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CANADIAN ARCHITECT may/18

Governor General’s Award

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may/18 v.63 n.05


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64 Saint-Laurent Sports Complex

06 VIEWPOINT

Young Architect, and Emerging Architectural Practice awards; plus RAIC news, and a message from incoming RAIC president and CEO Mike Brennan.

09 NEWS

New projects across Canada; celebrating the winners of the Ontario Association of Architects awards.

80 CALENDAR

17 RAIC JOURNAL

The Indian Residential Schools Hisotry and Dialogue Centre opens in Vancouver. TEXT Haley Lewis.

Profiles of the 2018 RAIC award winners: Architectural Firm,

Design-related events across Canada and around the world.

82 BACKPAGE

DOUBLESPACE

 ort McMurray International 40 F Airport

 ort York Visitor Centre 52 F

56 Rabbit Snare Gorge

JAMES BRITTAIN

PAWEL KARWOWSKI

RAYMOND CHOW

60 B  orden Park Pavilion

Architectural awards need to pay more attention to the actual architecture. TEXT Adele Weder

36 Casey House

48 T  wo Hulls House

OLIVIER BLOUIN

44 M  aison de la littérature

EMA PETER

DOUBLESPACE

 tade de Soccer de Montréal 32 S

GREG RICHARDSON

DOUBLESPACE-

28 Audain Art Museum

TOM ARBAN

JAMES DOW

OLIVIER BLOUIN

2018 GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDALS

 ichal and Renata Hornstein 68 M Pavilion for Peace

72 P  arallelogram House

Saint-Laurent Sports Complex, by Saucier + Perrotte Architectes, with Les Environs art installation by artist Mathieu Gaudet.

COVER

V.63 N.00 THE NATIONAL REVIEW OF DESIGN AND PRACTICE / THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE RAIC

03

CANADIAN ARCHITECT

MAY 2018


CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/18

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VIEWPOINT

­­EDITOR (2017-2018) ADELE WEDER, HON. MRAIC

The 1970 edition of our journal showcased the Massey Medals, the most prestigious architectural awards of their day. The jury’s selection prompted managing editor Robert Gretton’s exhortion to future jurors to “touch every building” on their shortlists to come up with better-informed evaluations.

LEFT

A modest proposal for architecture awards: make the judges experience the architecture. More than we care to admit, architecture is partly a trick of the light. Much depends on the timing and context of your interaction with it and the medium through which it is delivered— the medium being paper or pixels more often than bricks and mortar. Architects across the country regularly submit images and textual explanations of their best work to multiple awards programmes. It’s becoming a crowded industry, and some awards are rather inconsequential. Others, like the provincial and national awards that we are proudly reporting on over the following pages, bring with them a large degree of credibility as well as publicity and prestige. But in most cases, there is one commonality: they permit architectural evaluation based on simulacra. Even at the highest levels, very few projects can be visited in person by all the members of any given jury; several projects that make the shortlists and podiums—particularly those in remote locales or foreign countries—might not have been visited in person by even a single juror. In these cases, the architecture is not judged by the primordial experience of walking in and around it, but by flattering photography, drawings and texts explaining how well—in theory—the building works. You know that’s not enough. This problem isn’t new: the November 1970 cover of The Canadian Architect, devoted to the Massey Medals in architecture, was emblazoned with this tagline: “If you failed to win this medal, turn to page 27.” On that page, managing editor Robert Gretton bewailed the results of that year’s medal selection, which he deemed to include some certifiable mediocrities while excluding obvious masterpieces. And then he offered this proviso: “It is very evident that after this year, it should be mandatory for every member of the jury to touch every building selected as a finalist with his fingertips.” Italics his.

Despite Gretton’s plea, there are still very few architectural adjudications that insist on this firsthand evaluation. Since 1970, photography and digital renderings have become exponentially more sophisticated and lifelike. On one hand, you could argue that such verisimilitude reduces the need to evaluate the buildings in person. On the other hand, it makes in-person evaluation all the more necessary: video flythroughs, digital renderings and carefully photoshopped images—relentlessly delivered via Instagram and other channels—can delude us into thinking that we’re experiencing a building. It is precisely because architecture has become such an intensely visual commodity that the walk-through is so important. It’s no secret that architectural awards are in danger of becoming more like photography competitions. Post-production work—once frowned upon and now widely acceptable—can significantly alter the look of a building and its apparent design qualities. The bestowing of an award on a remote, unvisited work of architecture is a leap of faith, an adjudicatory gamble, since design flaws can easily remain unknown to jurors. And yet the existence of these awards is crucial to architectural culture, inspiration, promotion and understanding. What to do? One solution is to shift the priorities of the awards schedules and budgets. At the modest local level, insist that the jurors trek to every building. At the better-financed national and international level, redirect the adjudication fees towards the expense of sending at least one member of the jury to each shortlisted project. This would require more organization and a longer timeline, but can be revenueneutral—save for the jurors who would have to give up their honoraria in the name of public service. But wouldn’t it be worth it? Adele Weder

AWEDER@CANADIANARCHITECT.COM

EDITOR (ON LEAVE) ELSA LAM, MRAIC ART DIRECTOR ROY GAIOT ASSISTANT EDITOR STEFAN NOVAKOVIC EDITORIAL ADVISOR IAN CHODIKOFF, OAA, FRAIC CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ANNMARIE ADAMS, FRAIC ODILE HÉNAULT DOUGLAS MACLEOD, NCARB, MRAIC REGIONAL CORRESPONDENTS HALIFAX CHRISTINE MACY, OAA REGINA BERNARD FLAMAN, SAA MONTREAL DAVID THEODORE CALGARY GRAHAM LIVESEY, MRAIC WINNIPEG LISA LANDRUM, MAA, AIA, MRAIC VICE PRESIDENT & SENIOR PUBLISHER STEVE WILSON 416-441-2085 x105 SALES MANAGER FARIA AHMED 416-441-2085 x106 CUSTOMER SERVICE / PRODUCTION LAURA MOFFATT 416-441-2085 x104 CIRCULATION CIRCULATION@CANADIANARCHITECT.COM PRESIDENT OF IQ BUSINESS MEDIA INC. ALEX PAPANOU HEAD OFFICE 101 DUNCAN MILL ROAD, SUITE 302 TORONTO, ON M3B 1Z3 TELEPHONE 416-441-2085 E-MAIL info@canadianarchitect.com WEBSITE www.canadianarchitect.com Canadian Architect is published monthly by iQ Business Media Inc.. The editors have made every reasonable effort to provide accurate and authoritative information, but they assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. Subscription Rates Canada: $54.95 plus applicable taxes for one year; $87.95 plus applicable taxes for two years (HST – #80456 2965 RT0001). Price per single copy: $6.95. Students (prepaid with student ID, includes taxes): $27.00 for one year. USA: $105.95 US for one year. All other foreign: $125.95 US per year. Single copy US and foreign: $10.00 US. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., Canadian Architect, 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302 Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3. Postmaster: please forward forms 29B and 67B to 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302 Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3. Printed in Canada. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be re­produced either in part or in full without the consent of the copyright owner. From time to time we make our subscription list available to select companies and organizations whose product or service may interest you. If you do not wish your contact information to be made available, please contact us via one of the following methods: Telephone 416-441-2085 x104 E-mail circulation@canadianarchitect.com Mail Circulation, 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302, Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3 MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN BUSINESS PRESS MEMBER OF THE ALLIANCE FOR AUDITED MEDIA PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT #43096012 ISSN 1923-3353 (ONLINE) ISSN 0008-2872 (PRINT)


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AWARDS

AIBC Awards of Excellence

The Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC) has announce the winners of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture. Three projects received medals: the Okada-Marshall House by D’Arcy Jones Architecture, the University of British Columbia Aquatic Centre by MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects and Acton Ostry Architect, and the Columbia Valley Centre by Shape Architecture in joint venture with Hindle Architects. Three more projects received merit awards: Langara College Science and Technology Building by Proscenium Architecture and Interiors in association with Teeple Architects, the University of British Columbia Campus Energy Centre by DIALOG, and the South Surrey Operations Centre by Carscadden Stokes McDonald Architects.  The AIBC Emerging Firm Award went to Leckie Studio Architecture + Design. The Innovation Award went to Sechelt Water Resource Centre and to UBC Quantum Matter

ABOVE The Bahá’í Temple of South America, designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, honoured with an Ontario Association of Architects Award of Excellence.

Institute, both by Public: Architecture + Communication; and Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia, by Acton Ostry Architect. The AIBC Special Jury Award went to Swallowfield Barn by MOTIV Architects for community engagement; the Dock Building by Michael Green Architecture for exceptional design clarity; and to Crosstown Elementary School by Francl Architecture, for overcoming substantive obstacles to create profound socialenvironmental impact.

PROJECTS Wilson School of Design opens

Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Richmond, British Columbia, has officially opened the Wilson School of Design. Named in recognition of project donor Chip and Shannon Wilson, the new facility adds 140 full-time seats at the university, bringing the number of design-student spaces to almost 700. Designed by KPMB Architects and

SAMA JIM CANZIAN

The Ontario Association of Architects has announced ten Awards of Excellence winners from a shortlist of 20 finalists and more than 111 submissions. The winning criteria included creativity, context, sustainability, good design/good business, and legacy. Continuing a long-term winning streak for its Bahá’í Temple of South America in Santiago, Hariri Pontarini Architects received the nod that project as well as for Casey House in Toronto. KPMB Architects, another dual winner, took awards for Remai Modern Art Gallery in Saskatoon and the Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building & Louis A. Simpson International Building at Princeton University, New Jersey. LGA Architectural Partners won for its McEwen School of Architecture in Sudbury, and its co-founder Janna S. Levitt took home the G. Randy Roberts Service Award.Sullin Architects was named Best Emerging Practice, and the Order of da Vinci went to John H. Daniels. Other winners include the Collaborative Greenhouse Technology Centre in Vineland by Baird Sampson Neuert Architects, Double Duplex house in Toronto by Batay-Csorba Architects, Limelight Bandshell in North York by Paul Raff Studio, and the Wellington Building Rehabilitation in Ottawa by NORR Architects & Engineers.

SEBASTIÁN WILSON LEÓN

OAA Awards of Excellence

ABOVE The Okada-Marshall House, by D’Arcy Jones Architecture, winner of an AIBC Lieutenant Governor Award in Architecture medal.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/18

NEWS


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ABOVE Wilson School of Design at Kwantlen University in Richmond, by KPMB Architects and Public: Architecture + Communication.

Public: Architecture + Communication, the building is organized into three zones. The Ground Zone is highly public and the main interface with industry, with testing labs and an incubator for BC Technical Fashion. The Mid Zone houses the teaching studios, as well as fashion, interior design and graphics programmess. The Upper Zone is designated for event and conference space. www.kpmb.com www.publicdesign.ca

Michael Green reveals plans for Newark mass-timber complex

Vancouver-based Michael Green Architecture is set to bring another mass-timber project to reality, with a 500,000-sq.-ft office complex in Newark, New Jersey. The new building will be more than double the size of the firm’s existing mass-timber T3 building in Minnesota, the cover story of Canadian Architect in November 2017. www.mg-architecture.ca

Royal Ontario Museum kicks off Bloor Street makeover

Photo: Nick Merrick ©Hendrich Blessing

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The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) has announced plans to begin work on the Helga and Mike Schmidt Performance Terrace and the Reed Family Plaza. This initiative is part of the Museum’s Welcome Project, established to provide greater access to the Museum and enhance the ROM ’s role as a vital civic hub for the city and its visitors. Designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, the project encompasses nearly 5,500 square feet of exterior space, with new landscaping and an outdoor performance terrace. The Reed Family Plaza, which runs along the Museum’s north-facing façade, will feature a gathering space with plantings and seating to enhance the pedestrian experience and offer visitors a spot to meet, sit and relax. The re-opening of the Weston entrance doors in December 2017 had capped the first phase of what will be a large-scale reinvention of the museum’s public realm. The Bloor Street revitalization marks the second phase of the ROM’s “Project Welcome” renovations to the museum’s Queens Park façade. The initiative was made possible by lead donors Helga Schmidt, and Nita and Don Reed. www.rom.on.ca www.hariripontarini.com

Webster Library unveiled at Concordia

The the new Webster Library at Concordia University in Montreal has officially opened. Designed by Menkès Shooner Dagenais LeTourneux


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Architectes, the major expansion and renovation project aimed to create a landmark on campus, a central location to integrate digital technologies and anticipate future changes in library programming. The architects developed a clear strategy to organize the collections and users’ circulation routes. Playing on the theme of anamorphosis, the project relies on a complex network of lines and colour swatches, which challenge the user’s perception and hint that learning and knowledge are constructed from an individual point of view. www.msdl.ca

S+P to design Montreal’s new Museum of Contemporary Art

Montreal’s Musée d’art contemporain has named Saucier + Perrotte Architectes in consortium with GLCRM & Associés Architectes to design its new museum at the intersection of Jeanne-Mance and SainteCatherine Street. The Museum unveiled the design and preliminary drawings of the new building, which features a generously glazed ground-floor level and an upper level that boasts folded metal blades that reveal the interior space and filter the natural light. The unanimous jury selection follows a 2017 competition to redesign the museum. The project will generate new essential links with the Place des Festivals via Jeanne-Mance Street, while the Sainte-Catherine Street side will enjoy greater visibility with the expansion’s angular overhang.

