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CONTENTS Chairperson of Student Exchange Program International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation & African regional office Meet your Student Exchange Officers Discover Student Exchange Program Testimonials Preparing for Student Exchange Program in African Regional Office African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program

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Chairperson of Student Exchange at International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation

Dear IPSF Pharmily,

It is my pleasure to greet you with the first edition of Student Exchange Program (SEP) in the African Regional Office (AfRO) Newsletter as the IPSF Chairperson of Student Exchange 20172018. I am Safiye Çağansel, a recently registered pharmacist from Cyprus and I am in charge of a smooth-running SEP. My first interaction with IPSF and SEP was in 2015 when I represented my home association and became a member of IPSF at the 61st IPSF World Congress in India. That is where I became involved with SEP as the first ever Student Exchange Officer for the Eastern Mediterranean Pharmacy Students Society (EMUPSS). During the student exchange officer (SEO) meeting at World Congress, I really wanted to work actively to improve every aspect of this educative and personally enriching program in all dimensions. Having no predecessor was really challenging at the same time and this made the role not only fun but also valuable for my professional development. Following a successful SEO mandate in 2015-2016, I was both SEO and a member of the IPSF Student Exchange committee for 2016-2017. Everything went naturally and fit into its right place. I witnessed a transformation in the SEP and this reminded me of my favorite quote by Steve Jobs who says, “if you are working on something exciting that you really care about, you don’t have to be pushed, the vision pulls you.” SEP is an extraordinary, unforgettable experience and opportunity for every pharmacy student and is a perfect combination of travel, education, knowledge and exploration of the profession. SEP gives students the opportunity to explore the world and culture with travel while also practicing pharmacy in different fields, meeting pharmacy friends and building long-term friendships with all IPSF member countries. As Chairperson of Student Exchange, my main focus will be, firstly, communication, feedback and, of course, transparency. In addition to that, this year I would like to not only focus on achieving sustainability but also taking an active role to aid in personal and professional development of every position that is involved in SEP with trainings and collaboration with the IPSF Professional Development (PD) portfolio which will lead to further improvement of SEP in all aspects, also by achieving higher rates of successful exchanges. This year we are also implementing a brand new, user-friendly SEP database whose trainings will be delivered shortly after being functional. I heartily suggest for you to take the chance and participate in the SEP during the mandate of 20172018 to make unforgettable memories, lifetime friendships and learn about pharmacy practice and cultures in many different countries. SEP has a 65 year legacy of successful exchanges which makes it the oldest and longest exchange program for pharmacy students. Join the SEP Pharmily and keep the SEP spirit alive! To IPSF, to SEP, viva la pharmacie Yours in IPSF, Safiye Çağansel IPSF Chairperson of Student Exchange 2017-2018

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EDITORIAL Hello AfRO IPSFers,

I am excited to welcome you to issue 9 of our newsletter and the first one for the mandate of 2017/18. In this issue, we focus solely on the Student Exchange Programme (SEP) in the AfRO region. This is the first of what I hope will be regular publications aiming to promote SEP in the AfRO. In it, we introduce IPSF, AfRO, the Chairperson of Student Exchange and our incredible AfRO Student Exchange Officers. I am sure you would like to hear from those that have done SEP in AfRO, so we have testimonials for you too. I don’t want to let the cat out of the bag, the rest of the stories are supposed to be a surprise for you. Enjoy reading what is inside! Fabrice Humura IPSF AfRO Regional Media and Publications Officer 2017/18 rmpo@afro.ipsf.org

CREDITS

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Editor-in-Chief:

Katarina Zunic and Evangeline Armstrong Gordoneditor@ipsf.org

Editors:

Sara DiTursi

Design and layout:

Issaya Mbwilo

SEP in AfRo Region Newsletter

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Hello IPSF Pharmily, Welcome to the first ever issue of the SEP in AfRO Newsletter. The Student Exchange Programme (SEP) helps students from member organizations improve their personal and professional profiles and also helps to improve education and public health in their local communities following examples and experiences acquired from other countries. Above all, we believe that the major potential of participating in the SEP is that it allows students to learn from their counterparts in other countries, empowering them to contribute towards the development of their own countries. I would recommend embarking on the SEP and believe it is one of the best things you can ever do for yourself during your time in pharmacy school. It will provide you with the knowledge of pharmacy in a whole new country and it is great for cultural exchange as it will teach you what other cultures are like. They say “strangers are friends waiting to happen� and this is epitomised by the SEP because it will allow you to make long lasting friendships and connections all over the world. Last but not least, you should not live the same year 75 times and call it a life. Dare to be brave! SEP in AfRO will enable you to take part in new adventures while giving you the chance to explore the beauty and fun of another country. Happy reading and Viva la Pharmacie!

