO Captain Remoshay Nelson poses for a candid shot.


Nick Nelson


Commanding Officer Captain Bill Perkins greets photocall guests as MC3 Andrew Verbis captures the moment.


Nick Nelson


TOM SPANOS


This was my second ISAP Photo Call and I was curious how different things would be during the COVID pandemic. Without exception, I found the protocols and procedures that had been established to be very reasonable. In fact, they were actually a welcome change from some situations I’ve encountered over the last year where people clearly didn’t care about their health or the safety of others around them. We started the check-in process by showing our IDs to verify we were on the approved visitor list. Everyone was required to individually respond to a series of questions about our current health and recent COVID related experiences, in addition to a process to perform temperature checks of everyone. Lastly, we reviewed the twenty items defined in the Photo Call Safety Brief and were reminded multiple times to mask up with a multi-layer cloth mask or wear double masks. By Presidential Executive Order and DoD guidance, we needed to remain masked at ALL times on the installation unless eating or drinking. NAF El Centro US Navy Public Affairs Officer Kristopher Haugh did a great job guiding everyone through the process, while balancing the seriousness of the situation with making everyone feel welcome and the afternoon a memorable and enjoyable event. To increase social distancing, only two groups of 10 photographers were allowed on base. A big change from the 90-100 people last year. Following the two practices we all lined up along the runway to get closeup views of the Blue Angels when they taxied by and wave to everyone. Then it was time to load back onto the buses and move to Runway 26 in hopes of catching some up action. Last year the runway didn’t see any traffic. Fortunately, this year we had many opportunities to photograph T-45 Goshawk trainers, SH-60 Seahawk helos, and F-35B Lightning IIs landing and taking off. I always enjoy checking out the aviator call signs painted on the canopies and being this close made it easy to see the names and wonder about the associated backstories. Also being this close to the action allowed me to notice the “small” details like many of the Goshawk trailers were carrying small practice bombs. And of course, watching a pair of F-35Bs doing a STOVL landing and then afterburner takeoff was very memorable, and loud! The afternoon closed out with


everyone standing next to the vans while we watched a Seahawk doing a seemingly endless series of maneuvers. Everyone left the base with memory cards full of great memories. Besides the Photo Call time on base, I spent two full days and two half days doing photography outside the fence line at the approaches to Runways 30 and 26. Across this amount of time I was able to see the Wednesday arrival of the Thunderbirds, six Blue Angels and four Thunderbird 10 practice sessions. Having access to this many demonstrations allowed me the opportunity to step out of the normal airshow photography “box” and try some nontraditional camera/lens combinations. For several of the sessions I put the long lenses back in the bag and shifted to more wide angle glass, mixing things up by using 24-70mm, 24-105mm, and 70-200mm lenses. This allowed for more low altitude, directly over head shots and the inclusion of the crowds in images. And since I wasn’t always doing long distance photographs, I was able to just sit back and enjoy parts of the shows outside the confines of the viewfinder. Sometimes you lose how amazing the routines are when staring through the viewfinder. Plus, shooting with lighter glass was a nice change! Between the morning and afternoon sessions we’d sit back and relax or dash down to a different runway to catch the normal base air traffic. Memories I came home with include more than just the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds. Reconnecting with fellow photographers I’ve met over the years. Meeting new people that I’m sure I’ll run into at other future events. Sitting in my chair chatting about photography when a F-35B surprised us by doing a STOVL landing right over the top of us as it descended onto Runway 30. Talking about P-3s with NAF El Centro Commanding Officer Captain Bill Perkins, who made the time to drive out

to the runway to meet everyone. And learning about other opportunities for future photography at El Centro. Next trip I’ll be sure to the include a night visit to Imperial County Airport to capture all the rotary aircraft dropping in to refuel. Special thanks to Kris Haugh and Captain Perkins for making the time to be such wonderful hosts. Thanks to ISAP President Larry Grace for arranging such a great Photo Call. And best wishes to all the ISAP photographers, both on the Call and at the fence line. Look forward to seeing everyone at future events.


Tom Spanos


Tom Spanos


Tom Spanos


Tom Spanos


Tom Spanos


Tom Spanos


2021 HERITAGE F L I G H T

TRAINING COURSE Article and photos by ISAP President Larry Grace


This is the 24th year of the USAF Heritage Flight Training Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base located in Tucson, AZ. Aircraft, pilots and team members from the A-10 Thunderbolt II Demo Team, F-16 Viper Demo Team, F-22 Raptor Demo Team, F-35 Lightning II Demo Team along with pilots from the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation with their aircraft this year were two P-51 Mustangs, A-1 Skyraider, F-86 Sabre. For the past 24 years, the pilots and team members gather at Davis Monthan Air Force Base for training and upgrades to the Heritage Flight profile. The ground crews exchange information and learn from their previous airshow season as well as help train the new team members and pilots. One day of training is set aside for classroom, media training, safety, and briefing their airshow routine. The remaining four days, the demo pilots will fly their individual show routines; afterwards they will join up with the pilots from the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation and fly the Heritage Flight profile. There is a training cycle for each group of aircraft to fly and master what they learn. This training will also help the new pilots learn the flight profiles. After each flight the pilots will gather and debrief the flight and make any corrections for their next group flight. This is also the week that a new demo pilot will receive their certification to fly their single-ship demo as well as for the Heritage Flight demo. After the training is complete, the demo pilots and teams will be ready for the 2021 Airshow season. This year the newest A-10 Thunderbolt II Demo Team commander and pilot will be Capt. Haden “Gator” Fullam. He will lead a team of Air Force professionals for the 2021 and 2022 season. Returning for the 2021 Airshow season will be: U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II Demonstration Team commander and pilot Capt. Kristin “BEO” Wolfe in the Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II. F-16 Viper Demo Team commander and pilot Maj. Garret “Toro” Schmitz in the General Dynamics F-16C Fighting Falcon. F-22 Raptor Demo Team commander and pilot Maj. Joshua “Cabo” Gunderson in the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor.


“It’s an honor and privilege to command

this group of Airmen. The work the team does day-in and day-out is remarkable and shows the dedication and commitment we have to our mission, each other and everyone who will attend the shows.

- Capt. Haden “Gator” Fullam A-10 Thunderbolt II Demo Team Commander 2021 and 2022 season


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Larry Grace


Equipment Used: Body: Nikon D810 Lens: Tamron 24-70mm 2.8 Di VC USD G2 Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 D Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm 1:2.8 G II ED Nikkor AF-S 200-500mm 1:5.6 ED Processing: Adobe Lightroom Classic with DxO Nik Collection Color Efex Pro 4 on all images.

CAPITAL

HELOS

Article and photos by Rick Charles


To quote a familiar line from the well-known aviation movie, Top Gun, the Metropolitan Washington, DC region is a “target rich environment” for helicopter watchers. If you work in Downtown DC like I do there are plenty of helos of all shapes, colors and missions to see every day of the year. That’s the good news. Now for the bad news…for an aviation photographer, DC area helos are quite simply camera shy. That’s not by coincidence. The DC area is surrounded by the Special Flight Rules Area which is a post-9/11 security bubble extending out 30 nautical miles into neighboring Virginia and Maryland. Only cleared pilots and aircraft under ATC control can fly in this airspace. Why this is significant to us AvGeeks is that the security culture translates into heighten security around airports

and heliports, and any guy loitering around airports with government hangars with a big glass camera may get questioned or at least get a second or third look. And, U.S. government agencies, especially the “three-letter” variety, go to great lengths to mask their aviation operations’ true identity and they certainly don’t want any unnecessary attention. This environment is challenging for the helo photographer but all is not lost! There are plenty of great places to shoot from and plenty of helos to photograph if you know where to look, be a bit stubborn in your determination, and, of course, be a bit lucky. These photos represent the various types of helos performing a various assortment of missions that are routinely seen in the skies over the National Capital Region.

