Page 1


2

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

3


4

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

5


contents

inside

2.2018

34

Motion Picture Maven

Kathy Bates is famous for many roles in television and film, but she spoke exclusively with CULTURE about her leading role on Netflix’s Disjointed, as well as her own experiences with cannabis. O n the C O V E R :

K E I T H M U N YA N

26 30

52

features 44

Niche Nuptials High-end wedding vendors are offering their services to cannabis-loving couples.

52

Industry Insider Get intimate with Ashley Manta, a sex expert who is high on life, love and cannabis.

54

Tantalizing Talent Denver’s favorite drag queen opens up about performing, cannabis and her dream of peace and unity.

56

Talkin’ Dirty Get the truth from “T&A Talk Sex” Co-Host Christina Myers Hepburn who loves cannabis and keeps it real with discussions about sex.

56

44

departments 10 Letter from the Editor news 12 News Nuggets 13 By the Numbers 16 Local News 20 Legal Corner reviews 22 Company Highlight 24 Advocate Highlight 26 Strain, Topical & Concentrate Reviews 30 Cool Stuff 32 Entertainment Reviews in every issue 60 à la Carte 62 Growing Culture 64 Profile in Courage 66 News of the Weird

6

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

Online Exclusive! Candidate for New York Governor Plans to Legalize Cannabis d

d Industrial

Hemp License

Applications Available in Maine

Vol 9 IssUE 8


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

7


M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Editor-In-Chief Jamie Solis associate Editor Ashley Bennett Editorial coordinator Benjamin Adams managing editor Addison Herron-Wheeler Editorial Contributors Matthew Abel, Denise Pollicella, Devon Alexander Brown, Jasen T. Davis, Alex Distefano, Keira Fae, Caroline Hayes, Addison Herron-Wheeler, Pamela Jayne, M. Jay, Heather Johnson, Carl Kozlowski, Emily Manke, Meital Manzuri, Madison Ortiz, R. Scott Rappold, Paul Rogers, Ed Rosenthal, Kimberly R. Simms, Alexa Steinberg, Lanny Swerdlow, Simon Weedn, Amy Witt, Laurie Wolf Photographers Kristen Angelo, Steve Baker, Kristopher Christensen, John Gilhooley, Joel Meaders, Tonya Perme, Josué Rivas, Mike Rosati, Eric Stoner Art Director Steven Myrdahl production manager Michelle Aguirre Graphic DesignerS Payden Cobern, John Venegas sales director Joe Larson Account Executives Alex Brizicky, Molly Clark, Eric Bulls, Kim Cook, Lee Moran, Casey Roel, Garry Stalling, Shayne Williams, Annie Weber, Vic Zaragoza general Manager Iris Norsworthy office manager Mikayla Aguilar digital media Hannah Lemley coordinator Distribution Manager Cruz Bobadilla Publisher David Comden Culture® Magazine is published every month and distributes magazines at over 1,400 locations throughout Colorado. No articles, illustrations, photographs, or other matter within may be reproduced without written permission. Culture® Magazine is a registered trademark. All rights reserved.

10940 S. Parker Road, #237 | Parker | CO | 80134-7440 Phone/Fax 888.694.2046 www.CultureMagazine.com

CULTURE® Magazine is printed using post-recycled paper.

8

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

/freeculturemag

/iReadCulture

/iReadCulture


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

9


LETTER

FROM

THE

EDITOR

Li f e s t y l e of

“I

t’s a lifestyle” has been a CULTURE catchphrase since 2009. We don’t just consume cannabis; it’s an important part of our everyday lives. Cannabis allows us to live healthier. It enhances music. Cannabis inspires our creativity, encourages us to work out—it’s even in some of our favorite food and drinks. And finally—physical sensations like orgasms are more intense and pleasurable when cannabis is involved. February is notoriously one of CULTURE’s most intimate times of year, as we unveil our annual Sex Issue. The stories within this steamy issue embrace the themes of love, relationships and sex—and the many roles in which cannabis plays. When it comes to love and relationships in particular, it’s clear that couples who imbibe together, chill together. This is in part due to cannabis’ role in contributing to healthier relationships, which is not a new phenomenon. There are a number of studies that have presented evidence of a positive relationship between sex and cannabis. Back in September 2014, a study published in the Psychology of Addictive Behaviors proved there were fewer instances of violence between partners who both regularly consume cannabis. Additionally, cannabis appears to lead to more sex, according to a groundbreaking study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine, which was conducted by researchers at Stanford University in October 2017. The study found that those who consistently consume cannabis have sex 20 percent more often than those who do not. It’s no secret to consumers the ways in which cannabis can enhance the intensity of sexual pleasure and orgasms. Now with increasing research around sex and cannabis, we’re finding that when we masturbate to completion, our endocannabinoid systems are creating endocannabinoids. When we introduce cannabinoids derived from cannabis into our bodies, our endocannabinoid systems release

10

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

more endocannabinoids, which help balance most of our bodies’ functions. A study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine in November 2017 found evidence that endocannabinoids play a role in the sexual response cycle. While there is a clear physical reaction our bodies experience when we consume cannabis, which may affect the intensity of our pleasure and orgasms, it’s possible that cannabis also has a way of strengthening the nonverbal and spiritual connections between people. This deepened sense of togetherness leads to better sex overall. There have been countless testimonials by individuals who find that cannabinoids like CBD have the ability to make them feel more comfortable and less anxious. Ultimately, cannabis helps allow many people to embrace intimacy—which can clearly be a benefit both inside and outside of the bedroom. Both catering to adults, cannabis and sex make a poetic partnership. With further research by scientists and cannabis companies providing consumers with titillating, exciting sex products, it’s sure the correlation between these two pleasures will only continue to strengthen. c Cheers!

Jamie Solis Editor-in-Chief


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

11


NEWS

nuggetS

Longmont Working to Remove Confidential Info from Business Applications

Colorado Uses Cannabis Revenue in Place of Big Tobacco Funding Colorado received a huge settlement from tobacco companies in the mid-1990s, and the hundreds of millions of dollars have been funding statewide programs ever since. However, now that the money from the tobacco industry is finally dwindling, the state is turning to cannabis. “Tobacco master settlement revenues have been steadily declining for years, yet important health programs were dependent upon them,” Pat Steadman, former state senator, told CULTURE. Steadman worked on the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee and

helped allocate cannabis funding. “Meanwhile, the new marijuana tax revenues have continued to grow, so the solution was readily apparent. By refinancing certain health programs with marijuana tax revenues, we stabilized the funding for all the tobacco settlement programs.” This appears to be yet another sign of the times that tobacco sales are on the way out, and cannabis tax revenue will now fund many major state programs.

The city of Longmont is now allowing dispensaries to open within city limits. However, the licensing process hit a snag when license applications were publicly posted on Dec. 1, 2017, which contained confidential information. The city is claiming, however, that it was the fault of the applicants. “The applicants themselves were supposed to redact their marijuana business applications; specifically, they were required to submit two electronic versions, one redacted version and one unredacted,” Shawn Lewis, assistant city manager of Longmont, told CULTURE. “Even though redacting was the responsibility of the applicants as required by the city’s application guidelines,

Vermont Senate Passes Recreational Bill On Jan. 10, the Vermont Senate passed H.511, shortly after it cleared the House on Jan. 4. The House voted hours after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions ended federal protections on state cannabis laws, but Vermont sounded its voice loud and clear. Members from the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws were ecstatic. “For the second time in two years, Vermont lawmakers have rejected

12

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

city staff is now spending a great deal of time going through the applications and redacting them on behalf of the businesses that submitted them.” Regardless of where the fault lies, it is clear that there is interest from entrepreneurs, and once this obstacle is cleared, a local industry is likely to emerge.

the failed Flat Earth policies of marijuana prohibition. The majority of Vermonters, like the majority of the American public, desire to live in a community where responsible adults who choose to consume cannabis are no longer criminalized or stigmatized. Gov. Scott would be wise to provide Vermonters with this path forward, rather than cling to the failed policies of the past.” The bill was delivered to Gov. Scott’s desk for signature, and he signed it into law on Jan. 22.


