School-Based Gender Equality Campaign Guide

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SCHOOL-BASED GENDER EQUALITY CAMPAIGN GUIDE


This publication has been co-financed by the European Union and the Republic of Turkey. The content of the publication is the sole responsibility of the Consortium led by British Council and does not reflect the official opinions of the EU and/or the Ministry of National Education.

PREPARED BY: İrem SUNAR ÖZAT

APRIL 2016 Publication, distribution and reproduction rights of this material solely belongs to T.R. Ministry of National Education.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

Introduction Chapter 1

Gender Equality in Educational Settings

4

Teachers’ Role in Raising Awareness on Gender Equality

4

Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project

5

How to Use the Guide

5

Chapter 2

What is a campaign?

8

Planning Steps for the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign

12

Key Aspects of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign

16

Key Messages to be Conveyed throughout the Campaign

18

Chapter 3 Activities:

What do Kids Like Doing?

22

Do Professions Have Genders?

24

Snakes and Ladders Game

30

If Our Lives Were a Tree

34

Spider Web

36

Opinion Buses

38

Gender Equality Diaries

40

Does Our Language Have a Gender?

42

Pioneers of the Society

46

Career-gazer

48

Video Presentations

54

Pioneer Students

56

Reporting: Activity Evaluation Form

58

Chapter 4

“How About Rewriting?” – Best Practices

60


GİRİŞ

Dear Teachers, This guide was drawn up so as to provide support to the education personnel who will participate in the “School Based Gender Equality Campaign” which will be conducted in pilot schools with your valuable efforts, in scope of the “Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project” (ETCEP). The guide includes not only activities that are expected to be carried out in our schools, but also examples of practices and relevant information for the educators who intend to carry out similar activities after the completion of ETCEP, which is projected to end in September 2016. The first chapter of the guide includes information on how and why it is important to ensure gender equality in educational settings, on the role and the importance of our teachers in regards to this issue and on what kinds of activity are carried out in scope of Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project. Moreover, information on how to use this guide is provided at the end of this chapter. The second chapter of the guide lays an emphasis on ensuring gender equality in educational settings and provides practical information on what the raising awareness campaign is, on how such a campaign could be organized, while outlining the planning and the steps to be taken in the implementation of such a campaign. The chapter provides us with detailed information about the purpose and the scope of the School Based Gender Equality Campaign, and, on the other hand, it aims to provide guiding information to enable the effective organization of similar campaigns in future. The third chapter of the guide includes instructions and reports regarding the activities that will be carried out, with your valuable efforts, during the Campaign to be organized in scope of ETCEP. The forth chapter of the guide includes the best practices identified during the pilot applications of the Campaign. We hope the information provided in this chapter to be guiding, inspiring and supporting for school managers and teachers who are planning to use the guide in order to achieve gender equality in schools.

“How about rewriting the gender equality in educational settings?”

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gender equality in educational settings?


CHAPTER 1

• Gender Equality in Educational Settings • Teachers’ Role in Raising Awareness on Gender Equality • Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project • How to Use the Guide


Gender Equality in Educational Settings What Does Gender Equality in Education Mean? Gender equality in education means offering equal rights and opportunities to girls and boys at every step of education and ensuring that they are treated equally without ascribing to gender roles and stereotypes. This objective may only be accomplished by developing plans, programmes, policies and practices that take into account different priorities, needs and expectations of boys and girls in access to education, learning environments and processes, and education management.

Why Do We Want Gender Equality in Education?1 Differentiation of behaviours the society deems appropriate for and expects of boys and girls starts at early ages. Therefore, with a view to making sure that children’s development is not negatively affected or restricted, it is crucial to provide educational settings in schools, which support equality starting from early ages. Gender equality can only be guaranteed by identifying and addressing gender stereotypes as well as the disparities and inequalities that they entail, setting out what actions need to be taken in order to mitigate them, and effectively implementing the plan developed to achieve these objectives. In addition to being the environment where children spend most of their time, schools also prepare children for their future lives, which they would lead as part of a community. Developing egalitarian behaviours in the school environment would lay the necessary groundwork for the inception of equalitarian societies over time.

Teachers’ Role in Raising Awareness on Gender Equality Teachers play an essential role in both raising and furthering awareness on gender equality. As key players of the education and learning process, teachers contribute to the process through their approach which teaches, conveys and consolidates the perception of gender equality and the behavioural patterns associated with it both during the course of ensuring flow of information and at different stages of education. Teachers and school administrators play a key role in children’s lives. Having teachers and administrators with an awareness on gender equality employed in an egalitarian school, would primarily ensure that children are raised in a gender-sensitive environment where they are surrounded by proper role models. Moreover, this would also guarantee that people working in such an environment could do what they aspire to do within their potential without being limited by gender-biased stereotypes. Under the prevailing circumstances, achieving gender equality requires a process of change. Change would only be ensured through a gender-sensitive school climate created by everyone’s involvement.2

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1

“Gender Sensitive School Standards Handbook”, ETCEP p.7, November 2015

2

ibid, p.8


Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project Overall objective of Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project (ETCEP) is to contribute to promoting gender equality throughout the society. On the activity level, the project aims to integrate gender equality and gender-sensitive approach into all components of the education system. Implemented in cooperation with the Ministry of National Education (MoNE), the project is a flagship initiative in Turkey that enables teaching and administrative staff in schools to acquire gender sensitivity, promotes gender equality for boys and girls in schools and aims to raise awareness on gender equality among parents.

How to Use the Guide Developed in an effort to facilitate the implementation of the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign”, the Guide provides some practical knowledge and examples that might support similar activities you esteemed teachers may carry out in future. As you follow the guide, your primary objective should be to take an integral perspective. The sections of the guide presenting the main goal and targets of the campaign as well as the implementation steps, have been prepared in line with this objective. The ‘activities’ that make up for a major part of this Guide have been designed to help students from different age groups understand the concept of gender equality, while internalizing the concept of equality. Developed specifically for each age group, activity instructions include purpose of the activity, proper courses for implementing the activity, steps of implementation and some practical tips. All materials to be used as part of these activities shall be provided by the project office throughout the project period. The activities have been diversified for kindergarten, primary school, middle school and high school students. The indicators as to which activity is suitable for which age group can be found in the first part of Chapter 3 and under each activity heading.

Kindergarten

Primary School

Middle School

High School

Since they serve as an introduction to basic concepts, some of the activities need to be performed before others. Such activities are marked with activities must be undertaken considering the relevant age group. Activities marked with consolidating the messages received. Activities marked with

. These

are complementary to the previous activity and aimed at

are called energizers, providing entertaining aspect to your practice.

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List of Activities Activity Title Age Group What do Kids Like Doing?

Kindergarten

Do Professions Have Genders?

Kindergarten + Primary School

Snakes and Ladders Game

Primary School

If Our Lives Were a Tree

Middle School + High School

Spider Web

All Age Groups

Opinion Buses

Primary School + Middle School + High School

Gender Equality Diaries

High School

Does our Language Have a Gender?

Middle School + High School

Pioneers of the Society

Middle School + High School

Carrier-gazer

High School

Video Presentations

High School

Pioneer Students

High School

During the activities, students are actively involved in the process and the focus is on learning by doing. Teachers’ role as facilitators needs to be highlighted; their function should be of a guiding and facilitating nature, rather than instructive.

Tips: •

The part explaining how to implement the campaign needs to be well understood and internalized. We recommend you to keep in mind the information provided in this part, while undertaking the campaign together with your students.

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Before proceeding with the activities, activity instructions need to be carefully read and relevant teaching materials should be checked.

The tips presented on the activity pages include information that would facilitate and diversify your implementation of that activity.


CHAPTER 2

• What is a campaign? • Planning Steps for the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign • Key Aspects of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign • Key Messages to be Conveyed throughout the Campaign

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This chapter explains what a communication campaign is, describes the features of awareness-raising activities and gives an outline of the planning stages of an awareness-raising campaign. In addition, it provides the details regarding the aim, background efforts and content of the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign� which we are planning to implement in your schools with your valuable contributions, as well as some practical information you could use while undertaking the campaign. The primary aim of presenting these details is to facilitate the effective implementation of the Campaign at your schools. We hope that you could also use this Guide as a resource for awareness-raising activities you might perform after the project period is over.

WHAT IS A CAMPAIGN? In the simplest terms, a campaign is a series of activities designed and carried out with a view to achieving a certain outcome. In other words, it is a bulk of short-term activities planned in light of a long-term goal. While it may involve activities that are designed to achieve a simple commercial goal, a communication campaign might as well be used as a means for awareness-raising activities aimed at making a permanent change in the society’s level of knowledge, attitude and behaviours regarding a certain subject. A person with an increased level of awareness on a certain subject would later show increased attention to all information related with that subject. The idea is to make a change in the attitudes and behaviours over time by making sure that knowledge and guidance on the same subject is provided constantly.