PHI Air Medical AirCare 2 is based at Shannon Airport (KEZF) in Fredericksburg, Virginia and operates this Bell 407 for medevac missions in Northern and Central Virginia, Washington, DC and Maryland. Here, N427P is launching for an interfacility patient transfer mission. Notice this 407 is equipped with inflatable floats and life rafts on the skids. This is a FAA requirement since N427P is a single-engine aircraft and conducts missions across the Chesapeake Bay. (1/250, f/18, 112mm, ISO 500)


Rick Charles


Fairfax County Police Department operates two Bell 429 aircraft from its temporary facility at Manassas Regional Airport. This aircraft, N212FX, is returning to base after an operational patrol mission to the Mount Vernon area and along the Potomac River. (1/160, f/20, 70mm, ISO 400)


Rick Charles


Medstar operates this special aircraft, “SkyBear”, for Children’s National Hospital in Washington. SkyBear is a medevac-configured Airbus EC145 and here it is seen lifting off from the South Capitol Street heliport heading back to Washington Medical Center. (1/320, f/20, 200mm, ISO 252)


Rick Charles


The USAF’s 1st Helicopter Squadron based at Joint Base Andrews operates a large fleet of UH-1Ns for VIP transport. One of the unit’s core missions is evacuation of federal Executive Branch and Congressional leaders from the Capital during a crisis. This UH-1N is observed on short final to the South Capitol Street heliport for a practice touch and go. (1/250, f/22, 165mm, ISO 317)


Rick Charles


Sometimes you get lucky. This VH-3D needs no introduction. Operated by Marine Helicopter Squadron One, or HMX-1 of Marine Corps Air Facility Quantico, most people know it as “Marine 1” but that is only when the president is aboard. When not flying POTUS, HMX-1 aircraft operate using the “Nighthawk” callsign. They come in and out of DC low, fast and with as little radio traffic as possible. (1/200, f/29, 330mm, ISO 317)


Rick Charles


Tools of the trade. This helmet reflects the flight paramedic-owner’s unit (PH Air Medical’s AirCare 5 based at Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport, Virginia (KSHD) and a connection to a family member serving in the U.S. Air Force. (1/640, f/5.6, 50mm, ISO 504)


JUMPING A T D A W N WW I I AI RB O R N E D E M O N S T R ATIO N TEA M SUNRI S E A I R B O R N E O P E R ATIO N S Article and photos by Gary Daniels


Alarms sound off at 0530, causing groans in all of the sleeping quarters in remaining 78-year-old hangar at the Frederick Army Airfield in Frederick, Oklahoma. The hangar quickly transitions to hectic activity as cadre and students roll out of their bunks and ready for a day of training and jump operations during the WWII Airborne Demonstration Team (ADT) Jump School. Cool morning air at sunrise is calm before the sun heats the atmosphere, causing the wind to increase. So, crack of dawn jumps are the norm each day of jump school, weather permitting. ADT takes advantage of every opportunity to jump if wind conditions are safe. After a quick breakfast in the mess hall, the jumpers report for a briefing called the ‘Manifest Call.’ After the brief, main and reserve parachutes are drawn and a frenetic period of donning equipment and Jump Master Parachute Inspections (JMPI) happen as the eastern sky begins to lighten. At the same time, ground and aircrew prepare the aircraft for the morning mission. Once all of the JMPIs are completed, all gather for a morning prayer then board the aircraft. The C-47’s big radials cough to life with a smoky protest, chalks are pulled, and the pilots nudge the throttles forward to taxi out just as the sun is peaking over the horizon. After the run-up check, the throttles are pushed to take off power, and the old warbird rumbles down the runway. As the mains leave the ground, the jumpers stomp their feet to celebrate being airborne. While the aircraft is climbing to the jump altitude of 1500 feet, the Drop Zone (DZ) Safety Team is relaying DZ wind conditions to the Master Jump Master (MJM) aboard the aircraft. The transport makes a first pass over the DZ, and the MJM drops wind drift indicators to determine where the aircraft should be positioned over the DZ for the drop. The aircraft circles and makes another approach, lining up on the DZ according to the MJM’s guidance. While this is happening, the jumpers prepare for the drop. The sound of the big radials dominate the inside of the fuselage, so commands have to be yelled by the Jump Master (JM). “GET READY!” This command brings attention to the JM. “STAND UP!” The jumpers stand and prepare to hook up. “HOOK UP!” The jumpers attach their parachute static

lines to the aircraft anchor cable. “EQUIPMENT CHECK!” Each jumper checks the equipment of the jumper in front of them.” “SOUND OFF FOR EQUIPMENT CHECK!” Each jumper confirms all is well, shouting to be heard above the roaring engines. “10 OK! 9 OK! 8 OK! – up the line to the first jumper who shakes the JM’s hand and shouts, “1 OK! THANK YOU, JUMP MASTER!” “STAND IN THE DOOR!” The first jumper stands in the door, waiting for the command to jump. The wait is usually less than 60 seconds, but for the lead jumper it can seem like 60 minutes. The MJM signals the command to jump to the JM. The JM shouts, “GO, GO, GO!” 10 out in 15 seconds! The JM follows the others into the wild, blue yonder. Training kicks in as each jumper steps out into the 120mph airstream with their left leg extended which quickly snaps them to the left into a seated position parallel to the aircraft, legs fully extended with knees and ankles together, and chins tucked tightly into chests. This allows the static line to deploy the parachute safely as the jumper falls away from the aircraft. The egress and parachute deployment are over in mere seconds. Wind speed at jump altitude is always different than the wind speed on the DZ. So, the jumper needs to quickly orient the parachute and control the drift according to the conditions. The rising sun is casting long shadows on the DZ as jumpers and terra firma are reunited in a controlled and dusty tumble called a PLF, or “parachute landing fall.” Each jumper gets up quickly to indicate they are A-OK, gathers and secures their chute, then hustles off of the DZ to the waiting deuce-and-a-half for the ride back to the hangar. All of the above happens before 0715. There will be more lifts, as long as the wind stays within safety limits on the DZ. And, all of the deployed chutes have to be packed by the end of the day, even if that is 2300! There is still a long and exciting day ahead.


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


Gary Daniels


David Walsh

Gary Daniels


RED STARS OVER ALTENBURG Eastern and Western Aviation Heritage at Altenburg Nobitz

Article and photos by Marc Schultz

The history of Altenburg Airfield in Germany, now named Leipzig-Altenburg Airport, is long and rich in tradition. As early as 1913, the year of its foundation, the airfield was home to a flying school. After the Nazi takeover in 1933 and on Hermann Göring’s direct orders, an air base command was established in 1936 and the expansion as a military airfield began. Nevertheless the airfield was only briefly occupied by active flying units, operating a number of German aircraft types like the twin-engined Dornier Do 17 and the Messerschmitt Bf-109. Finally, Junkers Ju-88 night fighters of Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 (Night Fighter Wing 5) took off from Altenburg from February to April 1945. At the end of the war, the 6th U.S. Armored Division under General Robert W. Grow occupied the town of Altenburg which marked the end of Luftwaffe activities at the air base.