The percentage of pregnant women who agreed that they perceived risk in consuming cannabis once a week while pregnant in a recent statewide educational campaign study: (Source: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment)

90

The estimated number of people who have licenses to work in the cannabis industry in Colorado: (Source: JDVR)

34,459

The number of pages that contain the information of all of Colorado’s recreational cannabis shops, as organized by the Marijuana Enforcement Division: (Source: Westword)

13

The current number of medical cannabis dispensaries operating in Colorado, as of the beginning of 2018: (Source: Westword)

509

The length, in feet, that made up a single joint that was created by cannabis advocates in Massachusetts in December 2017: (Source: Los Angeles CBS)

The projected number of cannabis jobs in the United States that would be created immediately if federal cannabis legalization were to occur: (Source: New Frontier Data)

782,000

100

The amount of acres that Pennsylvanian farmers will be allowed for cultivating hemp, under revised 2018 state Department of Agriculture guidelines: (Source: PennLive.com)

100

USGBC Colorado: Cannabis Industry and Sustainability Panel WHEN: Thurs, Feb 22 WHERE: The Lighting Agency, 2661 17th St., Denver WEBSITE: www.usgbc.org Between lighting, ventilation and heating, the cannabis industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries. Indoor growing may seem harmless, but the actual output of greenhouse gas emissions is millions of metric tons annually. Learn all there is to know about what sustainability means for the cannabis industry. The panel will cover current sustainability initiatives, complete with a panel

discussion and audience Q&A, plus additional networking opportunities. This event is sponsored by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC), a nonprofit organization focused on sustainability in “building design, construction and operation.” The sustainable building sector often crosses paths with the cannabis community, which is why the time is right for a discussion panel on both topics. CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

13


14

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

15


NEWS

LOCAL

Cannabis Career Fair

Compliance Matters DISPENSARY raid affidavit released explaining charges of looping By Addison Herron-Wheeler

T

he cannabis industry has been reeling both locally and nationally following the massive raid on Sweet Leaf, a dispensary chain with locations in Colorado and Oregon. A recently released affidavit from the sting reveals more information about the major bust and why it occurred. The Sweet Leaf businesses that were raided are currently suspended due to allegations of “looping,” or allowing the same individual to come back multiple times to purchase more than one ounce of cannabis flower per day. While looping is illegal and customers are only allowed to purchase a maximum of one ounce of flower per day, the law is considered difficult to enforce, given the fact that in a fast-paced retail environment, it is often hard to determine the transaction history of every single customer. According to the affidavit, however, the alleged looping occurring at Sweet Leaf may have been more than run-of-the-mill returning customer purchasing attempts. The investigation first began when a man noticed suspicious activity around the 2647 W. 38th Ave. Sweet Leaf location in Denver. He noticed the same people coming in and out repeatedly, which was indicative of looping. This led to an investigation that has been developing since November of 2016. The arrest of a convicted felon, who was

16

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

purchasing pounds of cannabis at a time, gave the police even more information than what they collected through observing customers outside of the store. The employees at Sweet Leaf were allegedly encouraging customers to return to the store and make multiple purchases as long as they parked their cars off-camera and walked to and from their car to stash previously purchased product after every transaction. Nick Richards of Dill, Dill Carr Stonbraker & Hutchings P.C. in Denver is not affiliated with the case, but is involved in local cannabis law. He feels that businesses operating illegally should rightfully be shut down. “If the allegations of looping are true, then it is good for the legalized industry when those not following the rules are shut down,” Richards explained to CULTURE. “If true, then this type of policing is what is required under the United States Cole Memo. The Memo requires that state officials robustly enforce their state regulations. Absent [of] such enforcement, the Colorado industry would not be in compliance with federal guidelines that designate state legalize cannabis as a low priority for the United States Department of Justice.” While the Cole Memo may now be dead, this leaves the industry even more vulnerable to federal attacks if the state is not compliant. The affidavit alleges that the practice of looping took place at multiple Sweet Leaf locations, and it also alleges that employees at these locations either seemed aware of what was going on, or they never stopped or questioned the undercover officers when they made multiple purchases. It remains to be seen what will happen regarding the individual charges that the budtenders are facing, as well as the fate of the company in general. c

“If t he a l l ega t io ns o f l o o ping a r e t r ue, t hen it is g o o d f o r t he l ega l ized ind us t ry when t ho s e no t f o l l o wing t he r ul es a r e s hut d o wn. ”

The cannabis industry is easily one of the nation’s fastest growing career fields. Supported by the Vangst Talent Network, over 50 cannabis companies are looking to fill numerous positions for a variety of skill levels, from executive to entry level. Over 3,000 attendees are expected to be there. Companies include Verde Natural, Green Thumb Industries, Native Roots, Security Grade, Colorado Cannabis Company, Pure MMJ, Canna Security America, Marijuana Industry Group, IMPACT Network, Roots Rx, The Health Center, Simply Pure, Dress for Success and more. Those experienced in lab work, finance, sales, customer service, IT and marketing are all encouraged to attend. So dress for success, bring a few copies of your résumé and don’t forget to be confident! WHEN: Sat, Feb. 10 WHERE: EXDO Event Center, 1399 35th St., Denver WEBSITE: vangst. com/vangst-talentcareerfair


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

17


18

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

19


NEWS

LEGAL CORNER

Profits and Potential

Colorado’s cannabis industry could thrive i n c a p i ta l m a r k e t s By Dan Garfield, Attorney

M

oney. Everyone thinks cannabis businesses are swimming in it. Cannabis businesses, however, know better. For many reasons—federal illegality, IRC Code Section 280, licensing restrictions, cash-only businesses, etc.— cannabis businesses have struggled to raise capital. In Colorado, prior to the opening of retail stores in 2014, most businesses raised capital from friends and family or took high interest loans from private lenders. Many still do. In January 2017, licensed cannabis businesses in Colorado were finally permitted to have out-of-state owners (a maximum of 14), and private equity funds may now own up to 30 percent of a licensed business (no takers yet). Nevertheless, the capital markets in 2018 remain relatively closed to Colorado cannabis businesses. Banks unsurprisingly remain unwilling to lend, and out-of-state investors have often been stymied by a slowmoving and intrusive regulatory apparatus. These restrictive rules have caused cannabis companies to become creative, as best they can within the stringent rules of Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED). Because so many capital sources cannot (or will not) take equity in a licensed business that “touches the plant,” cannabis businesses sometimes form separate entities for their non-cannabis assets (such as real estate and intellectual property). But these structures create other problems, by making it difficult to spread risk, increasing legal and administrative costs, and confusing regulators and potential investors. Despite these creative “solutions,” however, only legislative fixes can truly open the capital markets for cannabis companies. 20

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

For some time, cannabis businesses have sought access to the public markets, as is the case in other states (e.g., California). Business owners have complained, with good reason, that Colorado is at risk of losing its status as a leader in the industry if they cannot access the public markets. When the Colorado General Assembly convened in early January, one of the first bills to be introduced in the Colorado House of Representatives was HB18-1011, which would, in addition to allowing an unlimited number of outof-state investors, allow for public company ownership, presumably beginning in 2019. One of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Dan Pabon, has been a champion for the industry in the legislature, but he is term-limited, and this will be his last year in the state House of Representatives. The bill would allow the MED to draft rules “substantively identical” to those in the gaming industry for ownership by public companies. This means not only would cannabis businesses be able to sell equity

“For some time, cannabis businesses have sought access to the public mark ets, as is the case in other states (e.g., California).”

stakes to public companies, but they would be permitted to trade on the public markets, including an initial public offering. Precedent exists for licensed cannabis companies to trade publicly and to own licensed cannabis businesses that “touch the plant.” Terra Tech, Inc., based in California, owns cultivation and production facilities and stores in California and Nevada. General Cannabis Corp., based in Colorado, has an ownership interest in an edible manufacturing facility in Arizona. Both companies trade on the OTC market. Imagine a public offering of one of the big chains in Colorado, such as LivWell or The Green Solution, which each sell tens of millions of dollars of cannabis each year. Such companies could be worth hundreds of millions of dollars, perhaps more, if traded publicly. Wouldn’t Wall Street jump at the chance to take these companies public? Would Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission let this happen? There is so much money at stake here, perhaps the prospect of publicly traded companies will be the impetus for Congress to deschedule cannabis. Appeals to justice don’t always lead to change in Washington, but profits and the potential for more often do. c


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

21


REVIEWs

company highlight

I n f u s i o n at its Finest BlueKudu goes above and beyond the edible industry s ta n d a r d

