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“Special focus on

7th IPSF AfPS Nigeria, Lagos” IPSF AfRO Issue #10


EDITORIAL Hello AfRO IPSFers, Very much thrilled to welcome you to your newsletter at the 10th edition. This specific newsletter focuses on upcoming 7th IPSF AfPS happening in Lagos Nigeria where LIT will be from 14th- 16th June and the main symposium between 17th to 22nd June while the most beloved PST is slated for 22nd to 25th June. In this newsletter, you’ll get to know 1. Why it is important for you to be part of this memorable event 2. Where to visit in Post Symposium Tour 3. Diverse culture of Nigerian 4. And any other important tip about 7th IPSF AfPS and other IPSF symposia.

Read as you get prepared of this event! Fabrice Humura IPSF AfRO Regional Media and Publications Officer 2017/18 rmpo@afro.ipsf.org

CREDITS Editor-in-Chief:

Evangeline Armstrong Gordoneditor@ipsf.org

Editors:

Sara DiTursi

Design and layout:

Issaya Mbwilo

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CONTENT IPSF AfRO Chairperson Previous AfPS in eyes of some AfRO members What to expect in Nigeria at the 7th IPSF AfPS Symposium Meet the 7th AfPS reception committee IPSF regional symposia 64th World congress

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Jacob Enchill, IPSF AfRO Chairperson

As

a regional office we have come as far as 10 years. A decade of success, a decade worth celebrating. The IPSF AfRO movement train is heading towards Nigeria in 2018 to celebrate this anniversary and we need everyone on board to make it a success. We need every association in the region representing at the 7th AfPS 2018, to make a landmark on the region’s history. The RWG and the RC are working tirelessly to make sure we lay down a foundation for a great leap post-10 years of the region. Others have labored and we share in their glory, ours is to do more and add to their gains.

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How I saw 6th IPSF AFRICAN PHARMACEUTICAL SYMPOSIUM, KUMASI, GHANA. By Bakani Mark Ncube (ZPSA, Zimbabwe)

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he date for the much anticipated 6th IPSF AfPS finally arrived and I was ecstatic to be travelling to West Africa for the first time, what better place to see than Ghana which was ready to host the next crop of game-changing African pharmacists! The regional symposia was held in the unique city of Kumasi, which is the second largest metropolitan area in Ghana. It hosts the seat of the Ashanti Kingdom and is arguably the richest in culture and history in the country. According to the Reception Committee (RC), the venue of the symposium was strategically sited at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology to enable us to have a feel of Ghana’s leading university of science and technology, while giving us a copious feel of indigenous Ghana and the theme for this year was the “Integration of orthodox and complementary medicine to enhance healthcare delivery in Africa”.

Bakani (1st from left) with folks taking selfie

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How I saw 6th IPSF AFRICAN PHARMACEUTICAL SYMPOSIUM, KUMASI, GHANA. Having been unable to attend the 62nd IPSF World Congress (WC) in Harare, Zimbabwe, I took it upon myself to sign up for the full package at the AfPS and was especially keen to be part of the Leaders in Training (LIT) group for this year. The IPSF AfRO Chairperson (ChP), Mr Arinze Awiligwe began the training with a presentation about IPSF from its history to its activities, regional offices and affiliated organizations. My experience at the LIT was incredible and I learnt a lot from the sessions with the words of Mr Isaac Adupong from Lead it Africa being the ones that stuck with me the most; he said “Be free to fail. Jump in” and that “Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitudes and in actions”. The regional symposium was from 4 – 10 July 2017 and I cannot help but smile when I reminisce on this event, especially as it was my first IPSF event. On the Welcome night, excitement filled the air as we all said our Hi’s to our friends from home and other countries. On that night we went shuttled to The View Bar & Grill were the welcome party was held. Boy oh boy do pharmacy students know how to party! My next fond memory of this AfPS is the opening ceremony which was graced by many revered speakers from Ghana and Nigeria in the fields of Pharmacognosy, Herbal Medicine and Pharmacy Practice. When I first read the theme for this AfPS on the promotional posters sent to me by the ChP of the AfPS in 2016, I was a bit confused by it because it was so long and seemed complex but when I realised what they were on about, my sentiments changed from confusion to “Damn, Pharmacognosy?!”. However, the opening ceremony successfully changed my view on the subject area and I had an epiphany that it is actually interesting and rewarding. They say you have to taste a culture to understand it and Ghana night did prove this statement to be true. Ghana night was a great day to experience Ghanaian culture and cuisine, especially after a long day of informative lectures at the Opening Ceremony. It was a time to relax beside the glistening Olympic size KNUST swimming pool and feast all our senses as well as interact with each other. The highlight of the night was the traditional dancing, the foods rich in flavour and variety and a man eating fire! I was honoured to be part of Zimbabwe’s Official delegates at the Regional Assembly (RA) – another first for me. It was a great learning experience as I saw how the RA is conducted, all its formalities as well voting. I took a leap of faith and ran for the post of Regional Media & Publications Officer against 2 other candidates. Lastly, at the Gala night the red carpet was rolled out and everyone pitched up looking dapper. It was a classy affair! This was a moving night because we would soon go our separate ways and some delegates would be heading to the airport that night or the next morning. It marked the end of our time together and as they say, “It’s easy to say goodbye if it is a prelude to a hello”. On this night a number of awards were presented and I received an award for Best SEO in AfRO for the 2016 – 17 mandate which was a great personal achievement and for my association (ZPSA). Overall, this was certainly a fruitful event that I will forever hold dear in my heart. Ghana is a beautiful country, rich in history and culture and her people are incredible! I enjoyed the AfPS and meeting all the people I encountered. I encourage all those who have never attended an IPSF event to put it on their Bucket List, you will return a changed person with a whole new outlook on life and the field of Pharmacy. I hope to see you all next year in Nigeria. Viva la IPSF! Viva la Pharmacie!