From July 1945 to 1992 the Soviet Air Force occupied the base and operated aircraft types like MIG-15, MIG-17, MIG-21, MIG-23 and MIG-27. From 1989, the 968th Fighter regiment, equipped with MiG-29s occupied the airfield as the last operational unit. Until May 1992, the Altenburg-Nobitz airfield was used by the Western Group of Troops. The last flight of a MiG-29 took place on April 8 of that year. Last material transfer flights to Russia were carried out by Il-76s in the same month and on June 15, the airfield was finally handed over to the German authorities. Founded in 2004 the airfield today hosts an aviation museum which is highly recommended for a visit - the Flugwelt Altenburg Nobitz. In addition to the historical development of the airfield, numerous


exhibits are on display. Among these aircraft are both eastern and western types such as MiG-21 SPS, Fiat G-91, North American F-86 Sabre, Lockheed TF-104G Starfighter, Sukhoi SU-22 and a C-160 Transall tactical transport aircraft. Highlight of the exhibition is definitely a Breguet BR1150 “Atlantique”. This aircraft was decommissioned in December 2006 at the Naval Air Wing 3 in Nordholz and was flown over to the Flugwelt Altenburg Nobitz e.V. in April 2007. So the Antlantique’s final mission led it to Altenburg-Nobitz airport. For more information about the exhibition visit the museum’s official website under https://flugwelt-altenburg-nobitz.de/.

The shots in this set had been taken with a Sony Alpha 6000 APS-C camera equipment in the summer of 2016. Post production was done with Luminar AI and Adobe LR Classic. Text and photos by Marc Schultz / www.flugsicht.com


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


Marc Schultz


A NEW GENERATION OF COMMERCIAL ADVERSARIES LANDS IN PHOENIX Article and photos by Nick Nelson

A behemoth of an aircraft quietly slips in for landing on runway 3R at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. The enormous Antonov AN-124 is carrying a special cargo originating from Israel intended to be delivered to a very eager customer.

Mark Streit

The cargo is destined for defense contractor Top Aces and includes four ex-Israeli F-16A/B Netz fleet aircraft. This becomes a first for a commercial provider to own and operate the fourth-generation fighter aircraft. Top Aces is a privately owned adversary-air company that provides air combat training for the U.S. Department of Defense as well as the Royal Canadian Air Force. They were founded in the year 2000 by three former RCAF fighter pilots. Their vision is to “train the next generation of combat leaders”. Top Aces U.S. headquarters is based in Mesa, Arizona where their new F-16s were delivered. The first four F-16s that arrived out of a reported 29 purchased from the Israeli Ministry of Defense have a storied past of their own with three of the four jets having downed adversary aircraft during a conflict.


Antonov An-124 on final approach for Rwy 3R at KIWA

The first ex-Israeli F-16 rolls down the ramp


The first F-16A to roll out of the gigantic AN-124 is serial #78-0322 Netz 129. This aircraft is a Block 5 version that was originally planned to be delivered to the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force under the Peace Zebra program of 1979 but was canceled and instead sent to the Israeli Air Force in 1980 under the program Peace Marble I. Netz 129 loaded with two 2,000lb Mark-84 bombs along with a flight of other F-16s and F-15s participated in Operation Opera which was an IAF bombing operation of an Iraqi nuclear facility in 1981. In 1982 Netz 129 was also credited with a kill in a conflict with a Syrian MiG-23 Flogger. The second aircraft to roll down the ramp is serial #78-0327 Netz 220. This F-16A aircraft was also a Peace Zebra aircraft that was delivered instead to the Israeli Air Force in 1980. It is a Block 10 version having downed a Syrian MiG-21 Fishbed in 1982. The next aircraft to roll down the ramp is serial #78-0362 Netz 017. This F-16B Block 5 is the only two-seater that was delivered in the first batch of aircraft to Top Aces. It was originally delivered to the Israeli Air Force in 1980 under program Peace Marble I and was used by the IAF for training purposes. And finally, the last aircraft of the four delivered rolled down the ramp. F-16A Block 10B serial #78-0346 Netz 250 was also delivered to the Israeli Air Force in 1981 under program Peace Marble I. It is the “Ace” of the batch having downed not one, but two Syrian aircraft (MiG-21 & MiG-23) during the Lebanon War of 1982. As Top Aces awaits its future F-16 deliveries they will be busy eagerly and methodically assembling, painting and testing their first batch of aircraft to make sure they are airworthy and ready to train the next generation of combat leaders.


Nick Nelson #78-0346 Netz 250 is the only one of the group credited with downing two adversary aircraft


Nick Nelson


AN-124’s internal crane offloads crates of F-16 wing assemblies


Kevin Hong

Nick Nelson


F-16 being towed to Top Ace’s hangar for assembly


0 2 0 2 G N I T T SPO hotos by Article and p

anu

Dragos Munte


We all know by now that 2020 is not a “normal” year. All our lives have been heavily impacted by the pandemic. The life of the spotters also. From a difficult equation of aligning more than 10 airshows per summer – we went (at least in Europe) to an absolute Zero (0). All airshows have been canceled and most multinational exercises also. So, what were the spotters supposed to do? Find alternatives…and the alternative was to go to the fences of the airbases in proximity and hope for planes. In Belgium there are two main airbases – Florennes and Kleine Brogel. Each base hosts two squadrons of F-16s of the Belgian Air Component. There is a daily flight activity in the airbases – usually two waves per day with the F-16s. The bases are also used by other types in the Belgian inventory like the C-130 Hercules, SF260 Marchetti, helicopters etc. Sometimes the bases are used by other airforces – this summer the Portuguese F-16s made a fuel stop at Florennes enroute to Poland and the E-3Cs AWACS from NATO Air Base Geilenkirchen sometimes perform touch and go at Kleine Brogel which is quite close to their home base.

There are a few special tail paintings on the Belgian F-16s so those are always nice to catch. The 349 and 350 squadrons have a World War II heritage and were founded in the UK so both have stripe painted aircraft since the 2019 celebrations of D-Day. The Operational Conversion Unit on the F-16 has also a special livery on one of their twin seaters marking 30 years of operations. The most well-known special livery is by far the Dark Falcon on the aircraft used for the Belgian F-16 Solo Display Team flown by – of course – Vador (the call sign of Stefan Darte the demo pilot). The most recent special tail marks 45 years of the F16 Multi National Fighter Program. All in all, is always good to have alternatives and spotting “at the fence” is such an alternative. The prospects for 2021 are not so optimistic as to the return of airshows in Europe – some events have already been canceled but we can only hope some will go ahead. Until then the spotters will always keep an eye on forums to get any hint of a photo shoot opportunity.

Belgian Air Component F-16 350 SQ at Florennes.


AWACS E-3C Sentry NATO at Kleine Brogel.


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Component C-130 at Kleine Brogel.


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Component F-16 – Dark Falcon at Florennes.


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Component F-16 Multi National Fighter Program at Kleine Brogel.