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Architects named for George Brown’s tall-wood building

George Brown College has announced that Moriyama & Teshima Architects in joint venture with Acton Ostry Architects have been selected to design The Arbour, a 12-storey mass-timber building on the college’s waterfront campus. Slated to be Ontario’s first tall wood, lowcarbon institutional building, the winning scheme was chosen from a four-project shortlist revealed in late March. The other finalists were Patkau Architects with MJMA; Shigeru Ban Architects with Brook McIlroy; and Provencher Roy with Turner Fleischer Architects.  The building will feature “breathing rooms” that use solar chimney systems to capture and harness light and air for sustainable natural ventilation. The design also promises flexibility of learning spaces, with walls able to expand and contract as needed, and will make use of domestically sourced mass-wood components. www.mtarch.com www.actonostry.ca


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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/18

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/18

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WHAT’S NEW

CSLA bestows teaching award to Beverly Sandalack

Calgary names Environmental Design Dean

The Canadian Society of Landscape Architects (CSLA) awarded Dr. Beverly Sandalack with the CSLA Teaching Award. This honour recognizes individuals who have made a substantial and significant life-long contribution to landscape architecture education. Sandalack is a Professor and Associate Dean (Academic) with the Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, and the founding director of the Master of Landscape Architecture program. In 2015, she and her colleagues led the establishment of the landscape architecture program, the first new Canadian graduate program in landscape architecture since 1980. Sandalack’s teaching methods are innovative, hands-on and exciting; students are provided with experiential learning and exposed to the breadth of the profession with a combination of technical and traditional tools and methods. She emphasizes both high tech and high touch to prepare students for their future careers. Her cultural landscape field trips were the model for what is now a foundational part of the planning and landscape architecture programs, where students have immersive experiences in diverse landscapes of Alberta. Her informal CityWalks, which predated Jane’s Walks in Calgary, allowed students and citizens to experience various parts of the city, illustrating the concepts and ideas she was teaching in the classroom. Sandalack has also chaired the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) Student Design Competition Jury since 2004 and is a member of IFLA’s Education and Academic Affairs Committee.

The University of Calgary has announced the appointment of John L. Brown, FRAIC as the Dean of the Faculty of Environmental Design, which offers professional programs in architecture, landscape architecture, planning and advanced, design-based, research degrees. Brown joined the architecture program in 1985, with a teaching and research focus in residential design and entrepreneurial forms of architectural practice. He served 10 years as Associate Dean (Research + International) and recently also served as Interim Dean. Brown is principal of John Brown Architect Ltd., a founding partner of Housebrand, and a co-founder of the advocacy group Slow Home Movement. www.evds.ucalgary.ca

Tom Emodi becomes Dean of RAIC College of Fellows

Halifax architect Tom Emodi, FRAIC has been named Dean of the RAIC College of Fellows for a three-year term, beginning this month. Tom succeeds Vancouver architect J. Robert Thibodeau, FRAIC, who served two three-year terms from 2011 to 2017. Emodi’s experience includes over 40 years of architectural practice, research and teaching in Australia, Canada, Africa, China and the Middle East. He spent more than 20 years as an architecture professor at Dalhousie University, where he also served as Dean of the Faculty of Architecture and Planning (1997 to 2003). www.raic.org

www.oaa.on.ca

CORRECTIONS In the Books section of the April issue, architect/critic Matthew Soules was inadvertently left out of the list of authors of the sevenbook West Coast Modern House series. Soules is the author of Binning House, a monograph of one of the earliest modern residential landmarks in Canada. In the credits for the story on Ancaster Creek House by Williamson Williamson, one wayward keystroke added a whopping 10,000 extra square feet to the 3,800-sq.-ft. house. Our apologies to the architects, clients and readers.


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Briefs En bref

RAIC Journal Journal de l’IRAC

Don’t miss the Festival of Architecture in Saint John, NB! This year’s conference, held in partnership with the Architects’ Association of New Brunswick, takes place May 30 to June 2. Register today at festival2018.raic.org to be a part of the sessions, tours, and networking opportunities that will make this an East Coast festival to remember! Ne ratez pas le Festival d’architecture à Saint John (N.-B.)! Le congrès de cette année, organisé en partenariat avec l’Association des architectes du Nouveau-Brunswick, se tient du 30 mai au 2 juin. Inscrivez-vous dès aujourd’hui à festival2018.raic.org pour participer aux séances éducatives, aux visites guidées et aux occasions de réseautage qui feront de ce festival sur la côte est un événement mémorable! The April 1 membership renewal deadline has passed, but it’s not too late. Renew online at www.raic.org to maintain your membership and the right to use your MRAIC designation. For questions, email membership@raic.org. La date limite du renouvellement des adhésions, le 1er avril, est passée, mais il n’est pas trop tard. Renouvelez en ligne à www.raic.org pour maintenir votre adhésion et votre droit d’utiliser la désignation MIRAC. Pour toute question, veuillez envoyer un courriel à membership@raic.org. The RAIC Syllabus program is turning 40! Watch for graduate interviews in the RAIC member Bulletin. Join the 120 graduates, 180 enrolled students and hundreds of past and present Syllabus volunteers in celebrating this milestone. @raicsyllabus Le programme Syllabus de l’IRAC a 40 ans! Lisez les entrevues réalisées auprès de diplômés du programme dans le bulletin des membres de l’IRAC. Joignez-vous aux 120 diplômés, aux 180 étudiants inscrits dans le programme et aux centaines de bénévoles d’hier et d’aujourd’hui pour célébrer cet anniversaire important. @raicsyllabus Applications for Syllabus 2018 Term 2 are now open until June 15. For more information: info@raic-syllabus.ca.

Message from the Chief Executive Officer Message du chef de la direction By Mike Brennan Chief Executive Officer, RAIC Chef de la direction, IRAC

As architects, one of your most impressive skills is listening carefully to your clients, to truly hear what they say. By gaining a solid understanding of what they want to accomplish, you can then employ your professional skills to deliver a project that meets or exceeds their aspirations.

La période d’inscription à la deuxième session du Syllabus en 2018 est ouverte jusqu’au 15 juin. Pour un supplément d’information : info@raic-syllabus.ca

I recently joined the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) as Chief Executive Officer, and a big part of my job— like yours—is listening. As a volunteer, member-driven organization, we have to listen better, prioritize, and respond meaningfully to what the members truly want and need.

The RAIC is the leading voice for excellence in the built environment in Canada, demonstrating how design enhances the quality of life, while addressing important issues of society through responsible architecture. www.raic.org

My background is in business. I come to the RAIC with 26 years of executive leadership and a proven track record of operational success in the not-for-profit sector as well as turnarounds in for-profit companies in North America. For me, every action, every expenditure, starts with a basic question: What value does it bring to members?

L’IRAC est le principal porte-parole en faveur de l’excellence du cadre bâti au Canada. Il démontre comment la conception améliore la qualité de vie tout en tenant compte d’importants enjeux sociétaux par la voie d’une architecture responsable. www.raic.org/fr

Earlier this year, the RAIC board of directors formalized a strategic plan that continued on pg 24

L’une de vos plus grandes forces, en tant qu’architectes, c’est d’écouter attentivement vos clients et de bien entendre leur message. En comprenant bien leurs objectifs, vous pouvez mettre vos compétences professionnelles à profit et réaliser des projets qui répondent à leurs attentes ou les dépassent. Je suis récemment entré en fonction à titre de chef de la direction de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada (IRAC) et tout comme vous, une grande partie de mon travail consiste à écouter. Comme organisation à adhésion volontaire qui sert les intérêts de ses membres, nous devons améliorer notre écoute, établir des priorités, répondre adéquatement aux besoins des membres et leur offrir ce qu’ils désirent vraiment. Je suis issu du milieu des affaires. J’arrive à l’IRAC avec 26 ans d’expérience dans des postes de cadre supérieur où j’ai fait mes preuves dans la direction d’organismes à but non lucratif et le redressement d’entreprises à but lucratif en Amérique du Nord. Avant d’entreprendre quelque action ou d’engager quelque suite à la page 24

17


RAIC Journal

Journal de l’IRAC

THE RAIC RUNS CANADA’S BIGGEST AND MOST EXCITING ARCHITECTURAL AWARDS PROGRAM. 2018 WINNERS,

Architectural Firm Award Le Prix du cabinet d’architectes de l’année

INCLUDING THOSE FEATURED HERE, WILL BE HONOURED AT THE RAIC/ AAANB FESTIVAL OF ARCHITECTURE IN SAINT JOHN, NB MAY 30 TO JUNE 2. L’IRAC GÈRE L’UN DES PROGRAMMES DE PRIX EN ARCHITECTURE LES PLUS IMPORTANTS ET LES PLUS EMBALLANTS AU CANADA. LES LAURÉATS DE 2018, Y COMPRIS CEUX QUI SONT PRÉS­ ENTÉS ICI, SERONT HONORÉS DANS LE CADRE DU FESTIVAL D’ARCHITECTURE DE L’IRAC/AANB QUI AURA LIEU À SAINT JOHN (N.-B.), DU 30 MAI AU 2 JUIN.

1 Bloor/Gladstone Library 2 Waterdown Library and Civic Centre

TOM ARBAN

18

1

3W  illiams Parkway Operations Centre 4 Newmarket Operations Centre 5S  urrey Operations Centre

1 Bibliothèque Bloor/Gladstone 2 Bibliothèque et centre civique de Waterdown

2018 - RDHA (Rounthwaite Dick and Hadley Architects) Toronto, Ontario WHO? Founded in 1919, RDHA is one of Canada’s oldest practices. Current work focuses on public buildings. The partners are Bob Goyeche, MRAIC, Momin Hoq, MRAIC, Geoff Miller, MRAIC, and Tyler Sharp, MRAIC. (Rob Boyko, MRAIC, retired in 2017.) In the last 10 years, RDHA has garnered over 40 major design awards, including three Governor General’s Medals in Architecture, and the RAIC Young Architect Medal for Tyler Sharp.

WHAT’S THE SECRET SAUCE? 3C  entre des opérations Williams Parkway 4C  entre des opérations de Newmarket 5C  entre des opérations de Surrey

The principals decided in 2005 to transform from a competent office with project management and technical experience to a studio that pursues design excellence. They rebranded, installed an in-house design library, undertook an analysis of staff skills, and developed a new design language focused on sustainability, clarity, and efficiency of form, material, and budget. The restructuring has led to an influx of young

talent. Management seeks to facilitate the professional paths of these emerging architects, from choosing assignments to provide requested or needed experience to the adoption of contemporary communication tools like Slack. “Often the programs that we take on relate to public projects that have modest budgets, limited building areas, and limited fees,” say the partners. “As a result, these projects are often overlooked by those who might bring a high-level of design study and resolution. This has been where we have excelled.”

JURY COMMENTS “There is a remarkable consistency throughout the last 10 to 15 years of work by a younger generation of designers that have taken over the firm and kept the lineage and re-established themselves as a leading designing firm in Toronto.” “For the successors to rebuild the firm and reputation and deliver a fresh portfo-

lio of completed projects, is exceptionally difficult. Many firms are going through this transition; some are being bought out or consolidated.” “They make very good architecture with lean budgets.”

RECENT PROJECTS Surrey Operations Centre, Surrey, BC (2016) Waterdown Library and Civic Centre, Hamilton, ON (2015) Lakeview, Port Credit, and Lorne Park Branch Libraries, Mississauga, ON (2011) Bloor/Gladstone District Library, Toronto, ON (2009)

QUI? Fondé en 1919, RDHA est l’un des plus anciens bureaux du Canada qui travaille principalement sur des projets d’édifices


QUELLE EST LA RECETTE SECRÈTE? En 2005, les associés ont décidé de transformer ce bureau compétent et fort en gestion de projets et en connaissances techniques pour viser l’excellence en design. Ils ont changé leur image et installé une bibliothèque de design; ils ont analysé les compétences du personnel et développé un nouveau langage conceptuel axé sur la durabilité, la clarté et l’efficacité de la forme, les matériaux et le budget. La restructuration a attiré les jeunes talents. Les associés cherchent à faciliter leur parcours professionnel en leur confiant des tâches qui leur permettront d’acquérir l’expérience dont ils ont besoin ou en leur apprenant à utiliser des outils de communications contemporains comme Slack. « Souvent, nos mandats portent sur des projets publics aux budgets modestes, aux superficies restreintes et aux honoraires limités », disent les associés. « C’est pourquoi ils sont souvent

ignorés au profit de projets qui exigent une étude conceptuelle et des solutions de plus haut niveau. C’est pourtant là où nous avons excellé. »

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COMMENTAIRES DU JURY « Il y a une constance remarquable dans les projets réalisés au cours des 10 à 15 dernières années par une génération de plus jeunes designers qui ont repris la firme et en ont assuré la pérennité tout en la repositionnant comme un chef de file du design à Toronto. » « Il est extrêmement difficile pour la relève de rebâtir une firme et d’en maintenir la réputation tout en montant un nouveau portfolio de réalisations. Bien des firmes sont actuellement en transition au Canada; certaines ont été rachetées et d’autres, consolidées. »

TOM ARBAN

publics. Bob Goyeche, MRAIC, Momin Hoq, MRAIC, Geoff Miller, MRAIC, et Tyler Sharp, MRAIC, en sont les associés. (Rob Boyko, MRAIC, a pris sa retraite en 2017). Au cours des 10 dernières années, RDHA a remporté plus de 40 prix de design, dont trois Médailles du Gouverneur général en architecture, et Tyler Sharp a reçu la Médaille du jeune architecte de l’IRAC.