As a holistic effort, an awareness-raising campaign is composed of a range of planned activities that involve short-term implementation phases, which are aimed at making a change in the level of knowledge, attitudes and/or behaviours of the society it intends to transform, compared to those it had before the campaign was implemented.

A carefully-planned and successfully implemented awareness-raising campaign would take us to where we want to go through the most efficient path and help us make positive changes over a larger population. There is certainly a major difference between paying temporary attention to a certain subject and achieving a long-lasting awareness on it. The key factor creating this difference is effective planning. Transforming this increased level of awareness into a positive change in attitude and behaviour, on the other hand, requires long-term planning and programming. Although there are various ways of implementing an awareness-raising campaign, ,the planning process is basically the same in all campaigns. The steps to be taken in the course of planning can be outlined through 6 questions:

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“5W1H” of AWARENESS-RAISING The basic formula of communication is described as “5W1H”. You can also use this formula while planning your own campaign:

Why ? This needs to be the first question to ask, since it would help you define your goal before proceeding to the planning stage of an awareness-raising campaign. By asking this question, you would see WHY an awareness-raising campaign is needed, which social problem is addressed and what kind of change is intended for the society/community where the campaign would be implemented. While defining your goal, you need to make sure that you have enough and up-to-date information about the subject you intend to address. You need to carry out a background research on the subject you intend to work on, and build on your campaign afterwards. The objectives you would define for your campaign should be measurable, achievable, timely and realistic. •

WHY should the target group pay attention to this subject?

WHY the target group’s level of knowledge and attitudes regarding this subject need to change?

Who ? WHO are the expected parties of this awareness-raising campaign (stakeholders)? Once you identify who these people are, you need to hierarchically list them according to their level of importance for the campaign. You then need to identify the parties whose support is crucial in achieving the campaign objects, and the parties who can be considered as the recipients of the campaign messages. You need to develop separate activities for each target group. •

WHO do we intend to reach with this campaign?

WHOSE level of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours do we aim to change through the awareness-raising activities?

WHO can support the campaign for successful implementation and WHOSE support do we actually need?

WHOSE approval is required before launching the campaign?

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What ? Knowing the main target group for your awareness-raising message would help you understand WHAT the content of the message should be and the best means for conveying it. Your message would prove effective only if it reaches the correct address. The method you use for conveying the message you have created in light of the characteristics of your target group and the goal of your campaign is as important as the message itself. You may need to organize particular activities for different target groups. For instance, where the target group is kindergarten and elementary school students, the most effective way of conveying your message to the recipients would be to use methods that would involve learning by playing. For high school students, on the other hand, you may need to choose activities that would show them how the issues associated with your message have tangible impact on their lives. While listing your activity ideas, having all the answers to the questions of WHAT materials, human and financial resources as well as the amount of time your activity will require would prove essential for implementing a realistic and practical campaign. •

WHAT would attract the target groups’ interest?

WHAT human resources would we need for the activity?

WHAT message should we convey to which group?

WHAT is the amount of time required to perform the activity?

WHAT is the most effective method of communication for each target group?

WHAT is the estimated cost of the activity?

WHAT kind of materials should we use?

How ? Another key step of implementing a campaign would be to answer the question of HOW. So far you have:

- identified who your target group is,

- drafted the messages you would like to give to each target group, and the types of activities you would carry out,

- established the methods you would apply for each activity, and

- set out your needs for human resources, time and budget.

Now it is time to ask the question of HOW you would perform each activity. If the response to the question of HOW is beyond your and your school’s capacity, you need to revisit the activity and make changes, where necessary.

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HOW can we acquire the materials we need to carry out our activity?

HOW can we acquire the human resources we need for our activity?

HOW can we provide the budget we need for implementing our activity?


When ? Establishing WHEN to carry out awareness-raising activities is one of the key factors affecting your success. The question of WHEN to implement the campaign determines your success in reaching your defined objectives. Moreover, timing of the activities as part of your campaign is also of the essence. The time of an activity should not be mistaken for the implementation period of it. For example, the length of an exhibition could be 2 hours; however, deciding on when the exhibition should take place as a part of your awareness-raising activities would define the impact it would make on the target group. In general, starting the awareness-raising activities at the beginning of your project would keep your stakeholders interested and actively engaged. •

WHEN should we start planning the campaign?

WHEN should we inform the stakeholders of the campaign?

WHEN should we proceed to the implementation phase of our campaign in order to successfully achieve our goals and use the available resources most efficiently?

WHEN do we need to make a press release?

WHEN should we organize the activities where press is invited?

WHEN should we end the campaign?

Where ? While you decide on the venue of an activity, you need to consider WHERE would be the best place for presenting your messages. For instance, if your message is that, for improving gender equality each student must take responsibility in household chores, you need to make sure that the material where this message is written on is designed for home use rather than a school setting (for instance as a refrigerator magnet); this would effectively reinforce your message. If you intend to use the media for conveying your messages, you need to decide which medium would prove more effective. For example, if the target group of your awareness-raising activities is the drivers who should follow traffic rules especially during the start and end of school hours, a better way to convey your message would be to have local radio stations make such announcements rather than using a printed material as a means of communication. •

For better results, which message should be used WHERE?

WHERE should we organize an activity specifically designed for a target group to achieve active involvement by the target group in question?

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In sum, the key to a successful awareness-raising campaign lies in proper planning. And the most fundamental part of planning is team work! While you plan a campaign, you may develop the first draft on your own. However, if you intend to implement a realistic,

United we stand

measurable and achievable campaign, it is strongly recommended that you share your campaign plans with a colleague before you proceed to the implementation phase! Different perspectives would bring different solutions, experience and skills.

So far, we have shared some general information on how to construct an awareness-raising campaign. Now, it is time to provide some detailed information about the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign” - an essential part of the “Communication Campaign of the Promoting Gender Equality in Education Project” - which has been developed in light of the principles and steps defined above, and explain how we can implement this campaign together.

PLANNING THE STEPS FOR THE SCHOOL-BASED GENDER EQUALITY CAMPAIGN

Why ? Why is the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign Organized?

The purpose of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign is to raise the awareness among educating and administrative personnel, students and parents in our pilot schools in regard to gender equality. Our purpose is to teach school girls and boys about gender equality; to raise awareness on equalitarian rhetoric and applications, and support them in getting better prepared for their future lives in line with their actual skills and potential including the choice of profession. We also aim to support education staff and parents to build a gender sensitive attitude in our pilot schools.

Why is raising awareness on gender equality in school necessary?

Besides being places where children spend most of their time, schools also prepare these children for their future regular life. Developing equalitarian behavior in school will lead to the development of an equalitarian society. Are there any other purposes, specific to your school, that you would like to add? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

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Who ? Who are included in the target group of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign? Whose support did we get in commencing our activities in order to ensure the success of the Campaign? Who did we get in contact with to increase the effectiveness of the campaign?

The primary target group of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign, which will be conducted with the particular contribution of the managers of Provincial Directorate for National Education in pilot cities, with that of pilot school managers and teachers, are students in various ages. We aim to increase children’s awareness of ensuring gender equality and to inform parents about the importance of this issue. We set up an efficient collaboration not only with the managers and the counseling teachers of our pilot schools, but also with the Provincial Directorate for National Education. We talked to the local press and to some of the non-governmental organizations during our previsits to the cities and shared our opinions on developing efficient collaboration methods. Who and what organizations do you think should be contacted to ensure the success of this campaign? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

What ? What would attract the attention of students from various age groups included in the target groups of the School-Based Gender Equality Campaign?

We created various messages and various activities to deliver those messages effectively to our target groups in the pilot cities, in line with the purpose of our project.

Which activity brings better results for each target group?

We held pre-evaluation meetings in some of our pilot schools during the preparation phase of this guide. We received feedback from teachers regarding what activities students might be more interested in.

What are the materials, human resources and budget for each activity?

In addition, we determined the activities that could be carried out in line with the capacity and the needs of the schools, we identified the necessary human resources and materials, as well as the kind of support the schools might need for each activity. Did you see the activities included in the final chapter of this guide? Do you have other opinions to add to those? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

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How ? How can we implement the activities

We gathered information on how to implement each activity by means of the meetings we held in

planned for the School Based Gender

our pilot cities to discuss the campaign plan and the details of the activities.

Equality Campaign? You may find the instructions for school activities, which play an important part of our campaign, presented in the following chapter of this Guide. Do you have innovative and applicable suggestions on methods to implement the activities included in the third Chapter of this Guide? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

When ? When will the School Based Gender

The School Based Gender Equality Campaign will be carried out between December, 2015 and June,

Equality Campaign be carried out?

2016. The schools where the first applications of the campaign will be carried out are expected to present successful practices to set an example for our schools in other pilot cities.

Has there been any decision taken in

Besides the dates of the campaign, each activity has been scheduled as well. The activities, which

regard to the time of the activities which

are illustrated in detail in Chapter 3, have been listed as per the learning ways of students of various

will be carried out during the campaign?

ages and with focus on raising awareness on gender equality, which is the target of the campaign.