22

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


Andrew Schrot, CEO of BlueKudu

By Richard Saunders

T

he professionals behind BlueKudu consider themselves to be the “makers of the finest chocolate edibles in the world.” And it’s clear that Colorado’s adult-use and medical markets both benefit from the level of quality that BlueKudu consistently produces. CULTURE connected with Andrew Schrot, CEO of BlueKudu, to learn the story behind the company’s famed edibles. The road to the top hasn’t always been easy for Schrot, but it’s always been rewarding. BlueKudu was founded in 2011 after Schrot noticed there was a need for delicious, cannabis-infused chocolates that deliver both consistency and quality to consumers in the state of Colorado. “Our goal is to make sure our passion for chocolate and a consistent experience comes through in every delicious bite.” From cannabis- and coffee-infused fine chocolate to almond-topped chocolate bars, BlueKudu turns edibles up a notch in quality, thanks to the company’s focus on research and talent. “We did extensive research and came up with a wide variety of flavors that suit the American palate,” Schrot said. “Further, our Chef Emma Levy honed her skills at The French Pastry School and then went on to become Head Baker at the world-famous La Fournette & Café in Chicago. Emma has developed an unbeatable sense of flavor combinations, letting her experience and passion shine through in every chocolate edible we make.” BlueKudu offers adult-use and medicinal options to consumers across the state. Medical edibles can have a much higher potency. As BlueKudu looks into the possibility of expanding across state lines, it’s clear the company’s experience in the Colorado cannabis market for over six years will help them overcome this challenge. “As we look to expand into other states, each state has a unique set of regulations for infused product manufacturers,” Schrot added. “We have been through a number of changes with Colorado’s regulations over the past six years. We understand that there will always be changes to the industry’s regulations. The changes are a part of the business you must deal with as the industry evolves.” “Compliancy is our top priority,” Schrot emphasized. Being prepared to enter a rapidly evolving market is what Schrot would advise those who are interested in the edibles industry to focus on. Since market trends can change very quickly, your business plan should be flexible. It’s difficult to predict what the state of the cannabis

“We und er s ta nd t ha t t her e wil l a lwa ys be cha ng es t o t he ind us t ry ’s r eg ul a t io ns. The cha ng es a r e a pa r t o f t he bus ines s yo u mu s t d ea l wit h a s t he ind us t ry evo lves. ”

market will be in a year, let alone five years, however BlueKudu will continue to plan for the bright future ahead. “In 2018, we plan on entering other markets and introducing a lineup of new products along the way,” Schrot revealed. BlueKudu’s original product was a chocolate roll akin to a Tootsie Roll, and from there, the company expanded to focus on fine infused chocolates. Later on, the company increasingly developed doses that could be broken up into single servings, making them compliant with state laws. BlueKudu is a success story that anybody in the cannabis industry could learn from. “We are proud to be one of the original infused products manufacturers in Colorado,” Schrot added. “From day one, BlueKudu’s focus has been on producing products that the cannabis community has known to trust for its quality and consistency. BlueKudu will continue to highlight the positive and beneficial aspects of cannabis.” c

+ www.bluekudu.com

CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

23


REVIEWs

advocate highlight What’s your greatest achievement for the cannabis cause? I hope my greatest achievement is yet to come, but, when I left biotech to join Next Frontier Biosciences, I made a commitment to help people by developing new products for the cannabis industry.

Dorothy “Dot” Colagiovanni Occupation: Senior Director of Pharmaceutical Development, Next Frontier Biosciences

Tell us about your professional background. I am a scientist with a PhD in toxicology. I have over two decades of experience working in the biotech industry developing drugs for cystic fibrosis, oncology, infections and inflammation. In 2016, I joined Next Frontier Biosciences as the Senior Director of Pharmaceutical Development. When and how did you become an advocate for cannabis? My advocacy began when my son was placed on the organ transplant list. 24

He was born with a rare liver disease that required extensive medical care and maintenance. After a decade of living with his native liver, it began to fail, and in 2010 my son was placed on the pediatric transplant list in Colorado. There is no way to describe the despair I felt watching my son slowly dying in front of my eyes while waiting for someone else’s child to die so mine could live. Every day was a struggle to get out of bed and try to be a mom to our son and older daughter. Trying to manage a normal family life was

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

challenging as our son could not attend school due to risks of infection. He also required at-home nursing care and nightly IV food supplementation. In order to manage the depression and anxiety I was experiencing during this waiting period, I relied on cannabis. Every evening after the kids went to bed, I would take a bath and smoke a bowl. It was the only way I could cope with the overwhelming situation. It made me realize that consuming cannabis was perfect for situational depression and stress without any long-term consequences associated with many pharmaceutical medications. How has cannabis benefited your life? Cannabis helped me get through the most difficult time of my life. Cannabis is a stress-reducing medication for me. I am normally a very Type A, high intensity person. Cannabis helps me relax and unwind.

How did that manifest? After years of research and development, Next Frontier Biosciences [launched] its first line of medical and recreational cannabis products in Colorado. These products are transmucosally and topically delivered and include a nasal mist, sublingual spray and topical salve. Who do you look up to or admire? I admire the 14th Dalai Lama, a man who escaped his homeland of Tibet in 1959 to spiritually lead his people and can never return. He shows humility, compassion and humor in all he does and says. He is a beacon of hope to me in the current unhinged political environment. If you could change one thing about the way cannabis is viewed and/ or treated right now, what would it be? I would remove cannabis from DEA Scheduling. Cannabis is medicine that can heal many afflictions more safely than pharmaceutical drugs. It should be viewed as a benefit to society, rather than the scourge some politicians present it as. c


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

25


REVIEWs

strain, topical & concentrate

Symphony Bath Bombs Don’t have time or money to get to the spa? No problem! Treat yourself to Coda Signature’s infused bath bombs, and enjoy something that the spa can never deliver—pain and stress relief that comes from THC and CBD. Life is busy, stress is real and many of us are no stranger to chronic aches and pains. Thanks to Coda Signature’s Symphony Bath Bombs, that we got from The Farmers Market in Denver, we can all experience complete and total relaxation right at home. Coda’s Symphony Bath Bombs come in three different scents (labeled as uplift, balance and calm), which are made from all natural ingredients and essential oils, and each has 15mg of CO2 extracted CBD and THC oils. The giant jawbreaker-looking bath treats have a touch of dried flowers and herbs decorated on top that float around the tub as you soak, creating a chic spa vibe. Simply run a hot bath, drop the bath bomb into the tub, and watch it fizz as its enveloping scent invites you to chillville. About 15 minutes after the bath, our bodies felt heavy and extremely relaxed. We can’t wait for our next soak.

Available wherever: Body Essential by Coda Signature is carried.

Amethyst Shatter

Available at: Fire Meds in Colorado Springs

As we all know, the cannabis industry is booming. New products are introduced consistently, and it’s hard to keep up—so we love when new concentrates come our way. That’s just the case with this Amethyst Shatter from Top Hat Processing. The slice we received was a gorgeous deep purple color. When kept in the freezer, this product was easy to work with. The effect of this shatter was definitely something to write home about. The body effect was instantly heavy, and a short-lived euphoric motivation came with it, which eventually resulted in a stress-free daydreaming experience. A snowy Sunday afternoon in Denver was spent coloring and playing games. The sleep we experienced that night was what dreams are made of. This specific strain contains a high dose of THC and THCV. The latter can act as an anxiety reducer and appetite suppressant, which is great, because sometimes the munchies are exhausting and expensive.

Blue Raz 500mg Innovative minds in the industry are always coming up with new vaporizer technology, which is something fun to discover and test out with our staff. We tried Blue Raz 500mg cartridges by The Clear™. Solvent-free and contaminate-free oil is contained expertly in a stainless steel cartridge made from quartz, a ceramic coil and organic Japanese cotton. We charged her up and let her rip. The first hit was strong and tasted just like a blue raspberry slushy. We felt the effects almost instantly, and the subtle smell lingered in the air for quite sometime, which proposed the question of what terpenes were in fact used to create that fruity blue raz flavor and smell. At 85-92 percent THC, you’re sure to feel elevated from this offering. If you’re a classic cannabis consumer and prefer the taste of specific strains, then these flavored pens are going to provide you with a completely new experience. Overall, the pens were easy to use and produced a nice hit that created a satisfying effect.

Available wherever: The Clear™ products are carried.

Shark Bite OG Caviar Available at: The Joint by Cannabis in Denver.

