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2018 CANADIAN ARCHITECT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

18 g  h3* (lead design architect) with S2 Architecture (prime consultant)

22 RDH Architects

26 Ja Architecture Studio

30 Moriyama & Teshima Architects / Acton Ostry Architects Inc. Associated Architects

34 Les Architectes FABG

38 Consortium Saucier+Perrotte / GLCRM Architectes

42 Office Ou

46 5468796 architecture

50 Kongats Architects

54 Atelier TAG and Architecture49 in consortium

58 Kuehn Malvezzi, Pelletier de Fontenay, Jodoin Lamarre Pratte with Atelier le Balto

62 Joshua Nieves, Dalhousie University

canadian architect

december 2018 05

6 Viewpoint

Editor Elsa Lam on social sustainability, one of the criteria for the entries in the Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence program.

8 TAckling Complexity

The jurors for the 2018 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence discuss this year’s entries and what set the winning projects apart in the competition.

63 Mark Melnichuk, McGill University

11 Winning Teams

Profiles of the 2018 award recipients.

18 Awards of Excellence

The winning projects of the 2018 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence, Awards of Merit, and Student Awards of Excellence.

66 Photo Award of Excellence

The winner of the inaugural Canadian Architect Photo Award of Excellence.

v.63 n.12

The Arbour by Moriyama & Teshima Architects / Acton Ostry Architects Inc. Associated Architects.

COVER

The National Review of Design and Practice / The Official Magazine of the RAIC

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canadian architect 12/18

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Viewpoint

What is Social Sustainability? Observant readers of Canadian Architect may notice that three years ago, we adjusted the evaluation criteria for our annual awards of excellence. While the competition has always recognized architectural design excellence through factors such as composition and response to program, we emphasized that projects would also be evaluated for their demonstration of exemplary environmental and social awareness. Environmental sustainability can be challenging to assess, especially in the design phase, when the necessary detailing, materials and systems may yet be dropped during value engineering. But social sustainability is an even more slippery concept. What does it even mean, and how can architecture contribute to it? If environmental sustainability is about living in a way that ensures the stability of the earth’s ecosystems, social sustainability may be seen as a call for the necessity of stable human communities. Maintaining biodiversity and ensuring the availability of needed resources is key to resilient ecosystems. In a similar way, healthy human communities are characterized by diversity, interconnectedness, and a good quality of life that is equitably shared by community members. Some architectural programs are pro-social by nature—libraries and community centres, for instance. But architecture still has a role to play in maximizing their accessibility, and suggesting ways they can perform good within a community. Recent recreation buildings include universal changerooms, for instance, a boon for families as well as those of various gender orientations. Visibility between activity spaces can enliven a building and encourage users to strike up a conversation or try different programs. Private sector structures can also contribute to social wellness. A commercial building can have public washrooms, an inviting street presence, and landscaping elements such as benches or shade structures that welcome passersby. An office can include biophilic elements that boost the health of occupants, and shared spaces that encourage interaction between tenants. A house can be designed to accommodate multiple generations, encouraging family connectedness. Of course, these modest proposals are not free of tension. On the contrary. Differences multiply as the complexity of spaces, occupants, and programs increases. This can

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lead to conflicts: who has priority of use over a shared space? Who cleans up after the homeless person who has sheltered in a welcoming alcove? What happens when the teenagers get too loud for the seniors in the next room? As a society, we are challenged to embrace these differences and work through them, rather than pushing them away. Architecture may offer some solutions. Several of the award-winning projects in this issue strike a balance between spaces that encourage quiet introversion and those that celebrate connection and extroversion. The Gabrielle-Roy Library, for instance, alternates between floors intended for quiet study and those dedicated to more interactive programs. At a much smaller scale, the Octagon accessory dwelling includes an alleyway-facing counter, where it’s envisaged that the owner can serve coffee to locals. Other projects that similarly carve out public use within private property include implied provisions for the care of those spaces. The Estonian Cultural Centre’s courtyard is fronted by a café and credit union, providing eyes onto the square and investing business owners with an interest in maintaining the space. The James Avenue Pumping Station raises its residential units to create a covered public plaza in one part of the project, and outside bleacher seating on the other side. Both spaces adjoin commercial units, and the bleachers are a proposed venue for the Winnipeg Fringe Festival. Social sustainability may also involve connecting new users to old buildings—creating fresh reasons for cherishing our built heritage, complete with the cultural history embedded in those places. The Old Post Office in Cambridge, Ontario, is transformed into a workshop-based library for a new generation of users, while a renovation to Montreal’s Oratoire Saint-Joseph opens up its dome for sightseeing. These enhancements connect people to existing structures in engaging ways, renewing these cultural assets for diverse groups. Just as ecosystems thrive on complexity, so do healthy societies. Architecture has a role to play in encouraging us to interact in positive ways not only with the built environment, but with one another. It’s not necessarily about making spaces more complex. Rather, it is about advocating for values of human equity, diversity and connection—using our designs. Elsa Lam

Editor elsa lam, fRAIC Art Director Roy Gaiot associate Editor Stefan novakovic Contributing Editors Annmarie Adams, FRAIC Odile Hénault Douglas MacLeod, ncarb, MRAIC Regional Correspondents Montreal David Theodore Calgary Graham Livesey, MRAIC Winnipeg Lisa Landrum, MAA, AIA, MRAIC vancouver adele weder, Hon. MRAIC Vice president & Senior Publisher Steve Wilson 416-441-2085 x105 sales MANAGER Faria Ahmed 416-441-2085 x106 Customer Service / production laura moffatt 416-441-2085 x104 Circulation circulation@canadianarchitect.com President of iq business media inc. Alex Papanou

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Head Office 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302 Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3 Telephone 416-441-2085 E-mail info@canadianarchitect.com Website www.canadianarchitect.com

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Canadian Architect is published monthly by iQ Business Media Inc.. The editors have made every reasonable effort to provide accurate and authoritative information, but they assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. Subscription Rates Canada: $54.95 plus applicable taxes for one year; $87.95 plus applicable taxes for two years (HST – #80456 2965 RT0001). Price per single copy: $15.00. USA: $135.95 USD for one year. International: $205.95 USD per year. Single copy for USA: $20.00 USD; International: $30.00 USD.

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Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., Canadian Architect, 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302 Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3. Postmaster: please forward forms 29B and 67B to 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302 Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3. Printed in Canada. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be re­produced either in part or in full without the consent of the copyright owner. From time to time we make our subscription list available to select companies and organizations whose product or service may interest you. If you do not wish your contact information to be made available, please contact us via one of the following methods: Telephone 416-441-2085 x104 E-mail circulation@canadianarchitect.com Mail Circulation, 101 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 302, Toronto, ON M3B 1Z3 Member of the Canadian Business Press Member of the ALLIANCE FOR AuditED MEDIA Publications Mail Agreement #43096012 ISSN 1923-3353 (Online) ISSN 0008-2872 (Print) Editor elsa lam, fRAIC

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canadian architect 12/18

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awards of excellence

Tackling Complexity

ABOVE Jurors Ted Watson, Monica Adair, and David Penner reviewed the 190 professional and student submissions to the 2018 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence program.

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2018 marks the 51st year of the Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence. This year, the competition attracted 190 submissions of projects in the design or construction phase, with a diversity of programs and locations in Canada and abroad. Jurors Monica Adair, David Penner and Ted Watson selected seven projects to receive Awards of Excellence, four to receive Awards of Merit, and two to receive Student Awards of Excellence. In addition, they selected an image to be recognized with an Award of Excellence in our inaugural Canadian Architect photography competition. The winning projects reflect a strong and diverse field of submissions this year—a showing that serves as a barometer of current ideas. It’s a moment with much promise. Canadian architects are increasingly addressing environmental concerns, tackling complex urban issues, and grappling with architecture’s role in social issues. On the environmental front, the jurors were struck by the quantity of projects proposing to use mass timber—particularly cross-laminated timber and nail-laminated timber. These products assemble fast-growing wood into structurally performative panels. The use of carbon-sequestering wood is a valuable tool for reducing the substantial environmental impact of new buildings. In their awards, the jury selected two projects that use exposed crosslaminated timber. The Arbour is a tall wood academic building for George Brown College’s Waterfront Campus in Toronto, and the New Paddock F1 Grand Prix du Canada in Montreal sports a bold, latticelike wood roof as an icon for the car race’s Canadian edition. Also notable for the jury was 80 Atlantic, a commercial building in Toronto’s Liberty Village that uses mass timber to create a new-build office space with the character of century-old brick-and-beam interiors. A novel approach to environmental concerns is shown in Windermere Fire Station 31, an Edmonton project whose form derives from optimizing a roof for the placement of solar panels. Another opportunity for environmental impact is identified by one of the student winners, who takes on the usually warehouse-like data centre. Sited in Iceland, his proposal recycles the waste heat from the servers into a high-production greenhouse. The adaptive reuse of existing buildings and industrial infrastructure—an approach that limits the environmental impact of demolition, while also respecting the integrity of urban fabric—is behind several of the selected projects. In Quebec, the Gabrielle-Roy library’s 1950s

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home is being enlarged and transformed into a light-filled structure that engages the adjacent street and plaza. A contemporary addition wraps around the Old Post Office in Cambridge, Ontario, which is being converted into a “bookless” library. The James Avenue Pumping Station, a century-old industrial building, is the focus of a block-sized mixed-use development in Winnipeg. Imagining how this approach can be extended to landscapes, a winning student proposal reuses infrastructure from a decommissioned mine to support the area’s remediation and accessibility for tourism. The challenges of building in existing urban neighbourhoods is a primary concern for many of this year’s entries. Among the winning projects, the International Estonian Centre frames a new courtyard, creating a place that generously invites public use in central Toronto. On a smaller scale, The Octagon is a laneway unit that creates an unexpected suite of spaces on an alley-facing site in Toronto’s gritty Queen West district. A project that generated much discussion was the conversion of a historic building into micro-units at the edge of Vancouver’s Gastown. The jury admired the intensity of research demonstrated in the proposal, which addressed the realities of a difficult neighbourhood, and brought forward a realistic approach to rental housing in the area. “When I see this kind of detailing, it’s a designer who’s thinking about a resident and how much they have to accommodate in such a small space,” says Adair. “This is saying, we have to make this work. There’s a care that reads through.” A socially progressive approach was also at the forefront of Škola Smíchov, an elementary school in central Prague that the jury recognized with an award. Projects are only as progressive as their clients allow, and the jury was cheered by this evidence of public investment into a courtyardfilled, community-connected institution for society’s youngest members. This year also saw a number of projects that addressed Indigenous spaces, ranging from cultural spaces on First Nations reserves to infrastructure for arctic communities. Although they did not quite make the list of winners, two entries stood out for the jurors as exhibiting fresh approaches to the decolonization of space. The design of Odeyto, an indigenous student centre for Seneca College, “has a sophistication to it that we don’t usually see in this type of space,” says Penner. The Northern Secwepemc Cultural Centre takes form as a series of pavilions, working