TOM ARBAN

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« Ils font de la très bonne architecture avec des budgets serrés. »

PROJETS RÉCENTS Centre des opérations de Surrey, Surrey, C.-B. (2016) Bibliothèque et centre municipal Waterdown, Hamilton, Ontario (2015) Bibliothèques de Lakeview, Port Credit et Lorne Park, Mississauga, Ontario (2011) Bibliothèque du quartier Bloor/Gladstone, 2009, Toronto, Ontario (2009)

EMA PETER

TOM ARBAN

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Emerging Architectural Practice Award Prix du cabinet d’architectes de la relève

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1 Roy Laurence House

2018 - Chevalier Morales Architectes

2S  aul Bellow Library

Montréal, Québec

3S  aul Bellow Library

WHO? Stephan Chevalier and Sergio Morales, MIRAC, founded Chevalier Morales Architectes in 2005. It currently has about 15 architects and collaborators.

4M  aison de la littérature 5M  aison de la littérature

Previously, they worked for more than a decade for prominent Canadian firms: Chevalier at Busby + Associates Architects and Patkau Architects, and Morales at Saucier + Perrotte.

1 Résidence Roy Laurence 2 Bibliothèque Saul Bellow

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WHAT’S THE SECRET SAUCE? Chevalier and Morales got their big break in 2009 when they placed as finalists in an international architectural competition for a new Montreal planetarium. With images of the project circulating online, they received significant visibility among peers and clients of public buildings.

3. Bibliothèque Saul Bellow 4M  aison de la littérature 5M  aison de la littérature ALL IMAGES/ TOUTES LES IMAGES: CHEVALIER MORALES ARCHITECTES

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In 2010, the firm was selected as finalists in competitions for the Notre-Damede-Grâce Cultural Centre, and a new library in Saint-Laurent borough, both in Montreal. The partners say that seeing the evolution of the program for a 21stcentury library, as well as ideas of sustainability, on these projects clarified their thoughts. Between 2011 and 2014, they won competitions for four libraries: Saul-Bellow and Pierrefonds in Montreal, Maison de la littérature in Quebec City, and a new library in Drummondville, QC.

The three libraries that have since opened are enjoying public and critical success. For example, the Maison de la littérature in Old Quebec City attracts both general and specialized tourism. It has also garnered several awards, including the Grand prix d’excellence of the Quebec Order of Architects, in 2017, and the 2014 Canadian Architect Award of Excellence.

JURY COMMENTS “This firm has become successful because of the opportunity to participate in competitions.”

RECENT PROJECTS Bibliothèque de Drummondville, Drummondville, QC (2017) Maison de la littérature, Quebec City, QC (2015) Bibliothèque Saul-Bellow library, Lachine, QC (2015) Résidence Vallée du Parc, Shawinigan, QC (2015)

QUI?

“They have grown as a successful young practice because of public policymaking and the opportunities that it creates.”

Stéphane Chevalier et Sergio Morales, MIRAC, ont fondé Chevalier Morales Architectes en 2005. L’équipe compte aujourd’hui une quinzaine d’architectes et de collaborateurs.

“Their work is creative, inventive, fresh, strong, sensitive to details, almost poetic.”

Auparavant, ils ont travaillé pendant plus de dix ans dans des bureaux canadiens de


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renom : Chevalier, chez Busby + Associates Architects et Patkau Architects; Morales, chez Saucier + Perrotte.

QUELLE EST LA RECETTE SECRÈTE? Les associés se sont fait connaître en 2009, en étant finalistes d’un concours d’architec­ture international pour le nouveau Planétarium de Montréal. Les images de leur projet ont circulé en ligne, ce qui leur a donné une grande visibilité auprès de leurs pairs et des clients du secteur public. En 2010, la firme a été choisie parmi les finalistes des concours pour le Centre culturel Notre-Dame-de-Grâce et la nouvelle bibliothèque de l’arrondissement SaintLaurent, tous deux à Montréal. Les associés disent que leur pensée et leur notion de la durabilité se sont précisées en voyant l’évolution du programme d’une bibliothèque du 21e siècle. Entre 2011 et 2014, ils ont remporté les concours de quatre bibliothèques: SaulBellow et Pierrefonds, à Montréal, Maison de la littérature, à Québec, et une nouvelle bibliothèque à Drummondville, au Québec. Les trois bibliothèques qui ont depuis lors ouvert leurs portes reçoivent un accueil favorable du public et de la cri-

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tique. Ainsi, la Maison de la littérature, dans le Vieux-Québec, attire à la fois tourisme général et le tourisme spécialisé. Ce projet a remporté plusieurs prix, dont le Grand prix d’excellence de l’Ordre des architectes du Québec en 2017 et le Prix d’excellence du magazine Canadian Architect en 2014.

COMMENTAIRES DU JURY « Cette firme a connu la réussite parce qu’elle a eu l’occasion de participer à des concours au Québec. Elle doit sa croissance à des politiques publiques et aux opportunités qu’elles créent. » « Ses projets sont créatifs, inventifs, rafraîchissants, solides, attentifs aux détails, presque poétiques. »

PROJETS RÉCENTS Bibliothèque de Drummondville, Drummondville, Québec (2017) Maison de la littérature, Québec, Québec (2015) Bibliothèque Saul-Bellow, Lachine, Québec (2015) Résidence Vallée du Parc, Shawinigan, Québec (2015)

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Young Architect Award Prix du jeune architecte

1 Luc Bouliane

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2 Bensimon Byrne 3 One Method 4C  ossette (in joint venture with Teeple Architects) 5 Relmar Houses

ADRIEN WILLIAMS

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6 Albany House

1 Luc Bouliane

2018 - Luc Jean-Paul Bouliane, MRAIC Toronto, Ontario

2 Bensimon Byrne

WHO?

3 One Method 4 Cossette (projet conjoint avec Teeple Architects) 5 Résidences Relmar 6 Résidence Albany

Luc Bouliane is a graduate of the University of Waterloo School of Architecture. From 2000 to 2010, he worked with his mentor Stephen Teeple at Teeple Architects in Toronto. In 2010, Bouliane founded Lebel + Bouliane with his partner Natasha Lebel in Toronto. The eight-person studio has developed a body of work with a focus on cultural institutions, adaptive re-use projects in historically significant buildings, and custom residences. The firm’s work was featured in the 2015 exhibition Twenty + Change: Next Generation, which showcases emerging practices in Canada. Bouliane has been a guest lecturer and critic at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture and OCAD University, and a critic at Ryerson University.

WHAT’S THE SECRET SAUCE? Bouliane credits his upbringing in the northern community of Sault Ste. Marie,

surrounded by Lake Superior and rock outcrops, for the geologically inspired and geometrically complex forms of his designs. He still returns north with Lebel and their two sons, where he looks to nature and geology as a source of inspiration.

JURY COMMENTS

CBC Building, Toronto, (2016) Ajax Public Library main branch, Ajax, ON (2016) Relmar Houses, Toronto, winner of a Tucker Design Award for excellence in the use of natural stone, (2015)

“Great design and work.”

QUI?

“He’s on a different trajectory for a young office. He has pursued larger public work from the very beginning, including commercial work, which is unusual.”

Luc Bouliane est un diplômé de l’École d’architecture de l’Université de Waterloo. De 2000 à 2010, il a travaillé avec son mentor Stephen Teeple de Teeple Architects à Toronto. En 2010, il a fondé le Lebel + Bouliane avec sa conjointe Natasha Lebel à Toronto.

“His work has strong sculptural qualities. It’s interesting. The spaces are dynamic in terms of composition, shapes, and forms, and the level of detail.”

RECENT PROJECTS Expansion and renovation of the National Museum of Immigration at Pier 2, Halifax, NS, a joint venture David J. Agro Architect (2015) Bensimon Byrne Ad Agency within the

L’atelier de huit personnes œuvre principalement à des projets de bâtiments culturels, de réutilisation adaptative de bâtiments patrimoniaux et de résidences personnalisées. En 2015, ses projets ont fait partie de Twenty + Change : Next Generation, une exposition portant sur le travail des bureaux émergents au Canada.


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QUELLE EST LA RECETTE SECRÈTE? Luc Bouliane considère que les formes géométriques complexes de ses projets qui sont souvent inspirées de la géologie lui viennent de son enfance dans la communauté nordique de Sault Ste. Marie, à proximité du lac Supérieur et de nombreux affleurements rocheux. Il retourne encore dans le nord dans ses temps libres avec sa conjointe et leurs deux fils. La nature et la géologie sont pour lui des sources d’inspiration.

COMMENTAIRES DU JURY

ments publics et de bâtiments commerciaux, ce qui est inhabituel. » « Son travail exprime de solides qualités sculpturales. C’est intéressant. Les espaces sont dynamiques sur les plans de la composition, des formes et du niveau de détail. »

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PROJETS RÉCENTS Agrandissement et rénovation du Musée canadien de l’immigration du Quai 21, à Halifax, Nouvelle-Écosse, en partenariat avec David J. Agro Architect (2015) Agence de publicité Bensimon Byrne, dans l’édifice de la CBC, Toronto (2016) Succursale principale de la bibliothèque publique d’Ajax, Ajax, Ontario (2016)

« Un design et un travail de qualité. » « Il suit une trajectoire différente pour un jeune bureau. Il a cherché dès le début à obtenir des mandats de plus grands bâti-

BOB GUNDU

M. Bouliane a été conférencier invité et critique à l’École d’architecture de l’Université de Waterloo et à l’Université de l’ÉADO, et critique à l’Université Ryerson.

Résidences Relmar, Toronto, projet lauréat d’un Tucker Design Award pour l’excellence en utilisation de la pierre naturelle (2015)

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SCOTT NORSWORTHY

ADRIEN WILLIAMS

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SCOTT NORSWORTHY

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continued from pg 17 identifies the strategic priorities for the next three years, (2018-2020). They include the following:

and to provide more flexibility, additional schedules for the Canadian Standard Form of Contract for Architectural Services – Document Six.

• developing non-dues revenue and cost efficiencies to build long-term sustainability;

We are also looking forward to recognition ceremonies for the Governor General’s Medals in Architecture and the National Urban Design Awards as well as issuing the call for submissions for the 2019 Moriyama RAIC International Prize.