26

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

Looking for the full Colorado cannasseur experience? Go get yourself some Gold Standard, DRAGON Originals Shark Bite OG Caviar from The Joint by Cannabis. For those of you who aren’t familiar, Caviar is flower that is dipped in oil and then rolled in kief. This specific variety we tried was slightly harsh upon inhale, yet had a smooth exhale. The flavor was rich, earthy and musky—it’s a smorgasbord of flavors, meaning the original taste of the flower can get lost a bit. It can be overkill if there are too many cannabis flavors, however, this creation still tasted better than tiny raw fish eggs, which share their name with this skunky smokable. The effect was extremely sedative while still producing enjoyable cerebral effects. This Caviar in particular would probably be best suited for an evening smoke or whenever ultimate relaxation is desired, because we sure didn’t get much done after partaking. Visit The Joint by Cannabis to check out their variety of DRAGON Caviar flavors to find which will work best for your next sesh.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

27


28

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

29


REVIEWs

For More Products Go To CultureMagazine.com

3. Easy Grinder

There is no easier way to grind cannabis. Traditional grinders are poorly designed, with no simple way of filling pre-rolls or bowls with finely ground cannabis without making a mess. The Easy Grinder, however, is here to end that struggle. It works electronically or manually, complete with LED lights, a magnetic seal and a manual crank. Just fill up to 2.5mg and dispense how much ground up cannabis you desire. The longer you press the button, the finer your herbs become. Large bulky grinders have become a thing of the past. Price: $99.99 More Information: www.easygrinder.com

1 1. Penis Hand Glass Pipe

Relax the jaw, tilt the head back, open the airway and show off your skills. The highly detailed Penis Hand Glass Pipe makes a great conversation-starter. Made by Empire Glassworks, the Penis Hand Glass Pipe is thick, heavy and is unlikely to shatter the first time you drop it. It’s a modest four inches long and comes in pink, purple or black. The carb is far enough away from the bowl, so you won’t burn your fingers when you take a hit like you would with cheaply designed pipes. Price: $50 More Information: www.empireglassworks.com 2. Fiera® Personal Care Device

Most people aren’t aware that the 1966 hit “Mellow Yellow” by Donovan was—by his own admission—about an electric banana-shaped vibrator. Sex toy technology has come a long, long way since the ’60s. The Fiera® Personal Care Device is a whole new concept developed by OB/ GYNs that applies gentle suction for stimulation. It is ideal for women who struggle with arousal or that want to increase intensity. If the conventional insertable vibrators of the past have left you unsatisfied, then Fiera® is the way to go. Whether it’s for yourself or a Valentine’s gift for your loved one, you can’t go wrong. Price: $199–249 More Information: shop.fiera.com

3

4

4. Puffco+

2

Dabbers rejoice! They call it the “first-ever pocket nail,” because the Puffco+ is a pen that literally comes with a ceramic nail that does just about everything a full-sized rig can do. There are no fragile coils that come with most other pens. Push the glowing cloud button five times, and take off into the stratosphere. Your hits will taste more like dabs than the metallic taste that is common in pens. This is not a pen that will fall apart within months, due to the quality of its design. Price: $99.99 More Information: www.puffco.com

CULTUREMAGAZINE.com GET YOUR CLICKS

30

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

HERE


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

31


REVIEWs

entertainment

Release Date: FEBRUARY 13 Available on: PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC

BOOK

Sinfully Sweet Cannabis Recipes Jenny and Rick Butler Pub. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform Ready to enhance your Valentine’s Day celebration with a little bit of romance and a whole lot of cannabis? Sinfully Sweet Cannabis Recipes is written by a husbandand-wife duo who know how to kick it up a notch when it comes to desserts. By infusing delicious desserts with the sweet gift of cannabis, one of these 75 recipes is sure to tickle your taste buds. You will find all the information you need to know about cooking with cannabis, from how to decarb cannabis to calculating proper THC dosing. A sinfully sweet future most certainly lies ahead. (Jacob Cannon)

32

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

GAME

Kingdom Come: Deliverance Dev. Warhorse Studios Pub. Deep Silver The fundamentals of role playing games are pretty standard (with elements like a hero who is labeled as “the chosen one” or the presence of an evil villain), but in Kingdom Come: Deliverance, you’re just a medieval soldier. The game takes a unique historical approach at medieval combat and life, allowing players to see through the eyes of an averagejoe soldier living in the 13th century Holy Roman Empire. Players get to wield classic weapons, wear a variety of armor sets, go on quests, ride horses, explore over 16 square kilometers of land and even listen to some period-relevant music on their journey. (Nicole Potter)

MUSIC MOVIE

IT Dir. Andy Muschietti Warner Bros. Pictures No novelist has had his or her work adapted to film as often as American horror writer Stephen King. Yet, in all of those dozens of movie adaptations very few have managed to make compelling cinema or, even at the very least, the original books justice. However, Director Andy Muschietti’s recent take on King’s clown monster classic, It, manages to not only build well upon its original material, but takes the terror to a whole new level. Featuring a cast of relative new comer child actors and a break-out performance by Bill Skarsgård as Pennywise the clown, It is a must see for anyone in need of a good scare. (Simon Weedn)

Dorothy Alice Kyle Emerson Guilty Pleasure Records If you’re looking for some psychedelicdriven, acoustic music to set the tone for a cloudy workday or a sunny drive toward the local mountains, Kyle Emerson has you covered. His musical career started in a local Denver psych group called Plum, and after the band dissolved, he went on to play his own moody, introspective version of trippy, offcenter folk. Dorothy Alice is the perfect debut album to set the tone for a long career. Some standout songs are the title track, and the catchy, short ballad entitled “Off the Road.” (Addison HerronWheeler)


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

33


34

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com By Robert Voets / Netflix


U n a b at e d A r t i s t r y

Kathy Bates is a versatile actress who shares all about her career, surviving breast cancer and how cannabis has brought her life full circle

Y

By Benjamin M. Adams

ou probably recognize her enduring performances from Misery, Fried Green Tomatoes, The Blind Side or one of the highest-grossing films of all time—Titanic. In television, her unparalleled career includes

American Horror Story, Six Feet Under, Two and a Half Men, The Stand, The Office and many more.

Kathy Bates’ incredible career in theater, film and television spans decades, recently earning her a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame—and fulfilling a childhood dream. The Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning actress, director and activist is currently starring as the lead character of Netflix’s Disjointed, a sitcom set inside a dispensary. Only now has Bates opened up about her own odyssey with medical cannabis to CULTURE—a journey that would lead her to portray Ruth Whitefeather Feldman, a seasoned cannabis activist who runs the fictional dispensary Ruth’s Alternative Caring. It was truly an honor for CULTURE to discuss cannabis, film and PostTraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with Bates.

What made you want to work on Disjointed? You know, it’s amazing how when our next 10 episodes dropped on Jan. 12, the timing couldn’t have been more prescient. We knew that things were coming, that [Prop. 64] had passed, and we were all really excited about it. Our show was just starting to begin shooting. We were thrilled. But now considering the fact that we’re getting pushed back, from the Attorney General specifically, it’s going to be a really fascinating journey between state and federal [laws]. What’s going on is the growers who have been there doing it for 60 years don’t want to suddenly be legislated. That’s what I’ve heard. You know, I think we’ll be okay, but I just don’t know if the government is going to start really playing dirty tricks, like muscling in on landlords. So it concerns me—and if there’s a fight, I’ll be right there on the frontline, because the more I’ve experimented, the more

I learn about it, even through the show, it has been a blast. I just really got interested in it as a two-time cancer survivor. I’ve used it to help with nausea and pain, so for me, it’s a real relief. I look at it like Prohibition from the ’20s, which didn’t work. I’m hoping that people will leave it alone. The other thing that bothers me is that they want to reinstate these draconian sentences for people in possession of a small amount of marijuana and send them away. It’s the close-mindedness, the lack of intelligence about marijuana. [Attorney General Jeff] Sessions was quoted as saying that they were, “OK, until I found out they smoked pot,”—but he was talking about the Ku Klux Klan for God’s sake! And that was the only reason he turned away from the Ku Klux Klan is because he learned they were smoking dope! I don’t fuckin’ get it. The bottom line? As you can see, I’ve grown a lot more passionate about the issue.

CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

35


In episode 3 of Disjointed, it’s revealed how the dispensary security guard, Carter, suffers from PTSD. The episode resonated with fans, especially those in the cannabis industry. Why do you think PTSD is such a hot issue? I think with the increased awareness of abuse in the last decade, which is now culminated with the pushback against sexual harassment—that those of us who were emotionally abused or were violated in any way—suffer from PTSD. And I think people have not been aware of it until the last few years. Or it hasn’t been out in the open. And I also think it has to do with what we learned about the soldiers coming back from Vietnam and now coming back from the Middle East. I would imagine the immigrants who are trying to find a new place to land and build a home are suffering from PTSD. It’s all over the world. One of the things that makes our show unique is that it’s not just all about laughter and jokes; it’s that storyline. It took a departure, and yet came from the scene of that dispensary and ultimately helped him with viewing with his PTSD, at least on a level to where he could function better during the day. And I think that it’s great to have something that makes you can laugh and cry at the same time. Almost anyone can relate with Ruth, because we all know someone like her who dresses like her and who decorates her living space with drapery, crystals and dream catchers. How did you prepare for the role of a dispensary owner? [Laughing] Well, I guess I went through a period of life like [that]. I’m sure back then I had a couple of dream catchers lying around. You could say it’s just been a natural preparation, for me, coming from a very straight-laced Southern lady wearing hose and gloves in the early ’60s and late ’50s to going into the Summer of Love and going to college and trying things for the first time. I mean, Jesus. I went from being very conservative—the whole nine yards, what we’d consider yuppie—and I became a full-fledged hippie. We were all screwing around all the time with different costumes we wanted to wear in public. And it was great fun. I miss those days. 38