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courtesy lemay

courtesy Gow hastings

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The Odeyto indigenous student centre at Seneca College was designed by Gow Hastings Architects with Two Row Architect. ABOVE Designed by Lemay, La Flèche is a mixed-use complex in Montreal that includes offices, a hotel and a residential tower. Top

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ABOVE Quadrangle’s 80 Atlantic project in Toronto uses mass timber to recreate the feel of a brickand-beam warehouse. Right A rental housing building designed by Human Studio sits at the border of Vancouver’s Gastown and Downtown Eastside, and integrates a 1889 structure.

gentrification or social mixing? 325 Carrall Street Small Rental Gastown, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

with a modest budget that “does so much with so little,” says Watson. The jury was interested to see some projects acting at an urban scale, even though they did not receive awards. The La Flèche complex in Montreal was notable for its elemental design and incorporation of a public space. Says Watson, “what is laudable is that they are working with a developer to create a project that is clearly architecture, at a larger scale.” There was also much discussion around the master plan for Railside at The Forks. “This is an innovative experiment in urban planning,” says Adair. Ultimately the jury was not convinced whether the formal resolution—with a strong geometry and multitude of courtyards—was the right fit for the Winnipeg site. Finally, it is a delight when projects reach through to a jury on a visceral level. This was the case with two projects in Montreal. The Insectarium is designed as an immersive, interactive experience that takes visitors on a journey through insect-like tunnels, then up into a butterfly-filled greenhouse. A project for the Oratoire Saint-Joseph du MontRoyal allows visitors to ascend into the oculus atop the sanctuary. Both are places that make the case for architecture’s continued ability to inspire, while tackling the serious issues that face our society today. Monica Adair AANB, NSAA, MRAIC, LEED AP Monica Adair is a co-founder and principal of Saint John, New Brunswick-based Acre Architects, and the recipient of the 2015 RAIC Young Architect Award. Acre Architects is a leader in cultural tourism

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human studio

quadrangle

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and is expanding the role of contemporary architecture in Atlantic Canada. The firm’s work was recognized with a 2017 New Brunswick Lieutenant-Governor’s Award of Excellence in Architecture, and Acre was the recipient of the 2018 Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture. Adair is profiled in the book Canada 150 Women – Conversations with Leaders, Champions, and Luminaries. David Penner MAA, FRAIC David Penner is founder and principal of David Penner Architect in Winnipeg. The boutique studio is the winner of numerous awards, including the Premier’s Award of Excellence at the 2015 Prairie Design Awards and the Grand Prize at CommerceDesignWinnipeg 2016. Most recently, his Fountain Springs Housing project (designed in collaboration with h5 architecture) won a 2018 Prairie Design Award. Ted Watson OAA, ARCHITECT AIBC, AAA, NSAA, SAA, MRAIC, SCUP,

LEED AP

Ted Watson is a partner at Toronto-based MJMA, a 60-person design studio that received the 2016 RAIC Architectural Firm Award. His design contribution has helped to initiate a new generation of public architecture, which heightens the user experience by engaging site and neighbourhood context, activating the pedestrian realm, and prioritizing sustainable development. Ted joined MJMA in 1996, becoming a partner in 2009.

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11

WINDERMERE FIRE STATION 31

LEFT TO RIGHT

Pat Hanson, Raymond Chow, Mark Kim, Jeff Gagnon, Joel Di Giacomo, Elise Shelley. (Missing: Farhan Durrani)

gh3* is a peer-recognized and award-winning Canadian design prac-

tice. Partners Pat Hanson and Raymond Chow lead an office team of 20 that works in the increasingly complex realm where architecture, urbanism and landscape overlap. gh3* designs with a modernist’s eye to order, beauty and social possibility—and an environmentalist’s awareness of sustainability and long-term thinking. gh3* has been awarded Governor General’s Medals for the Borden Park Pavilion in Edmonton and the Boathouse Studio on Stony Lake

in Ontario. The firm has completed projects at every scale, from small park pavilions and private houses to large civic and transit infrastructure. gh3* brings a tailored, client-centred approach to every stage of the design and construction process, with the aim of achieving pragmatic, poetic, environmentally responsible and aesthetically powerful design solutions. The firm believes that excellent design is an essential part of everyday life, and that spatially and visually engaging places can inspire joy and civic pride.

S2 Architecture is an architectural and interior design firm with studios

in Calgary and Edmonton, and over 20 years of history in design excellence. Its work spans a broad range of project types, and the foundation of its success is rooted in the delivery of creative design solutions for its clients, communities and the environment. The firm employs talented, motivated individuals who bring energy and passion to its culture along with a collaborative spirit to its work. S2 is passionate about creating practical spaces with character and functionality that reinforce a community’s identity and encourage public engagement. S2 believes in responsive and responsible architecture. Buildings play a significant and lasting role for their occupants and the public realm. The firm strives to provide meaningful structures and landmarks that create a supportive environment—transforming spaces into extraordinary places, and balancing between aesthetics and functionality.

LEFT TO RIGHT

Linus Murphy, Grace O’Brien, Eric Klatt

IDEA EXCHANGE - OLD POST OFFICE RDH Architects Inc. (RDHA) is a Toronto-based studio specializing in

TOP ROW

Tyler Sharp, Bob Goyeche, Juan Caballero Ivan Ilic, Andrew Cranford, Soo-Jin Rim

BOTTOM ROW

architecture for the public realm. Founded in 1919, the firm has a wide-ranging body of work, encompassing community and recreation facilities, libraries and cultural buildings, operations centres, transit facilities, post-secondary education facilities, secure buildings, corporate and institutional office buildings, and additions and renovations to heritage structures. In the past decade, the current principals have transformed the work and culture of the studio with the aspiration of producing clear, concept-driven public architecture of the highest calibre. The firm now feels and acts like an emerging design studio supported by 99 years of strong technical and managerial experience. Consequently, RDHA has re-emerged as one of Canada’s most acclaimed design firms, winning more than 50 major provincial, national and international awards in the last 10 years—most notably three Governor General’s Medals, the 2014 RAIC Young Architect Award for design partner Tyler Sharp, and the 2018 RAIC Architectural Firm Award.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/18

WINNERS


CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/18

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WINNERS

THE OCTAGON

LEFT TO RIGHT

Nima Javidi, Behnaz Assadi, Jaquelyn Bortolussi, Rosa Newman, Kyle O’Brien, Graham Oglend, Kaveh Taherizadeh, Ray Garrioch Ja Architecture Studio is a Toronto-based atelier that fuses the rootedness of a regionally focused practice with the sensibility of an internationally conscious design studio. Founded by a registered architect and a landscape designer, the studio has successfully realized a range of projects at different scales, and received awards in national and international competitions. Principals Nima Javidi and Behnaz Assadi both teach at the University of Toronto. Their research interests focus on how iconographic, geometric, formal and tectonic issues relate to broader contexts such as

fabrication, landscape and urbanism. From small residential projects that confront detail-level building constraints, to ambitious international competitions that must draw upon the collective repertoire of the discipline, Ja’s work attempts to investigate the core of architecture by operating at numerous points within its periphery. This approach was not chosen for its assurance of success but as a means for proving (or disproving) the merit and relevance of Ja’s ideas across multiple scales and contexts.

THE ARBOUR Moriyama & Teshima Architects (MTA) is a team of archi-

tects, planners and designers collaborating with visionary clients to build inspiring and enduring spaces that transform communities and reinforce civic identity. The firm believes that context underlies the spirit of every project, and has delivered high-quality, sustainable and awardwinning design services for 60 years. Its extensive portfolio of national and international projects has received over 200 awards, including six Governor General’s Awards. MTA’s collaborative studio is made up of individuals who reflect the cultural diversity that defines our country: a combination of industry leaders and young designers working together to design and deliver exceptional projects. Its work expresses a deep respect for natural, urban and social conditions where they explore the history, needs and aspirations of the individuals and institutions they serve, celebrating the creative relationship between culture and nature. Whether designing buildings that delight the human spirit, developing urban strategies that generate active healthy cities, or supporting clients’ objectives with sound problem-solving business sense, MTA strives to maintain a sense of welcoming delight LEFT TO RIGHT Will Klassen, Daniel Kinnett, Carol Phillips, Daniel Teramura, Veronica Madonna, Greg Perkins, Jay Zhao. (Missing: Tristan Roberton) and curiosity in our built environment.


THE ARBOUR

Founded in 1992 by Russell Acton and Mark Ostry, Vancouver-based Acton Ostry Architects is recognized for the creation of eloquent and engaging community, institutional and residential projects. The values of the firm embody a consideration to design that is without willful extravagance. Acton Ostry’s design approach incorporates new technologies and materials that sensitively respond to social, historical and environmental concerns. Through innovation, new technologies and materials are manipulated to make architecture that creates a sense of place expressed in a considered, modernist idiom. Acton Ostry Architects has received over 100 design awards, including six Canadian Architect Awards and 10 Lieutenant Governor Awards. The practice has received significant recognition for designs featuring the use of wood, including the 2007 Canadian Wood Council Wood Works Architectural Firm Award and the inaugural International Prize for Wood Architecture. The latter was awarded for the 18-storey Brock Commons Tallwood House student residence at the University of British Columbia, which, at the time of completion in 2017, was the world’s tallest contemporary mass wood building.

LEFT TO RIGHT

Russell Acton, Mark Ostry

NEW PADDOCK F1 GRAND PRIX DU CANADA

TOP ROW

Éric Gauthier, Marc-Antoine Fredette, Anna Kreplak, Roberto Pareja, Thomas Evans Nicolas Moussa, Marc Paradis, Dominique Potvin, Giselle Bouron, Vincent Désy

BOTTOM ROW

Founded in 1956 in Montreal, FABG is an architectural firm that has won numerous awards, including three Governor General’s Medals and more than 20 Prix d’Excellence from the Ordre des Architectes du Québec. FABG partner and design principal Eric Gauthier was awarded the Prix Ernest-Cormier from the Gouvernement du Québec for his contribution to architectural culture. FABG’s work includes the trans-

formation of modern iconic buildings like Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere and Mies van der Rohe’s gas station, as well as the development of new theatres and museums across the province. The work of the firm as been the subject of touring exhibitions, and was shown at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2014.