• attracting new members, specifically licensed architects, to strengthen the voice of architects and architecture; • reinforcing the RAIC’s core competency of professional development and education, including Syllabus, with a plan that addresses the learning needs of members at different stages of their career; •strengthening the RAIC’s advocacy program to tackle the issues architects face, as well as promoting a better built environment for Canadians. In all of these efforts, we consult and collaborate with a diverse community of stakeholders who contribute to our success. It is critical that we work together, collectively, with these integral partners in shaping a powerful and productive future for the RAIC. To that end, we will continue to build relationships and enhance engagement with individuals and organizations who share an interest in the values, activities and potential of the RAIC. The RAIC is always open to feedback from the architectural community across the country about how we can better protect your interests. One opportunity for discussion will be the Annual General Meeting on May 30 in Saint John, New Brunswick, which takes place at the start of the 2018 Festival of Architecture. The RAIC is presenting the festival in partnership with the Architects’ Association of New Brunswick. I invite all Canadian Architect readers to attend—come for the continuing education points; enjoy the East Coast hospitality, social events, awards gala, tours, and networking. Looking ahead to the fall, the RAIC will launch a revised Canadian Standard Form of Contract Between Architects and Consultant – Document Nine, a new edition of A Guide to Determining Appropriate Fees for the Services of an Architect, 

I believe in the contributions that architects make: protecting the environment, building robust communities, and driving social and economic well-being. I’m very excited to be working on your behalf. Contact Mike Brennan at mbrennan@raic.org or 613-241-3600 Ext. 206

suite de la page 17 dépense, je me pose la question fondamentale suivante : quelle valeur apportet-elle aux membres? Un peu plus tôt, cette année, le conseil d’administration de l’IRAC a officialisé un plan stratégique dans lequel il établit les priorités stratégiques des trois prochaines années (2018-2020) qui consistent notamment à : • élargir les sources de revenus (autres que les cotisations) et améliorer le rapport coût-efficience pour bâtir la viabilité à long terme; • attirer de nouveaux membres, principalement des architectes, pour renforcer la voix des architectes et de l’architecture; • renforcer les compétences de base de l’IRAC en matière de développement professionnel et d’éducation, y compris par rapport au programme Syllabus, avec un plan qui tient compte des besoins en formation des membres à différentes étapes de leur carrière; • renforcer le programme de l’IRAC en matière de défense et promotion des intérêts des membres et de la profession pour s’attaquer aux problèmes auxquels les architectes sont confrontés et promouvoir un meilleur cadre bâti pour la population canadienne. Dans tous ces efforts, nous consultons diverses parties intéressées qui con-

tribuent à notre réussite et nous collaborons avec elles. Il est essentiel de travailler ensemble, collectivement, avec ces partenaires pour assurer à l’IRAC un avenir solide et productif. À cette fin, nous continuerons de bâtir des relations et de renforcer l’engagement avec des personnes et des organisations qui partagent un intérêt dans les valeurs, les activités et le potentiel de l’IRAC. L’IRAC est toujours ouvert aux commentaires de la communauté architecturale du pays sur les mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour mieux protéger ses intérêts. L’assemblée générale annuelle offre d’ailleurs une bonne occasion de le faire. Elle se tiendra cette année le 30 mai, à Saint John (N.-B.), dans le cadre du Festival d’architecture 2018. L’IRAC présente le festival en partenariat avec l’Association des architectes du Nouveau-Brunswick. J’invite tous les lecteurs de Canadian Architect à y participer. Venez cumuler des heures de formation continue; profiter de l’hospitalité de la côte est; et assister à des activités sociales, au gala de remise des prix, à des visites guidées et à des activités de réseautage. À l’automne, l’IRAC entend lancer une version révisée de la Formule canadienne normalisée de contrat entre architectes et consultant – Document Neuf, une nouvelle édition du Guide aidant à déterminer les honoraires appropriés pour les services d’un architecte et, pour offrir une plus grande flexibilité, des annexes additionnelles à la Formule canadienne normalisée de contrat de services en architecture – Document Six. Nous avons également bien hâte aux cérémonies de remise des Médailles du Gouverneur général en architecture et des Prix nationaux de design urbain et au lancement de l’appel de candidatures pour le Prix international Moriyama IRAC 2019. Les architectes apportent de réelles contributions à la société, j’en suis convaincu. Ils protègent l’environnement, créent des collectivités robustes et favorisent le bienêtre social et économique. Je suis très enthousiaste de travailler pour vous. Pour joindre Mike Brennan : mbrennan@raic.org ou 613 241-3600, poste 206


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WIDE-RANGING

TOM ARBAN PHOTOGRAPHY

THE 2018 GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDALS IN ARCHITECTURE

Detail of the Fort York Visitor Centre in Toronto, by Patkau Architects in collaboration with Kearns Mancini Architects.

The Governor General Medals in Architecture, celebrating built works in Canada and elsewhere by our nation’s architects, are a showcase of some of the most exceptional projects of our era. The timespan for eligiblity is long: projects must be completed within the past seven years, and are awarded biannually. The selection usually reflects a variety of building types, and this year the selection is especially wide-ranging, from an international airport to a small hospital to a tiny park pavilion to an art museum. (In full disclosure, the present writer was a jury member for this year’s adjudication.) If there is a discernable trend this year, it is the recognition of projects that address the challenges of difficult or unconventional sites. In Whistler, the Audain museum is a brilliant response to building in the woods and over a f loodplain. Montreal’s Stade de soccer is built above a former quarry and dumping site. The Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion for Peace at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts is in large part a functional stairway that seamlessly multi-tasks as a social gathering space. The Maison de la littérature in Quebec City expands and transforms a 19th-century heritage church into a contemporary arena for reading, writing and research; and in a similar way the Casey House healthcare facility consists of a modernist expansion and respectful transformation of a 19th-century mansion. Fort McMurray International Airport brings rigour and grace to a remote locale. Edmonton’s Borden Park Pavilion visually blends

into its verdant surroundings by day and then illuminates them by night, in surreal fashion. Fork York Visitor Centre deftly fits into a narrow “found site” alongside the abutments of an expressway. And the Saint-Laurent sports complex and Regina’s Parallelogram House bring provocative forms, materials and angles into blandly generic suburban environments. In 2016, the last round of medals, not a single private residence made the list; this time, there are three. The medal-winning houses are not large, and—aside from the audaciously cantilevered Two Hulls House— not particularly expensive to build. But each of them, including the distinctive Rabbit Snare Gorge, has nonetheless challenged in some way the traditional concept of the shape, proportion, materiality and/or siting of houses in rural, coastal, and suburban settings. Architects still have more leeway in exploring and defying existing conventions in detached houses than in the housing type that is more crucial for our economic and ecological future: the multi-unit residential building, none of which feature among the medallists this year. The nation’s architects have produced a wealth of masterful cultural buildings in recent years, at home and afar, and not all of them are represented in these Medals and these pages. There is a season, and the next round of Governor General’s Medals will undoubtedly showcase some additional architectural landmarks whose highest moments of recognition are yet to come.

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AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

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10M

Whistler, British Columbia Patkau Architects James Dow / Patkau Architects

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

The Audain Art Museum is a $38.9-millon private museum in Whistler, BC. The 5,214-square-metre building houses Michael Audain’s personal art collection, which traces a visual record of British Columbia from the late 18th century to the present. It encompasses one of the world’s finest collections of precolonial First Nation masks, a superb collection of Emily Carr paintings, and works by some of Canada’s most significant post-war artists. These include Jack Shadbolt, E. J. Hughes, and Gordon Smith, as well as works by internationally known contemporary artists such as Jeff Wall, Rodney Graham, Stan Douglas and others. The design of the museum navigates three powerful determinants. First is the need to house both the permanent exhibition of Michael Audain’s collection and temporary exhibits of all kinds from across Canada and around the world. The second determinant is the beautiful but challenging site. The former municipal works yard, although en-

dowed with areas of magnificent coniferous canopy, is located within the floodplain of Fitzsimmons Creek and in need of environmental reclamation. The third determinant is the enormous snowfall typical of Whistler, averaging nearly 4.5 metres annually. The design responds to these determinants by projecting a volume of sequential public spaces and galleries into an existing void within the surrounding forest. It is elevated a full storey above the ground and crowned with a steep roof which defines a volume for administration and back-of-house support functions. The plan doubles as an integrated thermal strategy by using non-gallery zones as buffers between the demanding gallery environments and the exterior envelope. Building form and siting work synergistically with existing trees to embrace a reclaimed forest meadow. Directly across Blackcomb Way is Whistler Village. A bridge at street level draws the public from


The main museum entrance is accessed via a short pedesterian bridge from the street. ABOVE The building’s restrained form and character provide a quiet backdrop to the art within and the surrounding natural landscape. LEFT The interior public spaces are visible from the exterior, continuing the warm and luminous materiality. OPPOSITE

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 05/18

GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER


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The luminous woodwork highlights the main entrance. The simple form of the exterior is clad in an envelope of dark metal which recedes into the shadows of the surrounding forest.

ABOVE RIGHT

Blackcomb Way over the floodplain and through the trees onto a protected and sky-lit porch overlooking the meadow. From there, visitors can either descend to the forest floor or enter the museum. Via the descent, visitors link to the site and the Whistler Cultural Connector, a public footpath binding the cultural institutions and parks of Whistler. When they enter the museum, visitors gather in a lobby and event space that frames a wide view of the forest. Visitors then follow a glazed walkway overlooking the meadow. Permanent collection galleries precede access to the temporary exhibition galleries. The character of the building and interiors is deliberately restrained to provide a quiet, minimal backdrop to the art and the surrounding natural landscape. The simple form of the exterior is clad in an envelope of dark metal which recedes into the shadows of the surrounding forest. Where this envelope is opened – to provide access to the entry porch or views from the glazed walkway to the galleries – a luminous wood casing overlays the dark metal. Public spaces in the interior, which are visible from the exterior, continue this warm materiality. Gallery interiors in both the permanent and temporary exhibition areas are closed white volumes with minimal detail. :: Jury :: This is a structure that is, among other things, a total response to site conditions. The architects have taken exceptional care to position the building in deference to the exiting trees and over the seasonal flood plane, keeping the building’s footprint at a minimum. Inside, they have displayed a masterful control of artificial and natural light. Their mode of fragmenting the natural daylight at the covered entrance evokes the dappled light of the forest, and glazing along the circulation spaces brings in the actual forest light. The entrance bridge from the roadway and the stairway from the ground each invite visitors into the museum in almost story-like fashion. This building is both complex and serene, a masterpiece on every level.

CLIENT AUDAIN ART MUSEUM | ARCHITECT TEAM JOHN PATKAU, PATRICIA PATKAU, DAVID SHONE, MIKE GREEN, MARC HOLLAND, CAM KOROLUK, DIMITRI KOUBATIS, LUKE STERN, PETER SUTER, MICHAEL THORPE, DAVID ZEIBIN | STRUCTURAL EQUILIBRIUM CONSULTING INC. | MECHANICAL/ ELECTRICAL INTEGRAL GROUP | CIVIL CREUS ENGINEERING | LANDSCAPE PHILIPS FARVAAG SMALLENBERG | AUDIOVISUAL MC SQUARED SYSTEM DESIGN GROUP | CODE LMDG | ENVELOPE SPRATT EMANUEL | FLOOD KERR WOOD LEIDAL | GEOTECHNICAL GEOPACIFIC | LIGHTING HORTON LEES BROGDEN | SNOW MOUNTAIN RESORT ENGINEERING | SPECIFICATIONS SUSAN MORRIS SPECIFICATIONS | SURVEY SURVEY SERVICES LTD. | CONTRACTOR AXIOM BUILDERS | AREA 56,000 FT 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | COMPLETION SPRING 2016


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

STADE DE SOCCER DE MONTRÉAL Montréal, Quebec Saucier + Perrotte with HCMA Architecture + Design Olivier Blouin

On the site of a former quarry and future ecological park, the indoor soccer stadium emerges from the park’s artificial topography as a layer of mineral stratum recalling the geological nature of the site.

The history of the Saint-Michel Environmental Complex (SMEC) is mark­ed by radical changes and transformation. At first a quarry, then a dumping site, the SMEC is now being repurposed as one of Montreal’s biggest parks with a focus on the environment and sustainable living. Through these cycles, human intervention has taken a severe toll on the site’s topography and symbolism within the city. The new soccer stadium emerges from the park’s artificial topography as a layer of mineral stratum recalling the geological nature of the site. The mineral stratum is articulated by a continuous roof which cantilevers over the entry plaza, folds down over the interior soccer field, and extends to the ground to accommodate spectator seating for the outdoor field. Simultaneously reacting to the site and the requirements of the program, the dramatic roof structure gives a distinctive and unified presence to the complex. The park’s immense size called for an architectural intervention of grand scale and a truly unique gesture in the city. To ensure the formal

unity of the project, the design has been developed as the transformation of a single expansive element: an innovative hybrid wood structure composed of both CLT and glulam elements. The structural grid forms a layered mesh which appears to be random at first sight, but which in reality becomes denser where added structural strength is needed. Along Papineau Avenue, the architecture adapts itself to the existing landscape by embedding its supporting functions within the berm. This particular siting accommodates an elevated pedestrian path and preserves the existing trees. Along this edge, a series of glass boxes emerge from the augmented landscape to provide daylight and views for the administrative and public spaces. On the southern portion, a large crystal box which contains the main lobby signals the centre’s main entrance. Despite the magnitude of the project and its program, these luminous elements and the preserved vegetation give the architecture a critical human scale that respects the residential neighbourhood it faces. The transparency of the building also promotes a sense of openness.

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS


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The expansive roof structure reads as a single formal gesture in crosslaminated timber. The structural grid takes into account sustainability criteria and optimizes the dimensions according to the required spans.

The programmatic elements are organized efficiently by taking advantage of the linearity of the site as well as considering the circulation of different user groups, such as players, spectators and park visitors. The program is divided into two levels. Each level is organized using the main circulation corridor that links the interior to the exterior. On the public entrance level, the corridor is continuous from the plaza through the lobby and main public spaces, providing direct access to the stands. On the lower level, the corridor extends toward the exterior playing field and connects to the exterior stands. “They tend to run around and pretend they’re famous football players,” says architect Gilles Saucier, FRAIC. “They do goal celebrations, shout and pretend they’re being watched by a huge audience. It’s fantastic to see how the splendour of the building can have this effect on them. That it can transport people to a different place, a different reality. The Stade de Soccer project makes them stars.” :: Jury :: This suburban soccer stadium is a powerful expression of athletic activity and energy as well a strong homage to the geology of its site. The triangular geometry of the structural framework is both ambitious and restrained; its oversized glulam beams a big gesture that is in appropriate scale to the quarry below. The dramatic roofline becomes the identity of the project, its muscularity uniting the discrete components and projecting a cohesive presence. The stadium’s positioning on the berm gives it a heroic presence and celebrates it as a civic landmark.