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

By Robert Voets / Netflix


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

39


to find our footing in the first season. I’m hoping that the people who are now rushing out to buy marijuana and try it will get wind of our show, no pun intended. We’re living in dark times. So we could get heavy talking about the political side of it ad nauseam, but we need a break. I need a half an hour or five hours. I find myself binging on shows, just so that I can escape to another place. Have you ever felt like you were being judged for consuming cannabis? No, because until now, and doing press for our show, I really haven’t talked about it. So it will be interesting to see if anybody gives a shit whether I smoke or not. We’ll see what happens. You’ll visit me in jail, right? By Patrick Wymore / Netflix

I think that for Ruth, as an adolescent, to start hearing this call to her about this plant and its healing properties, I think that’s why she pushed herself to go to law school. But she never lost any of that, because her whole approach to marijuana is as a healing [aid]. She refers to her clients as patients. I’ve heard that Dr. Dina, who is our consultant, refers to her clients as patients. We’re used to going into a hotel room and putting drapes up and putting our things out. I remember working with an actress by the name of Elizabeth Ashley, early on in my career. She said, “Take everything with you, your pillows, your dogs, your pots and pans, to make it like home, because the road is really rough.” Recently, you’ve been very open about your battle with breast cancer, and it was not your first time facing cancer. Did you use medical cannabis to treat cancer and cancer medication side effects specifically? I used it for pain and nausea, instead of taking a painkiller like oxycodone or an opioid to ease the pain—I really couldn’t tolerate those things well. The thing that I like about marijuana is that you can regulate how stoned you want to get. You’re in control of that. And I think one of the things is, we’re not only going to have the feds fighting. “Big Pharma” is going to be 40

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

“I think with the increased awareness of abuse in the last decade, which is now culminated with the pushback against sexual harassment—that those of us who were emotionally abused or were violated in any way— suffer from PTSD.”

pouring millions of dollars through the lobbyists, because it’s a direct threat to the opioid market. Do you feel Disjointed is contributing to the perception of cannabis consumers and the cannabis industry? Well, you know, I hope we will. Right now, our audience is building, and I’m really excited about the next 10 episodes that [just came out]. I thought that it took us a few episodes

What is your favorite way to consume cannabis? I have two favorite ways. There’s an inhaler where you can buy cartridges. It’s PAX Pro. It’s real easy to use—you just slip in a cartridge and carry it with you and you can control the heat, you can control it from the phone app. And then I use a different vape. It’s Puffco. You put the wax in this little oven, you can control the heat. And you can put in shatter or whatever, but mainly wax. I find it’s really easy. The main thing I like about the vape delivery is that you can control it, because I don’t want to be blasted. I want to be able to just ease the pain. I suffer from hip pain and lower back pain. It really helps me. Of course, you know, I never get in my car having had dope. I think that’s incredibly irresponsible. I hope I don’t see people doing that, if they already aren’t. How do we put the amotivational theory to rest? Well, I think they ought to talk to some of the players in the NFL who are fighting the early onset of Alzheimer’s, CTE and other types of injuries and chronic pain. A lot of them now are switching to marijuana and getting off the opioids. It’s like anything else—it’s about awareness. I’m sure there are a lot of people out there who think it’s from the devil and who have closed minds about it. I say live and let live.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

41


“. . . If there’s a fight, I’ll be right there on the frontline, because the more I’ve experimented, the more I learn about it, even through the show—it has been a blast. I just really got interested in it as a two-time cancer survivor. I’ve used it to help with nausea and pain, so for me, it’s a real relief.” [Maclaine] flew all the way down here from Canada to be with me. I just worked with Billy Bob [Thornton]. He’s so sweet. And all of my family and friends.

By Robert Voets / Netflix

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce finally awarded you with a well-deserved star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2016. How did that feel? Well, it was especially cool because I had a picture of myself with my Aunt Lee that was taken there around 1960. In was in front of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. We had gone on a little tour out here. She and my grandmother lived out here, so we drove out here and spent some time with them. It’s a black and white photo of my Aunt Lee and me standing in front of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre back then. I put it on the cards to invite people to the event because my star is about 30 feet to the right of where we were standing. It was a bittersweet moment. I’m a breast cancer survivor. She died of breast cancer. It was long before they could really help her. I wish that she could have been there with me. It was a very special day for all of us. I was so grateful that Shirley

42

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

As a young pre-fame actress, did you always know deep down that one day you would become a star and that everyone would know your name? No. I was always very dramatic as a child. And then when I got seriously involved in training it was all about theater. I worked in regional theater companies. In the ’70s, we all were very snobby about doing television. I was very focused on the craft. I didn’t think about being a movie star. I just wanted to keep working and doing the best work I could do. So, it was a big surprise to get an Oscar. I didn’t plan to win an Oscar, even though it crosses every kid’s mind. What new projects are you currently working on? As a result of my breast cancer, I developed lymphedema. It’s swelling of glands that’s caused when you remove lymph glands that can move liquid through your body to be expelled. So as a result, the lymphs swelled. My doctor introduced me to someone who runs the Lymphatic Education & Research Network. For the last three years, I’ve been trying to raise awareness. Ten million people suffer from some sort of lymphatic disease. You can get it from an injury or it’s congenital. I just finished a film called On the Basis of Sex. It’s directed by Mimi Leder and stars Felicity Jones and Armie Hammer. It’s about the early days of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I’m very excited. c netflix.com/disjointed


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

43


“ T h e b e s t w ay t o ensure a flawless event of any sort is to hire reliable vendors who will go above and beyond e x p e c tat i o n s . ”

,

High-class vendors offer elegant services to couples who dream of cannabis weddings By Addison Herron-Wheeler

Lavish M at r i m o n y

Photography by Jewels

44

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

E

veryone has a vision for their special day. For some, it’s to be the blushing bride in white, the adoring betrothed standing amid a bouquet of fragrant flowers. For others, the pomp and circumstance doesn’t matter as much as the meaningful tradition of exchanging vows with their perfect partner. And for those of us who consider cannabis to be a meaningful, healing part of our lives, that special day can now involve that beloved herb. In states with legal cannabis, enthusiasts are living out their dreams with weddings curated around their tastes and styles— and including cannabis. In addition to premium cannabis products and the opportunity to imbibe them in style, these weddings also offer the same amenities as any classic wedding—lovely scenery and setting, pristine decorations and an overall gorgeous, high-end aesthetic. CULTURE spoke with a few of the vendors who make these types of weddings possible, in order to find out what it takes to have a beautiful cannabis-friendly wedding, and how they make it a reality for engaged couples across the nation.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

45


A ly s s a U f e r , K aya E v e n t D e s i g n s “It is important to hire vendors who are familiar with cannabis regulations. Having a knowledgeable event team to guide you along the way is imperative to having a safe and compliant event.”

“I love highlighting the natural beauty of the plant. Both leaves and flower can be added to the floral, table settings, favors and more! There are so many ways to get creative and have fun incorporating cannabis in weddings. Many people are intrigued by, but weary of, cannabis. Weddings offer a safe and comfortable environment for them to experiment.”

J e w e l s G r ay, Photography by Jewels “I love the way the buds and leaves photograph. They’re so interesting, and I love lots of texture in bouquets!”

“Cannabis weddings are a blast to photograph, and I love how the guests respond to the unique ways it is incorporated. We are so lucky to be able to share this with people who aren’t exposed to it on a daily basis, and it’s fun watching their reactions”

46

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

47


N ata s h a W i l l i a m s , C l o c k T o w e r E v e n t s “Our unique venue offers cannabis enthusiasts the opportunity to be able to experience the amazing mountain views and the city skyline from the top of the historic Daniels and Fisher Clock Tower. Clock Tower Events is a five-floor venue with two amazing balconies that wrap around the building; guests immediately gravitate to them to take it all in. Our space allows guests to legally consume cannabis responsibly in a private venue not accessible by the public. The sky’s the limit as far as creativity goes for events here.”

Ashley Schriener, Fluorescence “The best way to ensure a flawless event of any sort is to hire reliable vendors who will go above and beyond expectations. For a cannabis wedding, staying compliant and legal is key!”

“As a florist, it’s fun to incorporate cannabis flowers in unique ways. It’s not a plant we get to play with often and adds a beauty, texture and fragrance unlike anything else.”