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Component F-16 Operational Conversion Unit at Kleine Brogel.


Dragos Munteanu


Portugal Air Force F-16 201 Falcones sq at Florennes.


Dragos Munteanu


Belgian Air Component F-16s at Kleine Brogel.


Dragos Munteanu


Portugal Air Force F-16 301 Jaguares sq at Florennes.


Dragos Munteanu


SHOOTING

THE HONDAJET

Mark Streit

Article and photos by John Slemp


Back in March of 2019, I was contacted by one of my local clients, Epps Aviation, about photographing a Hondajet to promote their charter service. Having known about the jet since it’s inception, I had as yet been unable to photograph one in a “controlled” environment. This opportunity would allow me to change that, and to get up close. Of course, my client called the day before this was to happen, so there wasn’t a lot of time for pre-planning. Arriving the next afternoon almost an hour before the jet was to arrive back in town, I pulled up to discover it was landing and would be on the ramp shortly. A few images were made as it taxied up, but the harsh afternoon sun was quickly replace by blue-tinged light as it parked in the shade of the hangar. Of course, the tinge could be corrected in post processing but then the background, still fully lit, would be much warmer in tone than normal. The light in the shade was also without contrast, and thus didn’t reveal much of the luscious shape of the aircraft.


A number of images were made in this ramp position, but none of them really sparked my imagination. By using the hangar as the background, instead of the openly lit runway area, I was able to control the color better, but I still wasn’t quite satisfied. I tried a few images with sun flare, which has been a long-term trend in commercial photography usually applied in Photoshop, but it’s not a technique I’ve used much, or ever liked much. But it was worth a try nonetheless.

John Slemp

Nearing suppertime, my client mentioned that there was a bunch of lasagna left over in the break room, so I helped myself, while contemplating my options. The idea of “light painting” the aircraft popped into my head, and in fact had been something I’d been wanting to try anyway.

It’s not a new technique by any stretch (Ansel Adams in the 1930’s used a tungsten light to “paint” the underside of a bar counter he was once commissioned to photograph), but using strobe and layers in Photoshop was a new challenge. I wouldn’t say I’m a Photoshop wiz by any stretch, but I’ve spent a lot of time learning new techniques the last year, and even more so this spring with the COVID-19 lockdown. Since I was working by myself, I enlisted the aid of a nearby ramp worker to help. The idea was simple enough. With the camera mounted on a tripod, I framed up and manually focused the shot, as I didn’t want any “focushunting” if I wasn’t there with the camera. A Profoto remote trigger was mounted on the camera’s hot shoe, which fired the strobe remotely. With


my laptop mounted on a Tether Tools tray next to the camera, I connected the camera using a cable, so that the images would immediately feed into Capture One. That way I could evaluate the lighting position, as well as the intensity, since there wouldn’t be time to use a light meter. (I’ve not used one for years anyway…that’s what histograms are for!). Capture One (C1) is wonderful when working tethered as it’s quick, and allows one to fire the camera from the laptop with the simple push of a button. All of the camera controls can readily be changed as well, so it’s an ideal way to fire a camera remotely. Using a Profoto B1 battery-powered strobe mounted on a 6 foot long metal pole, a medium Chimera soft box was the light modifier chosen for the task. Not too big or heavy, it proved to be the right choice. Initially several exposures were made of the aircraft as it was, to establish the hangar and sky exposures. I waited until there was a good balance between the inside light of the hanger, and the deepening blue sky overhead., which also allowed the Epps sign to be properly exposed as well. Then it was time to paint. The first position had too many “hot spots” from the soft box reflection on the fuselage, so we repositioned the plane to face the camera,


After bringing the files into the computer the next day, selections were made based upon the best hangar/sky exposure, which would serve as the base for the composite image. Using the Canon 5D MKIV and a 24-70 zoom lens at 55mm, the base exposure was 8 seconds at f/9, ISO 160. Then the best nine exposures for the plane were selected, and using masks in Photoshop, they were all combined. This technique allowed for much greater control, as individual images of the aircraft could be adjusted if need be, and the hangar/sky image could also be tweaked as needed. Fortunately, all were pretty close straight out of the box, so a lot of post production on the individual images wasn’t necessary. This technique also allowed any spill light to be masked out

that may have hit the pavement under the plane. The Luminar Flex plugin for Lightroom created the burst of rays around the Epps sign, which could be customized as desired. Probably more time consuming than anything was the clean up of the ramp. The finished image wasn’t that difficult to execute, and the client was most pleased…as was I. It also validated my thought process in that, while the initial images were “serviceable”, it doesn’t hurt to stretch a bit and try new things. It also resulted in a new portfolio piece, and won a 3rd place in the Commercial Category in the prestigious Best of ASMP. It’s a yearly competition for commercial photographers hosted by the American Society of Media Photographers, of which I’m a long-time member. It was our third time being selected for this honor. Work is currently underway on a new website, which should be complete by the time this is read. Light painting allows any photographer to create images with much greater control than speed lights alone, although if the pilots hadn’t locked the plane, I probably would have placed a subtle light in the cabin/cockpit, and would have turned on the landing lights for a bit too. Perhaps next time!

John Slemp

and did it twice more. I started at the vertical stabilizer, and worked my way forward, moving about 4 feet for each exposure. It’s not an exact science, so it was an educated guess. At each point, I yelled to the ramp guy to “push the button,” which he did with glee. If memory serves, there were about nine exposures needed to paint the plane, and we were finished in about a half hour. No messing around with additional lights, cables, generators, grids, crew, etc. The face of the soft box was kept parallel to the fuselage of the plane at all times, as I didn’t want any flare from stray light hitting the lens.


John Slemp


Su Khoo

MEMBER SHOWCASE!


Dragos Munteanu

The Antonov 22 is a rare aircraft. There is only one in commercial operation – registered UR-09307 and operated by Antonov Airlines. And being unique it is of high interest for spotters. So when the spotter forums mentioned that the airplane might come to Oostende, Belgium – on the North Sea Coast the spotters in the area took to their cars and fled towards the airport by the sea. All came in perfectly – a nice July sunny evening and a good moment with the fellow spotters. And an unique aircraft. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D500 Lens: Sigma 150 - 600C ISO: 125 Shutter speed: 1/320 Exposure: f/10 Processed with Adobe Lightroom and NIK Collection


Kevin Hong

Flying home can be boring but when you have a good wingman and need to get photos of a new airplane you just acquired, you got to have some fun. The Gulf Coast Wing with the Commemorative Air Force took ownership of the SNJ from another unit. With some puffy clouds for a backdrop you can always create some dynamic photos and videos. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 7D Mark II Lens: Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/60 Exposure: f/22 Processed in Adobe Photoshop


Mark Streit 2018 Wings Over North Georgia event at Richard Russell Airport in Rome, GA. Two of the Air Combat Command demo teams were there. The F-22 Raptor Demo Team with the demo flown by Lt. Col. Paul “Loco” Lopez. Lt. Col. Lopez was giving the crowd that rapid fire quick open ordnance-bay door pass. Camera equipment and settings Camera: EOS 5D Mark IV Lens: Canon EF100-400mm L II IS USM ISO: 160 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/7.1 Image processed in Adobe Lightroom CC 2019 with the Topaz DeNoise AI plugin


Mike Bilek Southwest Airlines 737 captured while aircraft spotting at John Wayne Airport (KSNA) in Orange County, CA. The combination of the early morning approach and sun angle in early January made for a spectacular golden sunrise silhouette image. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Sony A9 Lens: Sony 100 - 400mm GM + 1.4x Teleconverter ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/1000 Exposure: f/11 Sony RAW processed in Adobe Lightroom Classic, opened as smart object in Photoshop CC 2020 then applied DFine2 and Color Efex Pro 4 filters using the Nik Collection.