On what phase are the press and the related non-governmental organizations to be included in the practices during the Campaign?

The press and some of the non-governmental organizations, which were contacted during the preparation phase in order to increase the effectiveness of the Campaign across the city, were invited to the last activity of the Campaign to bring the successful practices into view. Would you like to add anything to the timing of the Campaign practices? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

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Where ? Which places should be chosen to carry out

While creating the messages and the activities for our students, we wanted to get out of the

the practices of the School Based Gender

classroom to deliver the messages of the Campaign and we reconstructed some of our activities as

Equality Campaign?

outdoor activities.

Would reaching the students in the classrooms be enough? Where should we deliver our messages to the parents, another target group of the Campaign?

We planned for parents’ participation in an activity where the students’ performances and works from the campaign week would be exhibited. Thus, our aim was to bring together the works of students together with parents, and also to deliver the messages to parents through the word of students. So, we planned a gender equality expert to give a seminar to the parents and to outline the outcomes of students’ efforts in the foyer of the seminar hall.

Where do you think reaching the target groups of the campaign would be effective? ............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................

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KEY ASPECTS OF THE SCHOOL-BASED GENDER EQUALITY CAMPAIGN: Below you may find some tools that an international non-governmental organization might use in a campaign aiming to raise awareness on environmental pollution: •

street activities such as festivals and protests,

news in the printed media,

shows that require large-scale production,

striking campaign ads,

social media shares,

TV commercials

effective tools such as photos etc. that require significant amount of budget and resources

What impact can a school-based awareness-raising campaign have compared to other large-scale communication campaigns? Face-to-Face Communication is the most effective way of conveying an awareness-raising message to the target group and helping the target group internalize it!

Face to Face Communication!

A teacher’s communication power who would convey constructive messages to his/her students in a positive and sincere manner is much stronger than a commercial campaign run by a multinational company or the awarenessraising tools used by an international institution that involve large-scale productions! It is because the message can be conveyed to the main recipient directly and in a sincere manner. The change you would make on future generations via a school-based awareness-raising campaign will eventually make a deeper impact on the society.

Effective communication tips for the teachers:1 Listening is the key component of effective communication. A good listener does not only “hear” what is being said, but also uses body language to indicate that she/he is lending a listening ear. Listening is an active process involving hearing the messages communicated by the speaker and trying to understand them. Improving effective listening in the class is of high importance for the school-based awareness-raising campaigns. Classroom management is an art that combines the learning and teaching processes and involves coordinated use of some knowledge and skills. Facilitation skills of teachers, which emerged as a new form of leadership in the field of organizational psychology, support a participatory group approach in order to ensure effective communication. Participatory group approach views the potentials of students as a valuable and unique resource. Here are some of the tasks of a teacher as a facilitator in order to ensure the use of effective communication skills in the classroom: •

Observes the improvement of group decision-making skills of the students.

Writes down the opinions expressed by the students during the class communication.

Encourage students to use their abilities.

Help students to take responsibility.

1

Facilitation with Ease!: Core Skills for Facilitators, Team Leaders and Members, Managers, Consultant, and Trainers, Ingrid Bens, 2012. John Wiley & Sons Inc. NewYork United States Flawless Consulting: A Guide to Getting Your Expertise Used, Peter Block, 2011. John Wiley & Sons Inc. Chichester United Kingdom

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The teacher must be aware of his/her role as a “consultant” in order to sustain effective communication within the class. Within the scope of this role, the teacher stops viewing students as individuals that grasp the content and reveal their understanding through their exam performance. Leaving aside the understanding that the directional flow of information and decision making is from teacher to student, the teacher builds up the communication process together with the students. The teacher carries out the following tasks while taking up the consultant role to strengthen the communication: •

Is aware that making mistakes is a valuable part of learning process.

Supports learning and communication processes among the peers (among the students).

Establishes relationships based on mutual understanding.

Adopts the principle of trust and honesty in communication.

Tips for Developing Effective Communication Tools: Some students may bring an innovative perspective to the campaign. You can encourage such students to contribute to your school-based awarenessraising campaign. Below you may find some tips you could use in designing the announcement materials prior to the campaign. •

Outer beauty makes the first impression, inner beauty makes the lasting one!

You should make sure that the posters include striking and eye-pleasing visuals. If the poster is lack of visual appeal, it will not be read no matter how important and necessary it is! In order to make your posters visually appealing, you may use several applications provided by common office programs or via the Internet, free of charge. You should also make sure that the visuals you will use entail positive image on and reinforce the message of gender equality. •

Do not stick to one format!

You can prepare the posters in different sizes. It is more likely to attract your target group’s attention with posters and announcements in different sizes. You can hang large size posters in the most crowded and lively places (i.e. school entrance, dining hall, canteen etc.) and small sized ones on bulletin boards, toilets and classroom doors. If you have a chance to display videos in the common areas of your school, you can use the short movie and other presentations provided by our Project team at regular intervals. You can find the videos of the project on our website (etcep.meb.gov.tr).

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Slogans speak louder than actions!

Catchy and memorable titles and slogans affect the success of an awareness-raising campaign to a considerable extent. Titles/slogans written in different and large fonts form the most striking part of your poster. You should make sure that your titles and slogans are memorable, simple, short and positive.

During the preparation phase of the campaign, you can ask your students to find inspiring and catchy slogans based on these messages.

KEY MESSAGES TO BE CONVEYED THROUGHOUT THE CAMPAIGN To implement the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign” in all pilot provinces and schools, we have set out three key messages to be used throughout the campaign. Slogans convey these messages in a memorable, simple and short way. During your school campaign, we highly recommend that you emphasize these three messages.

gender equality in educational settings?

Gender equality in education requires equal opportunities and equal treatment for all students.

Children who are not subject to discrimination in educational settings grow up in line with their talents.

In this chapter, you have read the planning stages of an awareness-raising campaign, the details of the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign” and the tips you may use to successfully prepare the materials that we expect you to design with the help of your students.

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In the following chapter, you may find activity instructions you are expected to implement during the campaign.


CHAPTER 3

• ACTIVITIES • REPORTING

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This chapter includes activity instructions to be organized within the scope of the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign” with your valuable contributions. Listed by age groups, the activity instructions include purpose of the activity, proper courses for implementing the activity, steps of implementation and some practical tips.

Since they serve as an introduction to basic concepts, some of the activities need to be performed before others. Such activities have been marked with

.

These activities must be undertaken considering the relevant age group. Activities marked with

are complementary to the previous activity and aimed at consolidating the messages received. Some or all of these activities

can be implemented after the activities marked with the “red icon”, as per the relevant age group. Activities marked with

are called energizers, providing an entertaining aspect to your practice.

Each activity ends with reporting tips. Please fill in the report template provided at the end of Chapter 3, after completing each activity that you have carried out with your students and submit it to our Project Office on the fourth day of the campaign, together with all annexes.

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LIST OF ACTIVITIES Activity Title What do Kids Like Doing?

Age Group

Annexes 1. Occupations Flashcards

Do Professions Have Genders?

2. Girl/boy template 1. Messages of the Game

Snakes and Ladders Game

2. Image of the playmat for the snakes and ladders game

If Our Lives Were a Tree

-

Spider Web

-

Opinion Buses

-

Gender Equality Diaries

-

Does our Language Have a Gender?

1. Let’s learn the concepts 2. Worksheet

Pioneers of the Society

1. Occupations and genders questionnaire

Carrier-gazer

2. Carrier-gazer scenarios 3. Scenario analysis key for teachers

Video Presentations

-

Pioneer Students

-

Reporting: Evaluation Form

Evaluation form

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ACTIVITY: WHAT DO KIDS LIKE DOING?

Purpose : To identify kindergarten children’s perception on gender and to help them improve their critical thinking on how diverse and similar children can be.

Time : 30+ minutes Courses : All courses Age Group : Kindergarten children Activity Type : Indoor activity

Required Materials : •

Large sheets of paper (or poster board)

Markers

Coloured post-it notes

Tape

Steps of Implementation : Preparation:

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Draw two large overlapping circles (Venn Diagram) on paper or board.

Make sure that the overlapping area is large.

Write down “What do boys like doing?” above one of the circles and “What do girls like doing?” above the other.

Prepare another large paper titled “What do kids like doing?” or write the same title on the other side of the board.


Implementation: •

Tell you students that you are all going to make a list of different things that boys and girls like doing.

Start by asking what boys like doing. Write down their responses on post-its. Then put them on the board/paper.

Then ask what girls like doing. Write down their responses on post-its. Then put them on the board/paper.

If you want to facilitate the participation of your students during the question-answer process, you can create your own “stereotyped” examples beforehand and ask questions like “Who likes ….?” (i.e. “Who likes playing basketball?”, “Who likes making sandcastles?”, “Who likes playing with dolls?”).

If your students say at any point “But a boy/girl can like that, too”, put the post-it on the overlapping area of the venn diagram. However, please refrain from steering the communication in this direction.