Andrew Mieure, Top Shelf Budtending “There are a few very important words of advice to those who are trying to book a cannabis-friendly wedding venue. First off, they are actually pretty darn rare. Cannabis-friendly wedding venues change their mind about their policy on cannabis nearly every month. My suggestion to someone looking for venues would be to discover all cannabis-friendly wedding planners and ancillary service providers in the cannabis space.” 48

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

49


B r a d H a r r i s , V i c e P r e s i d e n t o f R e ta i l O p e r at i o n s , T h e J o i n t b y C a n n a b i s “The Joint by Cannabis caters to both adult-use cannabis consumers as well as medical patients. Conveniently located in Denver’s Highlands neighborhood, The Joint is a premium destination for all your cannabis needs, without the premium price tag. We carry over 50 strains of high quality, locally grown cannabis and a wide variety of concentrates, edibles, topicals and other infused products and accessories.” “The Joint by cannabis provides unparalleled customer service, product selection and competitive prices. Our dedicated staff work hard to ensure every customer leaves satisfied with his or her product selection and shopping experience. Don’t just take our word for it, The Joint by Cannabis was voted the No 1. Dispensary in Colorado by Leafly Readers and has a 4.9 out of 5 rating on Weedmaps.”

Breanna Kirtland, Owner, Fluorescence “The best support you can offer to a couple preparing for their wedding is a solid game plan and clear communication the entire way through. This way both parties know what to expect on the big day!”

Greg Schriener, General Manager, HMI/Dragon Originals “Herbal Medical Institute produces and markets DRAGON Original products for both medical and recreational dispensaries. DRAGON Original’s product family begins with and features a line fine hash oils. We were also the first company in Colorado to commercially produce Caviar (starting in 2011) and our Dragon Caviar is still the top-selling brand today!” “What makes DRAGON Originals stand out is our commitment to our clients, and especially to their customers—the consumer. Our mission is to provide premium quality products, at a fair price, for both recreational cannabis enthusiasts and medical cannabis patients. DRAGON Original products are handcrafted with loving care and sold with a satisfaction guaranteed.”

50

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

51


Ge t t i n g I n T o u c h A s h l e y M a n ta u s e s c a n n a b i s t o g u i d e h e r c l i e n t s t o m o r e s at i s f y i n g a n d m e a n i n g f u l s e x u a l e x p e r i e n c e s By R. Scott Rappold

C

annabis and sex—they are two things that go great together. But in an industry that's becoming more nuanced by the day, cannabis can have many uses in the bedroom beyond simply smoking a joint and turning out the lights. Just ask Ashley Manta, the 31-year-old founder of CannaSexual, who is on a mission to show the world how cannabis can help conquer sexual difficulties and lead to a more satisfying sex life. “In terms of the totality of the potential, I don’t think people give [cannabis] enough thought. We generally operate in a very narrow construct of what sex and sexuality look like, largely based on what we see in porn,” said Manta, a self-described “bubbly buxom blonde” who isn’t shy about sharing her own sexual experiences with the world.

B.

Based on Experience

Manta has been working as a sex counselor for a decade, though she was a late-comer to cannabis, first consuming it “on purpose” when she was 23. She discovered the cannabis stereotype was just that; she’d met people with PhDs who consumed it regularly. In 2013, Manta moved to California and visited a dispensary for the first time. Around this time, she also had her first pleasurable intercourse in a decade. This is because she was facing trauma from being raped a decade before. Cannabis played an important role in relaxing her for the experience and allowing her to feel pleasure instead of pain from penetration. She began to shift the focus of her counseling from sexual violence to enhancing pleasure, with a short stint as a phone sex operator on the way. And she found her niche by offering what few other counselors would—showing individual people and couples how cannabis could enhance their sex lives. Cannabis can awaken, rather than dull, the senses. So around 2015 Manta set out to discover how the plant could enhance sexuality in ways other substances could not.

A.

Awareness, Mindfulness, Communication and Cannabis

If you take one of Manta’s classes or book a private session, the first thing you’ll learn about is communication by staring into your partner’s eyes wordlessly for two minutes. Most people, she says, don’t know how to do it when it comes to sex. “People don’t know how to ask for what they need. They don’t know how to negotiate in the bedroom. People have shame about the bodies, about things they are into, about enjoying pleasure,” she said. “I really kind of help figure out what it is they’re missing or what’s holding them back, using a combination of

52

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com Photo by Nikolay Mikheev

awareness, mindfulness, communication and cannabis to start to adjust these things.” And cannabis can help in many ways. Say someone gets nervous about sexual performance? She might suggest a strain high in CBD to help calm them. Maybe a woman experiences pain with penetration? She suggests cannabis oils combined with toys and gentle touching. Or maybe it’s stress from work, life or a past traumatic sexual experience? “Stress is such an arousal killer and being able to take enough stress away that you can have a pleasurable experience, by yourself or with a partner, is one of the main benefits of cannabis, to get you out of your head and into your body.” She does most of her counseling in Southern California, as well as in Denver, Colorado, but is willing to travel wherever (given the clients provide travel expenses). Manta also writes for several publications, makes media appearances and is never shy about sharing her own sexual exploits to her thousands of Twitter and Instagram followers, so they know the things she suggests have already been tried—by her. Manta is also in the process of developing her own line of sex toys and products. “I want to be an educational resource and a lifestyle brand,” she said. The one wild card, of course, is that cannabis affects every person differently, so it’s often a journey of discovery with clients, sometimes trial and error. “What works for me and my body may not work well for you and your body,” she said. “My approach is, if this is a thing you are curious about, I can help you do that better. If it’s not your thing, you can still have amazing sex.” c

+ www.ashleymanta.com/cannasexual


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

53


How did you get started doing drag? Shaving. That’s how everyone should get started! Just kidding! For me it’s all about music. I started doing mixes for the local girls I admired. I had always wanted to perform in drag, but was enamored and blown away by the talent in Denver. It was daunting. Then I realized that I had something different. I’m a singer, songwriter, pianist and music producer. I figured with that, plus drive and passion, I would be able to impress my own crowd of fans as well. Who are some of your biggest influences? The singers and live performers. Adore Delano, Courtney Act, Alaska [Thunderfuck] and of course RuPaul.

Dashing and Daring L a d y S at i va l e t s h e r h a i r d o w n a n d g e t s r e a l w i t h C U LT U R E

I

By Addison Herron-Wheeler

t has been long established that the cannabis culture lifestyle is not just about heterosexual men gazing longingly at ladies taking bong hits in bikinis. Cannabis is also a major part of life for women, many alternative cultures and the LGBTQ community. And since it is a huge staple of queer culture, cannabis and drag go hand-in-hand. After all, what better way is there to relax before going in front of a crowd, ease the pain from wearing pump heels and generally set a good vibe? Lady Sativa, also known as Damien Dane, identifies as male by day, but by night, often slips into the drag persona of a tough but lovable chick who adores herb and wears her hair high. In honor of February being about all things sexy, CULTURE spoke with Denver’s resident drag queen Lady Sativa about drag, creative projects and her enthusiasm for cannabis.

54

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

How do you describe your style? Maladjusted Motorcycle Mohawk Mom. Like Cher in Mask, just with a lot more paint and a lot less dirt. My paint would be more described as “the blind stabbings of a lucky loser.” How do you feel about the drag scene locally and nationally? I wish I could say I paid more attention to it. I honestly have learned a great chunk of peace by not letting it affect me and not trying to affect it, locally or nationally. I’m focused on people more than drag queens, and I think that’s why I’m truly happy with my drag. What are your plans for 2018? Anything you’d like to announce? Porno: The Musical will be finished this year. I’m finished writing the music for this project, which has been bubbling for two years, and now having found an amazing scriptwriter, I’m elated to get it finished and see it produced and performed! I’m in a movie too. I have a great mentoring show idea, but that’s all I’ll say right

now. It’s going to be a big year of very unexpected evolution. How has cannabis affected your life and/or your creative process? I smoked right before I made the shaving joke! But, truly, cannabis literally erases the anxiety out of the creative process, thereby opening the doors, the windows and sometimes the roof of my creative energy. Anxiety is fear. It is the killer of art. Knowing that, I believe cannabis saves otherwise unrealized art. How do you feel about legalization so far? Is there anything you think could be done better or differently? To quote Hillary Clinton, “I just don’t want to move backwards.” Have you ever worked cannabis into your music as a theme? If so, how? It is the focus of many of my songs, indeed! “What You Need is a Blunt” gets requested quite a bit! Is there anything else you’d like to add? I just want us to focus on what makes us the same rather than what makes us different, in the drag community and in the world. George Carlin does bits about what makes us the same. They are hilarious, but they are great reminders. Have you ever gone into a room and you have no idea why you’re in there? Of course you have. We all have. That’s because we’re all the same. I’m no better than you; you’re no better than me. I’m Lady Sativa and so are you. Nugs and kisses! c

Don’t Miss Lady Sativa’s Lingerie Lounge Competition Drag Show. Occurs every fourth Monday at Herb’s, 2057 Larimer St., Denver.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