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/18

14 BIBLIOTHÈQUE GABRIELLE-ROY

Gilles Saucier, André Perrotte, Dominique Dumais, Gabriel Légaré-Bisaillon, Christophe Lafleur-Chartier, Tristan Leahy

Marc Letellier, Simon Brochu, Jocelyn Martel Annie Malouin, Mélissa Allard, Frédéric Asselin

TOP ROW

TOP ROW

BOTTOM ROW

BOTTOM ROW

Founded in 1988 by Gilles Saucier and André Perrotte, Saucier+Perrotte Architectes is a multidisciplinary practice that is internationally renowned

for its institutional, cultural and residential projects. The firm represented Canada at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2004, and has been honoured with numerous awards, including 10 Governor General’s Medals and Awards, three P/A Progressive Architecture honors, and two Chicago Athenaeum / European Centre International Architecture Awards. Saucier + Perrotte has been part of exhibitions including Les lieux de la couleur at the CCA (2000), Childhood Landscapes, Topographical Unfoldings in Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa and Buffalo (2002-2004), and Substance Over Spectacle in Vancouver (2005). In 2002, the CCA began archiving the firm’s architectural drawings and models, and in 2007, the firm designed the CCA exhibition 1973: Sorry, Out of Gas. Saucier+Perrotte received the RAIC’s 2009 Architectural Firm Award, and both partners received the inaugural Prix Ernest-Cormier and the 2018 RAIC Gold Medal.

For more than 40 years, Gagnon Letellier Cyr Ricard Mathieu et associés architectes (GLCRM) has combined traditional services in architec-

ture with a multidisciplinary approach. From its base in Quebec City, the firm has since expanded its reach with regional offices. Projects include the Canadian Embassy in Berlin, the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, and the Centre Vidéotron and Jean-Lesage International Airport, both in Quebec City. More than half of the firm’s fifty staff are architects, and many have been working with the team for more than a decade. This stability ensures continuous knowledge and expertise within the firm, allowing the studio to maintain a highquality standard in its services. The consortium Saucier+Perrotte / GLCRM architectes is also working on the transformation of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, based on their winning 2017 competition entry.

ŠKOLA SMÍCHOV Office Ou is a Toronto-based landscape and architecture

practice. By drawing on a wide range of influences and collaborators—from experts in other fields, local communities and governments, to the plants and animals that inhabit the land—its work reveals and strengthens the connections between natural and cultural systems. Established in 2016 by Nicolas Koff, Uros Novakovic, and Sebastian Bartnicki, the office has worked on projects including urban infill housing, institutional buildings, and large-scale master plans. Recent work includes award-winning sustainability-focused homes in the greater Toronto area, the international competition-winning design for the new National Museum Complex of South Korea, and landscape design for the No. 9 Gardens education centre. Office Ou is developing a book on productive urban landscapes, due for publication by Routledge in 2019.

Jia Liu, Oliver Green, Sebastian Bartnicki, Nicolas Koff, Uros Novakovic, Sophia Szagala

LEFT TO RIGHT


JAMES AVENUE PUMPING STATION

Apollinaire Au, Pablo Batista, Brandon Bergem, Ken Borton, Jordy Craddock, Donna Evans, Johanna Hurme, Andriy Ivanytskyy, Jeff Kachkan, Stas Klaz, Lindsey Koepke, Kelsey McMahon, Colin Neufeld, Sasa Radulovic, Hugh Taylor, Matthew Trendota, Alan Vamos, Shannon Wiebe, Jenn Yablonowski

5468796 is an architecture studio established in Winnipeg in 2007. Working around a single table, the office unites the diverse knowledge and experience of twenty young professionals. Together, they believe that every client, user and civic environment—regardless of budget— deserves an outcome that advances architecture. Born from a place where architecture was lost from the cultural radar, the firm aims to disrupt the status quo through new architectural propositions. Instead of looking for silver-bullet solutions, 5468796 pursues invention as a way to re-instate the legitimacy of Architecture in everyday life. They do so by finding opportunities in the most rudi-

mentary of briefs and re-imagining the role of architecture in the city. While aiming to execute its agenda locally on all fronts—from advocacy and teaching to public engagement and making—5468796’s work continues to be recognized for its resilience, resourcefulness and the rigorous pursuit of innovation. Firm recognitions include the Rice Design Alliance Spotlight Award and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s inaugural Emerging Architectural Practice Award; project recognitions include three Governor General’s Medals in Architecture.

INTERNATIONAL ESTONIAN CENTRE

LEFT TO RIGHT

Alar Kongats, Paula Prada, Paul Dolick, Laurence Ashley, Stephanie Leboeuf

Kongats Architects is a Toronto-based practice working in both the

private and public sectors, with diverse agencies and their user groups, to develop nationally and internationally recognized projects of design excellence in architecture. The firm offers a full range of architectural services, including design visioning, programming, building assessment and feasibility/planning. Kongats Architects approaches each new program of work as an en-

tirely fresh challenge, ensuring the broadest exploration of possibilities. The work itself is rational and strictly edited to ensure the projects’ fundamental ambitions are never compromised, while architecturally creating the most social, cultural and economic value for its clients’ investment. Critical recognition for the firm’s work includes past Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence and three Governor General’s Medals in Architecture.

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/18

16 INSECTARIUM DE MONTRÉAL

Architects Simona Malvezzi, Wilfried Kuehn and Johannes Kuehn founded Kuehn Malvezzi in Berlin in 2001. Public spaces, museums and exhibitions are the main focus of the office’s work as architects, designers and curators. Kuehn Malvezzi realized the architectural design for Documenta 11, the Friedrich Christian Flick Collection in the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum for Contemporary Art in Berlin, as well as the Julia Stoschek Collection in Dusseldorf, which was nominated for the international Mies van der Rohe Award. The firm has designed the reorganization of a number of contemporary and historical art collections, such as the Museum Belvedere in Vienna, the Liebieghaus in Frankfurt, the Museum Berggruen and the Museum of Decorative Arts in Berlin, and the Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Brunswick. Kuehn Malvezzi recently completed the conversion of the Moderne Galerie at the Saarlandmuseum in Saarbrücken, and the new venue of the Deutsche Bank art collection, the Prinzessinnenpalais in Berlin. The firm’s projects have been shown in exhibitions including the 10th, 13th and 14th Venice Architecture Biennials, Manifesta 7 in Trento, and the 2015 and 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennials. TOP ROW Wilfried Kuehn, Johannes Kuehn, Simona Malvezzi, Nina S. Beitzen MIDDLE ROW Yu Ninagawa, Jan Imberi, Rebekka Bode, Thomas Güthler BOTTOM ROW Andrea Bagnato, Christian Felgendreher, Valeska Höchst. (Missing: Berenice Corret)

TOP ROW

Yves de Fontenay, Hubert Pelletier BOTTOM ROW

Nathaniel Proulx Joanisse, Nicolas Mussche

Established in 2010 by Hubert Pelletier and Yves de Fontenay, Pelletier de Fontenay has quickly gained a reputation for excellence in designing contemporary public projects. The Montreal-based firm has placed first in international competitions for the New School LOSBATES near Prague and the Montreal Insectarium (in partnership with Kuehn Malvezzi). The firm was also selected as a finalist in competitions for the Glass Pavilion at the Montreal Botanical Gardens, Mile End Hotel, Est-Nord-Est Centre for Artists-in-Residence, Agora des Arts, and Place des Montréalaises (in collaboration with Bureau Bas Smets). The office was awarded the Phyllis Lambert Design Grant as well as the Architectural League Prize. The studio is interested in the relationship between abstract concepts of architecture and their material incarnations. This approach, born out of a fascination with both geometry and culture, is backed with an involvement in academic and officebased research. Pelletier de Fontenay’s ongoing research project, Invariations, was awarded three grants by the Quebec Arts and Letters Council. Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes is dedicated to the architectural

TOP ROW

Nicolas Ranger, Christine Nolet, Germain Paradis

BOTTOM ROW

Ariane Latendresse, Roxanne Rochette

design of specialized and technically complex institutional buildings of all types, particularly in the fields of health, education, research, culture and transportation. As a recipient of over 125 prizes for excellence and distinctions in architecture, including six Governor General’s Medals in Architecture, the firm has demonstrated its capacity to design and execute projects of high architectural quality. In consortiums over the last two decades, the firm has won architectural competitions for the projects including the Richard J.-Renaud Sciences Complex at Concordia University, Châteauguay public library, TOHU, Théâtre du Vieux-Terrebonne, Théâtre Gilles-Vigneault in St-Jérôme, and the Pôle du savoir, d’histoire et de la culture of the City of Chambly. Founded in 1958 by Bernard Jodoin, Denis Lamarre and Gérard Pratte, today Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes includes a team of 110 professionals under the direction of Alain Boudrias, Michel Bourassa, Michel Broz, Sylvain Morrier and Nicolas Ranger.


AMÉNAGEMENT DU MUSÉE ET DU DÔME DE LA BASILIQUE DE L’ORATOIRE SAINT-JOSEPH DU MONT-ROYAL

TOP ROW

Manon Asselin, Katsuhiro Yamazaki, Ange Sauvage, Cédric Langevin Francis Alphonso, Sammy Benalia, Dale Byrns, Jason Treherne

TOP ROW

BOTTOM ROW

Based in Montreal, Atelier TAG is a small husband-and-wife practice founded in 1997 by Manon Asselin and Katsuhiro Yamazaki. Since its inception, the studio has worked to reinterpret the civic function of architecture through the careful study of sociocultural contexts within which a given program operates, in order to create meaningful spaces. TAG’s growing body of work has allowed it to develop a design methodology focused on building technique and materiality. The work of the studio is a quest for simplicity, where the built space—through the calculated play of light and materiality—embodies the physical, cultural and poetic function of architecture. In recent years, TAG was awarded four Governor General’s medals and the Canada Council for the Arts’ Prix de Rome in architecture. Manon Asselin is a professor of architecture at the University of Montreal.

James Bridger, Isabelle Julien Paul O’Borne, Victor Napuri

BOTTOM ROW

In 2014, six architecture studios joined forces and pooled their expertise and complementary talents to create a single Canada-wide firm, Architecture49. The new firm combines the experience and reputation of Arcop, AE C onsultants, North 46, PBK, Smith Carter and WHW Architects. With more than 50 architects and technologists, the Montreal office of Architecture49—which previously operated as Arcop­—stands out for its extensive experience in executing complex projects, particularly involving the rehabilitation and reconstruction of buildings. The firm also has a significant number of new constructions to its credit. The firm is active in several sectors, including public and cultural buildings, heritage buildings, commercial design, hotels and convention centres, and sports facilities.

ENGAGING THE POST-INDUSTRIAL FRONTIER

NORTHERN CLOUD

REFLECTING ARCHITECTURE

Born in upstate New York, Joshua Nieves completed his undergraduate at Judson University in Illinois and his master’s at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. Between degrees, he worked at Lake Flato in San Antonio and at The Miller Hull Partnership in Seattle. Interested in the sensitivities of place-based design, he has hiked and travelled across North America, leading to a fascination in how human interaction with the land has the potential to harmonize, modify, and disrupt the natural environment. Josh currently lives in San Antonio and works at Clayton & Little Architects.

Mark Melnichuk recently graduated from

McGill University in Montreal with a Master of Architecture and was awarded the Ray Affleck Prize in Design and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal. His work at McGill University explored contextually informed design as a response to environmental issues with proposed projects in Israel, Newfoundland, and Iceland. Originally from Ontario, Mark completed his Bachelor of Architectural Science at Ryerson University in Toronto. He is currently working at Revery Architecture in Vancouver.  