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My experience at the Ghana 6th IPSF AfRO Pharmaceutical Symposium By Anesu Brighton Venge

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had been a year since I first made plans to attend the 6th African Pharmaceutical Symposium (AfPS), when it was announced at the 62nd IPSF World Congress in Zimbabwe. It was to be held in Ghana from the 4th of July to the 10th of July 2017.

[KNUST Great Hall, Vice Chancellors statues] Our local student association, the Zimbabwe Pharmaceutical Students Association (ZPSA) had already embarked on a journey to source sponsorship for our official delegates through the mother body, the Pharmacist Society of Zimbabwe (PSZ). Some of us had been saving the little pocket money we had in preparation for the grand continental event. When my money was enough to buy a flight to Ghana, I searched for the cheapest and most convenient flight through friends that I had met during the IPSF World Congress, where I was advised to use RwandAir - the African dream from the place of thousand hills. I was then left with the registration fee which, together with 13 other students and through the aid of our enthusiastic patron, we managed to raise for Ghana. I arrived in Ghana on the 3rd of July at 12 noon, at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra where I was welcomed by the most fun loving, astute and gentle Ghanaian man I have ever met. His name is Alexis, the Reception Committee member in charge of the transportation of delegates during the symposium ad his cheerfulness made me oblivious of the Ghana heat. That is when I also met a great phriend, Shully from Tanzania who had arrived at the same time as me. We had our sumptuous lunch as we waited for others to arrive and head for Kumasi.

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[ZPSA students delegates, yellow fever vaccination day] Tired as I was from the 14 hour flight, the zeal to experience Ghana kept me awake every minute from the moment I landed. I was looking outside where there was a lavish green with strings of shops lining the road in some parts of the highway. We were headed for the Kwame-Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. The university is located in the Ashanti region of Ghana, and I felt proud to hear that the Ashanti King is the Chancellor of the university. It is the largest university I have seen, that also enjoys a good number of students from neighboring countries. I was amazed to notice that we Africans are quite similar, with students from more than ten African countries, if not for the language barrier we are strictly the same. It was my first time being in West Africa and eating jollof and fried plantain (banana). I gathered that jollof is a relish, made from rice and different spices, mildly hot to super-hot spices, with fried plantain and chicken. One of the major social events was the international night, where each country displayed its uniqueness in dress, food, artifacts and dancing. Dancing was the most interesting for me, with some choreographic dancers and others just getting their groove on. It was an amazing night of cultural diversity and exchange, the beautiful dresses, the different genres of music and the various rhythms, the different languages and the unity of nations. The event lasted late into the warm night when we had to resign into our rooms at the hostel.

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[Some of the AfPS delegates at KNUST Pharmacognosy garden] The next day we went for a drug safety and reproductive health awareness campaign. The community that we visited was largely Moslem with the leaders and men seated on this side whilst the women and children on the other side. They were quite the welcoming audience as they joined us at our tents, let us ride their motorbikes and took selfies with us. I joined a group of friends to explore just before the end of the outreach session where we witnessed the real Kumasi life, the women selling their various products by the markets, the kids playing in the yard, a house party over there and a few guys playing a game of checkers by the corner. It was a nostalgic picture, not very different from home but unique in its own way. As we left the place just after midday, it started raining in the heat of the sun and I noticed that most of the people did not bother seeking shelter probably because it soon stopped raining and the sun dried them again. It was summer time in Ghana, and it would rain abruptly like that then stop, the sun flourishes a bit and then it rains again. The lush green is everywhere in Kumasi, or at least in all the places we visited. The Biri forest is a natural conservatory famously known for its beautiful butterflies. It has the largest trees I have seen, stretching high up into the sky where they form the forest canopy. The oldest trees were said to be more than hundred years old, and most of them (according to the guide) had medicinal uses hence the sanctuary for further research. If not for the summer weather, we would have seen the butterflies but it started raining again and we had to hurry to our buses and head towards Lake Bosomtwe. Lake Bosomtwe is the largest natural lake in West Africa, a magnificent sight with a refreshing aura. It’s a place to rest, to smile and to contemplate. We used a propelled boat to see the lake, where I noticed a very peculiar tree growing on the east side of the lake and a couple of skilled fishermen in their one-man fishing boats. Thereafter I spent most of the remaining time skipping stones while others played beach netball, danced to music and contemplated as they stared away into the calm waters.