After collecting all the responses, go through each of the post-its. Ask if boys/girls can also like that, too. Run a discussion that encourages participation of all your students.

Be prepared for the responses implying that something is only for boys/girls. Remind them that there could be some people out there from the opposite gender that might like doing the thing in question. You can use yourself and/or one of your “friends” as an example. You can also gather examples from the children books about diversity and differences.

During this discussion session, slide the post-its to the overlapping area in the middle. If you have used a sheet of paper during the activity, cut out the overlapping area and tape it below the title “What do kids like doing?” written on the paper/board.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the images of the papers and a list of the things written by the students on these papers as well as a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : Miller A., Institute for Humane Education, adapted from the activity titled “Boys Like, Girls Like, Kids Like” in the web library. (Access date: November 2015 http://humaneducation.org/)

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ACTIVITY: DO PROFESSIONS HAVE GENDERS?

Purpose : This activity aims to detect the lines drawn by children about the professions based on the gender stereotypes they have learned from their environment and help them break these stereotypes about the career paths they will choose in the future.

Time : 1-2 Course Hours Courses : Free Activity Time, Life and Science Age Group : Kindergarten children, Primary School Activity Type : Indoor activity

Required Materials : •

Drawing papers (for each students)

Crayons

Occupations flashcards

An empty girl/boy template

Steps of Implementation :

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First, have a little discussion with the students about professions. Ask them the professions they know. If there are students that do not know the professions named by their classmates, explain them briefly.

If there are professions in the flashcards that have not been talked about, briefly explain them (for example, veterinary, engineer, dentist, musician etc.). Make sure not to show the flashcards to your students at this stage.

Pay attention to not making any gender emphasis while talking about the professions.

Write down the professions named by the students.

Then hand out a paper and crayon to each student.


Ask the students to draw people from 6-8 professions on the papers. Repeat the professions in the correct order so that all students draw the picture of the same profession.

1. Teacher

2. Doctor

3. Dentist

4. Veterinarian

5. Baker

6. Musician

7. Engineer

8. Scientist

After giving sufficient time to your students to explain their drawings, re-introduce the professions listed above by using the flashcards.

Show the flashcards of both genders and ask the class to pass them around.

You can ask your students some of the following questions to encourage their participation:

o Do you think this person is very active while performing this job (Does the job requires running, jumping, standing etc.)?

o Do you think this person is good at repairing things?

o What colour of uniform does this person mostly wear?

o Does this person work mostly inside an office or outside?

o Have you ever met someone in this occupation?

After you ask these general questions about the occupations, ask if that occupation is for males or females. For the occupations traditionally dominated by one gender, ask some questions that will help them understand that the physical attributes/skills required by a job do not necessarily belong to one gender:

o “Do you think this occupation can be performed by a man?”

o “Do you think this occupation can be performed by a woman?”

o “Are all boys equally good at running?”

o “Do all girls jump at the same speed?”

o “… good at drawing?”

o “… like animals?” etc.

Before ending the discussion session, ask your students if they would like to pursue any of these occupations. •

Distribute the empty girl-boy templates to the students (see Annex 2) and ask them to draw the occupation they would like to pursue.

Ask each student to explain their drawings.

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Key points: Children should learn about an occupation independent from traditional gender stereotypes. Therefore, while introducing an occupation to your students, you should focus on the skills, interests etc. required for that occupation and emphasize that everyone has different skills regardless of their gender.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the images of the drawings of the students and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : Miller A., Institute for Humane Education, adapted from the activity titled “Selling Boy and Girl� in the web library. (Access date: November 2015 http://humaneducation.org/)

ANNEX 1 : Images of the Occupations Flashcards

ANNEX 2 : Girl/Boy Template

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ANNEX 1 : Images of the Occupations Flashcards The materials will be provided in sets to the pilot schools during the campaign period.

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Gender equality in education requires equal opportunities and equal treatment for all students.

� y t ie oc S n a ri a lit a g E n, io t ca u d E “ Egalitari an

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ANNEX 2 : Girl/Boy Template

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ACTIVITY: SNAKES AND LADDERS GAME

Purpose : The activity aims to convey gender equality messages to students in an entertaining way by combining the messages with physical activities and thus reinforcing them. The classical snakes/ladders game was adapted in a way to include gender equality messages. Among the other campaign activities, this activity serves as an energizer.

Time : 1 Course Hour (could be repeated in other courses) Courses : Free-Activity Time, Physical Education, Life and Sciences, Social Sciences and appropriate elective courses Age Group : Primary School Activity Type : Indoor/Outdoor activity

Required Materials : •

Stairs and Ladders play mat

Dice

A printout of the messages (annex 1)

Steps of Implementation :

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Divide the class into groups of 6 to 8 students.

Explain the students the rules of the game.

Then read the messages written on the play mat (given in Annex 1) in the right order.


Rules of the game:

1.

A minimum of 2 and maximum of 4 players can position on the mat. Having one student from each group on the mat might make the game more fun for the students.

2. The player with the highest roll starts first and proceeds as per the number on the dice. 3. The second player takes turn and proceeds as per the number on the dice. 4. Ladders represent positive messages and snakes represent negative ones. 5. When a player gets to the end of the ladder, he/she reads out the positive message written on the mat and moves up to the top of the ladder. 6. When a player gets to a square with the head of a snake , he/she reads out the negative message written on the mat and slides down to the square at the snake’s tail. 7.

The main purpose of the game is to replace the negative messages with positive ones. Thus, the player reaching a snake’s head and falling behind is given another chance to gain advantage: The player who is able to convert the negative message into a positive one correctly is given chance to roll again and proceed accordingly. The player is allowed to get help from the group members for affirmations. Positive messages are given in Annex 1.

8. The first player to reach 100 wins the game. 9. If needed, the game can be repeated to allow all group members to participate. If the number of students in the class is too high for full participation, the game can be repeated in other courses.

Key points: The main purpose of the game is to enable the students to reinforce the positive messages. Therefore, they should be encouraged to repeat one of the positive messages after a negative one.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the photos taken during the activity and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : The game has been adapted from the “Snakes and Ladders” game of My GEMS Diary, New Delhi, ICRW (2009) page 46.

ANNEX 1 :

ANNEX 2 :

Snakes and Ladder Game- Messages

Image of the play mat 31


ANNEX 1 : Snakes and Ladder Game- Messages

Positive Messages (Ladder): 1. Everyone is equal. 2. Everyone has the right to education. 3. Girls and boys can play the same games together. 4. People may have different learning styles. 5. Both girls and boys can do equally well in science. 6. We all have the right to go to school. 7. Men and women can choose the same occupations. 8. Everyone can do household chores. 9. It is up to us to treat everyone equally. 10. Every student is free to choose his/her occupation.

Negative Messages (Snakes) and the Affirmations: 1. Men are better at sports/Women can also be as good as men at sports. 2. Male students are lazier/Being a hardworking student is not about gender, but about one’s ambitions and skills. 3. Girls and boys cannot play the same games together/ Girls and boys can play the same games together. 4. It is more important for boys to go to school/Both girls and boys should go to school, because everyone has the right to education. 5. Boys are more successful in science than girls/Success does not depend on gender, but one’s personal characteristics and capacity. 6. Women cannot do the same things as men at work/ Women can do the same things as men at work. 7. Girls cannot be class presidents/Girls can be class presidents, just like boys. 8. Men don’t do household chores/Household chores must be shared by all.

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EK 2 : Image of the play mat

Every student is free to choose his/ her occupation.

It is more important for boys to go to school

Men don’t do household chores

Girls cannot be class presidents

Women cannot do the same things as men at work

It is up to us to treat everyone equally.

People may have different learning styles

Boys are more successful in science than girls

Men and women can choose the same occupations.

We all have the right to go to school.

Girls and boys cannot play the same games together

Male students are lazier

Both girls and boys can do equally well in science.

Everyone can do household chores.

Everyone is equal.

Girls and boys can play the same games together.

Men are better at sports

Everyone has the right to education.

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ACTIVITY: IF OUR LIVES WERE A TREE

Purpose : The activity aims to help students raise awareness on what lies beneath gender discrimination and gain an understanding about how they can contribute to achieve gender equality.

Time : 1-2 Course Hours Courses : Counselling and Career Planning Course, Counselling Time Age Group : Middle School, High School Activity Type : Indoor activity

Required Materials : •

A cardboard tree large enough for the students to easily see

A4 papers for each student

Markers

Steps of Implementation : Preparation: •

Draw a tree on a cardboard large enough for the class to easily see. You must also draw the roots.

Implementation: •

Start by asking the students the following questions in following order. Do not move on to the next question until you hear their responses for each question and write down their ideas about gender on the board. The questions are as follows:o Ağaç deyince aklımıza ne geliyor? o What comes to your mind when you heard the word “tree”? o What is the most important element that determines the species and structure of a tree? (Expect to reach the answer “seed”). o What are the factors affecting the growth, bud break, blooming and fruit bearing of a tree? (soil, water, minerals etc.)

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Tell them the trees always wish to reach the sky.