Mike Hill

Caught on the taxiway at AirVenture in 2017 - Greg Shelton brings his stock Stearman back to the main apron after a great display. Loved the color and the flag flying proudly from the over-wing frame and harness.. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon EOS 7DI Lens: Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 IS USM lens ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/160 Exposure: f/13 Some tweaking with Aurora HDR of the original Canon jpg image


Patrick Comtois

I really wanted to get shots of this experimental aircraft, the P-63 Kingcobra. This pilot had the skies all to himself and was able to do his parade passes from each direction. I positioned myself with my back to the sun as the pilot flew toward the sun and I was able to capture a full prop blur and the sun illuminating some of the prop. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D5 Lens: Nikkor 80 - 400mm f/4 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/80 Exposure: f/25 Processed in Photoshop and Lightroom


Richard JackJames Shooting photo of American Airlines taking off at Los Angeles International Airport from helicopter. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 1D Mark IV Lens: Canon 100 - 400mm f/4.5-5.6L ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/6.3 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Rob Tabor

An Edwards F-16 makes a low level run through Rainbow Canyon on a Test Pilot School Sortie. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 500mm f/4G ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/500 Exposure: f/4 Edited in Lightroom, Photoshop, Nik Software Color Efx Pro 4


Rod Cromer

The Moose is loose! The West Coast Demonstration Team’s C-17 about to jump the fence at Fort Worth’s Alliance Airport on October 16, Practice Day for the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Helicopter Air Show. Came with TWO crews, both of whom threw this plane around like they were fighter drivers. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 1Dx Lens: Canon 100 - 400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM ISO: 1000 Shutter speed: 1/2000 Exposure: f/11 Edited in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018


Scott Slingsby

This was the end to two perfect days of shooting in the Dallas metro area back in 2016. We were at a private grass strip north of Dallas where we were treated to a private airshow that along with this beautiful Texan included a Mustang, Caribou, Piper Cub and a Cessna O-2 Skymaster. The days festivities were pretty much over. The owner of the Texan parked the plane and came over to hang out with the group for a while before heading home. I couldn’t resist the clean shot with an empty background. Finally, no orange cones to get rid of. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D700 Lens: Nikon 70 - 200mm f/2.8 ISO: 640 Shutter speed: 1/80 Exposure: f/9 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Steve Zimmermann

Two P-51D Mustangs and the CAF’s B-17G “Texas Raiders” just after sunset over the plains of north Texas. Cavanaugh Flight Museum provided the photo ship and the subject P-51D “The Brat III”; the P-51D “Gunfighter” is a CAF bird out of Council Bluffs, Iowa. The aircraft came together for the Wings Over Dallas air show. This image was ‘saved’ from an underexposed, noisy, backlit, low-contrast RAW file (the D850’s auto-exposure system was fooled by the bright sky and I had earlier bumped up the ISO as daylight faded); it required removing parts of the Caribou’s fuselage and cargo ramp from the left side of the image and creating masked layers in Photoshop to treat the sky and background separately from the airframes. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D850 Lens: Nikon 70 - 200mm f/2.8 + Kenyon 4x4 gyro ISO: 640 Shutter speed: 1/20 Exposure: f/20 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Su Khoo

Folland Gnat T.1 XP502, RAF 4FTS, photographed in the snow outside Kemble Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire, UK. Camera equipment and settings Camera: 5D MkII Lens: Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 - f5.6L IS USM ISO: 160 Shutter speed: 1/250 Exposure: f/13 Processed in Lightroom and Photoshop


Ora Lassila

Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (KMHT), August 15th, 2020: Due to the pandemic, the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire was closed part of the spring and all of the summer. To celebrate a partial re-opening, as well as the museum’s online educational program that has featured a virtual around-the-world flight using a DC-3 simulator, an actual DC-3 was flown in and received a water cannon salute from the airport’s fire department. The aircraft is a Douglas DC-3A (N61981, c/n 2216), and is the former N35PB of the Provincetown-Boston Airlines. She is also one of the last remaining Douglas DSTs, possibly the last flying one. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T1i Lens: Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM ISO: 400 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/6.3 Edited in Photoshop and Lightroom


Geoffrey Arnwine

While this year has been decimated by the novel coronavirus pandemic, I have had the opportunity to look back and cherish the many great things that came out of last year, from meeting new people to finally seeing the Red Arrows fly. However, the highlight of 2019 for me was when I had the grand opportunity to go aboard a KC-10 Extender during a media flight for the Travis AFB “Thunder Over The Bay” Open House. During the flight, me and a couple fellow aviation photographers got to see 2 A-10 Thunderbolt II’s as well as an E-3 Sentry make a pit stop en route to the show. It was a moment like no other as I got to get in close proximity to take pictures of flying aircraft over the Mojave Desert. Unlike taking pictures of flying aircraft on the ground at airshows where you’re constantly twisting back and forth as they pass by, it was easier to track these jets refueling as they stayed idle through the boom window. However, one thing that doesn’t change is that it is unpredictable what they will do next. Whenever a plane is finished receiving fuel, it is important to be prepared for whenever they prepare to bank away from the tanker. It was quite a ride for a first time experience, and I definitely look forward to another one like this in the future. Media flights are typically offered at Air Force Bases which operate a tanker aircraft including the KC-10, like Travis. E-3 Sentry from Tinker AFB being refueled by a KC-10 Extender over the Sierra Nevada during a training mission. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Canon 7D Mk II Lens: Canon EF 24-105mm ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/1250 Exposure: f/9 Edited in Lightroom Classic


Keith Charlot

(Vacuum Flight) Mustang High Flight’s ex West German Air Force Dornier Alpha Jet N120AU with owner Mark Peterson at the controls and Chris Lamprecht piloting his former East German Air Force Aero Vodochody L-39ZO Albatros N187D above the beautiful southern Utah backdrop. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon D300 Lens: Nikon 18 - 200mm f/3.5 - 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter speed: 1/800 Exposure: f/7.1 Edited in Lightroom Classic


José M. Ramos

Sunset Sentinel - The view from Dog 1, an F/A-18D of VFC-12, looking to the southwest as the sun sets toward St. Augustine Florida from our CAP station in the Jacksonville Op Area. VFC-12 was supporting the Eisenhower Strike Group in January of 2020 when this image was taken as the carrier was participating in CompTuEx prior to deployment. Our mission was to try to challenge and penetrate the fleets defenses if able after the sun set but Carrier Air Wing Three was on top of things and we failed. Camera equipment and settings Camera: Nikon Z6 Lens: Nikon 24 - 70mm f/4S ISO: 250 Shutter speed: 1/10 Exposure: f/4 Edited in Photoshop


I

ational Socie ty ern nt

at

h

©

y

A

vi

io n

P h otogr

ap

MEET OUR MEMBERS


JIM CHUNG Hi everyone, this is Jim and I’m both a part-time health provider and a part time professional sports and wildlife photographer. I live in Toronto with my family and I got my start as a serious digital photographer by first becoming a serious digital astro-imager. This is a term I coined to differentiate terrestrial photos from astronomical images which are always conducted at infinity focus and take many hours of exposure to accomplish. I lived in that world for a decade and stepped back from it after too many years of sleep deprivation having achieved a level of competence that was now being hindered by my geographic location. Astro imaging is highly dependent on the weather and the quality of the atmosphere that you look through since none of us can afford our own space telescope.