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The

most epic night was the gala night, the name speaks for itself. Young men and women clad in their most glamorous suits and dresses respectively. A bit of African touch here, European there and a whole lot of Western over there. The most beautiful people I have seen, some with their dates and others with their best friends. I had my beautiful date of course, whom I shared this momentous night with, with the executive meal, music and atmosphere. It was the same night that awards were awarded to the best competitors in the professional development events and workshops, as well as awards for the best performing entities in the IPSF AfRO and of course the best dressed man and lady. After all the formalities had been attended to, we danced the night away rejoicing in the IPSF spirit. The following morning was not beautiful, as I realized that everyone was leaving and we had to say our goodbyes. I had grown fond of Ghana, its hospitality, spicy food and warm nights but now was the time to conclude and implement the lessons learnt. I made a lot of phriends from across Africa, and I wish to meet again at the AfPS next year in Nigeria. I want to thank the 6th AfPS Reception Committee for their warm reception and hard work ethic and I hope to meet all of them soon. My thanks also goes to my national association ZPSA and the mother body PSZ, they made this trip possible for me. Lastly, the IPSF community for this wonderful, educative, enlightening and fabulous event. Viva le pharmacie! Until we meet again‌ Anesu Brighton Venge has just completed his Bachelor of Pharmacy at the University of Zimbabwe. He is the previous Secretary General of the ZPSA, 2016-2017.

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My IPSF AfPS Love Story By Esther Mary Massaquoi

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name is Esther Mary, from NAPS-SL. I first learnt about IPSF in 2013 from executives of my association. They told us about the symposia and world Congresses held each year. This got me interested but I didn’t know what IPSF or AfPS was really all about. Then came EBOLA and all interest was lost. Some of my classmates where still interested and became involved. They advised me to like all the IPSF pages on Facebook and get myself involved, which I did, but I didn’t even read through the documents posted in those pages. This post where mainly and mostly from one Kent Odoki who I didn’t know. I thought of them as time consuming, data eating and of little interest to me; but then we have a very good IPSF Contact Person (CP), who is very hard working and continually inform us about activities, campaigns, etc. that IPSF or AfPS is undertaking. He informed us about the 6th African Pharmaceutical Symposium (AfPS) in Ghana and I was so delighted to attend. Then came the struggle to convince my mom about the importance of the symposium and finance. I also had my friends and classmates that were also interested in attending the symposium but facing a similar situation. So, we formed a group and sang carols during Christmas.We were able to pay our registration fee with the monies collected. After registration came the hassle for flight fares. We wrote letters of assistance to different personalities and organisations but only few responded to our letters and since we were many, the money wasn’t enough. My mum gave me what she had but the fare was still not complete. I was so heart broken and I almost gave up. I decidedto completely forget about the symposium and concentrate on my studies. Then God made a way, my uncles, aunts and people I didn’t even know completed the money for the flight fares and also stipend. Finally a week to the symposium, I was able to book my flight to Ghana. I was so delighted that I would be able to join my colleagues to represent Sierra Leone in Ghana. The experience and the education was superb. I met a lot of amazing people from Africa and beyond. I had a great time! The free Wi-Fi is unforgettable. I had enough free time and free data to go through Kent Odoki’s post who is Kennedy Odokonyero and to appreciate his work and writings. I am now so in love with IPSF and the IPSF African Region Office that I’ve made a decision to get more involved in whatever IPSF is doing. Thank you lord for this opportunity! Thank you IPSF AfPS(my new found love) for this experience .

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What to expect in Nigeria and the 7th IPSF AfPS Symposium NIGERIA AND ITS DIVERSE CULTURES By: Bamisaiye Adeola. PANS,NIGERIA.

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igeria, popularly known as the giant of Africa, is Africa’s most populous country with a population of over 180 million people. It is home to 250 different ethnic groups, each having its own unique blend of language, food, dance, dressing, practices e.t.c. The three main tribes in Nigeria are: Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo. Other major ethnic groups are: Fulani, Ijaw, Kanuri, Ibibio and Tiv.

One of the beach resorts in Lagos. These different tribes are concentrated in different parts of the country. The Hausa’s dominate the Northern part of the country, they constitute the majority of the population, leaving Yorubas and Igbos to share the southern part. The south western part is colonized by the Yorubas while the Igbos occupy the south eastern and south south region. Although, one would still find people from a different tribe resident in each of these regions. The Yoruba people speak Yoruba language, although there are slight variations in the way each ethnic group within the Yoruba tribe speak the language. Comom traditional foods in Yoruba land are: Iyan and efo riro (pounded yam and vegetable soup), amala (made from yam flour), Eba (made from garri) e.t.c. Yoruba females wears “Iro, buba and gele” which is a wrapper, a longsleeve,slightly oversized blouse and a headtie. The males wear a combination of “buba, sooro, agbada and fila”. Attending a Yoruba wedding should be a goal for anyone visiting the Yoruba land. The glamour, song, dance, practices and importance attached to it is exclusive. As a means of expressing the fun and togetherness that accompanies this ceremony, Yoruba ceremonies have been tagged “Owambe”. So, when next a Nigerian friend uploads a picture with the tag “owambe”, no doubt, the picture was taken at a ceremony.