Bakani Mark Ncube IPSF AfRO Media & Publication Subcommittee 2017/18 IPSF Student Exchange Committee 2017/18

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International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation & African regional office (IPSF)

WHO WE ARE

International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation (IPSF)

Established in London in 1949, the International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation (IPSF) is one of the world’s oldest international student volunteer organizations. IPSF is the leading international advocacy organization for pharmacy students with the aim to promote improved public health through the provision of information, education, networking as well as a range of publications and professional initiatives. Today, the Federation represents over 313,000 pharmacy students and young graduates from over 80 countries worldwide. IPSF initiatives focus mainly on the areas of public health, pharmacy education and professional development. Initiatives include public health campaigns, research on issues in pharmacy education and workforce development, the Student Exchange Program (SEP), international and regional congresses and symposia, and publication of the IPSF News Bulletin. IPSF holds Official Relations with the World Health Organization (WHO), Operational Relations with the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and Roster Consultative Status with the Economic Social Council of the United Nations (UN ECOSOC). IPSF works in close collaboration with the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP). The IPSF Secretariat is supported and hosted by the FIP in The Hague, The Netherlands. IPSF African Regional Office (AfRO) was established at the 54th IPSF World Congress held in Cluj-Napoca, Romania in August 2008 when its establishment was voted in as a way of tackling the importance of decentralizing IPSF work into regions. For further information visit www.afro.ipsf.org

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MEET YOUR STUDENT EXCHANGE OFFICERS

Ishimwe Alliance My name is Ishimwe Alliance and I am from Rwanda Pharmaceutical Student Association (RPSA).

The fun part about being an SEO is you get to talk to many foreign students and tell them about your country, schools programs and, of course, tell them how much they would enjoy working in your country. You also make lots of friends, embrace diverse cultures and if you are eager enough to learn you might pick a word or two from other languages you weren’t familiar with. I consider SEP as a way to provide a safe, nurturing environment to learn, grow, and experience a new way of life for both incoming and outgoing students. It allows students to connect with the outside world and shows the students that the world is full of possibilities and opportunities. I like the fact that the student exchange program opens the eyes of students and shows them how people of different cultures can mingle, get along and still have the same basic needs such as health, for example. I am looking forward to an increased number of host sites available in Rwanda so that we can send out more Rwandan students through the Student Exchange Programme and receive many more. I hope to design and develop advertising tools to increase the interest of both local and international students and get them involved with this program. My number one hobby is reading and others include travelling, dancing, hiking and hanging out with friends. Email: rwanda.seo@gmail.com

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I am by names of Koffi Jemima Desiree Andre from University of Felix Houphouet Boigny In Abidjan.

Koffi Jemima Desiree Andre

SEP is an opportunity to develop my hidden qualities, to help my friends to open a whole new world and for my own personal development. For this year, I sincerely hope to send many students from my country to other countries so that they get to know and love IPSF and overall, to get a new experience. My hobbies include reading books, watching movies as well as helping out other people. Email: seo.adepharm@gmail.com

I am called BALEMBA CISHUNGU Ornella from Club des Etudiants en Pharmacie de l’Universite Officielle de Bukavu (CEP-UOB). I study at universite officielle de bukavu from Democratic Republic of Congo.

BALEMBA CISHUNGU Ornella

Becoming SEO is an occasion for me to invite students and members of IPSF all over the World who are interested in visiting a Big and Beautiful country of Democratic Republic of Congo. This year, I will do my best to host for the first time incoming students in my country for SEP and as well send students from my country to other countries. My hobbies are football, basketball, swimming, and Music seo.cepuob@gmail.com

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Koffi Jemima Desiree Andre

Koffi Jemima Desiree Andre

I am Momorie Koroma from college of Medicine & Allied Health Sciences, University of Sierra Leone. I like being a Student Exchange Officer because it affords me the opportunity to learn about pharmacy practices in other countries and also to share our own practices in Sierra Leone with other pharmacy students. Although I haven’t been involved in exchange programs yet, I think SEP is a good way to learn from other pharmacy students and it certainly means a lot to me. I look forward to being involved in an exchange process, be it sending or receiving students.

My name is Kossivi Christ and I am completing my pharmacy studies at the Universite de Lome, Association des Etudiants en Pharmacie du Togo (AEPHAT), Togo. I like the Student Exchange Program because it helps you meet a lot of new people and learn from other countries. It is an opportunity for us to improve as individuals and to widen our minds, whilst broadening our horizons. Personally, I am quite outgoing and SEP fits that profile. I have a keen interest in industry and business, and some of my hobbies include watching Hollywood original voice movies.

My Hobbies are Football and Music.

Email: sep.aephat@gmail.com

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Issaya Mbwilo I’m Issaya Mbwilo from Muhimbili University of Health & Allied Sciences. My association is TAPSA, Tanzania I believe being an SEO of my association will build my capacity in different aspects in an amazing way. I will use this opportunity to promote the integrity of my association and country as well. I am learning many new skills and expanding my network with other pharmacy students all over the world. It is my hope, throughout my entire term in office, to have a new experience which I have never had before. SEP, put simply, means Student Exchange Program, but it’s far more meaningful if you take it to mean the window through which pharmacy students can be exposed to new opportunities and experiences around the world. I am looking forward to promoting SEP both in and out of Tanzania and it is my plan to receive and send large numbers of students during this term. I would also like to improve social network promotion for SEP as I believe it is key to a successful program. My hobbies are music! I love to listen to music. I am also a playing basketball. Email: seotapsa@gmail.com