If your interest is sufficiently piqued, you can read about my adventures in a book I wrote in 2015, “Astro Imaging Projects for the Amateur Astronomer – A Maker’s Guide.” I decided to work less at my main job as a health provider and pivoted to become primarily a tennis and motorsports photographer. Both are sports that I have played and I think that’s essential to understanding the nuance of each sport and to be able to capture those moments of drama that are unique to each sport. There are no parallels to a double fault or a pit stop crisis anywhere in the sporting world. Wildlife photography was just one of those happenstances that life delivers, you just have to recognize them. My wife and I would often go for nature hikes in the Don River valley that runs through the middle of Toronto and is a protected wildlife region and I would always bring a camera just in case.


I’ve always enjoyed aviation and attended ground school and had several hours in the air when I was in university but never finished studying for my flying license. Most of what I learned about aviation photography was through years of trial and error at local airshows and I felt this organization would be the right way to get it right. I’m likely in the minority as a user of the Olympus micro four thirds system. Most professionals are of course of the Canon or Nikon variety and using a full frame sized sensor but there are unique advantages to using a more compact system that does not in any way detract from image quality. In the future I’d like to write more at length about this topic. I use only two lenses at the airshow, the

Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 and the Zuiko 300mm f/4 prime often paired with a 2x teleconverter. My body of choice is the pro E-M1X body or the much smaller E-M1 Mark 2. I prefer to shoot in jpeg in order to get as many images recorded on fast 300 mb/s SD cards because the E-M1X can shoot stills at 60 fps. For normal daytime photos, there is more than enough dynamic range in a jpeg to make shadow adjustments in post. I use Photoshop because that’s what I use to process astro images which must be shot in raw since the signal is so weak that the histogram has to be stretched to incredible lengths. I also write a blog (jimchungblog.com) mainly about photography with a m43 centric nature that has been up for four years and has about 25k views annually. I look forward to participating in group ISAP events in the future.

Jim Chung

After a decade of walking a lot those “just in case” opportunities turned into my second book which came out this past October. It is a coffee table style book and the first photographic study of urban wildlife in Toronto - “Discovering Wildlife in Toronto’s Don Valley”.


Jim Chung


Jim Chung


JOSHUA PATTERSON As I walked my aunt and uncle down the driveway after their visit one crisp May afternoon, our attention was suddenly captured by a growing roar. I turned and looked up to see a QF-4E Phantom II streaking across the sky above me at no more than 2000 feet AGL, with the burner cans lit. As quick as it had come, it was gone. At that moment, nine year old me decided to pursue a career in aviation. Soon though, the thrill began to fade, and I wished I had been able to find some way to capture that moment. And so, I set myself the goal of photographing an F-4 in the air. This was the experience that sparked my interest in aviation photography. It was just my luck to grow up in Southern California, a place teeming with aviation history as well as numerous military air stations of every imaginable variety. That fortune allowed me frequent opportunities to sharpen my skills and learn from the large community of photographers in the area. With this background, I grabbed my new Sony A58 and signed up for a local photography class. That course is still the only professional training I’ve done; and I assume there are many other hobbyist photographers who have a similar story to tell about their education. While it was very minimal, I believe that education was exactly the start I needed in photography, and the understanding it gave me of the exposure triangle is just as relevant now as it was then. The A58 I had at the time served me well for many years, but even that rugged DSLR couldn’t handle my talent for being klutzy. Its life ended on a concrete hanger floor minutes after shooting an Omega Tanker 707. Currently I use a Sony A6100, and while the jump to mirrorless was an interesting one, it has been an exciting and challenging adventure full of new features, advantages, and, disadvantages. Most of my shooting is done on a Sony 100-300mm telephoto which I find to be just perfect for airshows and most other situations. In addition, I have a 55-200mm which I use for more up close situations like sitting just off the side of a runway for takeoffs and landings. For post processing, I use Lightroom almost exclusively. As for photo format, I always shoot RAW, just to ensure that I always keep my post processing options open, even if I don’t tend to edit very heavily. Around the time I started using Lightroom and paying attention to things like file formats was when I became aware of this thing called ISAP. I saw members out shooting at various airshows and events - it was soon clear that the members were some of the most talented aviation photographers I’d seen, and so, naturally, I joined! ISAP is still the only professional photography group to which I belong - I’m no master or teacher. But what I am is passionate, about flying and photo shooting. It’s this passion which I hope to share with others through my work, and just maybe, to inspire a person or two sometime down the road. While I still haven’t achieved my goal of photographed an F-4 in the air, I have had a wealth of good experiences I’d never have imagined as I walked out of my house on that spring day ten years ago. And so my aviation photography adventures continue.


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


Joshua Patterson


LUIS SALES Name is Sales...Luis Sales. Family man, IT guy, Technology geek and Aviation buff, currently living in Pembroke Pines, sunshine Florida. I’m advanced amateur that spends a considerable amount of time chasing Airshows and spotting at local Airports, mainly Miami International. I always say that Aviation and Photography are a match made in Heaven. It has become more than a hobby, a real passion. I got into Photography when my wife gave me a Nikon D7000 as a Christmas gift. I started learning about it by watching lots of videos in Youtube, reading Photography books, watching classes from the awesome guys at Kelbyone and just shooting, shooting and shooting. When Canon announced the 7D Mark II, I decided to make the switch from Nikon and haven’t looked back since then. This camera is awesome for everything action and, especially, Aviation Photography. I love it so much that I got me a second body, just to avoid having to change lenses in the middle of the action. To cover as much range as possible, I usually put a short or medium lens (Canon 16-35mm f/4 for ramp/statics or Canon 70-200 mm f/4 for closer action) on one body and a long lens (always the awesome Canon 100-400mm MkII) on the other, carrying them on a BlackRapid Dual Strap. It has proven very convenient and effective. I’ve always favored shooting RAW, mainly because it records more information and gives me more flexibility on post-editing. Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop are my go-to editing software. I always start in Lightroom, where basic (and some not so basic) adjustments are done, then I finish in Photoshop, just for that final “push” to the photo. It’s a powerful combination of tools! I’m always looking for opportunities to improve and learn about the experiences of other fellow Aviation Photographers so, when I found out about it a couple of years ago, becoming an ISAP member was a no brainer. It definitely has been, and continues to be, a valuable resource and has helped me to improve my shots while admiring the skills and enjoying the work of so many talented. I haven’t been able yet to attend to any of the events or symposiums but, definitely, it’s at the top of my to-do list. I really enjoy exchanging tips and tricks, talking about gear or just sharing the emotion of flight with my fellow Aviation Photographers every time I have a chance. I don’t think I’m expert enough to “advice” anyone but, if someone asks me, I’d say shoot what you like and how you like it. Don’t get lost on the technical details and try to enjoy this awesome hobby/passion/job, these beautiful machines and the great people who flight them, as much as possible.