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nterestingly, the Hausa people are not just prominent in Nigeria, they are also found in various parts of west Africa like Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana and Sudan. Grains like millet, rice, maize, sorghum are common in the Hausa land. These are grounded into flour to make “tuwo”, which can be eaten with soup such as Taushe, Kuka, Kubewa, Dagedage e.t.c. Hausas are well known for cattle rearing hence, they have abundant milk and meat. The meat can be processed dry into “ Kilishi” or roasted as “Suya”. Suya is however widely sold at night in Nigeria. It is garnished with onions, cucumber and pepper. You shouldn’t visit Nigeria, without having a taste of Suya. The Hausas have a restricted dressing code which is majorly based on their religious beliefs (Islam). The men wear large flowing gowns called “ Babban riga” and “Jalabia”, with caps known as “Hula”. The women wear wrappers called “Abaya”, with blouses, headties, shawls and hijabs. They also use jewelries called “Lalle”. The Igbos have their unique practices and tradition. Common food in Igbo land are: Ofe aku, Abacha (dried cassava strands mixed with palm oil), akpu (made from cassava) and yellow garri. They eat a lot of vegetable soup and “Ofe nsala”. New yam festival is a big ceremony, in which even Igbo people that are not resident in the Igbo land, travel down to participate in. They have big barns for yam and an Igbo man is esteemed according to how big his barn is. Igbo weddings called “Ibu Nmanyi” constitute a big part of their culture. The grooms family are given a list of items (usually a long list) to get as a prerequisite to marrying the bride. If you plan to marry an Igbo girl, your pocket will definitely feel it...lol. Igbo men wear “Akpoche” (a tiger patterned cloth), with a cap called “Opùagú”. The women wear a blouse (usually white) and wrapper made from unique traditional fabric. Nigeria is a country rich in cultural heritage. With each culture, having its own unique ceremonies, practices, food, language, dance, music e.t.c. Interestingly, Nigerians dwell peacefully together. Our rich cultural heritage will be beautifully displayed to ensure you have a splendid International night at the AfPS2018. Make sure you don’t leave without having a feel of that Naija Spirit buzzing in you.

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LAGOS THROUGH THE EYES OF AN OUTSIDER By TELLA Oluwatoyin Alice, 500 Level student, University of Ibadan Pharmacy School If you’re a Nigerian, and you have not been to Lagos, or you have not seen the city on TV, or at least, heard about the hustle and bustle of Lagos…….. are you sure you’re a Nigerian? A onetime capital of the country, before the federal capital was moved to Abuja in 1991. Lagos, known for its large population across Africa, as well as its vibrant economy, is one of the most desirable cities to live in in Nigeria.

Lagos is home to the tallest building in west Africa

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his is partly because of the numerous job opportunities brought about by the many companies situated in the state. It will interest you to discover that many of the Pharmaceutical industries in Nigeria are in Lagos, as well as many other manufacturing companies. This gives a promise of securing jobs after school for many Nigerian graduates. Even young school leavers and non-educated people continually troupe into the city from various parts of the country in their quest for greener pastures. This makes for the diversity in the population. Lagos is home to all kinds of people, including the rich, the not so rich as well as those in outright poverty. Christians and Muslims have homes in Lagos. The fact that this city is located in the south west region of the country doesn’t deter Hausas, who are from the north, Igbos, whose base is in the east, as well as other ethnic groups within and outside Nigeria from finding their place in Lagos. Indeed, Lagos is a microcosm of Nigeria.

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s a child, one of the things that fascinated me about Lagos was the Bar Beach, which has now been transformed into Eko Atlantic. I was told by someone in the neighbourhood that in Lagos, there were two large water bodies that lie side by side yet never meet. He furthered his exposition on the Bar Beach by saying that if you decide to forcefully mix them in a bottle, such bottle would break. ‘Okun’ (sea) and ‘Osa’ (lake) was what he told me that they were. Little did I know that the ‘water bodies’ was the Atlantic ocean which bordered the city of Lagos. I still desire to visit that beach sometime in the future. Another trademark of Lagos state are the yellow commercial buses also known as ‘Danfo’. When travelling from Ibadan to Lagos, the moment you start seeing them, you know that you are almost there. To board Danfos, you just have to be smart, because, Eko o gba gbere, (no room for sluggishness in Lagos). There’s usually a lot of people waiting to compete for limited spaces in those buses at the bus stops. Hence, when you see one approaching, and you’re in a hurry, make sure you position yourself, stop forming touche (acting all civilized), and enter once some passengers alight. You must also be careful to secure your bags to prevent pilfering. And when you want to alight, you have to be smart about it because the drivers almost never stop the bus, they only slow down and can almost scream at you if you do not get off the bus on time. Indeed, Lagos is not for the fainthearted. When I was in secondary school, a boarding school, there were students from other states, including Lagos. There was something peculiar about the Lagosians. They appeared more civilized, they were good dancers, they happened to know many contemporary Nigerian songs. I saw the reason for this when I went to Lagos. I saw for myself that Lagos is a city of fun. Even if you don’t listen to music personally, parties and clubs in the neighbourhood would get your ears fed with them. Furthermore, how can I talk about Lagos without making mention of BRT buses which were introduced by the immediate past governor of the state as part of his renovation project of the state. Those buses are long luxurious buses which are never held back by traffic because there is a special lane for them. The first time I went to Lagos and then came back home, one of my neighbours asked whether I had boarded BRT. Of course I didn’t until the second time I visited Lagos. I can remember my uncontainable excitement when I was preparing for my first trip there, it was as though I was going to heaven. Time and space would fail me to tell of all I know about the highly busy, rapidly developing city of Lagos. Of course, in my opinion, there’s no better place to host AFPS 2018 than Lagos. It’s the place to feel the naija spirit. Trust me, you are in for an exciting, once in a lifetime experience in Lagos. I literally cannot wait to visit Lagos again, to live the Lagos life with fellow Pharmacists in training from all over Africa. Viva la Lagos! Viva la Pharmacie! Viva la AFPS. See you at Lagos!