CLIENT VILLE DE MONTRÉAL | ARCHITECT TEAM GILLES SAUCIER, ANDRÉ PERROTTE, DARRYL CON-

DON, TREVOR DAVIES, MICHAEL HENDERSON, LIA RUCCOLO, PATRICE BÉGIN, CHARLES-ALEXANDRE DUBOIS, LESLIE LOK, DAVID MOREAUX, YUTARO MINAGAWA, VEDANTA BALBAHADUR, MARC-ANDRÉ TRATCH, NICK WORTH. | STRUCTURAL NCK INC. | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL BOUTHILLETTE PARIZEAU | LANDSCAPE WAA INC. | INTERIORS SAUCIER+PERROTTE ARCHITECTES / HCMA ARCHITECTS | CONTRACTOR GROUPE TEQ / ASTALDI CANADA | WOOD STRUCTURE NORDIC STRUCTURES | LEED SYNAIRGIS | AREA 12,600 M2 | BUDGET $34.3 M | COMPLETION APRIL 2015


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

CASEY HOUSE Toronto, Ontario Hariri Pontarini Doublespace Photography

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

Ten years in the making, the renovation and extension of Casey House, a specialized healthcare facility for individuals with HIV/AIDS, develops a new prototype for hospitals. The facility meets the needs of patients and healthcare providers in a setting designed to evoke the experience and comforts of home. With 14 new inpatient rooms and new Day Health Program servicing a roster of 200 registered clients, the 5,481-square-metre addition brings much-needed space and modernized amenities to augment and renovate the heritage-designated Victorian mansion. The new structure embraces the existing building, preserving its qualities and organizing the day-to-day user experience around a landscaped courtyard. An embrace emerged as a unifying theme to create a comfortable, home-like user experience, and an atmosphere of warmth, intimacy, comfort, privacy, connectivity, and solidity. Similarly, the language of the quilt, a symbolic expression of the battle against HIV/AIDS, was a source of inspiration for the design.

The architecture is a physical manifestation of the embrace in both the vertical and horizontal planes. The extension reaches over and around the restored Victorian mansion, while the new addition, with its robust, textured exterior, surrounds the central courtyard. Beautifully landscaped and alive, the courtyard is visible from every corridor and in-patient room. As one of the original mansions built along Jarvis Street, the retention of the existing 1875 building (known colloquially as the “Grey Lady”) maintains the original character of the street, while the addition introduces a dignified juxtaposition of the old and new. The façade, consisting of a palette of various brick, heavily tinted mirrored glass, and crust-faced limestone, is highly particularized and rich and becomes the architectural manifestation of the quilt. A garden in front, for delight and contemplation, is surrounded by a beech hedge for intimacy and privacy. Once inside, the experience is about the engagement of the old and new and the organization, or the embrace, around the courtyard, which


ABOVE The renovation and extension to Casey House began with the existing 19th-century converted mansion. At the heart of the contemporary extension is a narrow private courtyard, visible from the community spaces and from each of the patient rooms. The specialised healthcare facility for individuals with HIV/AIDS is designed to evoke the experience and comforts of home.

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ABOVE In the verdant courtyard, the treetops provide calming views to upper-floor units. RIGHT The interior exudes warmth in part by its use of natural materials, such as polished limestone and walnut.

is the ever-present symbol of life-affirming green, water, and light (trees, fountain, and sunlight). Emphasizing the relationship between the old and new, the heritage building’s brick remains exposed in the Living Room. This central gathering space, featuring a two-storey atrium, is anchored by a full-height fireplace crafted from Algonquin Limestone. A bridge connects the heritage and new spaces on the second floor with long views stretching from end to end. The courtyard allows direct sunlight into the core of the building on all floors. Given the private nature of the facility, it provides protected outdoor space for users, as well as transparency and clear sightlines across the project. The design integrates sustainable features inherently related to the clients’ health and wellbeing. Green spaces, high-efficiency tinted glass, cross-ventilation via the courtyard and operable windows, bike racks, rainwater collection cisterns, and locally sourced and reclaimed materials also add to the sustainability profile of the project. :: Jury :: While carefully restoring the original century-old house, the expansion offers comfort, light and beauty to a population that has historically been underserved. The intimacy of the plan and the rich materiality turns the idea of a clinical environment on its head. The material palette is extensive and the discrete formal elements are many, but are handled with exceptional rigour and care, thereby transcending the ornate. The façade’s varied articulation and massing keep the new building in scale with the original building, as well as maintaining a harmonious ambiance and human scale for the workers, patients, residents and neighbours. CLIENT CASEY HOUSE | ARCHITECT TEAM SIAMAK HARIRI, FRAIC; MICHAEL BOXER, JEFF STRAUSS, EDWARD JOSEPH, HOWARD WONG, CARA KEDZIOR, ANDRIA FONG, RICO LAW | STRUCTURAL ENTUITIVE | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL WSP CANADA | LANDSCAPE MARK HARTLEY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT | INTERIORS HARIRI PONTARINI ARCHITECTS & IBI GROUP CONTRACTOR BIRD | AREA 5,480 M 2 | BUDGET $40M | COMPLETION AUGUST 2017.

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MAPEI helps Canadian forestry center meet Living Building Challenge MAPEI products were used to build one of North America’s first facilities to meet the Living Building Challenge, an environmental standard that reflects the most advanced measure of sustainability in today’s built environment.

Bill Fisch Forest Stewardship and Education Centre York, Ontario

MAPEI met the challenge by providing Health Product Declarations (HPDs) for all of its products used on the project. To meet the standard’s requirements, sustainability and transparency were critical for selecting products used in the building’s construction. MAPEI products used: • Mapelastic ® • MAPEI Ultralite ™ Mortar

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

FORT MCMURRAY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Fort McMurray, Alberta omb architecture Ema Peter

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

The new Fort McMurray International Airport Terminal creates a meaningful portal for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo in the northern reaches of Alberta; a region characterized by its spectacular geography and the natural beauty of the boreal forest, the prairies, and the northern lights. Host to the national oil sands industry, the small community of Fort McMurray has been thrust onto the global stage, stimulating unprecedented growth and cultural diversification. The remote location coupled with rapid industrial development has severely diluted the availability of skilled building trades and inflated construction costs by 30-to-50 percent. As a result, conventional systems characterize the overwhelming majority of the local built environment, cost-driven to the lowest common denominator of basic steel and concrete structures and doing little for the human spirit. The boom-town ethos prevails, where cheap and fast buildings outnumber long-term quality at every turn.

The new terminal seeks an alternate path, leveraging local constraints into architectural opportunities that celebrate the unique qualities of the place and the spirit of its people. The architecture is purposefully succinct; material resources are used sparingly while also capitalizing on the qualitative advantages of off-site production and fabrication. The resultant building form relates to its green-field setting, respecting the language of the prairie landscape while simultaneously generating an iconic presence. A collection of robust volumes is deployed to express discrete programmatic functions, arranged to facilitate future expansion of the 15,000-square-metre facility. The low, linear, three-storey profile establishes itself with a sense of permanence, inspired by the durability of the native ecology and industry. Raw natural materials are used throughout, including weathering steel, bitumen-hued metal cladding, and exposed concrete. Inside, warm, wood framed spaces that provide direct physical and visual access


Built in a remote location, the airport was constructed with significant offsite fabrication, durable materials (including a long-span CLT ceiling) and simple technologies to ensure quality and minimize the construction schedule and future maintenance. The building projects an iconic presence in the landscape and honest expression of its locale.

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ABOVE The ambitious project comprises a new green-field airport for the region, complete with a new terminal building, aircraft apron, taxiways, approach road, and parking areas.

to a landscaped courtyard greet the passengers. The interior spaces feature abundant natural light and views celebrating the sun, sky and horizon help to orient passengers in transition. A sculptural screen wall above the arrivals hall, composed of illuminated white steel fins, subtly evokes the northern lights and the aspen stands of the boreal forest. Several innovations challenge the status quo, including passive solar orientation, super-insulated building envelope assemblies, in-floor radiant heating, displacement ventilation, and sophisticated heat recovery systems. Low-emitting materials are used throughout to promote healthy interior environments for passengers and employees. More significantly, the building is also distinguished by its early adoption and creative application of a mass timber construction system that envelopes the principal public spaces. Its use as an expressive and didactic design element contributes to community identity. It also confirms that mass timber construction systems can compete economically with the steel-and-concrete solutions that currently dominate the building industry Canada-wide. The environmental benefits of renewable wood-based solutions are well-known. They include significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, reduced carbon footprint, superior thermal performance, and reductions in energy use. Validating and completing a large-scale mass timber solution in one of the country’s most challenging regions has broad and meaningful implications for construction, relevant to regions across Canada.

:: Jury :: The airport typology is a process-heavy programme that often subjugates the architecture, but this project harnesses those very processes to create the architecture. The design successfully addresses almost every element of the programme, from the graphically superior wayfinding, to the discreetly embedded garbage and recycling bins, to the passenger areas carefully organized to create a sense of calm and comfort. Wood is used at different levels and approaches: the long-span CLT panels on the ceiling are a warm and practical structural element. The more fine-grained wood wall surfaces on the ground floor provide an elegant, meditative backdrop for the fraught process of travel. The upper-level roadway breaks up the massing of the overall building in an elegant way and offers clerestory lighting. From structural logic to passenger convenience to an overall sense of warmth and beauty, this is an airport that works beautifully at every level.

CLIENT THE FORT MCMURRAY AIRPORT AUTHORITY | ARCHITECT TEAM STEVE MCFARLANE, ROBERT GRANT | STRUCTURAL EQUILIBRIUM CONSULTING INC. | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL INTEGRAL GROUP | LANDSCAPE PWL PARTNERSHIP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS INC. | INTERIORS COMPLETED BY OFFICE OF MCFARLANE BIGGAR; COMMENCED AS MCFARLANE GREEN BIGGAR ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN | CONTRACTOR LEDCOR CONSTRUCTION LTD. | AREA 15,000 M 2 | BUDGET $258 M | COMPLETION OCTOBER 2014


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER The Maison de la littérature is a modernist expansion and transformation of a 19th-century Gothic Revival church in Quebec City. BELOW The luminous addition contrasts boldly with the heritage building. OPPOSITE PAGE The church interior is now a cultural centre for readers and writers. LEFT

MAISON DE LA LITTÉRATURE Quebec City Chevalier Morales Architectes Doublespace Photography

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

Given the significant programming requirements and the difficult and somewhat hidden access to the main spaces of Wesley Temple, the architects felt it was appropriate to move part of the program into a new annex outside the church space to create more walking areas and an increased sense of freedom. This strategy facilitated some of the work and provided a more effective layout for some of the spaces. It also helped declutter Wesley Temple, a heritage building, allowing the architects to preserve and restore the original spatiality of the overall structure. The partly transparent and strangely familiar shape of this new annex gives an open, contemporary feel to the Institut Canadien de Québec, the main entrance of which is now accessed naturally from the bottom

of the sloping Chaussée des Écossais where it intersects with Rue StStanislas. The institution’s interior layout provides greater access via the main door of the temple as well as the parking lot that also leads into the annex. These various access options all converge on the large opening in the floor and the hanging light fixture at the heart of the building, connecting the café, two exhibition areas, and the library collections. This extension, which in its dialectic relationship with the original temple brings the institution fully into the 21st century with its e-books and Twitter poems, houses the main creative spaces in the upper levels. The idea of putting the creative spaces outside the temple while maintaining a close connection to it seemed symbolically


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ABOVE Unique in North America, the “House of Literature” comprises a public library, a permanent exhibition on Quebec literature, a creative studio, a writers’ residence, writing carrels, and a reading lounge.

appropriate. Slightly detached, its impressive views of the river and the old city offer a greater sense of freedom. The insertion approach used for the new annex is aimed primarily at showcasing, complementing and preserving the heritage value of the existing building. The extension emerges as a strong symbol of the redeveloped heritage space and avoids altering the architectural composition of the existing structure. Placing the new program in the annex (originally planned for inside Wesley Temple) meant that no major changes had to be made to the existing stone envelope. The project also included a significant restoration component for the building’s masonry and English gothic church windows. The glass annex establishes a material and formal dialogue with the existing stone building. The quality of its materials, its transparency, and simplicity of detail serve to reveal and showcase the existing structure. The extension’s simple and controlled skin does not compete with the richness and quality of the adjacent historic details and masonry assembly, creating a dialogue between the past and present of the historic neighbourhood of Old Quebec City.