55


L e t ’s Ta l k S e x

From cuddles to cannabis, podcast Co-host C h r i s t i n a H e p b u r n i s c o u r a g e o u s ly c a n d i d By Carl Kozlowski

C

hristina Hepburn is one woman who knows what she wants out of life and isn’t afraid to pursue it, especially when it comes to the arena of sexuality. As the co-creator and co-host of the popular podcast “T&A Talk Sex,” she’s known on-air as “T” because of her amply gifted bosom, and she dispenses a wide range of information on sex and relationships from an

56

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

Photos by Jonathan Saunders

informed yet often hilarious perspective. That’s because Hepburn is also one of the Los Angeles comedy scene’s most vibrant rising stars, having starred, co-written and directed dozens of shorts for the “AutocorrectFU” web series, which based comic scenarios around actual screwed-up text conversations and was selected by Funny Or Die as the new show of the month to discover last April. She’s also a frequent presence at The Comedy Store and other notable stages across the city.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

57


“‘T&A’ is a show that talks about taboo topics with humor and good information. For me, the show was about using my voice as a woman to talk freely about sexuality in our culture,” Hepburn told CULTURE. “To discuss taboo topics without judgment or shame, to act as a symbol to other women who don’t feel entitled to have a healthy sexuality, and to influence our current culture’s perspective on sex in our lives.” “We had a slogan that says ‘Because sex isn’t ever just about sex,’ and we say that because sex acts as the fastest access point to your emotional health, 58

physical health and your relationships to others. We use sex as a lens to selfimprovement.” Among the taboos that Hepburn has discussed on the program are BDSM clubs, anal sex, sex work, polyamory and open relationships, and how she and her co-host came to love giving blow jobs. She is determined to break societal repression that renders female orgasms controversial, and her surprising hope is that “more people have slower, longer sex.” Hepburn is also a certified professional cuddlist, a gig in which she has learned to give

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

and receive the value of nonerotic touch to heal the human mind and spirit. While many initially scoffed at the field, she likens it to the simple act of making others feel better by smiling at them. “When people talk about impact with another person on the street, you smile and they smile, and it’s a pay it forward effect,” says Hepburn. “You have the power to bring healing with non-sexual touch.” “Even with sex, for example, one has the power to make a man or woman have physical spasms of arousal and pleasure past the moment of touching them. That shows the impact of sex on another person—it’s deep, profound, and it’s lasting.” “Personally, with sex, I like to be played like a musical instrument,” she adds. “We are inherently musical as humans. There’s rhythm and pacing, speeding up and slowing down, there’s arousal, and it’s musical—it’s like a music score.” A New Orleans native who broke into working in radio during college in New York City, Hepburn has also found that cannabis can be a key component in heightening sexual pleasure. And she’s not just talking about the obvious joy of smoking a joint and then having a romp, either. “I’ve had that experience, and it does create a euphoric buzz; it’s really fun,” she said. “I’ve been turned onto marijuana lubricant lately, because a wonderful woman named Ashley Manta first talked about it in the first year on our podcast, and it was always on my mind,” added Hepburn. “Finally someone gifted me a tube of it, I used it, and it’s absolutely magical and fun. You don’t get high from it all over your body, but feel an intensity in your genitals. In the vulva area, it’s like a throbbing in a good way, a throbbing intensity of pleasure. It will break a latex condom, so be warned, but other than that, it’s a great treat to experiment and play with.” c

“I’ve been turned onto marijuana lubricant l at e ly, because a wonderful woman named A s h l e y M a n ta f i r s t ta l k e d about it in the first year on our p o d c a s t, and it was a l w ay s o n m y mind.”

+

www.TATalkSex.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

59


culture

Romantic and Rousing

growing

Chef J’s experience as a professional chef has led him to c r e at i n g u n i q u e h i g h dining experiences By Amy C. Witt

COURAGE

à

la

carte

L

IN

+ www.chefj.com

P RO F ILE

“ I t ’ s a b o u t c r e at i n g a m o o d . Y o u r f e e l i n g s w i l l e l e vat e w h at m o o d y o u c h o o s e t o c r e at e . ”

60

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

ove, food and cannabis are inexorably linked—a diverse variety of complex hormonal reactions that affect our emotional feelings and attachments. Just like Sour Dream or Green Crack, which are euphoric and calming while taking you on sexual adventures, other herbs, foods and ingredients like cacao and magnesium have the same effect. In-kind, Jason Harley, also known as Chef J, and his company OG KITCHEN are combining cannabis and haute cuisine to produce an unforgettably luxurious and cerebral experience. With over 20 years as a private chef, successful restaurateur and entrepreneur, Chef J is taking infused cannabis cuisine to the next level. For many years of his career, he has been hosting glamorous haute cuisine parties and dinners for A-list celebrities, royal families and high profile businesspeople all over the world. With the legalization of cannabis in California this year, Chef J was inspired to marry his love for cannabis and signature healthy cooking style and established his business, OG KITCHEN. “It’s about creating a mood. Your feelings will elevate what mood you choose to create,” Chef J smiled as he explained that he guarantees he will satisfy your taste buds while simultaneously letting your body adventure to a comfortable and exciting new heights.


Based out of Los Angeles, California, OG KITCHEN is an edible cannabis and commercial event company on a mission to provide only the healthiest and most delicious alternative forms of medication and entertainment. All foods and ingredients, including cannabis are compliant, organic, pesticide-free and sourced from local farmers and growers. “OG KITCHEN keeps tabs on the process as the flowers make their way through the closed-loop ecosystem from the farm to table,” Chef J told CULTURE. This Valentine’s Day, OG KITCHEN is hosting an elaborate lover’s affair as Chef J showcases his spin on elevated revamped cuisine. A soldout, private invite-only event, cannasseurs will enjoy a curated menu tailored around pairing only the best and tastiest sativas and indicas with a variety of earthy, citrus and herbal notes around a dazzling luxurious table in an undisclosed mansion in Beverly Hills. While indulging in the different tastes, smells and textures of the dishes, each person gets an average of 70mg of THC and CBD spread throughout the meal, with each course at 10mg. For starters, guests will enjoy a CBD isolated beverage for relaxation, followed by a hors d’ oeuvres paired with a sativa smoke. The first course, something like light lobster bisque with sherry and canna cream drizzle will create a savory amount of pleasure smoked with a hybrid strain joint. A dab to clear the palate, and you will be ready to enjoy the second course. The third course will feature a combination of vegetables and meat, along with an indica strain to chill and prepare to satiate the sweet tooth for the fourth course, dessert.

To heighten the bright party, dessert by OG KITCHEN’S will conclude the meal. At this Valentine’s Day event, Chef J will be serving his newest “Truffles D’ Cannabis” specialty gourmet chocolates. Dosed for pleasure with the world’s most potent natural stimulants, three truffles contain a boost of aphrodisiac herbs and 10mg of THC from the cleanest cannabis and made from the highest-grade FDA-approved herbs that are wild harvested or organically grown in the countries of their origin. Not only will guests enjoy a decadent dinner, they will not leave emptyhanded. Goodie bags are always a welcomed surprise, and cannaseurss will leave with a JRollz pre-roll. Chef J has created an in-house mixed recipe for his premium handcrafted award-winning pre-roll line, JRollz. Known for #holdthetrim, JRollz, a seed-to-sale brand, takes pride in growing top-shelf cannabis while only grinding and rolling bud to create their flower, wax and kief joints. Winning third at the Blazers Cup 2017, JRollz’s High Octane OG pre-roll is filled with an indica, cloneonly strain High Octane OG, also known as Heirloom OG, which provides an extra dose of relaxation while leaving a smooth pungent flavor on the palate. Other pre-rolls like Girl Scout Cookies, Candy Jack and XXX OG are also available. “We strive to create amazing experiences through our edible line, cannabis dinner, events and ever changing smokable products,” he said. The intimacy and ambiance that Chef J creates is born from good intentions, a permanent love and connection with the cannabis community and freed inhibitions over a heartfelt meal. c

G e t a ta s t e o f Chef J’s special Va l e n t i n e ’ s D ay cookies Sexy Ginseng Chocolate Cookies 2.5 dozen servings Ingredients: 1 1/4 cups cannabutter, room temperature 2 cups sugar 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 3/4 cup Dutch process cocoa powder

2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon Indian ginseng 1/2 teaspoon salt Powdered sugar, for garnish

Instructions: 1. In a large bowl, add the butter and sugar and cream together with a handmixer. Add the eggs and vanilla extract to the creamed mixture and mix until combined. 2. In a medium bowl, mix the cocoa powder, flour, baking soda, ginseng and salt. Slowly add the dry ingredients and continue mixing until incorporated. 3. Roll the dough into 2 logs that are about 2-inches high and 1 foot long. Wrap them in waxed paper and place in the refrigerator for 2 hours. 4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 5. Once thoroughly chilled, slice the cookies into 1/2-inch thick rounds and cover with sanding sugar. 6. Place on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet and bake for 10 minutes. 7. Remove to a wire rack to cool.