Ema is principal of Ema Peter Photography. In the past decade, she has worked with some of North America’s most prominent architecture and interior design firms. Ema holds a master’s degree in art and applied photography, and a PhD in photojournalism. She is a contributor to publications including the New York Times, Canadian Architect, Elle Decor, Azure, Architectural Record and Dwell. Ema has been named one of the world’s top 12 women in architectural photography, and has been listed as a top five architectural photographer for three consecutive years by the Architizer A+ Awards. In 2018, she won the Architizer A+ award in both juried and public choice competitions.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/18

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canadian architect 12/18

18 award of excellence

Windermere Fire Station 31

Edmonton, Alberta gh3* (lead design architect) with S2 Architecture (prime consultant)

As civic buildings, fire stations find themselves in the unusual role of being highly functional, technical buildings embedded in residential communities. The vision for Windermere Fire Station takes cues from the past: the iconic characteristics of a pitched roof, large fire truck doors, and solid load-bearing walls. But the contemporary fire station also carries a new imperative for sustainable citizenship that has implications for the building’s form, orientation and image. Fire Station 31 will serve a new community in Southwest Edmonton, bordered by the North Saskatchewan River and the Whitemud Creek Ravine. The community of Windermere aims to exemplify the careful integration of the natural and built environments. The City of Edmonton has taken a leadership role by requiring the fire station to obtain LEED Silver certification, meet 40 percent better energy efficiency and 40 percent better greenhouse gas emissions than NECB 2011, and achieve 80 kilowatt-hours per square metre per year for heating needs. In addition, the project is also a pilot to investigate if achieving net-zero energy on an emergency response fire hall is feasible. The study will consider viability by looking at energy use, operational needs and budget considerations. To achieve net-zero, the south-facing roof is clad with photovoltaic cells. The roof is optimized for solar generation capacity, generating the shape of the building. While the roof plane is lifted to provide a substrate for solar arrays, the ground plane is pushed down to collect and cleanse water in a front yard bioswale. A concrete plinth in the centre of the bioswale, accessed by a light metal bridge, provides a site for public art. Other sustainability measures include geothermal heating and cooling, and maximizing natural lighting to reduce energy loads and improve the quality of the workplace. Strategically placed glazed walls between the garage and domestic quarters are key to optimizing daylight and ventilation, as well as providing visual connections important for orientation, safety, and facilitating quick response times.

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Clad in dark ironspot brick, Fire Station 31’s sombre tones will give it a visual strength when seen silhouetted against the prairie sky. The simple profile and the mass of masonry wall emblematically marry references to the residential and to the disciplined functionality of the fire station. The use of two brick bond types adds subtle character to the façade’s surface. Edmonton’s extended daylight hours in summer and minimized daylight hours in winter will be gauged by the glazing of the apparatus bay doors, as they transition from slightly reflective elements during the day to glowing apertures at night. The design creates an expressive, engaging structure that heightens civic pride, incorporating green technical advances and a move towards more transparent buildings. It aims to be a high-functioning workplace in times of emergency, and a welcoming community beacon in quiet times. Ted Watson :: The shape is simply derived in a single gesture that creates the height and the hierarchy within the program, and also yields a comfortably familiar but unique shape. It’s rational in responding to daylight while also having a sustainablility agenda. David Penner :: I like the elegance and simplicity of the planning and massing. The site is well executed, with bioswales and a sculpture court that addresses the requirement for public art in a proactive way, rather than leaving it to chance. Monica Adair :: A lot of environmental solutions feel like add-ons that are disconnected from the architecture. Here, the solar panels and form are seamlessly integrated, signalling that the sustainability agenda matters as much as the program inside. The design elevates the bar for community-scaled fire stations, with a materiality and a commitment to detailing that will make it an object of civic pride.

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A sculpture garden fronting the fire station provides a designated platform for public art. The planted area acts as a rainwater bioswale. Top right The fire station’s distinctive profile is a result of optimizing the roof for solar panels. The design aims to achieve net-zero energy. Above Ironspot brick references the solidity of traditional fire stations, while two types of brick bonds add texture to the façades.

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Ground Floor  1 apparatus bay  2 captain’s office  3 day room  4 study  5 kitchen  6 patio  7 fitness room  8 dorms  9 captain’s dorms 10 change rooms 11 duty gear locker 12 generator 13 garbage / recycling 14 bioswales 15 public art

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The high roof area spans overtop of the garage. Daylight strategies are used throughout the building to minimize energy consumption. ABOVE The building’s form derives from a single pinch-like gesture.

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CLIENT City of Edmonton | STRUCTURAL RJC | MECHANICAL Smith + Andersen | ELECTRICAL

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SMP | CIVIL Urban Systems | LANDSCAPE Urban Systems, gh3* | GEOTHERMAL Revolve Engineering | LEED Eco Ammo | COST KBK | AREA 1,425 m2| BUDGET $10.5 M | STATUS 100% Design Development | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2020

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canadian architect 12/18

22 award of excellence

Idea Exchange Old Post Office Cambridge, Ontario RDH Architects

The Old Post Office is Canada’s first “bookless” library. Apart from displaying a few recent book acquisitions and periodicals, its spaces are dedicated to the idea of creation in a broad sense, for all age groups. While libraries are still places for storing books, they are now facilities geared toward storing information in all its forms to facilitate both passive and active learning, where what is learned in the facility can be physically put into practice. The project is a major renovation, restoration and addition to a listed heritage structure in Galt, Ontario. Galt is the largest of three townships that make up the municipality of Cambridge, and its historically intact downtown core area developed alongside the Grand River. The historic post office building, constructed in 1884-85, was designed by Thomas Fuller, the architect of the original Parliament Buildings’ Centre Block (destroyed by fire) and Library of Parliament. The design doubles the existing space by adding 9,000 square feet to the south and west of the historic structure. The addition is conceived as a transparent, glowing contemporary pavilion floating atop the adjacent Grand River. The program primarily comprises studio spaces for public creation, supplemented by a café-restaurant as a secondary, contiguous use.

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The lower level of the building contains a black box theatre, film and audio recording suites, musical equipment for recording and performance, laptop dispensing and gaming areas. On the ground f loor, there’s a café-reading room and restaurant with a commercial kitchen. The second level includes a children’s discovery centre with smart tables, Lego, Lite Brite and magnet feature walls, robot building kits, and a large exterior roof terrace with green roof. Finally, the third level attic contains an adult-oriented studio space with provisions for a laser cutting machine, 3D printers, soldering stations, vinyl cutters, irons, sewing machines, and wood and metal workshop tools. This equipment would be available in extended hours to facilitate public creation for older age groups. The site perches dramatically along the Grand River, and benefits from views to the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, the main location of the Idea Exchange, two large cathedrals, and a new performing arts facility. The design scheme uses material transparency in an attempt to promote views of the historic structure, bring light into the various levels of studio space, and project the life and vitality of the progressive public program to the city beyond.

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Ted Watson :: This project brings together the elements of heritage, industrial fabric, a river wall system and an urban system in a constrained but rational package. The modern intervention has its own identity that embraces the heritage building, with a skylight that politely separates the two. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

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David Penner :: The twisting to the west is a fabulous gesture that somehow lightens the whole intervention, and the layering of the stone detailing on the frit is beautiful. What’s most admirable in my mind is the balancing between the conservation of the existing building and the addition. The original building is so bold and strong in itself, and it holds its own, even though the addition is significant. Monica Adair :: The modern architecture has as much character as the heritage structure that it elegantly envelops. The two not only co-exist, they enhance each others’ assets. It’s not about the new simply becoming the feature, but a prosperous revival of the historic structure. The project also re-engages the industrial setting, making this an iconic and refreshed river’s edge.

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Opposite As a “bookless” library, the Old Post Office renovates and adds to a historic structure on the Grand River in Cambridge, Ontario. Above A ground floor reading room and third floor teaching space cantilever out over the river. The ceramic frit pattern derives from stone detailing on the pediment of the historic building.

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canadian architect 12/18

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ABOVE The reading room enjoys panoramic views of the Grand River, and serves as a central hub for the building’s varied spaces and activities. A skylight separates the addition from the historic post office.

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ABSTRACTION OF PATTERN INTO CERAMIC FRIT SCREEN

INTEGRATION OF LED PIXEL LIGHTING INTO CUSTOM CERAMIC FRIT PATTERN

CLIENT City of Cambridge & The Idea Exchange | HERITAGE Stevens Burgess Architects,

Kelly Gilbride | STRUCTURAL WSP, Andrew Dionne | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Jain & Associates | LANDSCAPE NAK Design Strategies, Robert Ng | CIVIL Valdor Engineering | COST AW Hooker Associates | ACOUSTICS Aercoustics Engineering | AREA 1,736 m2 | BUDGET $11.1 M | STATUS Under construction | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION November 2018

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canadian architect 12/18

26 award of excellence

The Octagon

Toronto, Ontario Ja Architecture Studio

The Octagon resists the notion that architecture should be either formally interesting and autonomous from its site or completely contextual. Instead, the project proposes a complex figurative form that, in spite of being a new building, is inextricably linked to its surroundings. It deftly mediates between an existing Victorian semi-detached house and the rapidly changing urban environment around it. Located directly behind the vibrant commercial strip of Toronto’s Queen Street West, the property is situated in one of the city’s most sought-after neighbourhoods. The area has been gentrified over the past decade, and as property prices persist in rising and development pressures increase, it is inevitable that it will continue to change. But despite new developments to the south and the ongoing expansion of the adjacent Drake Hotel, this corner has managed to hold on to its distinctive character. It’s a place where small-scale residential and commercial uses mix, supporting an active street life that extends into the neighbourhood’s gritty laneways. The new rear laneway suite is developed around the idea of a long path—a singular organizing circulation element—that, both in plan and in section, weaves through each room of the unit, tracing a route from the public street up to the private upper-level mezzanine. Without being overly prescriptive, a series of spaces along the way aims to support the rituals of daily life. An enlarged corridor leads from the street, with a counter facing the laneway that allows the owner to serve coffee to locals heading to work. Across, the corridor opens to a garden shared with the main house, suggesting al fresco dinners with guests. The corridor terminates in a staircase that spirals up through a series of loosely defined spaces: a living room on the second floor, a sleeping area on the third floor, and a private study for a quiet night of reading on the upper floor. Formally, the project aims to be both functional and expressive. Borrowing the form of octagon turrets found nearby, the solid mass in the rear laneway extends upwards. Balconies are carved out of the volume, and a slight twist in the roof ridge creates a form that is both responsive to its surroundings and dynamic. The project uses light wood framing for ease of construction, and is clad in slate shingles. This material references the slate roof of the main house, and adds variegated texture to the long wall in the laneway. Throughout the structure, details are kept concealed to reinforce the idea of the project as a single volume. While increasing constraints and lowered ambitions make it challenging, architecture still has a role to play in imparting identity to our cities. At a broader level, this set piece encourages new development to find virtue in overlooked spaces, and suggests that function need not trump form. At its best, architecture allows for a range of functions to take place simultaneously, and proposes new forms that are innovative, purposeful and expressive.