:: Jury :: This transformation of and addition to a historic church into a literary cultural centre provides a complex spatial experience that engages with the past while imbuing the building with a new present-day relevance. By finishing everything uniformly in white, the structure of the historic architectural elements is brought forward. Against that structure, there is a play between the original and the new interventions. The plan of the new annex organizes the more cellular elements of the programme, freeing the space of the original church to be a more f luid interconnection of open spaces. The jury carefully deliberated over the radical approach taken to the historic church; the final structure evokes rather than restores the past. However, this re-invention offers a new spatial identity for an abandoned church. CLIENT VILLE DE QUÉBEC | ARCHITECT TEAM STEPHAN CHEVALIER, SERGIO MORALES, ALEXANDRE MASSÉ, JULIE RONDEAU, SIMON BARRETTE, CHRISTINE GIGUÈRE | STRUCTURAL EMS INGÉNIERIE INC. | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL STANTEC | LANDSCAPE VILLE DE QUÉBEC | INTERIORS CHEVALIER MORALES ARCHITECTES | CONTRACTOR L’INTENDANT | SCENOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT TRIZART ALLIANCE | SCENOGRAPHY LUC PLAMONDON | ACOUSTICS OCTAVE ACOUSTIQUE INC. | AREA 1,919 M2 | BUDGET $11.8 M | COMPLETION SPRING 2015


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

TWO HULLS HOUSE ABOVE A steel-frame house with a wood skin, its steel endoskeleton resists both gravity loads and wind uplift. The 32-foot cantilevers and concrete fin foundations allow the sea to pass under without damage. OPPOSITE The main entrance to Two Hulls House; section drawing.

Port Mouton, Nova Scotia MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Greg Richardson except where indicated

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

Two Hulls House is situated in a glaciated, coastal landscape with a cool maritime climate. The site’s geological make-up consists of granite bedrock and boulder till, creating pristine white-sand beaches and turquoise waters. Two pavilions float above the shoreline like two ship’s hulls resting on cradles for the winter, forming protected outdoor spaces between and underneath them. Like a pair of binoculars, Two Hulls House acts as a landscape-viewing instrument, effortlessly framing the environment. A concrete seawall on the foreshore protects the house from rogue waves. Two Hulls House touches the land lightly, resting on concrete fins, to have a minimal impact on the fragile land and flora.

This is a permanent home for a family of four, consisting of a day pavilion and a night pavilion. One approaches the understated, abstract public façade on the land side, then proceeds through the foyer, turning right to the sleeping pavilion or left into the living pavilion. Lantern-like outdoor porches dematerialize the two main forms on the ocean ends and glow from within at night. Inside the great room is a f loating hearth 7.3-metres-long, the focal point of this space. This is a steel-frame structure, comprising a bridge truss with a boardand-batten cedar skin. The white endoskeleton of Two Hulls House resists both gravity loads and wind uplift. The 9.8-metre cantilevers


10'

0

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JAMES BRITTAIN

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ABOVE A minimalist curtain wall is the fenestration of the “binocular” ends of the house. RIGHT The breezeway between the two “hulls”.

and the concrete fin foundations invite the ocean to pass under without damaging the hulls above. The fenestration of the “binocular” ends takes the form of minimalist curtain-wall glazing with structural silicone, while the side elevations contain storefront glazing. The geothermal heating system, with its concrete thermal-mass floors, harvests heat from the sun. This is a carefully crafted, durable building, that responds to its demanding climate to achieve a long life and elegantly reference the maritime heritage of its place. :: Jury :: Drawing vernacular references into a form evocative of two bridges cantilevered over the water, the Two Hull House generates a dramatic presence on the landscape. In abstracting the forms of the ships that once helped build up the region, the architect has infused the house with an intriguing ghost-like quality and a strong sense of place. Inside, the architecture and ocean are in dialogue, with a fenestration pattern that offers a variety of views that are distinctively different from the generic linear ocean views of most waterfront houses. The hooded decks give a sense of comfort and shelter in a harsh climate, even as they literally bring the inhabitants closer to the ocean.

CLIENT SYLVIA AND MARCELO NICOLELA | ARCHITECT TEAM BRIAN MACKAY-LYONS FRAIC, KEVIN REID, TALBOT SWEETAPPLE MRAIC, DAVID BOURQUE, OMAR GANDHI MRAIC, SAWA ROSTKOWSKA, JORDAN RICE | STRUCTURAL : CAMPBELL COMEAU ENGINEERING LTD. | LANDSCAPE CORNELIA HAHN OBERLANDER | INTERIORS IHOR PONA AND PIN/TAYLOR ARCHITECTS | CONTRACTOR DELMAR CONSTRUCTION LTD. | AREA 2,750 SQ. FT. | BUDGET WITHHELD | COMPLETION AUGUST 2011.


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

FORT YORK VISITOR CENTRE Toronto, Ontario Patkau Architects with Kearns Mancini Architects Tom Arban Photography, except as indicated

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

It was time to remember more deliberately. It was time to remind Torontonians, Canadians–and perhaps the world–of how we stood guard for our country. When the American troops invaded in 1813, the fort at the edge of Lake Ontario was the ground for the Battle of York. And afterward, for a long time, Fort York struggled to remain relevant. A national competition in 2009 resulted in the design and construction of a new visitor centre at the Fort York National Historic Site in downtown Toronto. The joint venture team considered the site as the birthplace of Toronto; the fort is home to one of the oldest collections of fortifications in Canada, dating back to the War of 1812. Today, the

Fort York Visitor Centre, completed in 2015, commemorates the historic significance of the site, providing a contemplative opportunity for visitors to reflect as they ascend to the Fort Commons to a final prospect overlooking the fort and the city beyond. Strategically situated along the edge of the site, the centre is fortified and defined by a series of monolithic weathering steel panel walls, which resonate with the design of the fort just beyond, and define the horizontal datum of the battlefield immediately to the north. Beyond the weathering steel wall, the building rises toward the fort, ultimately providing a prospect onto the entire historic site through a belvedere


PATKAU ARCHITECTS OPPOSITE Below the elevated concrete canopy of the Gardiner Expressway and geographically landlocked by rail corridors, the Fort York Visitor Centre establishes a prominent front door to the Fort where none previously existed. ABOVEThe project’s main facade is intimately interwoven in alternations of transparency and solidity, which seek to evoke glimpses afforded from within the fortifications. BELOW A schematic diagram of the visitors’ route, through which visitors can learn about the history of the Fortifications through digital media presentations, artifact displays and dioramas.

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The design is sympathetic to both the linearity of the site and to the act of “emerging” from the history of the site.

located on the uppermost rooftop. It offers an intimate experience of the topographical history of the site, which vividly recounts the transformation of the grounds and the city through the decades. With its frosted glass and rusty steel exterior, the centre is a long linear structure that sits southwest of the fort just north of the Gardiner Expressway. The weathering steel plates that comprise the façade are reminiscent of the area’s industrial past. Despite having been value-engineered within an inch of its architectural life, the centre is exquisitely detailed and spatially coherent. The project’s main facade is intimately interwoven in alternations of transparency and solidity, which seek to evoke glimpses from within the fortifications. The plan was devised to be sympathetic to both the linearity of the site and to the act of emerging from the history of the site. Thus, visitors to the building travel back and forth as they gradually rise to the final prospect of the fort. Along the way, visitors can learn about the history of the fortifications. Corridors, such as the time tunnel, offer vivid insights into the period in which the fort was built through digital media presentations and curated artifact displays and dioramas. In this way, visitors to the fort can gain a deep understanding of the history of the site in a relatively compact setting. The project team was able to deliver the project without comprom-

ising the essential imagery, the expressive architectural content, and spatial arrangement of the project despite many budgetary, construction and timeline constraints. :: Jury :: This building is a powerful and robust intervention that serves as a threshold between the historic and the contemporary. Its linear plan and attenuated promenade builds on that edge condition of the on-site expressway. Its robust materiality and relentlessly repeated forms suggest the ramparts of the original fort. The design unapologetically celebrates the infrastructure around it, and invokes the concept of earth and the idea of fortification. Yet the Corten-steel canopies over the doorways provide both a welcoming entrance to this museum. CLIENT CITY OF TORONTO | ARCHITECT TEAM PATKAU ARCHITECTS—JAMES EIDSE, MIKE GREEN, DIMITRI KOUBATIS, SHANE O’NEILL, JOHN PATKAU, PATRICIA PATKAU, THOMAS SCHROEDER, LUKE STERN, MICHAEL THORPE; KEARNS MANCINI ARCHITECTS—JONATHAN KEARNS, DAN MCNEIL, LUCY O’CONNOR, ZHIVKA HRISTOVA, TONY MANCINI, PETER NG | STRUCTURAL READ JONES CHRISTOFFERSON CONSULTING ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL COBALT ENGINEERING | CIVIL MMM GROUP | LANDSCAPE JANET ROSENBURG ASSOCIATES | HERITAGE UNTERMAN MCPHAIL ASSOCIATES | RENDERINGS LUXIGON / PATKAU ARCHITECTS | AREA 2,380 M 2 | BUDGET $12.2M | COMPLETION 2014


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

RABBIT SNARE GORGE Inverness, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia Omar Gandhi Architects with Design Base 8 Doublespace Photography

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

Lawrence MacIsaac recalls stories of his great-grandfather using the property to teach his sons how to snare rabbits, while his great-grandmother used the “laundry stone” at the bottom of a small waterfall to wash clothing. With the extremely steep sides of the gorge, it was difficult to do anything with the land, including harvesting the trees, so it was left to grow wild. The cabin at Rabbit Snare Gorge is the first of three small creaturelike structures hidden in the mysterious landscape. The cabin is the primary dwelling on a 46-acre parcel of land found on the rugged wooded coastline of rural Cape Breton. It is designed as a gently adapted gabled tower. This allows it to reach above the forest canopy with two major viewing platforms; one oriented directly toward the ocean, and the other along the length of the convergent brook valley.

The landscape of Rabbit Snare Gorge is defined by the steep slopes of the Cape Breton Highlands, dense woodland with patches of Acadian hardwood, deep gorges cut by a babbling brook, and the rocky cliffs of the Northumberland Strait. The location allows for a long wide view of the entire property including the majority of the gorge leading toward the ocean. The procession through the cabin starts with the entry and bedrooms on the ground f loor to the double-height kitchen and dining room on the second f loor and, lastly, the living space on the third f loor. Here, is the final lookout view of the entire property. The structure is linked to the local vernacular by a number of formal elements. The traditional gable form of the cabin is manipulated to open views and follow the path of the sun. It emphasizes the major interior


The cabin is the primary dwelling on a 46-acre parcel of land on the rugged wooded coastline of rural Cape Breton. The cabin is a gently adapted gabled tower, which allows it to reach above the forest canopy with two major viewing platforms, one oriented directly towards the ocean and the other along the length of the convergent brook valley.

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The structure references the local vernacular by way of locally sourced wood, and by archetypal gable and shed forms, designed to open up views and follow the sun’s path.

CLIENT KEVIN AND STEPHANIE BRIODY | ARCHITECT TEAM OMAR GANDHI ARCHITECT—OMAR GANDHI, MRAIC; PETER BRAITHWAITE, PETER KOLODZIEJ, MAXWELL SCHNUTGEN, ELIZABETH POWELL, JEFF SHAW; DESIGN BASE 8, NYC—JON SIANI, JON WILSON, GARRETT HELM | CONSULTANTS ANDREA DONCASTER ENGINEERING, JOSEPH ‘MACGEE’ MACFARLANE | BUDGET $310/SQ.FT | COMPLETION FALL 2015

spaces, and accentuates the verticality of the tower, while efficiently shedding snow and rain. Traditional, local wood board cladding is used on the exterior of the cabin. The cabin’s steel entry hoop takes shape from the entry windbreaks which are unique to Cape Breton and Newfoundland coastal communities. It is light on the land and heavy against the wind. The client is an avid outdoorsman and hobby arborist with sincere respect for the natural landscape. Therefore, sensitivity to site and ecological disruption was an early and major design parameter. The tower typology of the cabin offers elevated views and ample programming within a minimal footprint. The exposure of the sloped site means it endures the full brunt of heavy Atlantic rainstorms, winter Nor’easters, corrosive salt-spray from crashing swell, and strong suetes winds. The latter are local south-easterlies which accelerate down the Highland escarpment to reach speeds of over 200km/h. The local suetes demand robust structural systems to withstand major lateral loads and uplift. The tall cabin combats the high winds through redundant sheathing. Every solid plane, including the interior partition wall, contributes as shear walls, diaphragms, and stacked compression rings. The windbreak, constructed out of welded weathering steel, is then hung from the framing. :: Jury :: Rabbit Snare Gorge suggests an alternative idea of a dwelling in the Canadian landscape. The programme is simple: a country home on a small footprint with an elegantly restrained palette inside and out. But the architect has visually “stretched” what we think of as conventional house proportions, distorting and transforming the structure into something slightly otherworldly. Its narrow verticality, slot windows and over height door offer a provocative new image of the cabin in the wilderness. The upper floor deck offers an elevated perspective of the surrounding valley, completing the project’s uncanny persona.