Then distribute an A4 paper to each student.

Ask the following questions in order and give them the instructions:

Questions and Instruction: o If our social life were a tree, what would be the characteristics of this tree? o Think about the occupations you will pursue as a girl and boy, your daily roles and responsibilities and your future roles and responsibilities. What do you see as the challenges? What do you want to change? o Think about the roles and responsibilities of your mothers, fathers and other people around you. What do you think they see as the challenges? What do you want to change for them? o What could be the reasons for these challenges? What are the seeds causing these challenges and the roots and minerals intensifying them? Please write them down on the related parts of the tree you have drawn. o What are the outcomes of these challenges? Please write them down on the trunk and wings of the tree. o How do these outcomes affect the relationships between women and men? Please show them as the flowers and fruits of the tree. o We all aim for having a positive social and work life. We all want to reach the bright blue endless sky like trees and find peace. How do you define the sky we would like to reach by solving these problems and overcoming the challenges? •

After your students complete their individual works, allow those who want to share their trees with the class to speak.

While they are explaining their trees, write down their on the relevant parts of the cardboard tree hung on the board.

For example, write down the opinions referring to social judgements as the reasons of the difficulties in choosing a profession on the roots and the opinions regarding women’s choices of professions such as nursing etc. on the flowers and fruits of the tree. Follow the same pattern for all the answers until you form a tree in the class.

At the end of the activity, write down the positive opinions (for example those about a social life where women and men were given equal opportunities to choose their professions) on the sky part of the poster.

End the activity by explaining the class the reasons of gender discrimination, adding that it is something that can be changed.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the list of the students’ opinions written on the tree and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : This activity was inspired by the activity titled “The River of My Life” in Hope A, Timmel S, “The River of My Life” Training for Transformation Book 2 Mambo Press, Gweru (1984)

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ACTIVITY: SPIDER WEB

Purpose : The activity aims to support the students’ process of learning the concept of gender and help them enhance their learning by means of an energizing and entertaining activity.

Time : 20 min. Courses : Free Activity Time, Physical Education Course, Life and Science Course, Social Sciences Course, Counselling and Career Planning Course, Counselling Time

Age Group : All age groups Activity Type : Indoor/outdoor activity

Required Materials : •

A ball of yarn

Steps of Implementation :

36

Ask the students to stand up and form a circle (If the physical environment is not suitable for forming a circle, the students can perform the activity by standing at their desks).

Wrap the end of the yarn around your wrist. Then share one statement about gender equality and toss the ball of yarn to the student you want to hear.

After you have listened the opinion of the student, share another statement about gender equality and ask the student holding the yarn to throw it to another student that he/she wants to hear. Before throwing the yarn, the student must also wrap a piece of the yarn around his/her waist.


Repeat this process by sharing different statements with your students.

Make sure that the statements are appropriate to the age of the students.

You can use the following statements: “Even if I were a man, I would still not like driving”; “Women can be good drivers”; “Men can cook as well as women”, ”Firefighting and engineering are a man’s job”; “Women like to gossip, but men don’t”; “Only women like to look fancy”; “Pink is for girls and blue is for boys”; “Shopping is a man’s job, while doing household chores is a woman’s job”.

More than one student can express opinions about one statement. If the exchange of ideas about a statement goes well, allow the student holding the yarn to say “go on” and throw the yarn to another student since it would be a good way to sustain the exchange of ideas.

You can steer the process using arguments and recommendations that will prevent the students from agreeing on negative opinions about gender equality.

End the activity when a spider web like structure is formed.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the photos of the class (provided that permission is obtained) and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : This activity was adapted from the activity in Arabella, K. Shifting Paradigms, The Rustica Press Publishing, South Africa, (1992) p. 148.

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ACTIVITY: OPINION BUSES

Purpose : The activity aims to encourage the students to exchange ideas about how to achieve gender equality and to make gender equality a topic that students can talk about.

Time : 1 Course Hour Courses : Free Activity Time, Life and Science Course, Social Sciences Course, Counselling and Career Planning Course, Counselling Time

Age Group : Primary School, Middle School (4th to 8th graders), High School Activity Type : Indoor activity

Required Materials : •

3 paperboards

Markers

A sheet of paper

Tape

Steps of Implementation : Preparation:

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Cut the coloured paperboards (20 x 40 cm) to prepare the bus stop plates. You will need 6 “bus stops”.

Write down “Women Can’t Be Powerful Leaders”, “Men are Better at Technology”, “Women are Weak in Overcoming Difficulties”, “Men Don’t Cry” on the paperboards.


Implementation: •

Ask for help from your students to stick the paperboards you will use as bus stop plates on the walls of the class.

Tell them they will take a trip by means of this activity and tell them to read the statements written on the plates carefully.

Tell them that the buses they will get on will take them to a journey of opinions.

Then ask them to go to the bus stop they want and wait there.

After all students have chosen their stop, ask them the reason behind their choice.

Let them explain their opinions.

During the exchange of ideas, if anyone wants to change his/her bus stop, let them or even encourage them to do it.

If there is a bus stop that no one has chosen, ask them the reason why they did not chose it.

Ask them to stand and wait at the bus stops throughout the activity.

Ensure interactive participation.

Write down the opinions in favour of gender equality on the one side of the board and those against it on the other side.

End the session by emphasizing that social perceptions and opinions can change and individual efforts are important in changing the issues such as career choices and distribution of roles and responsibilities in the way that will promote gender equality.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include a short evaluation form including the opinions expressed by the students and the comments of the teacher about these opinions.

Resources Used : This activity was adapted from the activity in Arabella, K. Shifting Paradigms, The Rustica Press, South Africa, (1992) p. 58.

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ACTIVITY: GENDER EQUALITY DIARIES The activity aims to (1) record the differences in the awareness levels of students by means of the activities they

Purpose : have attended during the “School-Based Gender Equality Campaign” that will be held in the pilot schools for a week and (2) to put the observations of the students and information they have learned in writing and help them reinforce the campaign messages. The diaries kept by the students including their viewpoints, statements and potential solutions to the similar problems they have experienced are expected to help raising awareness of their peers in the future campaigns. It is important that the participating students start keeping diaries at the very beginning of the Campaign.

Time : 1 Week Courses : Counselling Time Age Group : 10th to 12th Grade Students Activity Type : Indoor activity

Required Materials : •

Gender Equality Diaries (ETCEP Diaries)

Steps of Implementation : Preparation: •

During the preparation phase, identify the students who would like to participate in the study, 2 weeks in advance if possible. Keep in mind that participation should be on voluntary basis.

While doing the announcement, make sure all students in the classrooms are provided sufficient information about the purpose and content of the study.

While identifying the volunteers, it is important to ensure a balance between the number of male and female participants.

Implementation:

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The diaries shall be distributed to the participating students in the first day of the campaign.

The purpose of the activity and expected contribution from students should be explained as follows.


o Purpose:

Our purpose, during the Gender Equality Campaign that will take place in our school for a week, is to support you in developing gender sensitive viewpoint, by guiding you to write down every sentence, situation or image that catches your attention, related to gender equality / inequality you witnessed at home, in school or in printed and visual media. Some of the issues you write down or innovative ideas you may come up with may be used for similar activities targeting your peers. o Content: The subjects you can include in your diary as per the purpose of the activity are following: - Sentences related to gender equality / inequality which you heard at home, in your social environment, that you witness on television or read in books, newspapers, magazines etc. - The phrases in our language related to equality / inequality of woman/man (professions, proverbs, idioms etc.) - Information on individuals who you think are successful on the profession you may like to choose in future or on individuals who might have a positive influence in our society (role models) and the qualities of those individuals taking your attention. o Rules for Keeping the Diary: - There is no word limit for diaries. - You should protect your diaries from wearing off, tearing and getting dirty. - The diaries should be handed over to your Counseling Teacher - The diaries should be written using a pen/pencil in a legible handwriting. - You can affix the photographs, pictures, drawings, newspapers/magazine clippings etc. to your diaries if they are related to the campaign and to the activities you participate in. o Copyrights: The copyrights of the diaries in this campaign belong to the Ministry of National Education. The Project Team may use parts of the content of the diary when needed. No payment entailing copyrights shall be made to the participants.

Key points: •

GE Diaries can be used as an independent diary keeping activity regarding what students want to share on gender equality; the activity could either be limited or implemented together with the activities that your school selects.

Keeping the diaries regulary and properly is important; however, the students’ genuine expressions should be delivered without any intervention (reduction, editing etc.).

In order to provide an efficient participation by the students, you may arrange a short evaluation meeting in the middle of the week.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the images of the drawings by the students and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : This activity is inspired from “The Kindness Diaries Project”, which has been conducted by Marmara Educator’s Federation, with than 100.000 children having participated in since the begining. For more detailed information on the mentioned project: http://www.iyilikgunlugu.com

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ACTIVITY: DOES OUR LANGUAGE HAVE A GENDER?