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Monica Adair :: The Octagon breaks the mould of what we typically think of as a laneway house. It starts to push how these dwellings are used, and also explores how the broader program of residential living can be transformed. It rethinks what is liveable. The long, narrow circulation bar becomes an object for living as well as an urban artifact. Everything is carefully worked out. It’s very clever and bold. Ted Watson :: This project is small in size, but exciting in its larger implications. Not only is it a beautiful object, but the form is derived from its functionality and the manipulation of the geometry through the section. It’s anonymous but iconic, it’s a residential project that enriches the public realm, it’s an enclosure while it’s also a compositionally strong form—it has an ambiguity that makes it powerful. David Penner :: Really gritty and really sophisticated at the same time. It’s tied in to the Second Empire style of the existing house. I like how it recognizes the side lane as an urban artery, and provides eyes to the lane to make it a safer space. I see it as an extension of the spirit of the nearby Drake Hotel. CLIENT Laleh Rouhani | STRUCTURAL Moses Stuctural | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Sustain-

globe | CODE Edward Ofuso-Barko | LANDSCAPE Behnaz Assadi (Ja Studio) | CONTRACTOR Mazifa | AREA 135 m2 | BUDGET Withheld | STATUS Design Development

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The project flanks an alleyway behind Toronto’s Drake Hotel, and includes a counter envisaged as a place for serving coffee to locals. ABOVE A stair spirals up through the flexible living spaces of the tower at the rear of the lot. Right Slate shingle cladding gives the project a monolithic character and references the roof of the main house. Top

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An enlarged corridor along the side of the lot includes a kitchenette and washroom, and opens to both the alleyway and to the shared garden.

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canadian architect 12/18

30 award of excellence

The Arbour George Brown College, Waterfront Campus, Toronto, Ontario Moriyama & Teshima Architects / Acton Ostry Architects Inc. Associated Architects

Located on George Brown College’s expanding Waterfront Campus, The Arbour houses the college’s School of Technology and the Tall Wood Research Institute. This 10-storey-wood, low-carbon building is the first of its kind in Ontario, featuring ecological innovation across its entire life cycle and acting as a model for smart, sustainable, green building innovation throughout Canada. The design seeks to instill generous space for wellbeing and sustainable development. A custom mass timber structural system provides the longer spans required for institutional academic use. A triple-storey atrium and series of interconnected gathering spaces support community social health within the structure’s limited footprint. Passive access to fresh air and light allow the building to act like a tree—a living being that synergistically interacts with its ecosystem. The project’s innovative structural approach takes full advantage of the spanning capabilities of cross-laminated timber (CLT) structures. Uncluttered interior spaces are achieved through a state-of-theart CLT f lat-plate system that is relatively thin and requires no use of beams, thereby reducing overall building height, volume, and material costs, as well as simplifying the distribution of building systems. Cross-laminated timber is used not only for slabs but also for supports; the latter comprise a f lush transfer system of cross-laminated slab bands and columns. The plan is organized using a tartan grid to establish three parallel bars of programmable space. The mass wood structure is laid out

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on a seven-by-nine metre grid. The outer bars house classrooms, labs and administrative offices, with access to light and views. The central bar houses vertical circulation cores bookended by an interconnected sequence of double-height, interactive social spaces for students and staff. Computer labs are comfortably housed within the inner central spine. The large-span, beamless structure enables the free placement of demising walls, providing flexibility over time. The aspiration to achieve a net-zero/net-positive-ready building is at the core of the architectural expression. This imperative starts with the design of a thermally efficient building envelope, with optimized daylighting and natural ventilation systems, reducing reliance on mechanical systems. East and west solar chimneys act as the lungs of the building, creating natural convection by drawing air up and through the structure to ensure that air from operable windows is continually refreshed. A strongly sloping roof allows for south-facing solar panels, while the angled profile creates a clerestory for the top level, which houses the Tall Wood Institute. Here, building and program come together at the apex to confront climate change head-on for current and future generations. The wood used for The Arbour will be sourced from sustainably managed forests with a legal requirement to regenerate all harvested areas. With the current worldwide interest in tall timber, the Arbour is poised to set a precedent for the approval of exposed mass wood high-rise buildings and to accelerate the development of the Canadian forest products industry.

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Constructed from cross-laminated timber, the academic building rises to a peak above the Tall Wood Institute, housed on the upper level. A triple-storey ground floor atrium is the first in a series of social spaces that rise through the building. Below The structure’s uncluttered, beamless spaces are achieved through a custom cross-laminated timber flat-plate structural system.

Opposite ABOVE

David Penner :: To me, the Arbour is a cathedral of wood, with a form that is like an upscaled Victorian house. Monica Adair :: We saw a number of mass timber projects among the submissions, and this one led in terms of execution, detailing and the potential of using mass timber beyond its minimal viable articulation. It is thoughtfully detailed with an innovative structural solution of hybrid wall-columns that allow for longer spans—a prototype system that could have impacts far beyond this site. Ted Watson :: In addition to the architects, the client for this project also needs to be lauded. Lauded as an institution for taking a lead on innovation and sustainability within their building portfolio, addressing issues that urgently face us all. The design solution is a very clean execution of the program, targeting net-zero energy, achieving resiliency, and using smart-building technologies in a mass timber structure. It presents the possibility of wood structures becoming a viable option within the “longer span” institutional market. CLIENT George Brown College | STRUCTURAL Fast + Epp | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Integral Group | ENVIRONMENTAL Transsolar Inc. | LANDSCAPE Terraplan Landscape Architects | CODE GHL Consultants Ltd. | COST Altus Group | FIRE CHM Fire Consultants Ltd. | AREA 195,000 ft 2 | BUDGET $95 M | STATUS Schematic Design/Design Development | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2023

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R L  1 Potential PV Panels  2 Standing Seam Roof Assembly  3 CLT Roof Deck  4 3 -Ply CLT Sloped Box Beam  5 500mm x 1200mm CLT Column  6 CLT Truss Bridge

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Top The project addresses Queens Quay Boulevard to the north and Sherbourne Common to the east. ABOVE A central feature stair rises up to level 5, where a pedestrian bridge connects to an adjacent campus building.

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Photo: Skidmore, Owings + Merrill

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canadian architect 12/18

34 award of excellence

New Paddock F1 Grand Prix du Canada Montreal, Quebec Les Architectes FABG

The Canadian Grand Prix is part of the Formula One Championship, the world’s premier series of single-seater auto races, held on raceways around the world. Since 1978, the Canadian race weekend has been held in Montreal, on the Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve. Named in honour of the Canadian auto racer, the raceway is located on Notre-Dame Island, the former site of Expo 67. In the decades since that pivotal event, the island has been gradually transformed into a park with various attractions, including a casino, public beach, Olympic rowing basin and military museum. When it is not hosting the Formula One race, the four-kilometre roadway is popular as an informal training track used by amateur cyclists. As part of a renewal agreement for the Canadian Grand Prix, the City of Montreal has committed to replacing the temporary structures currently used for the race with a permanent building that will accommodate the needs of the event. The new paddock will include garages for the racing teams, offices for the Fédération internationale de l’automobile, which organizes the event, rooms for the race sponsor, lounge space for 5,000 people, and a media center for journalists and broadcasters. All of the building’s interior furnishings and equipment are shipped from abroad and installed for the duration of the event.

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Construction for the project is on a tight timeline: it needs to be completed in the ten months separating the 2018 and 2019 editions of the Grand Prix. To facilitate the completion of the $50-million project in this timespan, the building is designed as an assemblage of prefabricated parts. These include concrete panels, steel beams and columns, CLT wood beams and panels, curtain wall and demountable partitions. In case the car racing event is terminated, the entire structure can be dismantled and the material reused. The building aims to make responsible use of public money, and makes a virtue of the fact that it will be only be used for a short time each year. In contrast with other international Grand Prix facilities, the lounge areas have no exterior walls and no air conditioning, finishes are bare, and solar panels provide electricity for lighting. The open-air lounges bring guests closer to the sights and sounds of the adjacent raceway. Overhead, the building’s iconic roof structure distinguishes the Canadian edition of the race. The roof creates an identity based on our collective desire to make optimal use of wood, one of our most important natural resources. The exposed geometric structure is reminiscent of the daring pavilions of Expo 67, and marks a commitment toward sustainable development.

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An exposed cross-laminated timber roof covers the main structure for the Formula One Grand Prix racetrack in Montreal. To facilitate construction on a tight timeline, the building is designed as an assemblage of pre-fabricated parts, including concrete panels, steel beams and columns, and cross-laminated timber beams and panels. ABOVE Facing the racetrack, the pavilion includes garages for the racing teams, open-air lounge spaces, a media centre and offices. Interior furnishings and equipment are shipped from abroad and installed each year for the event.

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David Penner :: I really admire the way the exposed wood roof structure speeds along the raceway. It works at the almost-sublime scale of the speedway and celebrates the event of the Grand Prix. Monica Adair :: If the Grand Prix isn’t exciting enough, this project further elevates the spirit of the sport. The structure is a powerful branding icon for the site and F1, putting architecture on par with the captivating spectator sport, all while showing a capacity for restraint. Also impressive is the plan to tackle environmental sustainability by minimizing the use of mechanical systems—a progressive approach that you wouldn’t necessary expect from F1. Ted Watson :: It’s a very satisfying response to the program, while also delivering a clear legibility, making great spaces and a strong identity for the project type. It’s a beautiful bar, the resolution of the plan is clean, the sections are compelling, and the use of the wood system is powerful and cost-effective.

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The lounge areas have no exterior walls or air conditioning, adding to the environmental sustainability of the building and allowing guests to experience the unobstructed sights and sounds of the race. ABOVE The elongated building flanks the finish-line section of the race track.

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Second Level Plan  1 terrace  2 multimedia and broadcast centre  3 lounge space  4 operations centre

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CLIENT Société du Parc Jean-Drapeau | STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL/CIVIL CIMA+ AREA 22,235 m2 | BUDGET $47 M | STATUS Under construction | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION

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canadian architect 12/18

38 award of excellence

Bibliothèque Gabrielle-Roy Quebec City, Quebec Consortium Saucier+Perrotte / GLCRM Architectes

Gabrielle-Roy library is located in the heart of a vibrant cultural and commercial district. The Saint-Roch neighbourhood in central Quebec City is home to a diverse and dynamic community that has dramatically grown over the past years. The design for the extension and renovation of an existing library aims to connect it more closely with the city, by spreading public functions throughout the building’s various strata. On each floor, both in the existing building and in the addition, a new interface between the collections and the city is proposed. The experience of the library becomes a rich path, oscillating between public projection and quiet introversion. A number of key urban and architectural gestures reinforce the library’s connection to the neighbourhood. On the ground level, a generous outdoor space gives the library an undeniably urban character. Physical and visual continuity between inside and outside increase the opportunities for exchange between the library and its neighbourhood. Indoors, the ground floor is focused on urban life, community, and families, with spaces such as a café, a kitchen for culinary workshops, a small amphitheatre, children’s collections, an exhibition area, and a civic life section with newspapers and periodicals. Considered as a whole, the public space and the library’s ground floor constitute a rich urban environment for both visitors and the local community.