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Inspiring the Future of Healthcare in Africa: Innovation, Economy and Sustainable Development By Adebisi Yusuff Adebayo – Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

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health vista has transformed theatrically since the inception of independence of some African countries about fifty years ago, and this is expected to be on a continual projection as the region progresses over the next 50 years. Some African countries have made somewhat headway in improving the health outcomes of their populations, in spite of the challenges posed by poverty rife, epidemic diseases, food insecurity and malnutrition. Nonetheless, more still needs to be done to put an end to the sporadic increase health challenges in the region. The long-established communicable diseases of HIV/ AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) remain the major drivers of mortality. Concomitantly, chronic conditions such as heart and other cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer which are associated with a growing middle-class way of life – are also emerging as major causes of death in the region. This is responsible for creating double disease burden that the health systems in developing countries are inadequately equipped to handle. All these made it pertinent to invest in young professionals and professionals-in-training which are the future of healthcare system in the region. African health systems are impecunious, overextended, and understaffed, rendering the challenge of addressing this double disease burden a colossal challenge. Good health is a prerequisite for development. A nation that takes the health of the population with levity is an economically down nation. This makes it clearer that achievement of this goal is not dependent on the health sector alone; rather is conciliated by environmental, social, infrastructural, and regulatory systems which made it pertinent to build capacity of future and young healthcare professionals to combat these challenges. In the coming years, we will witness more holistic and sophisticated approach to improving health. Building capacity of the future healthcare givers and professionals cannot be overemphasized as well as, instilling the spirit of innovation and ensuring the proper sensitization of the young professionals on their roles in transforming the landscape of healthcare in Africa remains apposite.

Lagos the hosting city of 7th AfPS

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is noteworthy that the roles and the impacts of pharmaceutical sector cannot be deemphasized in achieving good healthcare for all in any country. This justifies the saying that “without drugs there is no healthcare”. Surprisingly, there are shortages of crucial medicines throughout the continent, consequently only a fraction of those in need receive treatment which is one of the challenges that we need to rise up to by devising innovative and sustainable strategy with considerable positive impacts on the economy of the continent in the long run. According to a study published in WHO Atlas of Health Statistics (2012), it was deduced that in Sub-Saharan Africa, only 38% of essential drugs are available in public facilities and most countries rely on imported medicines to treat their citizens, importing roughly 70% of medicines and 95% of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Meanwhile, the total size of Africa’s pharmaceutical industry is less than 1% of global share thus the medicines produced cannot be enough for the continent.

Here comes African Pharmaceutical Symposium 2018 with the theme – “Inspiring the Future of Healthcare in Africa: Innovation, Economy and Sustainable Development”, the gathering aimed to deliver well-rounded event which will bring together experienced speakers from Africa and beyond to educate the delegates on the wide range of topics ranging from antimicrobial resistance, growing substance abuse and effective drug policy, to global pharmaceutical marketing, innovative approach to healthcare, roles of pharmacist and pharmacy student in achieving Sustainable Development Goals 3 - Universal Health Coverage among others that would have direct and future impact on the African pharmacy students and graduates. Innovation in healthcare can take various forms, ranging from service delivery models, drug therapies, tests and devices, surgical procedures, patient education and counseling to new forms of health professional training, management and financing. In recent years, the healthcare has experienced an escalation of innovations designed to improve life expectancy and quality of life of the patient. Even though innovation is hard according to numerous studies, more headways were made in developed countries compared to developing countries. As Africa move towards developmental path, the ability to create sustainable and efficient health systems will enormously depends on its capacity to invent, take advantage of and maximize solutions that are sensitive and appropriate for the local communities. Innovative research is becoming the major focus as healthcare sector faces freakish challenges to improve quality and lower risk, improve access, increase efficiency, and lower costs. More importantly, local healthcare innovations have a way of providing new path out of poverty by providing the opportunity for growth, finance and employment. The implication of these is that pharmacy students and graduates need to build capacity in other to contribute reasonably since some of the required skills set to pursue career in the necessary fields are not learned in pharmacy school but in scientific and educational gathering such as AfPS 2018. For examples, advancement in pharmacogenetics, genetic prescribing, more specific diagnostic scanners, surgical robot, drug dispensing ATMs, Big Data and other pharmaceutical procedures such as Stents, balloon angioplasty among others. Essentially, student pharmacists, seasoned and young pharmacists should make strides to offer innovative services to patients, form interprofessional care teams, and think outside the box to demonstrate the value pharmacists bring to the patient care and the whole healthcare sectors. All these will be well-addressed during the symposium via various plenary sessions, workshops and abstract sessions.

On Innovation:

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On Economy:

The vital relationship between economy and health cannot be overstated. According to Koffi Annan, “The biggest enemy of health in the developing world is poverty”. Better health is crucial to human happiness, light-heartedness, social, emotional and physical well-being. It also makes an important contribution to economic progress, as healthy populations live longer and are more productive and save more. This directly results from the fact that healthy people are willing and ready to work. Wealthier countries have healthier populations for a start as there is going to be an increase in effective workforce. According to World Bank Report, “50% of the economic growth differentials between developing and developed nations are attributed to poor health and low life expectancy”. At AfPS 2018, discussions will go on an advanced length on how invaluable the pharmaceutical sector could be in boosting the economy in Africa. In addition, insights on how economy of a nation can affect greatly, the quality of healthcare delivery on the populace will be well-addressed.