Purpose : The purpose of the activity is to help students become aware of the discriminatory, prejudicial and stereotypical

expressions in daily language, in media and in different social environments and also to introduce the practice of evaluating the language from a gender equality perspective. These expressions may include general roles and responsibilities that the society expects from men and women, discriminatory, prejudicial and stereotype expressions, as well as names of some professions. Students are encouraged to make up new expressions which emphasise the differences in a positive way.

Time : 3 Days Courses : Turkish, Literature, Counselling and Career Planning, Counselling Hour Age Group : Secondary School – High School students. Activity Type : Indoor Activity

Required Materials : •

Gender Equality Diaries or,

Does Our Language Have a Gender? Worksheet

Steps of Implementation :

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Explain the purpose of the activity and our expectations.

Write “discrimination”, “prejudice”, and “stereotype” on board. Ask the students the meanings of these words.

If you provide examples to students to have them understand the differences and the relation between these terms easier, the sessions will be easily conducted. You can see the Annex-1 for short annotations on the terms.

Write some of the stereotypes about equality of women and men that the students utter.

Start the 2nd debate session to investigate the expressions written on the board in accordance with the “Does Our Language Have a Gender?” worksheet in Annex-2.


In order to increase students’ interest in the subject to be studied, ask guiding questions so that they can see the relation between language and culture, the change in language according to time and social needs and the change in gender roles accepted by society over time: o “Can you provide examples of expressions / words in our language that have changed over time?” o “Can you provide examples of new words in our language?” o “Can you think of any proverb / idiom which reflect our culture?” o “What kinds of expressions can lead to discrimination, prejudice and stereotype according to you?”

Then, ask them to spend the following 3 days from the first class to write in their worksheets / notebooks all sexist expressions, similar to the ones discussed in the class, that they witness in the context of school, family or friends, in written and visual media, that they read in textbooks, novels, magazines, websites etc.

These expressions may have a negative discriminative meaning, as well as no discriminative meaning, however may reinforce sexist traditional roles and responsibilities.

At the end of the 2nd day, spend one class hour to discuss the expressions written down by students.

Write on the board all the expressions selected by the class. Those expressions may be proverbs, a profession referring to a certain gender etc.

Ask questions on the expressions written on board, such as who would consider those expressions as negative and discriminative, in order to encourage students to think about those in detail.

Encourage students to make up new expressions to positively emphasize the differences, to replace those they identified to be standing for gender discrimination.

Key points: Gender takes shape through social interactions; it changes in time and varies across different societies. Putting an emphasis on the sexist expressions having been included in our culture in time and on the ability of those negative expressions to change again will help you to reach to the target of this activity easier.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include pictures of the drawings made by students and a short evaluation form.

ANNEX 1 :

ANNEX 2 :

Let’s Learn the Concepts

“Does Our Language Have a Gender?” Worksheet

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ANNEX 1 : Let’s Learn the Concepts

Discrimination : First article of Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.” All human beings are accepted to be equal from birth. Discrimination stands for generalized negative thoughts and acts which ignore the aforementioned principle and which are directed against a certain group or group members, on base of the individual’s or the group’s differences in religion, language, race and gender. Prejudice : The concept of prejudice refers to already existing positive or negative information, behavior and opinion (belief) on an individual, group or thing. A prejudice can be positive or negative. A prejudice specific to individuals cause an evaluation of those individuals under the general beliefs about the groups that the person is assumed to be a member of, instead of based on the characteristics of the person. For example; labeling a driver who makes mistakes in traffic as “female driver”, “minibus driver”, instead of just defining him/her as “bad driver”, leads to other drivers addressing female drivers and minibus drivers negatively in regular contexts, and also leads to a new set of unfounded general beliefs. Stereotype : Prejudices and stereotypes are connected but different concepts. Stereotypes refer to the generalized beliefs shaped by limited experiences, which means making use of that stereotype to bring to a new level any belief and behavior developed against any kind of situation. According to psychologists, almost anyone uses stereotypes frequently, as it saves time when thinking in daily life. Similar to a prejudice, a stereotype can also be both positive and negative. However, it generalizes one single situation and it makes us see things in light of already existing impressions and information, instead of the real characteristics of each situation. For example; women are “more emotional” and men are “stronger” etc. It is unrealistic to expect every woman to be more emotional than a man and every man to be stronger than a woman. The more concepts based on prejudices, stereotypes, discrimination we know, the freer our language is of these concepts, and we end up having a more positivist and equalitarian approach to individuals and situations.

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ANNEX 2 : “Does Our Language Have a Gender?” School Name: Student’s Name and Surname:

/ Class:

gender equality in educational settings? 45


ACTIVITY: COMMUNITY LEADERS

Purpose : The purpose of the activity is to guide students in conducting a research and a presentation on role models , in order to help them internalise the concept of gender equality.

Time : 4 days Courses : Turkish, Social Studies, Visual Arts, Technology and Designing, Informatics, Literature, Counselling, Career Planning, Counselling Hour

Age Group : Secondary and High School Students Activity Type : Indoor Activity

Required Materials : Depending on the course:

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The Gender Equality Diaries / ETCEP activity worksheet (Turkish, Social Studies, Literature, Counseling and Career Planning)

Presentations software, computer and projector (Technology and Designing, Informatics)

Handwork materials (Visual Arts)


Steps of Implementation : •

Ask students to pick a native or foreign scientist, author, sportsman, painter, director, photographer, actor/actress and/or role models whom they can take as example, and then to conduct a research / prepare a presentation about them. Try to keep a balance between male and female community leaders would help the activity to reach its goal.

Ask the student to include in the assignment a short biography and pictures of the chosen person, and if possible, pictures of that person’s work, and a short description of their reasons for choosing that specific person.

When choosing the individuals for their assignment, encourage them to choose: o Individuals who could successfully make a difference in the community when fighting against discrimination, or in support of women rights, human rights, children rights, in Turkey or abroad, o Successful scientists in Turkey, o Individuals who could achieve their dreams and influenced others’ life positively.

The next day, ask the students to prepare a short plan to illustrate the method they think of using when preparing the assignment. Request students who are having a hard time selecting a role model / community leader to restart their research by asking questions related to their own interests. Take the necessary measures to prevent students from focusing on only one gender.

Ask students to do the presentation in class 3-4 days after handing out the assignments.

In the last day of the activity, have students vote for the most successful presentations.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include photographs from the day of the presentations and a short evaluation form.

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ACTIVITY: CAREER-GAZER

Purpose : The purpose of the activity is helping the students become aware of their own prejudices on professions and, by doing that, encouraging them to choose their future professions in accordance with their own talents, independent from any stereotype.

Time : 2 Class Hours Courses : Counselling, Career Planning, Counselling Hour Age Group : 10th, 11th, 12th grade students Activity Type : Indoor Activity

Required Materials :

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“Professions and Their Genders” survey

“Career-gazer” scenarios.


Steps of Implementation : Lesson 1 : •

Introduce the “Professions and Their Genders” form after telling students you would like to provide the class with some information on professions, and also check their existing knowledge on some professions. (See: Annex-1)

Before handing out the surveys, give brief information about the professions you think students would not know much about.

Hand out the surveys and ask each student to fill the form individually. Give them enough time to complete the survey. Students can keep the papers after filling in the survey form.

Emphasize on every single profession and write on the board what profession would mainly be performed by which gender.

Investigate every profession one by one and start a debate on the answers, views and counter-views.

You can ask the following questions to fire up the debate:

“What profession has the highest number of votes for “women”?”

“What profession has the highest number of votes for “men”?”

“What profession do you think will have the higher demand in future?”

Collect the survey forms at the end of the class to include them in your report.

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Lesson 2 : •

Talk briefly about the results of the debate from the previous class on what professions can be performed by which gender.

Divide the class into groups of 4 students and give them scenarios in the workplace. (see: Annex-2)

Keep the balance of genders inside the groups as much as possible.

Even though some of the scenarios seem to be more for female students and some others seem to be more for male students, trying to find a solution to the scenarios as a team of different genders is important to improving students’ ability to empathize.

Ask the groups to share their solutions with the class under the form of a presentation.

According to students’ and teachers’ preferences, the presentations can also be performed as a drama activity.

Key points: It is important for students to become aware of their own prejudices in order to be able to change their negative attitudes . Consequently, no intervention into students’ responses should be made, and their responses to the question “Which gender would be more successful in which profession?” should be diverted by asking “WHY DO YOU THINK IT IS LIKE THAT?“

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include the survey forms that the students filled in and a short evaluation form.

Resources Used : Inspired from the activity named “Men’s Work or Women’s Work?” in “Gender Equity Activity Book, State of Alaska, Early Education and Development Department”, page 7.

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ANNEX 1 :

ANNEX 2 :

ANNEX 3 :

“Professions and Their Genders” Survey

Career-gazer Scenarios

Key to Scenario Analysis for Teachers


ANNEX 1 : “Professions and Their Genders” Survey School Name: Student’s Name and Surname:

/ Class:

PROFESSIONS and THEIR GENDERS SURVEY Please select what professions below are performed by a man and which by a woman. Please select the option “both” if you think the given professions can be performed by anyone, regardless of their gender.