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Just like the ground floor, level 02—two floors above—has a public character. This is reinforced by its clear glass envelope and distinctive golden ceiling, features that it shares with the ground floor. The collections on this level focus principally on music, cinema, arts, and travel. Users have access to a music studio and several practice rooms, a projection room, a fab lab and an arts workshop. An outdoor terrace spans the south side of this floor. Alternating with these more public programs, levels 01 and 03 are more focused on introverted reading and learning. Collections related to literature, history, philosophy, geography, science and technology are distributed around the skylit atrium, maximizing access to natural light and providing uplifting views for users. On these levels, a fritted glass envelope creates a diaphanous screen that filters sunlight and ensures a low-glare environment conducive to learning. Specialized collections include a comic strip section and a nature section with an outdoor reading garden that extends to the rooftop. The library also includes a suite of archive rooms and a number of collaborative spaces of different sizes. The library’s rich program allows it to move from a quiet repository of books towards becoming an active social hub—a true “third place” adapted to its diverse and changing community.

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Opposite The library’s ground and third floors are distinguished by golden ceilings and connections to the plaza. ABOVE An atrium brings daylight into the centre of the space. Right The addition to the south of the existing building creates a strong relationship with the street edge.

David Penner :: We’ve seen a number of projects that are driven by the need for interconnectedness to public space, both visual and physical. This project seems to take it one step further. It offers a lot of complexity within a very pure box. Monica Adair :: Within a typical floor slab structure, this project uses unassuming moves to powerfully transform a typology that could have been otherwise very familiar. In particular, the architect transforms the relationship between the street and the addition with varying protruding levels, and uses this as an opportunity to activate the ground plane and create a dynamic urban edge. Ted Watson :: This project is an adaptive reuse and addition to an existing building that is deceptively simple and legible. The existing building is not a liability within the scheme, but is retained and becomes like a completely new place. The new-build portion is working extremely hard to leverage as much public space, light, interconnection between the levels, and green space as possible to completely transform the existing building, program and site.

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ABOVE A sectional diagram and model show the vertical connections through the space. In addition to the central atrium, a winter garden spans the lower two levels, while at the top of the building, an exterior terrace with bleacher seating is part of the nature, science and technology section.

 1 Entrance hall  2 Main desk and services  3 Exhibition space  4 Offices  5 Self-check and automated return  6 Security desk  7 Loading dock  8 lift  9 Telecom Room 10 Children’s collections 11 Culinary workshop 12 Winter garden

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canadian architect 12/18

42 award of excellence

Škola Smíchov Prague, Czech Republic

Office Ou

Škola Smíchov will be the first new urban public school built in central Prague in nearly a century. The new building will accommodate 540 students aged 6 to 14. It is located within the ambitious Smíchov City redevelopment, which aims to transform 50 acres of former railway lands into a mixed-use community that prioritizes green space, walkability, and a fine-grained urban fabric. The school’s design is guided by the idea of fostering social and environmental stewardship in students, at a scale that expands as they grow: learning to take care of themselves, of their classmates, of the school community, and finally of the wider urban community and natural world. The building supports this by offering opportunities to engage with the city and with nature, so that students can see themselves as part of a larger community and find connections between classroom learning and the outside world. The building is conceived as a simple gridded framework, populated by classrooms, gyms, offices, terraces and gardens. This logic creates a miniature city for children to explore and care for. Constructed from

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glulam timber, the frame formally unifies the building while allowing the diversity and individuality of its program elements to flourish. Individual classrooms are clearly legible within the grid and include balconies that invite public display of student work. Plantings and movable screens shield the classroom windows from solar gain, while summertime passive ventilation and night purging is supported by clerestory windows between every classroom and the corridors, and mechanically controlled vents from the corridors to the courtyards. Internally, the school is organized around a central atrium, with a stair that connects all f loors and lands at the main hall—the central gathering space for the school community. The ground and lower level contain the major shared spaces, including the cafeteria, gyms and club rooms. Level 1 is reserved for younger students, Level 2 is for older students, and Level 3 contains specialty classrooms, each with its own quietly whimsical roof shape. Rooftop terraces and courtyards provide secure play spaces and gardening areas, and bring light deep into the building.

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Opposite Situated in an area of central Prague undergoing redevelopment, the school is structured within a three-dimensional grid framework. Individual classrooms on the second and third floors include balconies where student work can be displayed. ABOVE Courtyards cascade through the school and the lower level assembly area opens onto a park, providing opportunities for outdoor play and learning.

At the site level, the building forms an urban edge to the neighbourhood’s principal boulevard, where the main entry is located, along with amenity spaces open for community use after school hours. To the east, a playing field steps down to a public park, and the groundskeeper’s house looks over the vehicle drop-off and secondary entrance. The structural system is a hybrid of mass timber and concrete, combining the aesthetic and environmental qualities of wood with concrete’s thermal mass, structural performance and fire safety. With the exception of the basement levels, the majority of the building is based on pre-fabrication and “dry” construction methods, and components are sized for truck transport. The entire building speaks of its internal life, encouraging children to see Škola Smíchov as their school, home and community. Client Prague City District 5 | Local Architect of Record INOSTUDIO architekci Area 12,622 m2 | Budget 250 million CZK | Anticipated completion Fall 2020

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Monica Adair :: The importance of play carries through the expression of the building and how you move through the project. The classrooms turn almost inside-out and become a way to celebrate the lively program that’s inside. It encompasses the spirit of being a kids’ school, and its delivery doesn’t seem to over-coddle the students. Ted Watson :: There’s a levity but also a rigour to this project. It’s extremely elegant in its solution. The plan is loaded with surprises and delights, delivering a maximum amount of joy, light, and access to nature within a rigorous framework. It has terraced courtyards that bring outdoor garden space to each level. Governments, school boards, and taxpayers across Canada should take note of how other countries cherish these buildings as important places for children to learn and engage with the world. David Penner :: I was struck by the lightness of the frame and the freedom that it implies: freedom that is often held down or that feels restricted in Canadian schools. It’s a building that teaches kids to live in the world.

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A sectional perspective shows the connections between the school’s interior and exterior spaces. ABOVE The gymnasiums, meeting rooms, and performance spaces are accessible to the community after school hours.

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 1 CLASSROOM  2 ARTS CLASSROOM  3 WORKSHOP  4 TEACHER’S ROOMS  5 LABORATORY  6 PRACTICE KITCHEN  7 KITCHEN GARDEN  8 GREENHOUSE  9 ORCHARD AND POLLINATOR GARDEN

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canadian architect 12/18

46 award of merit

James Avenue Pumping Station

Winnipeg, Manitoba 5468796 architecture

In 1904, much of downtown Winnipeg was threatened when a fire at James Ashdown’s Main Street hardware store raged out of control. The domestic water supply, fed by artesian wells, proved inadequate, and untreated Red River water was pumped into the domestic supply in a desperate attempt to increase water pressure. The fire was extinguished, but the city’s water supply was contaminated in the process. In response, the James Avenue Pumping Station opened three years later. It housed the massive equipment required to run a high-pressure water system for fire-fighting, and was serviced by the city’s rail system. But almost a century after, it was no longer needed for its original purpose, and the building has been vacant since 1986. It was purchased by our client in 2015, who is now turning it into a mixeduse development. After 17 attempts to revive the historic structure over the last 14 years, it was slated for demolition. But then 5468796 developed the building pro forma for the James Avenue Pumping Station and presented it to the current client, leading to successful preservation through private investment. The pumphouse is retained, and three mixed-use buildings will be built on the east and west ends of the parcel. Linked by street-level alleyways and overhead walkways, the structures maintain views of each other and create a tight urban-scale environment that corresponds to the thriving mixed-use neighbourhood.

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Capped at six storeys in height, the new development consists of rental apartments, commercial use at ground level, and structured parking. Exterior walkways and skip-stop corridors increase the efficiency of the building, allowing for cross-ventilation in all units and permitting a maximum number of suites to overlook the river. Intelligent zoning and connections between the historical building and the new program will strengthen tenants’ and visitors’ relationship to each other and to their local architectural history. While the existing pumphouse’s foundation was not capable of supporting the construction of additional floors on top, a gantry crane capacity allowed for a new floor within the existing building. Incorporated as tenancy, this left the pumps on the main floor free and clear of complicated programming. The development scenario allows for the great pump hall—a well-preserved example of the “golden age” of machinery—to be physically showcased, free on all sides and newly accessible to the public. In keeping with the utilitarian nature of the original design, the new-build volumes bookend the existing structure and subtly support its aesthetic through deliberately simple, modular forms. Views are directed to the historic pumphouse from a variety of vantage points— the approach to the site, the neighbouring exterior walkways, and the intimate alleyways formed between the old and new façades—highlighting the building’s storied past.

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At the south corner of the property, the new residential block lifts to create a covered public plaza facing the waterfront. ABOVE Offices float within the historic pumphouse, with walkways and atria providing a variety of vantage points on the preserved equipment on the lower level. Opposite

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David Penner :: Hats off to the development team, because it has taken some 25 years for something to happen on this site, with its remarkable heritage building. The addition has an appropriately industrial character that links to the pumphouse machinery that is retained on the lower level. It’s bold and tries new ways of engaging the historic. It is only unfortunate that the addition obscures the twin-gable façade of the pump house, which is its key elevation.

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Monica Adair :: The architect creates a procession of circulation in the interior of the central building that captivatingly connects to the lower bowels of the old pumping station. Over the course of its deliberations, the jury questioned whether the exterior public realm and retail zones could be further developed in a way that would reveal their engagement with the urban fabric. How could these exterior spaces be animated to feel like an inviting environment that penetrates the raw urban realm that exists on and around the site?

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Ted Watson :: This project is compelling in the rationality with which it delivers density and residential accommodation, while engaging deliberately but lightly with a heritage property. The notion that this was a pro forma brought to the developer by the architects is very promising. Can our profession be more proactive about development, and how we can be driving those solutions?

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Electrical/Civil MCW GROUP | LANDSCAPE SCATLIFF + MILLER + MURRAY | Energy Modelling

INTEGRATED DESIGNS | Cladding VICWEST BUILDING PRODUCTS | Steel SHOPOST | AREA 72,450 FT 2 [RESIDENTIAL] + 19,100 FT 2 [COMMERCIAL] | BUDGET Withheld | STATUS Design / Permitting | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2020

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ABOVE The three residential blocks added to the site contain rental apartments that are arranged as skip-stop units, accessed through exerior walkways. Left A view of the faรงade facing Waterfront Drive. Below A covered plaza sits at the southern corner of the site, connecting to a pedestian mews that runs between the residences and historic pumphouse.