On

Sustainable Development: According to United Nations, “The density of pharmacists will now be taken into account in measuring the achievement of United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.” The implication of this is that pharmacist’s role in achieving SDG-3 cannot be deemphasized. Various plenary sessions and abstract presentations targeted at emphasizing the role of pharmacists in achieving good health for all (Universal Health Coverage) and how this development can be sustained in order to improve healthcare delivery in Africa will be discussed at length at the symposium. For the landscape of healthcare system in Africa to be transformed to the point of our desire, our roles cannot be embroidered. See you in Lagos come June. Cheers! The writer is a member of Publicity team for African Pharmaceutical Symposium 2018.

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LOOKING BEYOND THE WALLS: Pharmacy education in Northern Nigeria. By Yusuf, Hassan Wada

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ectic, fascinating and fun are a few of the words I would use to describe being a Phamacy Student in Northern Nigeria. Pharmacy education in Nigeria is historically rooted in the British educational system. Pharmacy education in Northern Nigeria commenced in the early 1930s with the training of the Chemists and Druggists at the school of pharmacy located at Zaria in 1930 (Northern Nigeria) with only one school in the country located in the Western part of Nigeria at Yaba in 1927 (Western Nigeria) making them two. In 1961, year after independence The Chemists and Druggists Diploma, patterned after the British education system, was the first minimum requirement for registration as Chemist and Druggist. Much later in 1961 it was upgraded to the Chemist and Druggist Diploma. This was the first requirement for registration as a Pharmacist by the former Pharmacist Board of Nigeria PBN. The three year Pharmacy degree programme was started In1968 in the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, ABU Zaria. However the first set of students were admitted in 1970 and they graduated in 1973 with a BSc degree in Pharmacy. The Faculty then comprised of two sections; (1) Pharmaceutics and Pharmacognosy. (2) Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry. In the 80’s ABU Zaria started the B. Pharm Degree and the first school of pharmacy to graduate with a declassified degree. The northern Nigeria cultural milieu Northern Nigeria is the most populous region in Africa with abundant human resources. An understanding of pharmacy education in Nigeria would be of importance to other countries of the world that may require or use pharmaceutical workforce from Nigeria. Religion and culture are closely intertwined in northern Nigeria; both involve systems of actions, justified by values and beliefs. The region‘s ethnic majorities are Hausa and Fulani, and the population is predominantly Muslim. Islam in northern Nigeria is a complete way of life, governing behaviors both inside and outside the home. At the moment, there are precisely 6 fully accredited and two partially accredited Pharmacy schools in Northern Nigeria, which churn out pharmacy graduates annually. Improvement and Indication of the acceptance of a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree started in the Northern Nigeria with a University (Bayero University Kano) which took-off 2015 and other school with B.Pharm which fulfill the educational aspect of the requirements for licensure as a pharmacist. The duration of study prescribed for the PharmD is 6 years through UTME (Unified tertiary matriculation examination). A number of schools of pharmacy in the region are at various stages of implementing the PharmD program. University of Jos and Usmanu Danfodiyo University for example, have obtained the approval of the university senate to commence the program. The final endorsement lies with the regulatory body, PCN (Pharmacists Council of Nigeria).

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he ownership of Universities offering pharmacy in northern Nigeria has moved from what used to be solely Federal to include State, in which the first state university (Gombe State University) got a partial accreditation from both NUC (National Universities Commission) and PCN earlier this year. Northern Nigeria has been in the fore front in the establishment and sustaining various continental and regional Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical related organizations.

Lagos city Pharmacists in Northern Nigeria practice in a wide array of fields, which include community, hospital and administration, academia, industry, and military. The educational programs of Nigerian schools are generally designed for international competence and the curricula for pharmacy education is not an exception. Today, Northern Pharmacist are remarked worldwide, we have seen many advancement around the globe achieved both in the field of innovation, technology and healthcare advancement, even in the most difficult areas of human endeavour. We’re rich in strategic Active ingredients, Excipients and mineral resources used for production, from which the nation earns wealth with which it funds several activities geared towards national development. We can’t wait to host you for the IPSF-AfRO 2018 Symposium in Lagos. Where we will exchange intelligent ideas from the knowledge we have gained about pharmacy, towards inspiring the future of healthcare in Africa.

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NIGERIA AND ITS DIVERSE CULTURES By Bamisaiye Adeola