Profession Gender Builder Steward / ess Social Services Spc. Secretary Primary Sch. Teacher Hair Dresser Veterinarian Physical Ed. Teacher Cook Photographer Nurse Cpu System Analist Dentist Sports Reporter Newspaper Editor Mechanical Engineer Librarian

Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____ Woman ____

Profession Gender Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____

Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____

Dietitian Woman ____ Pilot Woman ____ Chief Superintendent Woman ____ Jewelry Designer Woman ____ Accountant Woman ____ Security Guard Woman ____ Physiatrist Woman ____ Bus Driver Woman ____ Consul General Woman ____ Rector Woman ____ Mechatronics Eng. Woman ____ HSE Specialist Woman ____ Graphic Designer Woman ____ Cameraman Woman ____ Garbage man Woman ____ Computer Teacher Woman ____ Civil Engineer Woman ____

Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____ Man ____

Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____ Both ____

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ANNEX 2 : “Career-gazer Scenarios”

CAREER-GAZER SCENARIOS The scenarios below contain examples of some negativity that you may encounter within your career. We would like you to think of how you would resolve such or similar problems when you face them, and to bring a positive and realistic solution by discussing your suggestions with other group members. Some of the scenarios seem to suit female students more and others seem suit male students more but we would like you to read the scenario carefully, put yourself into the shoes of the person in the given scenario and suggest a solution.

Scenario 1: Let’s assume you are the only employee in the constructions industry. Your team works very efficiently and faster than the business plan. Your boss tells you he would be away from the construction site for a day and hands over to you a list of tasks for your team to complete until his return. You know you cannot finish the work on time if you don’t start working right away. As the only woman member of the group, how do you convince your teammates to continue carrying out the work without a break? Considering what other teammates might say and how you would constructively convince them, what solution do you suggest to resolve such a problem that you may encounter within any point in your career?

Scenario 2: Let’s assume you are the only dietitian in the company you work in. Every other dietitian and paramedic are women. You began avoiding using the common resting room because private conversations and jokes on the differences between men and women started to annoy you. Moreover, some of the female patients tell you they feel disturbed to see a male dietitian and they do not want to talk about their weight problems, without considering how good you are at your job. How do you tell other dietitians that you are disturbed by the way they support clients’ habit to get appointments with female dietitians and how do you suggest that they behave more carefully at work? Why may other dietitians be unaware that you were disturbed? What can you do to maintain a positive communication with your colleagues and, in the same time, to change the prejudices of some of the clients?

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ANNEX 3 : Scenario analysis key for teachers

Scenario 1: While analysing the scenarios: •

Ask your students shat they think about women being leaders;

Which skills should women possess in a group dominated by men.

After listening their suggestions for solutions you may discuss this scenario over occupations traditionally attributed to one gender.

After the presentations are over, you may ask your students what should they take into consideration in developing social relations, roles and responsibilities.

Based on their responses you may proceed with the second scenario presentations.

Scenario 2: While analysing the scenarios: •

You may ask your students what they think about men’s communication and social skills.

You may then ask them what type of communication and social skills should men use in the given scenario.

After listening to their replies, you may ask your students to give similar examples from everyday life.

After the presentations are over, you may ask your students what should they take into consideration in developing social relations, roles and responsibilities.

You may complete the session after wrapping up their replies.

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ACTIVITY: VIDEO PRESENTATIONS

Purpose : The purpose of the activity is to support high school students to develop arguments on gender equality, and by doing that, to allow them ponder on this concept in detail, and to support them in expressing their thoughts by using effective communication techniques.

Time : 2 Class Hours Courses : English, Social Studies, Visual Arts, Technology and Designing, Informatics, Counselling Hour Age Group : High School Students Activity Type : Indoor Activity

Required Materials :

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Presentation tools (Computer, projection)

Short Videos (Provided by project office)

Colored post-its

Board paper, as many as the number of groups in the class

Board markers


Steps of Implementation : Lesson 1 : •

Prepare the classroom for short video presentations.

Let the students watch the videos that have been sent to school by the Project Team, explaining the concept of gender equality dynamically, especially to young generations.

Tell them the videos are mainly focused on problems that women are encountering. After watching the videos, while the groups are preparing for their presentations, ask them what difficulties men may have, ask them to express their opinions on discrimination and obstacles and their suggestions to resolve the problems.

Organize students in groups of 4 or 5 to have them perform a group work.

Make each group watch a video they choose from the video list.

During the remaining time of the class, allow them to brainstorm and to work on a presentation, including their own comments on the themes of those videos and similar examples.

Lesson 2 : •

Prepare the classroom for short video presentations.

Save the presentations of the students onto the classroom computer.

Ask students to make their presentations in the order they choose to.

While a group is making the presentation, ask other students to write down the parts they like and the questions they have, if any.

After all presentations are over, you may ask your students on what they think about each presentation, and ask them to discuss which group came up with the strongest argument during the presentations (over the video content), to determine which was the most interesting presentation and encourage them to think both on their presentation and those of the others.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include pictures of cardboard papers the students wrote their ideas on, soft copies of the presentations and a short evaluation form.

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ACTIVITY: PIONEER STUDENTS

Purpose : The purpose of the activity is to increase sense of ownership to the subject and the project among students who would like to work as “pioneer students”; as well as obtaining alternative written and visual materials created by them to be used increasing awareness among their peers.

Time : 1 Week Courses That Could Be Implemented : All related Age Group : High School Students Activity Type : Indoor Activity

Required Materials : •

Photo Camera / Video camera

Gender Equality Diaries / Notebook

Steps of Implementation : Preparation:

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During the preparation phase of the implementation, 1 or 2 weeks before implementing the campaign, identify the children who will participate in the study. Keep in mind that participation should be on voluntary basis.

Make sure all students in the classrooms that you visit for the announcements are provided sufficient information about the purpose and content of the study.

While identifying the volunteers, it is important to keep a balance between the number of male and female participants.


Explain the purpose of the activity and our expectations from students: “Our purpose is to establish a “Pioneer Student Group” who shall follow the activities to be carried out during Gender Equality Campaign in our school, , and identify successful and interesting implementations determine and report successful and interesting implementations of the activities that might serve as a good practice for other schools.

Take the necessary permissions for the students participating in the activity, so that they can also follow the activities carried out in different classrooms.

Prepare a schedule for what activity will take place in what classroom and identify what pioneer student will follow what activity.

Explain the principles of how to use the photo camera / video camera during the activity.

Implementation: •

Ask the pioneer students to follow the activities in other classes, starting from the first day of the campaign, so as to determine the remarkable outcomes out of them all, the kind of work which can set examples and inspire other students.

Assign those students with collecting the necessary information regarding the work they found successful, to use in creating computer presentations (ppt), “ETCEP Boards” posters, short videos etc. visuals.

Conduct interviews about the following topics with the students who were found successful by their peers: the type of things they were careful about, their insight on why their paper was better than those of the other students; report students’ answers in their own words.

In the last day of the campaign, take these registries to give to the Project team in a proper format which the pioneer students will select (For Example: a short presentation, video or “ETCEP Board” visuals named “GE Campaign in Our School”) to be used as examples while conducting “School Based Gender Equality Campaign”.

Copyrights: •

The copyrights of all the written and visual data produced in this campaign over “Pioneer Students” activity belong to the Ministry of National Education. The Project Team may use the contents of these materials when needed, in which case no payment will be made to the participants.

Reporting : The reports of this activity must include presentations of “Pioneer Students” and a short evaluation form.

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REPORTING ACTIVITY EVALUATION FORM : The Name of the Activity: Dates: Teacher: Class: 1.

Do you think the instructions of the activity are written clearly?

2. (If your answer is “no�) While following the instructions, which parts were difficult to understand and perform and what kinds of revisions are necessary?

3. Which section did your students like most?

4. Which part of the activity was the hardest to perform for your students?

5. Did you observe your students gaining the acquisitions aimed at by the activity?

6. Do you advise this activity to be performed in other schools as well?

7.

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Please write below the list of annexes containing photographs of the activity and successful outcomes. Please hand the annexes to the Project Team.


CHAPTER 4

Best Practices

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This chapter contains examples of successful applications carried out during School Based Gender Equality Campaign activities, which took place in Trabzon on 14-18 December and in İzmir on 15-19 February 2016. The applications presented in this chapter brought innovative contributions to the activity suggestions proposed in the guideline by school managers, teachers and students. These practices were identified through “Activity Evaluation Forms� filled in and delivered by teachers performing the activity, and through the reports of the project team based on on-site observations. We hope the information provided in this chapter will be a useful guide and an inspiration for the school managers and to the teachers who are planning to use the Guide, as a part of their efforts for ensuring gender equality in schools.