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

BORDEN PARK PAVILION The building recalls the iconic geometry of classical pavilions. Inside, the pavilion core contains public washrooms and vending machines, encircled by a small seating area offering views to the park.

Edmonton, Alberta GH3 Raymond Chow

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

Awarded through a national design competition in 2011, the Borden Park Pavilion attempts to recall the history of Borden Park through the reintroduction of the playful qualities of its status as an amusement park in the early 20th century. The scheme makes overtly manifest the iconic geometry of classical parks and pavilions in its pedestrian design, comprised of axial and curving paths that merge into circuses at key points. This notion is further carried out by the circular form of the amenity pavilion itself, which also engages in a formal relationship with the park’s other geometric structures from past and present, such as the carousel, bandshell and Ferris wheel.

Adjacent to the pavilion, a series of entry courts and seating patios emerge as soft and hardscaped rings – a trajectory of the building form into the landscape, as well as an expansion of its visual and useable footprint. Primary functions of the amenity pavilion are confined to the core, allowing a complete 360-degree promenade around the building perimeter to maximize year-round engagement with the park and landscape through a fully transparent exterior skin. This skin, when viewed from the exterior in daylight, is visually impermeable and highly reflective. In mirroring the immediate landscape in striking triangular facets, the building seems almost to dissolve into its idyllic surroundings, lending


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The pavilion becomes a luminous beacon at nightfall. From the outside, the pavilion is clad with triangulated, highly reflective glass panels, effectively dissolving into its surroundings.

ABOVE RIGHT

a fleeting, ephemeral quality to the experience of the pavilion while encouraging a sense of liveliness and interactivity through the device of the façade as a fun-house mirror. Play, as a key conceptual driver of the project, draws on the park’s historic tradition as a popular Sunday attraction for thousands of residents who gathered to picnic, enjoy concerts and ballgames, and partake in rides on roller coasters and carousels. Fittingly, the pavilion’s form and expressive timber truss structure evoke the playful qualities of children’s toy drums and merry-go-rounds. Material simplicity and structural uniqueness result in a building of studied minimalism. A distinct architecture is achieved through a seamlessly integrated building façade comprised of a glulam Douglas fir structural frame and an SSG (structural silicone glazed) curtain wall incorporating sealed glazed units. Both structure and cladding are triangulated and faceted, which allows the expression of the structural grid and pattern on the building’s exterior. The resulting floor-to-ceiling glazing provides captivating panoramic views from the pavilion while blurring the boundary between interior and exterior space and intensifying the sense of connection to seasonal dynamics and to the park itself. An integrated approach to environmental sustainability is evident in the choice of materials: wood, concrete, and glass were selected for their durability, permanence, and timelessness. The structural ambition of the design emphasizes the use of rough whitewashed laminated timbers, whose rich patina and spatial arrangement recall the iconic structures and materiality of the park’s history while foregrounding the sustainable character of the pavilion. The building’s remaining palette consists of simple materials that, in character, emphasize the surrounding landscape, and in quality, ensure a robust and enduring building.

:: Jury :: The pavilion gifts its community with a simple and joyous reductive architectural form. The integration of mullions and support framework, the triangular glazing units, and the circle-within-a-circle plan work together to generate a singularly powerful presence within a city park. It is the abstraction that would one would see at the level of art, but with which people can actually engage and play. Its character shifts diurnally, becoming nearly invisible at times as its mirrored facades reflect the surrounding trees, and then transforming into a lantern at sundown. It is a refreshingly well-considered and carefully designed object of fascination within what is the usually neglected programme of park infrastructure. BORDEN PARK PAVILION | ARCHITECT GH3 | CLIENT CITY OF EDMONTON | ARCHITECT TEAM PAT

HANSON, DIANA GERRARD, LOUISE CLAVIN | STRUCTURAL CHERNENKO ENGINEERING LTD. | MECH-

ANICAL VITAL ENGINEERING CORPORATION | ELECTRICAL A.B. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING INC. LANDSCAPE GH3 | CONTRACTOR JEN-COL CONSTRUCTION LTD.| AREA 245 M2 | BUDGET $2.1 M COMPLETION MARCH 2014

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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

SAINTLAURENT SPORTS COMPLEX Montreal, Quebec Saucier + Perrotte with HCMA Olivier Blouin

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

The structure links Marcel Laurin Park to the north and Thimens Boulevard, a main thoroughfare of this Montreal suburb. Inside are sports venues bound together by carefully considered social spaces.

The Saint-Laurent Sports Complex is located between the existing Émile Legault School and Raymond Bourque Arena, both of which are horizontal in form and neutral in character. As a result, for this project, it became vital to create a strong visual and physical link between the Marcel-Laurin Park to the north and the projected green band that will run along Thimens Boulevard. The sculptural nature of the project creates a strong link between these two natural elements in the urban fabric. Two angular objects—one prismatic, white and diaphanous, the other darker and stretched horizontally—embrace the specific programmatic functions of the project and simultaneously transcend them; they invite users and passersby from the boulevard while serving as a signal for the passage toward the park beyond. The two volumes appear to be shifting, activated by the kinetic energy emanating from the heart of the project, thereby evoking the dynamic nature of the activities taking place within, such as sports, athletics, and training. The volumetric approach is inspired by the tectonic forces that bend the surface layer of the site’s landscape. The project contains an accessible green roof landscape that serves as a continuation of the public promenade of pedestrian and bicycle paths that start at Thimens Boulevard. Leading through the outdoor public space and alongside the main entrance, this new topographic


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The facility combines an indoor soccer field with a yoga studio, training room, change rooms and lockers; the white prismatic volume contains a gymnasium, recreational pool and 25-metre swimming pool.

path continues over the sculptural architectural volumes toward the sports field and Marcel-Laurin Park beyond. The main access to the sports complex is through a large triangle cut into the undulating plane of the site. Upon entering the complex, visitors find the café and the exterior terrace to the right as well as large openings to the interior soccer field. To the left, large portions of glass give onto the adjacent pools, over which the volumes of the palestra and the gymnasium hover, seemingly suspended inside the white angular prism. A colourful sculptural staircase, visually connected to the volumes of the palestra, sinuously engages the structural elements of the building. The superimposition of the palestra and gymnasium above the pool area allows them to be connected directly to the multifunctional room and public hall, which are both essential to the intensive and varied uses of the building. Sport and recreation facilities have become important gathering places and play a vital role in the development of both healthy communities and competitive athletes. As such, the Saint-Laurent Sports Complex is bound to become an essential community and social hub and serve as a leading-edge facility for recreation, sport, wellness and special events. To this end, the building has been rigorously designed to perform to the highest calibre structurally, programmatically, func-

tionally and aesthetically. To meet the wide range of community needs, the design is flexible and adaptive, both on a daily basis and over the lifespan of the building. :: Jury :: This project is distinctively stark and austere.The strategic manipulation of what is essentially two huge boxes and the ground-level glazing generate a dynamic tension that is palpable as one approaches the building and walks through it. There is a fearless confidence in the decision to reduce all the complex and varied activities and services of the programme into two stark, strong, sculptural forms and a very small number of strong colours. The architecture takes the human activities inside and transforms them into an abstraction of strength and energy. CLIENT ARRONDISSEMENT SAINT-LAURENT | ARCHITECT TEAM GILLES SAUCIER, ANDRÉ PERROTTE, TREVOR DAVIES, DARRYL CONDON, MICHAEL HENDERSON, DOMINIQUE DUMAIS, YUTARO MINAGAWA, PATRICE BEGIN, MARIE EVE PRIMEAU, OLIVIER KRIEGER, JEAN-PHILIPPE BEAUCHAMP, KATE BUSBY, ANNA BENDIX, LIA RUCCOLO, CHARLES ALEXANDRE DUBOIS, GREG NEUDORF, VEDANTA BALBAHADUR, CARL-JAN RUPP, ADAM FAWKES, NICK WORTH, STEVE DIPASQUAL | STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL SNC-LAVALIN INC. | LANDSCAPE CLAUDE CORMIER + ASSOCIÉS | INTERIORS SAUCIER+PERROTTE ARCHITECTES / HCMA ARCHITECTS | CONTRACTOR UNIGERTEC| AREA 14,300 M2 | BUDGET $42.9M | COMPLETION 2017


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MICHAL AND RENATA HORNSTEIN PAVILION FOR PEACE

MARC CRAMER

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Montreal, Quebec Atelier TAG with Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes Marc Cramer, Pawel Karwowski and Olivier Blouin

LOCATION

ARCHITECT PHOTOS

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is composed of five pavilions: the Hornstein Pavilion (1910); the Stewart Pavilion (1976); the Desmarais Pavilion (1991); the Bourgie Pavilion (2011), and the new Pavilion for Peace (2016). The new building is located on Bishop Street to the south of the Desmarais Pavilion, designed by Moshe Safdie. The two buildings are linked by an aerial passageway spanning an alley. Whereas Sherbrooke Street has grown over the years to include largerscale towers, Bishop Street has retained the 19th-century scale of Victorian houses. The project was conceived to address both of these scales simultaneously. The dynamic rotation of the bipartite composition allows

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a subtle integration of the Victorian scale. The rotation is geo-specific: the lower body turns and greets the visitor while the upper body opens toward the museum campus and Mount Royal further in the distance. The MMFA campus is an assemblage of distinct architectural styles. Each pavilion evokes its era and provides a commentary on the particular role that the institution has played in society over time. This idea is foremost anchored in the unique circulation strategy of each pavilion. The Beaux-Arts museum of 1910, designed by architects Edward and William S. Maxwell, is structured around an introverted central grand stair that contributes little to the act of exhibition viewing. It is “as

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The Pavilion for Peace is clad in a lacework designed to emphasize the two-part massing by enveloping the whole in a delicate veil. Much more than a mere device for efficient circulation, the event stairway is first and foremost a slow space designed for lingering. ABOVE The pavilion stairway is juxtaposed with the museum’s old masters collection, the second largest in Canada. OPPOSITE TOP

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though the ceremony of the visit was of equal importance to the contemplation of the artworks themselves” whereas the Pavilion for Peace redefines the institution’s relationship with the city, offering a renewed museum experience. Expanding upon the Bourdieusian theory of democratization of culture introduced by Safdie in his 1991 building, the Pavilion for Peace furthers the ideology of universal access to culture and continues to develop its social role and its communicative dimension. The proposed concept is structured around the event stair, addressing the expanded role of the 21st-century museum. This socio-spatial apparatus links the experience of the museum to the city and offers a multitude of spatial relationships. The in-between space, suspended in the city, animates the Bishop Street façade, providing visitors a momentary interlude from the contemplative experience of the galleries, and allowing them to reconnect with the city and the community beyond the walls of the MMFA . This interior urban promenade, f luid and filled with light, offers spectacular views of the mountain and the river. Through its event stair, the architecture of the pavilion positions the visitors, rather than the artifacts, at the center of the museum experience and activates bold, innovative programs associated with education and art-therapy. Its carefully choreographed architectural space facilitates social cohesion by encouraging impromptu public dialogue on art and a shared cultural experience. The intimate scale of the Pavilion for Peace allows the MMFA to build upon this process of cultural democratization and to realize a museum that operates not as a sanctuary but as an accessible and engaged cultural agora.

:: Jury :: The Pavilion for Peace beautifully and effectively fulfills its purpose of providing visitors with galleries, an all-in-one stairway, corridor, and linear public living room that winds its way up to the building. It works on both sides of its walls, providing a generous zone for gallery-goers within, while visually projecting its energy and activity to the city outside. The building is a sensitive insertion into the urban fabric, with a jogged façade that addresses the scale of the adjacent historic houses. The cool, abstract glass-and-aluminum palette of the exterior is balanced with the warm, natural wood of the interior. Its generosity of space and its strategic spatial zoning facilitates both efficient visitor movement and optional socialization. Visible from a block away and transforming into an illuminated lantern at night, the pavilion offers a transparent and welcoming transition from the gallery to the city.