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canadian architect 12/18

50 award of merit

International Estonian Centre

Toronto, Ontario Kongats Architects

Located on the Bloor Cultural Corridor in central Toronto, the International Estonian Centre hosts a series of spaces for the Estonian community and opens its doors to the general public for performances, public lectures and film festivals. The facility includes a café, library, sauna, art studio, classrooms and administrative offices. Its f lexible main hall seats up to 330 guests for performances and conferences, and is divisible into three private rooms to host smaller events. On the ground f loor, a credit union and an accelerator space for digital start-ups adjoin a pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly public courtyard. The facility incorporates and renovates a designated heritage mansion. The building is structured as a series of stage-like platforms enclosed by a luminous curtain made of glazing and cast foamed-aluminum panels. The choice of foamed aluminum makes a material reference to the Estonian New Year’s tradition of bleigiessen, in which lead drippings are used to forecast the year ahead. The building’s serrated form, which takes the shape of Estonia’s landmass, picks up on the zigzag rhythm of the residential façades along Madison Avenue. The irregularity of the form and the varying scales of the serrations provide the opportunity for pause along the curtain wall, allowing for quieter encounters and engagement among users. The building’s durable materials and attention to detailing give it an elegant, landmark quality in keeping with nearby architectural

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and cultural destinations, including the University of Toronto, Bata Shoe Museum, and Royal Ontario Museum. As befits a country known as one of the world’s most advanced digital societies, the interior spaces are technologically sophisticated, ensuring the facility will remain f lexible for future users. Sustainability is a key value for Estonians, so the building generates energy on-site, recycles greywater, employs a high-performance building envelope with triple-pane glazing and operable windows, and uses in-f loor water-sourced heating and cooling. Exterior spaces incorporate permeable pavers. A west-facing, accessible rooftop terrace adds to the facility’s sustainability goals and presents additional green space in this dense urban neighbourhood. The site is well-serviced by public transit at the intersection of two subway lines, and next to a new crosstown cycling lane, providing strong alternatives to automobile access. As a mid-rise development with three levels above grade, the centre acts as a buffer between the high-rises towering up to 20 storeys on Bloor Street and the historic residences along Madison Avenue. The east-west orientation of the facility ensures that the centre’s courtyard has sunlight through all four seasons. The courtyard and a throughblock connection relieve foot traffic along Bloor Street and invite public use, in keeping with a City of Toronto planning initiative to animate the area’s side streets.

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Opposite The centre’s serrated façade traces the outline of Estonia’s landmass, framing a courtyard that engages with Paul Martel park across the street. ABOVE Performance and community spaces occupy the second and third floors, inviting a variety of uses by the Estonian community as well as rentals for private events. below A café, credit union, and the Estonian trade office occupy the ground floor of the new structure, while leasable space for digital start-ups is planned in the renovated historic mansion portion of the building.

David Penner :: This project sits comfortably on the site and will become a positive contribution to the neighbourhood. Using the existing heritage house as a transition to the adjoining neighbourhood is effective in responding to the larger urban fabric of the Annex. Monica Adair :: How can a building help to create an identity through a formal gesture? While narrative is directly translated into the shape of this building’s façade and courtyard, it goes beyond simply the object itself to yield compelling spaces, creating a unique identity and a sense of place. Inside, the form-generator results in unique spaces that could be otherwise indulgent. Ted Watson :: This project successfully mediates the scale between a residential environment and the tall buildings on Bloor Street. It leverages its site location to the west to achieve something very difficult—engaging a park space across the street. So many cultural centres are fortresses, and in contrast, this creates a welcoming public space. CLIENT International Estonian Centre Inc. | LANDSCAPE North Design Office | HERITAGE Robyn Huether Architect | STRUCTURAL Entuitive | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL/AV Smith + Andersen | SUSTAINABILITY Footprint | CIVIL MGM Consulting Inc. | COST Altus Group | ACOUSTICS/VIBRATION RWDI | GEOTECHNICAL/SHORING Terrapro | PLANNING Bousfield | TRAFFIC LMM Engineering | AREA 36,000 ft 2 | BUDGET Withheld | STATUS Design Development, preliminary contract documents | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2021

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ABOVE An accessible rooftop terrace is planted with indigenous flowers and grasses, while non-planted portions use a cool-roof finsh. The terrace channels greywater to an underground cistern, adding to the facility’s sustainability goals.

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COMMUN  6 Performance Area  7 Storage/ Service corridor 10m  8 Main Hall  9 Balcony

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A series of elevators, stairs and walkways allows visitors to enter the space between the upper and lower domes of the Oratory, and climb into the lantern atop the building. Opposite Malleable metal mesh is used as an architectural element that unifies the project. The textile clads ceilings and partitions in the renovated museum at the lower level of the Oratory.

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Aménagement du musée et du dôme de la basilique de l’Oratoire Saint-Joseph du Mont-Royal

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Montreal, Quebec Atelier TAG and Architecture49 in consortium

The fourth and final phase of a major renovation plan, this project makes the Oratory’s long-hidden inter-dome space and lanternon accessible to the public, offering the highest viewing belvedere of the city. Adding to the experience, the museum beneath the sanctuary level will also be fully redefined. The new promenade through the museum and the inter-dome is an extension and enhancement of an existing pilgrimage path. It presents the Oratory as a journey, both physical and spiritual, rather than a simple object of consumption. The project develops a simple construction system: the use of a malleable metal mesh which is stretched over the existing secondary structure. The architectural textile is chosen for its transparency, low maintenance, lightness, ref lective surface, durability and fire resistance. The veil confers an ethereal appearance to the inter-dome space, while its woven surface ref lects specks of light. From a utilitarian point of view, it provides an economical solution for rendering the existing stairs and ramps code-compliant, offers a protective coating to the asbestos surface of the domes, and subtly integrates mechanical systems and acoustic surfaces. The transparency of the mesh also allows the installation of lighting fixtures within the enlarged profile of the ramp’s handrails.

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In the renovated museum, the circular ticket office is a unifying crossroad that serves the other programmatic elements. Defined by the transcription of the cupola’s geometry, the central hub allows minimal staff to effectively direct visitors to destinations including the temporary exhibitions, sculpture garden, and stairs and elevators leading to the inter-dome. The visitor ascends step by step to the drum, a space that deftly sorts the flow of visitors up and down, avoiding cross-traffic, and that offers visitors new perspectives on the sanctuary below. The second climb is enclosed within the stair tower, ending with an unveiling: the visitor enters the bridge and finally discovers the immensity of the space of the oculus. The final ascent is an uncanny experience: up a spiral, perched above a large dome. The vertiginous impression of being levitated is mitigated by the enveloping presence of the architectural drape. The ultimate destination, the lanternon, is the apex of both the experience itself and of Montreal. On the descent, a ramp circles the dome, providing low-angle views accentuated by the curvature of the dome. From the dimmed space of the dome, the final landing on the mezzanine, by contrast, is bathed in light. Here, visitors gather to admire panoramic views of the surroundings. The project is the winning entry in a Quebec-wide architectural competition held in the spring of 2018.

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David Penner :: This project blurs the line between programmer and architect. The brief proposes a novel way to adaptively reuse a heritage structure to allow people to see its construction, inhabiting the shell space of the dome. There is an existing stair in place that is rendered code-compliant in this design. Executing the project will be technically challenging. Monica Adair :: The architecture engages with the sublime nature and grandeur of the space. It tells an important story for this site, and will create a novel and exploratory journey through the building, from the basement to the spire, allowing visitors to revisit a familiar space in a new way. By capturing the sublime, this adaptive reuse project makes the case for protecting this icon. Ted Watson :: The graphic representation and documentation on this project are extremely captivating, rich and informative. The use of metal mesh net as a veil-like guard is appropriately minimal and creates a thrill factor—it’s the right choice to protect both visitors and the architecture. The mesh gives the forms a ghost-like, ephemeral quality that makes this very loaded project type strangely delicate and poetic.

CLIENT L’Oratoire Saint-Joseph du Mont-Royal | STRUCTURAL SDK et associés | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Stantec Consulting Ltd. | VISITOR EXPERIENCE DESIGNERS GSM Project

|

LIGHTING CS Design | COST LCO Construction and Management Consultants Inc. | AREA

3,500

m2

| BUDGET $13.5 M | STATUS Schematic design | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION July 2022

A sectional perspective reveals the previously hidden spaces of the building that are made available to visitors. Top Right The project orchestrates the visit as a series of episodes in a physical and spiritual journey. Left A bridge leads to the oculus at the top of the inner dome, from which visitors may choose to ascend into the lantern.

Top left

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Experience. Innovation.

ADVERTISEMENT

Exit Hatches Add Vital Safety Component on Major Rail Project

Photo: Dan Arnold

Underground construction is especially dangerous, particularly in large urban areas with pipes, wires and infrastructure that keep a city connected. When Walsh/Shea Corridor Constructors started to build a long rail line in Los Angeles, Calif. that included underground stations, one of its first objectives was to plan for emergency egress for underground workers. The 8.5-mile Crenshaw/LAX Transit Project rail line includes six emergency exit hatches and four large doors to access underground control systems. The hatches and doors, manufactured by The BILCO Company in New Haven, Conn., provide code-compliant egress for underground workers, and eventually, subway riders. “Even before there were any designs, the engineering team knew that they needed doors that would provide safe and reliable emergency egress’’ said Dave Pebley of Specialty Building Components, the sales representative for The BILCO Company in Pico Rivera, Calif. “The doors had to meet code requirements, but also stand up to the demands of the job.” Installed at stops along the entire length of the line, the doors are equipped with many custom features that make them ideal for use in this application. Each is equipped with engineered lift assistance and a two-point panic locking mechanism that allow the doors to open with less than 30-pounds of force, a critical requirement for safe egress in an emergency. Additional features will also be added at the ground level where the doors will be installed in sidewalks to ensure reliability and enhanced safety. To prevent structural damage, the doors are reinforced for vehicular loading to withstand the weight of an occasional car or truck that may drive onto the sidewalk. They also feature a slip resistant coating on the walking surface to ensure safety in these high pedestrian traffic areas. There are two emergency doors at the Expo/Crenshaw, Martin Luther King, and Leimert Park underground stations. The stations at Hyde Park, Fairview Heights, Downtown Inglewood and Westchester/ Veterans are at-grade and the Aviation/Century stop is elevated, so emergency evacuation doors are not required. “These doors are located on the sidewalk and had to be tested by the fire department.” Pebley said. “They meet H-20 wheel loading

BILCO’s specially designed access doors provide code-compliant egress for underground construction workers and eventually subway riders.