Chef J’s Cooking Tips • Don’t heat butters or oils too high. You will cook off the THC before you can even use the product. Make sure to use proper thermometers and know your temperatures. • It’s very important you weigh properly to use the right dosage. Not using the correct dosage will affect the food, consumer and experience.

CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

61


culture growing carte la à COURAGE IN P RO F ILE 62

Lessons from a Hawaiian Garden Pa r t 1 By Ed Rosenthal Hawaii is fabled for its fine cannabis. I attended the Hawaii Cannabis Expo in February 2017 in Oahu. I expected to sample some fine entries, and I was not disappointed. The intense sun at latitude 21° (for reference, Key West, Florida is latitude 24°) and the mild island weather create great cultivation environments. I wasn’t a judge when I attended last year, but I did try many of the varieties of cannabis. The samples included several fine sativa and indica-sativa hybrids, which do especially well under the intense sun and are genetically inclined to resist flowering under short days. However, there was better to be had. I was innocently hanging outside the Blaisdell Center in Honolulu where the conference was held, and I was invited to join a small circle of newfound friends. A fellow named Dustin pulled out an extra-wide pre-roll. I understood immediately that he was a successful grower who was confident of his product’s quality. The mildness of the draw, combined with the fine terpenes and high levels of THC and I suspect, THCV, was a recipe for pleasure-creation and key to mind opening awareness and creativity. It was proof that cannabis liberates the wandering mind opening it to emotion, love and beauty. This was certainly excellent weed. Until Hawaii legalized cultivation of medical cannabis,

outdoor growing was policed heavily by law enforcement. Happily, following legalization, the gardens have moved to backyards and other domesticated spaces. Hawaii has a climate similar to some low latitude areas of the U.S. such as Florida, portions of the gulf coast and southern California. It stays warm enough and gets enough light to support plant growth throughout the year. The problem is dealing with day length. The closer a place is to the equator, the smaller the difference between summer and winter light and dark hours. On June 21, the longest day of the year, there is 13 hours and 25 minutes of light. On Dec. 21, the shortest day, there is 10 hours and 51 minutes of light. Cannabis is a short-day plant that chemically measures the number of hours of uninterrupted darkness to determine when to begin to flower. Most varieties require 11 hours or less of darkness to flower. When a plant is placed outdoors under natural light regimen any time in Hawaii, they begin to flower no matter the season. I saw just two gardens while I was there. The plants were in vegetative growth, filling out a bit before they were allowed to flower. This was accomplished simply by using strategically placed fluorescent lights around the garden that were kept on all night. Once the plants grow to desired size the lights are turned off and the plants initiate flowering. Next month, harvest! c

Copyright by Ed Rosenthal. All rights are reserved. First North American Magazine rights only are assigned to culture Magazine. No other reproduction of this material is permitted without the specific written permission of the author/copyright holder.

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

Jared, a breeder from Pakalo Seed Company, in the trial garden.

Some of the plants were placed in large containers, while others were in the ground and irrigated using drippers off of irrigation hose.

Some of the plants that were not close to the lights began to flower after they grew past taller than the lights’ reflection.

The fluorescent lights were kept on all night to prevent flowering so plants could get to a larger size.

A view of the garden. Jared selects plants for breeding from several gardens. Each patient is allowed 10 plants. Varieties include Molokai G13, 13 Gorillas and Auntie’s Pie, Molokai Killahs and Crackseed.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

63


growing

culture

Robert Pearce

P RO F ILE

IN

COURAGE

à

la

carte

Age: 35

64

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

Condition/Illness: Bipolar disorder, anxiety, depression and substance abuse disorder Consuming medical cannabis since: 2012 

Why did you start consuming cannabis? I started using cannabis in social situations and quickly realized that it helped me with my anxiety in those same social situations. When I’m depressed it lifts me up. When I’m manic it helps slow my brain down. Did you try other methods or treatments before cannabis? Yes I’ve tried all kinds of pharmaceuticals, but nothing works like pot.

What’s the most important issue or problem facing medical cannabis patients? Discrimination. I think it will be a long time before a medical marijuana prescription will be looked at the same way as traditional pharmacology. If you don’t think so, go to [a behavioral health agency] and participate in their treatment program with an Oregon Medical Marijuana Program card, and see what they say. What do you say to those who are skeptical about cannabis as medicine? They are entitled to their opinions, but don’t knock it till you try it. c

Are you an medical cannabis patient with a compelling story to tell? If so, we want to hear from you. Email your name, contact information and details about your experiences with medical cannabis to courage@ireadculture.com.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

65


News of the

Weird

By the Editors at Andrews McMeel

LEAD STORY— AWWWWWWWW When five-year-old TyLon Pittman of Byram, Mississippi, saw the Grinch stealing Christmas on Dec. 16 on TV, he did what any civic-minded citizen would do. He called 911. TyLon told Byram police officer Lauren Develle, who answered the call, that he did not want the Grinch to come steal his Christmas, reported the Clarion Ledger. Develle made TyLon an honorary junior officer and had him come down to the station on Dec. 18 to help her lock away the Grinch, who hung his head as TyLon asked him, “Why are you stealing Christmas?” Although the green fiend apologized, TyLon wouldn’t release him from the holding cell. Police chief Luke Thompson told TyLon to come back when he’s 21, “and I’m going to give you a job application, OK?” WRONG PLACE, WRONG TIME In Gilgandra, New South Wales, Australia, on Nov. 29, sheep shearer Casey Barnes was tramping down wool, and her father and boyfriend were working nearby, when her long, curly hair became caught in a belt-driven motor. Horrifically, the motor ripped her scalp off from the back of her head to above her eyes and ears. Barnes was flown to Sydney, where doctors performed an emergency 20-hour surgery to save her scalp, but were ultimately 66

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

unsuccessful. Barnes will have artificial skin attached to her head instead, reports The Sun. A GoFundMe page has been established to help with her medical bills. AN ENGAGED CITIZENRY Pam Bisanti, a 31-year resident of Mount Dora, Florida, has approached the city council more than once about the speeding traffic along Clayton Street, where she lives. On Nov. 27, Bisanti made good on her threat to take matters into her own hands if the council didn’t by wielding a handmade sign reading “SLOW DOWN” as she stood next to the roadway during rush hour wearing her pajamas and robe. “The mothers up the street who send their kids down to the bus stop should have every expectation that those kids will be able to cross Clayton without being killed,” Bisanti told the Daily Commercial, saying she plans to continue her protest until the city takes action. “I am frustrated, angry and fed up. There needs to be a solution sooner than later. Remember that vision of me in my pajamas,” she added. UNCLEAR ON THE CONCEPT Melissa Allen, 32, was arrested on Dec. 19 after attempting to shoplift more than $1,000 in merchandise from a Framingham, Massachusetts, Target store, reported The Boston Globe. On hand to help in the arrest were more than 50 police officers who were at the store to participate in the annual “Shop With a Cop” holiday charity event. ALARMING ANIMAL North Fort Myers, Florida, homeowner Joanie Mathews was terrorized for


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

67


hours on Nov. 14 by a large pig that wandered into her yard overnight and spent the day destroying the lawn and biting Mathews three times before trapping her in the cab of her truck. “She would circle the truck ... and I would jump in the back seat and I was like ‘Go away, pig!” Mathews told NBC-2 TV. Mathews finally called law enforcement, and it took three Lee County sheriff’s officers to wrangle the testy porker. “It was just hilarious because the pig fought them every which way,” Mathews said. No one, at press time, had stepped forward to claim the pig. FAMILY VALUES Mazen Dayem, 36, of Staten Island, New York, obtained a restraining order against his father-

68

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com

in-law, Yunes Doleh, 62, in September after Doleh repeatedly tormented him by waving his hairpiece at Dayem, provoking Dayem’s greatest phobia— the Tasmanian Devil of Looney Tunes fame. Not easily deterred, Doleh was arrested on Nov. 5 for violating the order after he “removed his wig (and) made hand gestures” at a funeral the two attended, Dayem explained to the New York Post. “It’s just a very large fear of mine, his damn wig . . . I have nightmares.” Court papers say Doleh “proceeded to grimace, snarl, gurn and gesticulate.” He was charged with criminal mischief in Staten Island County court, and then sued his son-in-law for defamation after photos from the arrest appeared on social media.


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

69


70

FEBRUARY 2018 CultureMagazine.com


CultureMagazine.com

FEBRUARY 2018

71


Profile for Culture Magazine

Culture Magazine Colorado February 2018  

Culture Magazine Colorado February 2018