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igeria, popularly known as the giant of Africa, is Africa’s most populous country with a population of over 180 million people. It is home to 250 different ethnic groups, each having its own unique blend of language, food, dance, dressing, practices e.t.c. The three main tribes in Nigeria are: Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo. Other major ethnic groups are: Fulani, Ijaw, Kanuri, Ibibio and Tiv. These different tribes are concentrated in different parts of the country. The Hausa’s dominate the Northern part of the country, they constitute the majority of the population, leaving Yorubas and Igbos to share the southern part. The south western part is colonized by the Yorubas while the Igbos occupy the south eastern and south south region. Although, one would still find people from a different tribe resident in each of these regions. he Yoruba people speak Yoruba language, although there are slight variations in the way each ethnic group within the Yoruba tribe speak the language. Comom traditional foods in Yoruba land are: Iyan and efo riro (pounded yam and vegetable soup), amala (made from yam flour), Eba (made from garri) e.t.c. Yoruba females wears “Iro, buba and gele” which is a wrapper, a long-sleeve,slightly oversized blouse and a headtie. The males wear a combination of “buba, sooro, agbada and fila”. Attending a Yoruba wedding should be a goal for anyone visiting the Yoruba land. The glamour, song, dance, practices and importance attached to it is exclusive. As a means of expressing the fun and togetherness that accompanies this ceremony, Yoruba ceremonies have been tagged “Owambe”. So, when next a Nigerian friend uploads a picture with the tag “owambe”, no doubt, the picture was taken at a ceremony. nterestingly, the Hausa people are not just prominent in Nigeria, they are also found in various parts of west Africa like Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana and Sudan. Grains like millet, rice, maize, sorghum are common in the Hausa land. These are grounded into flour to make “tuwo”, which can be eaten with soup such as Taushe, Kuka, Kubewa, Dagedage e.t.c. Hausas are well known for cattle rearing hence, they have abundant milk and meat. The meat can be processed dry into “ Kilishi” or roasted as “Suya”. Suya is however widely sold at night in Nigeria. It is garnished with onions, cucumber and pepper. You shouldn’t visit Nigeria, without having a taste of Suya. The Hausas have a restricted dressing code which is majorly based on their religious beliefs (Islam). The men wear large flowing gowns called “ Babban riga” and “Jalabia”, with caps known as “Hula”. The women wear wrappers called “Abaya”, with blouses, headties, shawls and hijabs. They also use jewelries called “Lalle”. he Igbos have their unique practices and tradition. Common food in Igbo land are: Ofe aku, Abacha (dried cassava strands mixed with palm oil), akpu (made from cassava) and yellow garri. They eat a lot of vegetable soup and “Ofe nsala”. New yam festival is a big ceremony, in which even Igbo people that are not resident in the Igbo land, travel down to participate in. They have big barns for yam and an Igbo man is esteemed according to how big his barn is. Igbo weddings called “Ibu Nmanyi” constitute a big part of their culture. The grooms family are given a list of items (usually a long list) to get as a prerequisite to marrying the bride. If you plan to marry an Igbo girl, your pocket will definitely feel it...lol. Igbo men wear “Akpoche” (a tiger patterned cloth), with a cap called “Opùagú”. The women wear a blouse (usually white) and wrapper made from unique traditional fabric. Nigeria is a country rich in cultural heritage. With each culture, having its own unique ceremonies, practices, food, language, dance, music e.t.c. Interestingly, Nigerians dwell peacefully together. Our rich cultural heritage will be beautifully displayed to ensure you have a splendid International night at the AfPS2018. Make sure you don’t leave without having a feel of that Naija Spirit buzzing in you.

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Eko’ni baje: Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the IPSF African Regional Office By Aniekan Ekpenyong. If you ask a mother what makes her most grateful, she is likely to tell you when she gave birth to her first child or when her child was 10. Age 10 signifies a steady progress from childhood to adolescence. It is usually a moment that calls for celebrations. You can only imagine the joy of mother IPSF. The IPSF African Regional Office also known as IPSF AfRO was birthed in August, 2008 at the IPSF General Assembly in Cluj-Napoca, Romania to allow for the decentralization of the Federation into regions. Creation was aimed at extension of the work the Federation was doing in public health, professional development and advocacy, providing a region-specific approach. The creation of the African regional office followed that of the Asia Pacific and Pan American regional offices in 1999. The International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation (IPSF) is the oldest faculty-based organization founded in 1949 and represents over 320,000 individuals in more than 80 countries with more than 100 different representative pharmacy students association. The federation is engaged in pharmacy education, public health, professional development, advocacy, cultural awareness and partnerships developing pharmacists worldwide. The federation aims to provide opportunities for professional development, education and international exchange, advocates for improvements to pharmaceutical education strategies and health systems as well as present a platform for member organizations to exchange knowledge, experience and ideas. Activities organized by IPSF include world congresses, regional symposia and different projects in public health, professional development and student exchanges. From being a region with less than 5 countries in the early 2000s, AfRO has grown to accommodate members from more than 18 countries with representation from all regions of Africa, excluding North Africa. Currently, members include Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Mali, Togo, Benin Republic, Burkina Faso (West Africa), Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania (East and Central Africa), South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho and Zambia (Southern Africa) The region has engaged in numerous projects and activities since its inception, advancing the aims of the federation while providing an avenue for networking between members. Amongst the many achievements recorded by the federation include the 62nd IPSF World Congress held in Zimbabwe and the 2017 World Health Scientific Symposium in Kigali, Rwanda which all turned out to be a huge success. Typical projects engaged in are student exchanges, public health campaigns and professional development events such as the Trainers Development Camp (TDC) and the Leaders-in-training LIT event. Every year, the region organizes the African Pharmaceutical Symposium (AfPS). The AfPS was first hosted in 2012 at Algiers, Algeria. Subsequently, the event has been hosted in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Kenya and Ghana. The African Pharmaceutical Symposium (AfPS) brings together pharmacy students and recent graduates from all over Africa in an African city for about a week. The delegates engage in educational and scientific symposia, workshops, industrial visits, public health campaigns around the host city and a great variety of social and cultural events. The 7th AfPS which would be held in the city of Lagos is hosted by the Pharmaceutical Association of Nigeria Students (PANS) and aims to unite both old and new IPSFers in a spectacular reunion party, provide a forum where the future of the region can be discussed and offer valuable mentorship opportunities for young pharmacy leaders across Africa. It promises to be a fulfilling and rewarding time of learning and networking as it blends the traditional approach to the AfPS with the exciting anniversary celebrations. The event also serves as a unique opportunity to discover LAGOS, the largest megacity and the 4th largest economy in Africa. From the hustling and bustling of day time activities to the bliss of night time, the city has everything it takes to deliver that spectacular Nigerian feel you have always been expecting. Everyone on the Reception Committee led by Ms. Akudo Alli is all ready to provide an unforgettable experience. I am excited and only counting months left to being a part of this unique gathering of IPSFers from all over Africa and beyond. It would be a history making event! Wouldn’t you rather feel the Naija spirit with us this year? Eko’ni baje! (Welcome to Lagos) and Feel the #9jaSpirit