Photo: Dan Arnold

specifications, but are also light enough to be opened easily by one person. which is an engineering challenge.” Planning for this $2.058 billion project started in 1992 and the extension is designed to better serve transit-dependent residents in the corridor and provide economic stimulus in the region. The project will be the first rail line to serve Crenshaw Boulevard and the city of Inglewood since streetcars of the Los Angeles Rail Line stopped running in 1955. The new light rail line will use the alignment of the streetcars in some instances. It is expected to be operational in 2019. Los Angeles is amid a major infrastructure update in advance of the 2028 Summer Olympics. Besides the new Crenshaw line, Los Angeles is also building a nine-mile extension to a Westside subway line and an automated people mover that will serve people on the Crenshaw

Line and help them connect to the broader Metro rail network.

For over 90 years, The BILCO Company has been a building industry pioneer in the design and development of specialty access products. Over these years, the company has built a reputation among architects, and engineers for products that are unequaled in design and workmanship. BILCO – an ISO 9001 certified company – offers commercial and residential specialty access products. BILCO is a wholly owned subsidiary of AmesburyTruth, a division of Tyman Plc. For more information, visit www.bilco.com.

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canadian architect 12/18

58 award of merit

Insectarium de Montréal Jardin Botanique de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec Kuehn Malvezzi, Pelletier de Fontenay, Jodoin Lamarre Pratte with Atelier le Balto

The design of the insectarium aims to synthesize form and content. The result is neither flamboyant architecture nor an abstract container. Instead, it’s a place where nature, architecture and museology converge in a single entity. These are orchestrated to enhance the visitor’s individual sensory experience. From the outside, the building appears to be a simple multi-bay greenhouse at the edge of a prairie landscape. However, a large vegetated dome in front hints that there are more mysterious aspects to this place. On approaching, a linear butterfly garden slopes down, leading visitors below the greenhouse to the entry foyer, a pared-down space open to the outdoors. A floor-to-ceiling slit in the back wall of the foyer brings visitors to the start of the museum journey. The first stage of the visit is a parcours along a serpentine path that leads through a series of cave-like rooms. Intentionally disorienting, the trip aims to initiate visitors to the scale of insects. Interactive exhibitions are designed to connect visitors to the sensory world and impressive motor abilities of insects, inviting humans to a different universe of perception. The path then leads to a cocoon-like space, beneath the vegetated dome. Here, the museum’s mounted insect collections are on display. Visitors slowly making their way along another path back to the surface, as the surrounding light, temperature, humidity and smells all gradually change. Once fully above ground, they emerge at the centre of the greenhouse, surrounded by butterflies and insects. The luminous greenhouse offers a synthesis of experiences. The pathways are formed as furrows cut into a mass of earth of variable height, guiding visitors through the space, and repeating the material-

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ity of the caves below. Along the furrows are displays that showcase different insects in their respective environments. The insectarium goes beyond exhibits to actively interact with visitors. Architecture and scenography become one. The result is not simply decorative displays, but rather real experiences—touch, smell, heat, the bioclimatic effect of the materials themselves—all changing as visitors move from one space to the next. Beyond their obvious differences, plants, insects and people are closely linked to one another. The project hopes to awaken visitors to these connections. This is a place that not only allows plants and insects to f lourish under expert care, but a venue that can also nurture visitors’ storehouses of memories and trajectories of personal growth. Monica Adair :: The insectarium actively invites visitors to embark on a journey at the scale of the insect. It’s a great section and plan that allows one to experience a narrative, with a lot of unexpected playfulness and whimsy that is not necessarily revealed from the outside. It’s meant to be experienced—it’s not a building that can be devoured in one singular moment. Ted Watson :: There’s a minimum number of moves here that create an elaborate promenade in a highly economical form. The learning aspects and interpretive aspects of the building are baked into the architecture—the architecture is not separate from its curatorship. David Penner :: There’s a clarity to this project—its experiential proposition is a real success. The architecture takes us through an adventure of discovery.

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Opposite From the main botanical gardens, a sloping butterfly garden leads to the entry of the museum—an open-air foyer that spans the length of the building. Top A domed space at the end of the underground pathway showcases mounted specimens from the insectarium’s collections. ABOVE The underground portion of the visit features a series of interactive installations inviting visitors to experience the world from the scale and perspective of an insect.

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The visit culminates in a butterfly greenhouse. Pathways continue the language of thickened earth construction, with displays of live insects embedded in the walls. Right The museum’s passageways evoke the tunnels of burrowing insects. ABOVE

9 12 10 11

11 Ground Floor

3

13

2

1

4 5

6 8

7

0

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10M

underGround Floor

 1 Garden of pollinators  2 Reception  3 Lunch area  4 Tunnel  5 Alcoves  6 Gallery  7 dome

 8 ramps  9 The Great Vivarium 10 Workshop 11 Horticulture

production 12 Laboratories 13 Administration

CLIENT Espace pour la Vie | LANDSCAPE Atelier le balto | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Dupras

Ledoux | STRUCTURAL NCK | AREA 3,600 m2 | BUDGET $18 M | STATUS Construction drawings | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2020

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Custom pivoting partition system with felt panel inserts Northeastern University – Toronto Campus Designer: Perkins + Will

Congratulations to all ARIDO award winners! CA Dec 18.indd 61

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canadian architect 12/18

62 STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Engaging the Post-Industrial Frontier

0

Butte, Montana Joshua Nieves Faculty advisor: Catherine Venart, Dalhousie University

Excess soils and waste mounded around the Berkeley Pit copper mine have obscured its view from the city, changed natural ravines into vast tailings ponds, and caused the pit to fill with toxic waters. This project centres on four locations in and around the vast super-fund area. Uses for the sites are based on their latent infrastructural potential. The original mine yard has been an impromptu music venue since the mine’s closure in 1976, and the city aspires to convert it to a permanent concert facility. The project invents a winch-based system that enables the headframe to be transformed into a sunken theatre, concert venue, outdoor stage, or elevated black-box theatre. Used as a water level monitoring point, the Anselmo mine is linked through underground tunnels to the Berkeley Pit. Its headframe is connected to house a water treatment facility intertwined with public gallery and viewing spaces. At grade, phytoremediation wetlands transform the vacant watershed into a greenway. Currently, the Berkeley Pit Viewing Stand is a tourist attraction, which tunnels through the perimeter mound of overburden and onto a small viewing platform. The project uses the existing tunnel as the primary access point for reclamation efforts within the mine, reestablishing this landscape as a publicly accessible parkland. Sitting atop the northern slopes of the Berkeley Pit, the Emily Mine

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100'

ABOVE A water treatment plant is built among the industrial ruins of Anselmo mine, while phytoremediation wetlands gradually transform the aboveground area into a public greenway.

headframe has become an iconic structure for photographers. It is transformed into a destination and gathering place, with a cathedral-like roof over a monumental bonfire pit. Through the adaptation of Butte’s dormant infrastructure, we can work towards the restoration of local environmental systems, and also imagine new possibilities for how to inhabit the greater global postindustrial frontier. Monica Adair :: This is a rigorous exploration of interventions that rethink a series of once-derelict landscapes. It is convincing in its comprehensiveness and completeness. Ted Watson :: This project is beautifully represented with an extremely strong graphic presentation of the subject. It looks at reclaiming industrial spaces in a socially and environmentally sustainable way. Each of the four sites has a different feel and realization that draws you in. David Penner :: It’s interesting to see the romanticizing of industrial landscapes in the schools. There’s a good balance of resolution in this project, which spans from the big-picture issues relating to programming down to the details. I think that’s really admirable.

2018-12-02 9:44 PM


Northern Cloud

Stykkisholmur, Iceland Mark Melnichuk Faculty advisor: Martin Bressani, McGill University

Data centres are anonymous warehouses, consuming an enormous amount of energy to serve the world’s immense digital demands. Just short of becoming an environmental crisis, they also have underlying negative social impacts. Often, these ominous buildings exploit local energy resources while giving back little in return. Northern Cloud is an architectural response that takes a synthetic approach to energy conservation by augmenting the data centre with a greenhouse and community centre. This strategy aims to lower energy consumption and make use of waste heat generated by the servers, through a contextual response which benefits the local community. Unlike typical data centres where servers are in a large open space, Northern Cloud’s servers are arranged along a long perimeter form, which wraps around a central greenhouse. As servers generate large amounts of heat, the façade is designed for cold air intake, a technique and aesthetic similar to local fish-drying huts. Waste heat generated by the servers is then fed into the central greenhouse. Food grown and harvested in the greenhouse is used in the adjacent restaurant and sold to the community, providing year-round food security to the region. The massing of the building responds to the site’s sloping topography, providing a gradually rising accessible green roof, while collecting rainwater for greenhouse irrigation. The form terminates

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ABOVE A solar chimney lookout tower is an integral part of the energy conservation strategies of this data centre, whose waste heat is used in a community greenhouse and restaurant.

in a solar chimney lookout tower—a concrete exhaust plenum which helps draw air out of the greenhouse while also providing views out over the dramatic Icelandic landscape. As an alternative to a generic building, Northern Cloud proposes a contextual architectural response to data centres in Iceland. It is a new interface between data infrastructure and the local community, shifting the identity of the data centre away from anonymity to become celebrated. Monica Adair :: There is a lot of restraint in this project, which takes a complex combination of programs and distills them down to a clear and compelling project. The sectional explorations are particularly strong, moving through from the core to the exhaust plenum. The project creates carefully crafted, magical moments. David Penner :: The simplicity of the organization—and the scheme in general—would only be possible with a confident understanding of the program. I really like the boldness of this project. Ted Watson :: This project feels believable—it could work. The representation is very evocative and atmospheric. It makes you feel the site, and sense the project’s spaces.

2018-12-02 9:44 PM


canadian architect 12/18

64 product showcase Performance From Top To Bottom

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canadian architect 12/18

66 PHOTO AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Photo

TEXT

BYLINE

Reflecting Architecture

Ema Peter Photography

I always try to catch the decisive moment— the shot that will make you not only notice, but feel, the architecture. This image is of the Parq Vancouver, by ACDF architecture in consortium with Architecture49, and in close collaboration with IBI Group. I knew that it would be important to showcase the reflectiveness of the building, and I concentrated on taking photos that highlighted how the building reflects the environment around it. Then I thought, this is the perfect building to mix two of my passions: architecture and clouds. I asked Maxime Alexis-Frappier, one of the partners and co-founders of ACDF, if he agreed to let me try this idea. He did. When the day came, I knew from the beginning it would be perfect. This specific shot was in an area where not many people passed by. It had the most unique cloud surrounding the terrace. I needed a person in the image, and put the camera on a timer while I ran multiple times into the shot myself. David Penner :: I appreciate the complex composition and the intriguing layering of building, sky, context, and what appears to be a mullion fin layer on the facade itself. It’s very rich. Ted Watson :: The cloud elevates the photograph from simply documenting the architecture. It takes a photographer’s eye to capture that sky and reflection at that moment in time. Monica Adair :: At the end of the day, this photo seizes the essence of the magical moments where design, environment, time and the viewer meet.

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Profile for IQ Business Media

Canadian Architect December 2018  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...

Canadian Architect December 2018  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...