CLIENT MONTREAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS | ARCHITECT TEAM ATELIER TAG—MANON ASSELIN, KATSUHIRO YAMAZAKI, PAWEL KARWOWSKI, MATHIEU LEMIEUX-BLANCHARD, BENJAMIN RANKIN, ÉOLE SYLVAIN ET CÉDRIC LANGEVIN; JODOIN LAMARRE PRATTE—NICOLAS RANGER, OLIVIER MILLIEN, GUYLAINE BEAUDOIN, SERGE BRETON, MICHEL BOURASSA, ISRAEL LUDENA CERMENO, CHRISTINE TRUDEAU-GUERTIN | STRUCTURAL NCK—JACQUES CHARTRAND AND GUILLAUME LEROUX | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL SMI ÉNERPRO—PIERRE LÉVESQUE AND FABIEN CHOISEZ | EXHIBITION DESIGN MMFA STAFF, ARCHITEM, PRAA | LIGHTING CONSULTANT CS DESIGN—CONOR SAMPSON | ACOUSTIC CONSULTANT JEAN-PIERRE LEGAULT | CONTRACTOR POMERLEAU | AREA 4,363 M2 | BUDGET $23.7 M | COMPLETION NOVEMBER 2016


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GOVERNOR GENERAL’S MEDAL WINNER

PARALLELOGRAM HOUSE

East St. Paul, Manitoba 5468796 James Brittain, except as indicated

LOCATION

ARCHITECTS PHOTOS

Designed for a family of four, the Parallelogram House is located in East St. Paul, a bedroom community just north of Winnipeg. Situated on a typical suburban street, the home stands in quiet and refined contrast to its stucco-clad neighbours. It is characterized by an unorthodox form and unexpected materials that are at once inconspicuous and yet architecturally significant. Since the neighbourhood was developed 30 years ago, the property has not been touched. It is a remnant site beside a thick stand of existing trees with a public walking and cycling trail beyond. The clients were drawn to the potential of the site as a generous and shaded outdoor sanctuary and a tranquil clearing where they could settle their family and build campfires with their children. While the clients desired a bungalow, they also wanted to ensure that all the rooms had views of the front or backyard. Based on the lot size, setbacks, and the frontage requirements, the program could only fit within a two-storey volume. By skewing of the floor plan into a parallelogram, the window area was increased by almost 1.5 times without increasing the footprint. This strategy opened the home to a panoramic view of the tree preserve and welcomed the southern exposure into the site and home.

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Built in a neighbourhood of conventional houses on large lots, the Parallelogram House contrasts sharply with its surroundings. By skewing the floor plan into a parallelogram, the window area was greatly increased without enlarging the footprint, opening the home up to a panoramic view of the trees and preserving the site’s southern exposure within the required setbacks.

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On the exterior, the house is clad in naturally stained wood siding that wraps onto the underside of the roof overhang above. The overhang covers open patios and a screened porch, supported by a series of u-shaped Cor-Ten plate steel columns. These columns extend the rich texture and long shadows of the surrounding trees and serve to screen private rooms. Together, the dark palette of wood and steel ground this quiet residence into its surrounding landscape. Inside, high ceilings and an open plan define the main living space. The plan flows around a freestanding utility box which contains the kitchen pantry as well as a walk-in closet and bathroom. The wood-clad box grows upwards from the floor and helps define the spaces around it. A simple and muted palette emphasizes the interior volumes with a sequence of light wells and skylights that draw daylight from the main floor all the way down to the basement. The bedroom wing is separated from the living space by a white steel screen that extends the geometry and function of the exterior columns into and throughout the house.

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:: Jury :: At once radical and subtle, Parallelogram House experiments with the context of ordinary suburban architecture. Its diagonal facades front and back afford more expansive and yet more private view lines than the ubiquitous and non-private in-line siting of houses in residential neighbourhoods. Its use of steel fins provides a provocative alternative both in material and form to the predictable and banal materials that are more common to the programme. This is domestic architecture that challenges its paradigm, and yet with its single-story height and earthtoned façade, it maintains a low profile. CLIENT NOLAN PLOEGMAN | ARCHITECT TEAM SASA RADULOVIC, JOHANNA HURME, COLIN

The home’s vertical wood siding wraps onto the underside of an extensive roof overhang, which is supported by Cor-Ten columns that evoke the rich texture and shadows of the tree line.

ABOVE

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NEUFELD, APOLLINAIRE AU, PABLO BATISTA, KEN BORTON, JORDY CRADDOCK, AYNSLEE HURDAL, CAROLINE INGLIS, KELSEY MCMAHON, SHANNON WIEBE, SHARON ACKERMAN, MANDY ALDCORN, SARAH ALMAKI, BEN GREENWOOD, ANDRIY IVANYTSKYY, JEFF KACHKAN, TRENT THOMPSON | STRUCTURAL HANUSCHAK CONSULTANTS INC. | LANDSCAPE SCATLIFF + MILLER + MURRAY | CONTRACTOR CONCORD PROJECTS | AREA 2,700 FT 2 + GARAGE + FULL BASEMENT | BUDGET WITHHELD | COMPLETION AUGUST 2014

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ACROSS CANADA Vancouver 05/10—10/08

Offsite: Shigeru Ban A look at Shigeru Ban’s use of low-cost materials to house victims of natural disasters. Offsite: Shigeru Ban is organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Institute of Asian Art.

09/20—09/23

IDS Vancouver The Interior Design Show Vancouver is the Pacific platform for all things design and is a leading showcase of new products and furniture, designers and avantgarde concepts from North America and beyond.

www.vancouver.interiordesignshow.com

Toronto

www.vanartgallery.bc.ca

—05/27

rzlbd Hopscotch The exhibition challenges the conventionality of the singlefamily home through 12 built residential infill projects within the Toronto area.

COURTESY OF WEST VANCOUVER MUSEUM

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www.urbanspacegallery.ca

05/23—05/25

Vancouver’s Ritz Hotel Lounge, immortalized by Selwyn Pullan. 05/16—07-04

What’s Lost

Curated by Kiriko Watanabe and exhibiting at the West Vancouver Museum, this exhibition highlights mid-century architectural photographer Selwyn Pullan’s images of now-demolished landmark modernist structures and interiors. www.westvancouvermuseum.ca

05/29—05/30

DesignThinkers Vancouver Canada’s annual conference for visual communicators is a vital forum for communications and design professionals. www.designthinkers.com

06/09—09/30

Cabin Fever The exhibition traces the tradition of the cabin in Canada and the United States—from the settlement of the frontier to the contemporary depictions circulated across the internet—showing how this humble architectural form has helped shape a larger cultural identity. www.vanartgallery.bc.ca

Bold by Design: OAA Conference 2018 This year’s Ontario Association of Architects conference will explore how architects can use the knowledge and skills of the profession: creativity, design thinking and critical analysis—to challenge existing models and develop new approaches to complex problems.

working and education in the North American design, architecture, construction and real estate communities. The show is home to Construct Canada, HomeBuilder & Renovator Expo, PM E xpo and World of Concrete Pavilion.

Calgary

Montreal

www.buildingscanada.com

www.thebuildingsshow.com

—09/02

Lab Cult: An unorthodox history of interchanges between science and architecture After long questioning science’s capacity to provide answers to architecture’s social mandate, architects and designers are once again enchanted with the concept of the laboratory. Case studies from the 19th and 20th centuries are presented through archival material from the CCA collection, as well as loans from institutions across North America. www.cca.qc.ca

—10/07

Philip Beesley: Transforming Space Can architecture respond, feel, care? Philip Beesley: Transforming Space is an immersive experience that merges chemistry, artificial intelligence and encompassing soundscapes into an immersive, interactive setting.

Utopie Radicali: Florence 1966–1976 Organized by Palazzo Strozzi and curated by Pino Brugellis, Gianni Pettena, and Alberto Salvadori, the exhibition brings together the work of Archizoom, Superstudio, 9999, UFO, Zzigurat, Remo Buti, and Gianni Pettena—iconoclast practitioners who made Florence a focal point for new developments in architectural thought.

10/11 2018

05/24—09/09

www.oaa.on.ca

06/02—10/08

www.rom.on.ca

Green Building Festival The Green Building Festival offers top quality programming that pushes the boundaries of how sustainable buildings and cities are designed, constructed and managed. www.sbcanada.org

10/28—10/30

The Buildings Show The leading multi-component exhibition for sourcing, net-

www.cca.qc.ca

Unstable Presence: Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has earned a reputation for largescale, participatory “anti-monument” installations that frequently incorporate technology, light and the architecture of public spaces. The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal hosts his upcoming exhibition. www.macm.org

11/07—11/08

BUILDEX Calgary 2018 BUILDEX Calgary is Alberta’s largest tradeshow & conference for the Construction, Renovation, Architecture, Interior Design and Property Management industries.   Winnipeg 10/11

Manitoba Design Exposition The one-day trade show for the design community of Manitoba, presented by the Professional Interior Designers Institute of Manitoba, offering a snapshot of the design industry’s latest products and services. www.pidim.ca

Saint John 05/30—06/02

RAIC Festival of Architecture The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual Festival of Architecture comes to New Brunswick in 2018. Continuing education sessions, tours, and awards, are planned as part of the annual showcase. The RAIC has also issued a call for presenters for the event. www.festival2018.raic.org

St John’s

05/22—05/25

Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada Conference This year’s conference will be held at the base of Signal Hill, a National Historic Site overlooking the entrance to St. John’s Harbour. St. John’s is one of the oldest European settlements in North America. www.canada-architecture.org


INTERNATIONAL Venice

05/26—11/25

La Biennale di Venezia Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara curate the 16th installations of the legendary international architecture exhibition, on the grounds of the Giardini in Venice. The Biennale Architecture 2018 will be titled Freespace, evoking a generosity of spiting and a sense of humanity at the core of architecture’s agenda. This year, the Canadian entry to the biennale is UNCEDED, led by architect Douglas Cardinal. www.labiennale.org/en www.unceded.ca

ference in cities of every size all over the world. Over 23,000 attendees are expected.

1,000-square-foot home designed for the exhibition by architect Pierluigi Colombo.

07/15—01/13/19

London

www.conferenceonarchitecture.com

Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s architects responded to contradictory demands and influences, developing a postwar architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. www.moma.org

New York

Washington, D.C.

06/21—06/23

—09/18

AIA Conference on Architecture 2018 Some of the most creative architects, designers, and firms will share how they’re creating their own blueprint and making a dif-

Making Room: Housing for a Changing America This exhibition explores cuttingedge typologies through case studies and the presentation of The Open House—a flexible,

www.nbm.org

nessing a subtle interplay of light, water and geometry, her atmospheric courtyard-based design draws on both the domestic architecture of Mexico and Britain. www.serpentinegalleries.org

06/01—06/30

London Festival of Architecture 2018 The London Festival of Architecture celebrates London as a global hub of architectural experimentation, practice and debate. The festival returns to the capital for all of June 2018 with a lively and diverse programme of public events across London exploring the theme “identity.”

09/04—09/23

www.londonfestivalofarchitecture.org

Paris

06/15—10/07

09/07—09/11

Serpentine Pavilion: Frida Escobedo Architect Frida Escobedo, celebrated for dynamic projects that reactivate urban space, has been commissioned to design the Serpentine Pavilion 2018. Har-

London Design Biennale Taking over the entirety of Somerset House, entries from over 35 countries will explore how design affects every aspect of our lives – the way we live and how we live – and influences our very being, emotions and experiences. www.londondesignbiennale.com

Maison & Objet The seminal lifestyle show brings together a 360-degree product offering of decoration, design, furniture, accessories, textiles, fragrances, tableware, and more. www.maison-objet.com

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BACKPAGE

RESILIENCE THROUGH ARCHITECTURE TEXT

Haley Lewis

THE INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL HISTORY AND DIALOGUE CENTRE OPENS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

“My inspiration for this project comes from this idea of using the landscape as a relief to the content within the building,” says Alfred Waugh, principal of Formline Architecture. He is speaking of the newly opened Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre that he designed on the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus. The project is personal for him: Waugh is affiliated with the Fond Du Lac (Denesuline) Nation of northern Saskatchewan, and his mother went through residential school. The Centre, which opened in April, is intended to be a space for dialogue, learning and healing—bridging the gap in knowledge about Indigenous people in Canada, and the implications of the residential school system. The Centre has a space devoted to Elders, a kitchen, boardroom, offices and digital exhibition space. Waugh was challenged to design a building that evokes Indigenous

culture without specifically referring to any one community, as the space is meant for all. “We learned from our consultation with Musqueam Elders that residential schools felt like prisons, with small confining windows,” says Waugh. “The Elders requested abundant glazing to connect the inside to natural landscape and provide relief from the emotional content of the digital exhibitory.” The building sits below street level, nestled between the campus’s two main libraries. UBC has a policy for green roofs on new buildings, but installing a green roof on the Centre would have made it seem to disappear into the landscape, notes Waugh. “Wouldn’t that have been a symbol of burying a piece of history we would like to forget?” Instead, Waugh successfully fought for a copper roof cladding, which references the materials used by certain Indigenous chiefs. “This will give dignity to the people who went through this experience, the same

ABOVE Designed by Alfred Waugh, MRAIC, the new Centre is a landmark forum for confronting a harsh legacy.

dignity Canada gives to their Parliament Buildings,” which are also copper-clad. Other references include a waterfall flanked by copper fins, and charred cedar siding. “The waterfall feature celebrates our rainy climate and references the tears of the survivors,” says Waugh. “Charring the cedar makes it more resilient to stand the test of time, much like the families that endured residential school.” Constructing a building meant to heal and educate, designed by an Indigenous architect, in a traditionally colonial place–a university–on Musqueam land is a powerful and meaningful step forward when it comes to reconciliation. The thousands of students who walk past the building on UBC’s campus every day now have an opportunity to know the histories it houses. Haley Lewis is a member of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte (Ontario) and has recently completed her Master of Journalism at the University of British Columbia.

UBC/PAUL JOSEPH

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Canadian Architect May 2018  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...

Canadian Architect May 2018  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...