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What you need to know about Lagos; the hosting city of AfPS2018 By Temitope Ben-Ajepe, the IPSF Contact Person for PANS, Nigeria 2017/2018

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nergy; my preferred English word if I ever were to pick a synonym for my city, Lagos. It’s the very first thing you notice as you touch down Nigeria’s former Federal Capital Territory and now it’s biggest, thriving commercial hub; one can literally feel the boisterousness as it permeates every nook and cranny of the Center of Excellence. The energy in Lagos can never be missed -- it is alive, well and it thrives, even in the sweltering heat. It never skips a beat.

The event this year will hold at Golden Tulip Hotel agos through the collective efforts of Nigerian IPSFers, will be welcoming with open arms, our counterparts from the rest of the African Regional Office for the 7th edition of the African Pharmaceutical Symposium which interestingly coincides with the 10th anniversary of the office’s inception billed to take place from the 17th through the 22nd of June, 2018. Special considerations are being made by the Reception Committee and PANS National Executive Council to ensure this symposium adds value to everyone who’ll be attending, ensuring we have an event that is forward thinking and befitting for the future of Africa’s healthcare delivery team with regards to the contributions of young, emerging pharmacists. We cannot be more chuffed and we’re set to extend our hospitability, share our knowledge, learn from our guests as we invite them all to learn about our diverse culture(s) and douse the negative press we’ve received from mainstream media of late.

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n discovering Lagos, it is advisable to prep oneself for the bouts of energy all around and ultimately enjoy it. Alighting an aircraft, (hardly ever) strolling through Customs and claiming baggage at the conveyer belt before bursting out of the Arrivals Lounge of the international wing of the Muritala Mohammed International Airport is a combined lesson in the fine art of juggling quiet charisma, sophistication and short outbursts of stark, raving madness. Lagos, fondly referred to as Eko by its locals has something in store for everyone – as visitors to the city for AfPS2018 are soon to find out. It is a place of big breaks for the hardworking, the headquarters for bustling night life for die hard party lovers (no one said it better than Banky W. when he said “Ain’t no party like a Lagos party”), a steadily growing economy for investors and diverse markets for the business savvy in almost every sphere that one can think up. It is also a place with churches and mosques on every other street – a shortcut to heaven, some might argue. Lagos could very well be a school of hard knocks but it is also a gift that keeps on giving; it is the gateway to our country and a treasure trove for the keen eyed tourist because: melting pots bring everything and everyone together and Lagos is a melting point – literally and figuratively speaking. Without mincing words, if there’s anything at all you seek in Nigeria, you stand a most assured chance of finding it here. The stark contrast between the elitist and the more humbling backgrounds and how they co-exist side by side is a pure wonder: an unbelievable, jarring disconnect between both extremes to some and to others, the culmination of the best of both worlds. The writer is the IPSF Contact Person for PANS, Nigeria 2017/2018

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Meet 7th IPSF AfPS Reception committee

I am happy to welcome you all to the 7th AfPS. The symposium is an outstanding international forum to discuss progress of pharmacy profession and event will feature most experienced speakers and enjoyable events throughtout. AfPS2018 is an opportunity to network, learn and discuss ways to improve healthcare in Africa. Come, let’s inspire the future of healthcare in Africa together.

AKUDO ALLI – Chairperson

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The 7th IPSF AfPS, which will mark the 10th anniversary of the AfRO promises to deliver a rich blend of academic and sociocultural experiences. We can not wait to receive our delegates while showcasing the diverse, yet beautiful culture of our beloved country Nigeria. Come expectant!

Ethel Mba, Secretary

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Meet 7th IPSF AfPS Reception committee

OKEKE ADAOBI – Treasurer

EKAWU IYAMENI - Events Coordinator

ONOCHIE KELVIN - Marketing Coordinator

IKENNA AMAFILI - Public Relations Officer

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Other IPSF Events 1. The IPSF Eastern Mediterranean Pharmaceutical Symposium (EMPS) is the key regional event of the IPSF Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (IPSF EMRO) as part of the IPSF - International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation.

2. The Pan American Regional Symposium (PARS) is the largest event of the International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation Pan American Regional Office (IPSF PARO), established in 2002 to unify the Americas within the Federation’s aims, objectives, and vision.

3. World Congress Date : 30 Jul - 8 Aug 2018 Theme: : “From Lab to Counter: The Different Pharmacists’ Profiles and Their Constant . Contribution to Global Health.”

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Toward afps 2018  

Isuue #10

Toward afps 2018  

Isuue #10

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