Luis Sales


Luis Sales


Luis Sales


Luis Sales


Luis Sales


MIKE HARRIS Hello fellow photographers. My name is Mike Harris and I was born and raised in Cheltenham, England in the beautiful Costwolds. At age 19 I spent two years in Canada and fell in love with the country, the lifestyle and the people and after my two year absence decided to pack my bags and head West. My interest in both airplanes and photography came from my father. As a young lad on Sunday afternoons we would go to the local airport and watch students perform “circuits ‘n bumps” and sometimes we would enter the small museum and look at the Mosquito and other planes. Dad was a keen hobby photographer that would be asked to take friend’s wedding pictures and I would tag along and just watch. When I moved to Fort Macleod, Alberta Canada in 1983 my first job was at a photo studio where I received some on the job training, but the majority of my learning came from library books and trial and error. The small-town studio did not stay in business long and I had to find another vocation but I decided to keep up with the photography and stayed pretty busy shooting a lot of weddings with my Bronica medium format equipment and Multiblitz strobes. I became very interested in building and flying RC model planes and the inevitable happened when I strapped a 35mm camera to the side and took my first aerial pictures. Frustrating back then as it was a one shot wonder, land and wind the film on and then repeat etc. Today, it’s a dream with modern drones and stabilized camera’s with the correct credentials of course. Now I work full time shift work at Lethbridge Police Service and on my off days I am still a semipro photographer shooting headshots, real estate, aerial (from both drones and real aircraft) and some sports, portraits etc. For me the biggest challenge was to learn Lightroom and Photoshop coming from 120 roll film and C41 processing. I have always had a desire in my mind to shoot aviation photography but did not do anything about it till watching one of Moose Petersen’s tutorial video’s on KelbyOne and then the penny dropped and my mind lit up like a pinball machine. That was the reason I joined ISAP, I wanted to learn all I could about this wonderful facet of photography. I understand that it will be a lengthy process and different techniques to what I am used to but I don’t want to live in a rut as a rut, in my opinion is just a grave with the ends kicked out! I shoot with a Canon 5Dmk4 and an R6 and use the following glass: 70200mm f/2.8, 16-35mm f/4, 24-105mm f/4 & Sigma 150-600mm1.4x converter. I am a believer in RAW just because the latitude it gives in post processing. I love to chat and glad ISAP have a dedicated Facebook group where I hope to meet and learn from the world’s best aviation photographers.


Mike Harris


Mike Harris


Mike Harris


Mike Harris


Mike Harris


SAM DAMMERS My name is Sam Dammers and I joined ISAP to improve my aviation photography. I am licensed as an architect and work primarily as a construction consultant to financial institutions. I travel frequently for work and am frequently able to view various airports and air bases during these travels as well as to attend a few airshows outside of the Midwest each year. I was introduced to a 35mm SLR camera prior to studying architecture in Europe during my senior year of college. During graduate school, I expanded my photographic experience by working as a staff photographer for the campus newspaper. I learned about black and white film development and printing while working under publishing deadlines. Not to date myself, but this experience led to regularly purchasing bulk film (in rolls of one hundred feet which equated to about twenty (20) rolls of 36-exposures). This supported early efforts with a motor-driven Nikon (FM) capable of the blistering rate of 3-1/2-frames per second. A documentary photography teacher once observed that “When writers get together, don’t presume they discuss the merits of their typewriters.” That said, my first camera was a Nikkormat FT-2 (manufactured by Nikon) and I didn’t look elsewhere when transitioning to digital equipment. Before going digital, I shrewdly (?) purchased a Mamiya 645 to force myself to intentionally slow down from the pace of my 35mm film cameras to work more on composition. I’m sure I was the only individual shooting film at the last Phancon as QF-4s departed Tyndall AFB. No need to worry about hard drive failures there. Currently, I generate RAW files on my Nikon D300 and D500 coupled with a Nikon 200mm to 500mm zoom. This is not a light nor diminutive lens but it is really sharp. It’s worth the effort. My post-production work is unsophisticated and reliant upon iPhoto for most tasks. This is, for me, a growing edge. In addition to photography, I like to sketch. I typically attend airshows (or visit museums) with a sketch pad and drawing board in one hand, a camera in the other, and a bag (or backpack) to carry assorted equipment. I usually spend mornings at airshows drawing static aircraft and once the aircraft start moving, I start photography.


Sam Dammers


Sam Dammers


Sam Dammers


Sam Dammers


BOOK IN REVIEW Article by ISAP Editor Kevin Hong


IT’S FINALLY HERE! After more than 40 years in aviation, world-famous air-to-air photographer Philip Makanna has published his eighth and final book - a collection of the best photographs that he has made in his career. If you have seen the word GHOSTS on an aviation calendar or book, you undoubtedly know who Philip Makanna is and have seen his work. His gorgeous photography of World War I and World War II aircraft from all over the world in many years of calendars can now be seen in this final collaboration of Philip’s devotion to vintage aircraft. We were fortunate enough to review one of the newly released limited edition books called GHOSTS Aerial Photography. The high quality luster on the dust cover jacket definitely grabs your attention with vibrant colors of the sunlight reflecting off of the beautiful P-51 Mustang on the front cover. On the back shows a great photo of a World War I action scene reverting to a simpler time at the dawn of dogfighting. The printer that made the book is very elaborate and the selection of paper makes the colors in the photographs pop right out of the page. The photos are very vibrant and design throughout the entire book is very elegant. It’s not a book that is full of text blocks and mediocre airplane photos. This book is definitely a work of art. The placement of photos and text balance each other very well. Every aircraft type is accompanied by captions, quotes, technical specifications and three-view silhouettes in black and white. Historic archival photography enhances the sleek and elegant design. The photos shot by Philip and the historical photos tell a story and capture the beauty of each aircraft. For the content, the book draws you in as soon as you open the book to the first page. An elegant black and white photo of a World War I plane in the center of the first page starts the journey back in time. The text is structured in two main chapters covering aircraft from World War I and World War II. If you have read Makanna’s other books, this new book will definitely show his journey from around the globe documenting these great airplanes from England and New Zealand to Texas and back. The World War I section is truly amazing. The beautiful landscape of New Zealand and formations of planes tell a story that begins and ends in the clouds–full of the beauty, romance and tragedy that accompanies these legends of flight. Each spread tells a story not only about the aircraft but also some of the history behind the pilots and people that flew them. There are also quotes from pilots and people like HG Wells, and Winston Churchill setting the tone for a progressive timeline throughout the book as you turn each page.


The historical photos paired with the photos Makanna took are a great contrast from the past and more recent years. As I was reading and looking at the photos I realized some of the planes in them are no longer exist. Some aircraft were destroyed and others may have been restored after their crash. If you are an aviation enthusiast, love aviation photography, or love aviation history, you will really enjoy this book. It is definitely a huge accomplishment to travel around the globe and shoot some of the rarest aircraft in the world over the last 40 years. For everyone that has been collecting the GHOSTS book series since the beginning, you definitely don’t want to miss the last book produced by Philip Makanna. This is a must-have for all fans of aviation photography. GHOSTS - Aerial Photography has been printed by the incredible craftsmen that have printed the GHOSTS calendars and books for decades. 11.5” x 11.5”, 192 pages, premium paper, hardbound. This is a limited edition of 1,000 copies. Each book is autographed by Philip Makanna and will be available exclusively from GHOSTS.com.