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DOES OUR LANGUAGE HAVE A GENDER? The aim of “Does Our Language Have a Gender” activity is to help children become aware of the discriminatory, prejudicial and stereotypical expressions in daily language, in media and in different social environments and also to introduce the practice of evaluating the language for the principle of gender equality. We have observed that the students were intrigued by the activity as they were willing to participate in both debates and presentations, that they had fun and continued making use of this new information they have learnt even after the classes were over.

“My Lionhearted Son”

“Like a girl…”

“Students did not want to end the debate. It was great to see boys and girls being active in the same time” Turkish Teacher – Cudibey Secondary School / Trabzon “Students had a lot of fun while expressing their opinions on the concepts of the activity. I observed that they tried to find the discriminative expressions others had used and correct them. I can see that they began to criticize the discriminative expressions in books, texts, news etc.” Turkish Teacher –Cudibey Secondary School / Trabzon

“Does Our Language Have a Gender?” was the most diverse activity, where the teachers applied innovative approaches the most. In every school which the activity was carried out, there was evidence of various and interesting new ideas for engaging more students and reaching the purpose of the activity.

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During the implementation of the activity in Güzelyalı Secondary School, one of the pilot schools in İzmir, teachers brought a different visual approach.

““We asked the students, who had been informed on the issue in the previous class, to write on black cardboards proverbs and idioms with a discriminative meaning in regards to gender equality and bring the cardboards to class. On the day of the activity, my students came with the cardboards they had prepared. We listened to the ideas of all the students. We talked about the problems. Then, we turned the cardboards backwards and attached them to the white board so as to turn the whiteboard into a black board. This way, the board looked like the dark sky. I handed out to the students some stars I had previously prepared. I asked them to write on each star their positive opinions regarding this issue in one sentence. In the center of the board, I attached the moon with the message “MEN AND WOMEN ARE EQUAL”. I told my students that, even though some problems may seem like a dark sky, we can illuminate the dark with our positive thoughts and I said change is triggered by youth. Later on, all the students came to the board, expressed their positive thoughts and attached a star on the board. We had a lot of fun in this activity. The way the board looked at the end of the activity was very beautiful.” Turkish Teacher – Güzelyalı Secondary School / İzmir.

The Turkish teacher who implemented this activity using the method “be like Ayşe / be like Ali”, which was very famous in social media when this Guide was being written, also brought a new approach which helped the students express their thoughts regarding the stereotypes when attending the activity more easily. The teacher, who implemented this activity to 5th and to 6th grade students after an information and preparation class, asked her students to write and share their feelings and opinions regarding concepts of gender equality and discrimination similar to “be like Ayşe/ Ali” scheme. The drawings students made in the debate session contained not only their feelings and opinions regarding discriminative expressions in the language, but also stereotypes disturbing them, which enriched the purpose of the activity.

(Acting like a Man)

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(Men and Women Are Equal


Teachers of American Collegiate Institute – İzmir made the students re-write sexist expressions in the language, benefiting from legends and tales, in order to help the students detect those expressions easier. The activity, which was designed for high school level, included analyzing the subject in terms of legends and tales, attracted students’ attention and made them participate in the activity more willingly.

“Stepmothers or witches always represent the women in power in tales. In addition, in tales, the prejudice that good is “by birth” and bad is “adoptive” is commonplace from beginning to the end. When analyzing the tales The Snow White, Cinderella and The Frog Prince, the motif that all male characters being rich and powerful stands out. Men are already expected to have those qualifications. Power, heroism and wealth are the key features of men in these and many other tales. In tales, men are often supposed to pass the tests successfully, to show heroism and to be brave and clever. The ones who do not have these features are considered worthless.” 11 th grade student. ““Modern tales are no different either. In Shrek, heroism is a tool which can be bought. Fiona would have turned into a hero if Shrek did not exist but Shrek finds his way to become a hero and she returns to her passive role. In the Brave, Miranda comes back to her mother, after rebelling against her mother and doing what she wanted. As it can be seen, the predetermined role of the women does not differ, even in tales.” 11 th grade student. On the other hand, it was observed that, successful activities positively affected other classes where the activities were not carried out.

“The effects of the campaign activities reflected on every teacher’s classes. Mathematics teachers started to bring up “Why are the majority of the questions asked by boys?” issue. We observed that all the teachers started to realize the sexist expressions in the language and started to correct them.” Ali Cihat Bıyıklıoğlu – Principle of Cudibey Secondary School

BEST PRACTICE NOTES Success factors of this activity were teachers making the process of finding the sexist stereotypes in the language and changing them in an entertaining way for the students and the teachers’ methods of moderating the debates actively. The authentic methods teachers used in order to encourage students’ participation had a positive effect on students’ visual perception and on improving their self-expression skills.

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PIONEER STUDENTS “The Pioneer Students” activity involves volunteering students following the activities carried out in the campaign term in their school, so as to determine and register successful practices among those activities which can set as examples to other schools. The real purpose of this activity is to make the students feel as if they own this project and to obtain written and visual materials to share with students from other schools. Teachers and students in Trabzon Yol-İş Sendikası Secondary School implemented the proposed activity in such an enthusiastic and successful manner that all the students, from kindergarten children to the senior students, participated in the campaign and contributed to increasing awareness on the issue.

“To be honest, students paid most attention to this campaign. This generation is determined to learn and protect their rights. The activities were partially managed by teachers and partially by students. We observed that the ways of communication students used, the methods, the preparation processes and the imaginary factors were very creative and authentic.”

Mehmet Faik Kayalıgil – Principle of Yol-İş Sendikası Secondary School

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BEST PRACTICE NOTES: Success factors of this activity were the participation of the students voluntarily and the stance of the school managers and teachers who provided constructive feedback and assistance on every level. The messages of the campaign were conveyed by the school managers and the teachers, and, at the same time, the students were encouraged to use interesting methods to convey their messages to their friends. Conveying messages from students to students increased the value of the campaign. Directing students who have an interest and talent in this field from being observers of the activity to being the pioneers of the change is a very important outcome in terms of the sustainability of this project.

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THE SNAKES AND LADDERS GAME “The Snakes and the Ladders Game” activity mainly aims at conveying and reinforcing gender equality messages to students in an entertaining way, by combining these messages with physical activities. The classical snakes and ladders game was adapted in a way to include gender equality messages. The new rule, giving one extra turn to the student who corrects the negative messages written on the game and replaces them with positive messages, brought a new face to the game. Among the other campaign activities, which aim at creating awareness on gender equality, this one was designed to be an energizer. Teachers of Trabzon Hasan Ali Yücel Primary School and Yol-İş Sendikası Secondary School used this game in a more complex and surprising way, with an improved the game mat and dice prepared by the Project Team.

“After the real activity, some of the game materials of the campaign were used by our counseling teachers with the purpose of therapy and deenergizer for the students.” Tansu Şen – Principle of Hasan Ali Yücel Primary School / Trabzon Teachers of İzmir Batıçim Primary School carried out all the energizing activities, including snakes and ladders game, in the school yard, with the participation of all classes in the same time, which ensured students’ learning all together while having fun in a festival like environment.

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In Yol-İş Sendikası Secondary School, teachers of the special education class diversified the messages send through the activity instructions with practical examples from daily life, to be able to teach this activity to their students. In this way, they modified this game to easily understandable and more fun for students who are in need for special education.

“* Everyone is equal. For example, both boys and girls can drive.

* Everybody learns in different ways.”

BEST PRACTICE NOTES: Success factors of this activity was the teachers’ success in conveying the messages suitable for the purposes of this activity, without distracting students, while teachers presented this activity as an energetic and entertaining activity. Our teachers made our students reinforce the things they had learnt while playing the game in class and continued using the activity materials even after the campaign.

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DO PROFESSIONS HAVE GENDERS? The “Would a Profession Have a Gender?” activity aims at detecting the lines drawn by children regarding professions based on the gender stereotypes they have learned from their environment and at helping them break these stereotypes about the career paths they will choose in the future. Teachers found it beneficial that the activity allows the students express themselves both verbally and through drawings. Teachers stated that the “Occupations Cards”, which were obtained as a part of the activity, attracted the wide attention of students, and the students liked drawing something related to the profession of their choice.

“My students enjoyed the occupation cards a lot. The other factor making the activity entertaining was the students sharing with each other the drawings they had made. Kindergarten Teacher – Batıçim Primary School / İzmir

At kindergarten level, it was proved that a correct activity planning method can bring effective results in preparing students to understand the messages of the activity.

“We could not make the kindergarten students believe that there was gender discrimination: They said “we can be whatever we want”. Mehmet Faik Kayalıgil – Principle of Yol-İş Sendikası Secondary School

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BEST PRACTICE NOTES: Success factor of this activity was the success of the teacher in encouraging children to actively participate in the activity and the teacher’s sensitivity to materializing the concepts.

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MORE INFORMATION: T.C. Millî Eğitim Bakanlığı Ortaöğretim Genel Müdürlüğü MEB Beşevler Kampüsü, F Blok, Kat:1 Yenimahalle, Ankara - TURKEY Tel: +90 312 212 50 55 Fax: +90 312 212 50 59 etcep@meb.gov.tr

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