In memory of ISAP SECRETARY MIKE COLLINS 1961 - 2021

Blue Skies and Tail Winds


AIRPLANE SILHOUETTES by John Ford

Identify these aircraft. The answers are found next to the Kenyon Gyro Ad.

1


2


3


4


ww

w. m

in

ds

hi r. c o m

re

na tu

ea

th

wi

f tg

ge

en ga

TH CA E R R CH w YI OIC w NG E w. th SO OF in LU WO kt T I RK an O N IN kp S G F O PR ho R OF to CA E .c M SSI ER O om A NA G E LS AR


| where photography clicks

KelbyOne is an online education community for creative people to help them create the type of images they’ve always wanted.

We are driven by a passion to provide incredible training, with over 800 courses.

kelbyone.com

Our HD-quality lessons, are available to stream 24/7 and taught by world-class industry instructors. Online Access also includes digital editions of Photoshop User magazine and Lightroom Magazine, guided learning tracks, a community forum, brushes, presets and so much more.

Visit kelbyone.com/pricing to view membership plans


The World’s First 60-600mm 10x Hyper-Telephoto Zoom Lens Supremely high optical quality featuring FLD and SLD elements, multi-material construction including magnesium alloy for enhanced durability, and excellent portability make this the choice of traveling pros.

Sports

60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Case, Hood (LH1144-01), Cover Lens Cap (LC-740E), Shoulder Strap, Built-In Tripod Socket (Non-Detachable) Included.

Learn more at

All lenses protected by a

sigmaphoto.com

4-Year USA Warranty

facebook Instagram �


LIOE Design is a product company that manufactures their own product designs. Located in Seattle, WA all their products are aviation inspired from their Aero Ti Chopsticks. Every product has a story. A reason why a product looks the way it does from function and practicality to aesthetics. All our products are designed with the belief that everyday goods can be extraordinary. We strive to ensure the user is getting the most unique experience and to create a everyday item in a completely re-imagined way. We design to spark imagination and creativity even in the most creative people. Creating products that inspire design. 1) Air Squadron playing cards This deck of cards has artwork of modern jets and aircraft. The inspiration was to create a deck of cards unlike other cards, the Kings and Queens are B-2 Bomber and SR-71. The Jokers are the A-10 and F-22. Every card is unique creating the perfect deck for an aviation enthusiast or card collector! 2) Stealth Pen The Stealth Pen has a unique, aluminum uni-body design with four total components making it lightweight as well as easy to assemble and disassemble. The slotted design offers a futuristic touch and cuts down on the weight of the pen while allowing the user a glance at the inside ink cartridge. 3) Titan Business card holder The Titan is aero-inspired minimalist light-weight card holder. The pattern on the front of the card holder is reminisce of a futuristic space door and inspired by the nose of the B29 Super Fortress. Titan has a dark gunmetal gray color and is made from aircraft grade 6061-T6 Aluminum.

LIOEDESIGN.COM Visit their website to learn more about their products

15% discount for ISAP members

For details visit the ISAP newsletter or member log-in section of the ISAP website.

Jim Wilson Photography International Distributor for Kenyon Stabilizing Products 214-796-9743 jw@jimwilsonphotography.com

Answers to Airplane Silhouettes 1. Aichi B7A1 Ryusei Grace Japanese 2. Aichi E13A Japanese 3. Airspeed A.S. 31 copy 4. Antonov An-74T Coaler*USSR


Kevin Hong The Professionals Source Professionals in the world of imaging rely on the professionals of B&H for their equipment needs. We have experts ready to give courteous service with a phone call, a click of the mouse or a personal visit. Our SuperStore We pay tribute to the wealth of possibilities available for photography, videography and other media industries. We make the wonders of technology available through our complete lines of photo, video, audio, lighting, pro accessories, computers, data storage, optics, entertainment, projection and surveillance devices, to which we add a wonderful, personal experience for professionals, hobbyists and consumers alike.

History We opened our original storefront in 1973. Our reputation for extensive inventory and intelligent conversation about photography began with our first customer. We grew from a small photography shop in Manhattan’s Financial District to a major supplier of photo, video and audio equipment on 17th Street, with customers returning again and again for our low pricing and high reliability. The new millennium’s explosion of affordable technology for pros and consumers alike brought new lines of computers, home entertainment, and consumer devices at our location or online at www.bhphotovideo.com We continue to expand to meet your needs with showrooms, classes, educational and social media, and more.


ISAP Merchandise

If you wish to purchase any ISAP merchandise please email info@aviationphoto.org Send your name and current address and you will be invoiced via PayPal. Shipping cost will be added to your invoice. Members with an international address will have a higher shipping rate. ISAP Challenge coin - $10 + shipping ISAP safety vest (Small to X-Large) - $28 + shipping ISAP safety vest 2XL - $31, 3XL - $34, 4XL - $38 + shipping ISAP membership patch - $5 + shipping Limited patch version with Velcro backing - $10 + shipping


I

onal Soc iet nati r e y nt

at

h

©

y

A

vi

io n

Pho

ap togr

www.aviationphoto.org

WWW.KELBYONE.COM

WWW.REDRIVERPAPER.COM

WWW.FULLCOLOR.COM

WWW.SIGMA.COM

WWW.BHPHOTOVIDEO.COM

WWW.THINKTANKPHOTO.COM

WWW.DELKINDEVICES.COM


N

S

F O R AV IA TI PH

T RN A IONAL

TY

O

O

E CI

OTO

Y

IN

H

TE

GRA P

ISAP Board Members President and Board Chairman Larry Grace Vice President and Vice Chairman Jim Wilson Treasurer Gary Edwards ISAP Board Member George Kounis ISAP Board Member Kevin Hong ISAP Staff Member John Sepp ISAP Staff Member Craig Swancy Chairman Emeritus Jay Miller Airspeed Editor Kevin Hong Airspeed is a periodic publication of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP) and is used to communicate news, functions, convention information, and other information of interest on the local, regional, and national scenes. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and should not be construed as the views or opinions of the International Society for Aviation Photography (ISAP). Please contact us at isap_info@aviationphoto.org or isappresident@gmail.com Airspeed is a publication to showcase our members’ work in capturing aviation events. Images should be sized at a minimum size of at least 5100 x 3300 (17” x 11”) @ 300 dpi. We would like your largest landscape file size format for our full page spread in our featured magazine. Please submit up to 10 images per article and your text in a Microsoft Word document. Email your article and images by using www.wetransfer.com and send to isap_info@aviationphoto.org (Up to 2GB). Members can submit images for review for a future cover or back page display or would like to inquire on doing an article for Airspeed contact us via email at isap_info@aviationphoto.org We look forward to your submission and to showcase your articles and images.


I

ational Socie ty ern nt

at

h

©

y

A

vi

io n

P h otogr

ap

Profile for International Society of Aviation Photography, Inc.

Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The April 2021 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world. Fro...

Airspeed - The Magazine for Aviation Photographers  

The April 2021 Airspeed magazine will highlight ISAP member's photography experiences, their passion for aviation from around the world. Fro...

Profile for isaporg