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JANE Oaga Hi, I am Jane Oaga from the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Pharmaceutical Students Association of Kenya (KePhSA), Kenya. I like being an SEO because I get to interact with other SEOs as we work towards creating a successful SEP experience, in addition to meeting various exchange students. To me, SEP means adventure. This is achieved as you experience different pharmaceutical practice environments all over the world, quench your thirst for knowledge and learn about different cultures. During my mandate, I’m looking forward to increasing SEP awareness among pharmacy students in my country, having successful SEPs and developing new friendships. My hobbies include swimming, exploring new territories and reading novels. E-mail: kephsa.seo@gmail.com My name is Schneider Zuidema Kadiki from the University of Zimbabwe (UZ). My Association is the Zimbabwe Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (ZPSA) I like being an SEO because it presents me with the opportunity to interact with and learn from people of different countries, backgrounds, and cultures. It allows me to broaden my academic knowledge and my understanding of the world around me. SEP means that I get to represent my country on an international level and be part of the team that facilitates the transfer of students to universities across the globe. I am part of a team responsible for helping students learn my culture as well as other cultures. My hobbies are reading, writing, movies and music.

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Issac Nii Ofoli Anang My name is Isaac Nii Ofoli Anang, a fifth year Doctor of Pharmacy student at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) – Kumasi, Ghana. I am the current International Relations Officer (IRO) and a member of the Ghana Pharmaceutical Students’ Association. I may not be a very fun, outdoorsy person but I like to make new friends and meet new people. It’s actually one of the reasons I ran for the international relations office in my association—widening my scope about cultures and differences people share are things I find very interesting. Besides that, I’m a very clichéd person. I read novels, watch pre-recorded tv series, and listen to pop music at my leisure. To begin with, I am still in my commencing weeks of being an Exchange officer so I would not say I have that many experiences in my hat to draw from. Nevertheless, I like being an SEO for a plethora of reasons. I’ve mentioned the very first one in the above paragraph—I’m hooked on forming bridges with the unknown. I yearn to meet new people from different cultures. SEP is a great opportunity to achieve that, and being an SEO simply means I am at the centre of it all. Coordinating and helping my association members as well as other IPSF family achieve their fantastic discovery goals is very pleasant. As SEO, I get to work with some great people from my association and improve on leadership skills and management, which includes teamwork and coordination. It has provided me with new opportunities I did not know existed, for example, professional networking as a student with prospective host pharmacists or healthcare professionals. In a nutshell, I like being an SEO for GPSA because I get to meet and work with a great number of amazing people and learn from them. SEP to me means dreaming and making those dreams materialize. My mantra for this SEP year in GPSA is, ‘Believe. Initiate. Discover’. I see the global pharmacy world as one big drawing board with so many possibilities. There is so much room for all pharmaceutical scientists and students to make something new, inspiring, and exciting in their own way and in their chosen corner. I regard SEP as one of the many tools we can use to achieve the above feat. Moreover, SEP to me is an opportunity. An opportunity to basically put the Ghana Pharmaceutical Students’ Association on the map. We are ready for exploits. We just need to show the world. SEP is just the avenue for that. That is my ultimate goal. In my tenure of office (2017/2018 SEP year), I look forward to giving a new meaning to SEP in my association. Members should hear of SEP next year and think of achievable possibilities. I hope to make GPSA and Ghana the SEP destination of the year. My expectations are to work with highly motivated and inspired student participants, cooperative SEP committees, SEOs and IPSF community, and reliable and committed hosts and facilities. The aim, again, is to put GPSA on the map. We will work and settle for nothing less.

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Discover Student Exchange Program Testimonials I may travel far and wide but my heart will always yearn for Africa, for it is home. Africa is a magnificent and splendid continent, with a myriad of magical destinations, from the Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe, to the wildlife of the Nairobi National Park and the volcanoes in the Land of a thousand hills amongst many others.

#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Ghana Célia Moncoiffé I went to Ghana for a SEP lasting 6 weeks. It was a very long journey from France to Ghana. I didn’t know what to expect but I already knew it would be a big adventure that would change me because when you come from Europe, life in Africa is bound to be an adventure for you.

At first I didn’t feel very safe in the streets because everyone was staring at me, they were curious to see a white girl in their country. But then I met , I met people who were always smiling, always happy, I learnt to talk with people in the streets, to laugh and have fun with them. I learnt that in this country you can never feel alone because people are very friendly and helpful.

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There is another thing I noticed very quickly. People are always happy in Africa. And it was so good to be with them and to let them communicate their happiness to me. It got me thinking of my country as a very sad country where people have a lot but are always complaining, feeling sad and being selfish.

When I started the internship in a com-

munity pharmacy, I was afraid because I didn’t know what they would ask me to do. Some of the patients didn’t speak English, only local languages and we had a lot of work sometimes. It was difficult at first but my colleagues were very nice and always by my side if I needed help. I had to prepare the drugs to give it to the pharmacist to deliver it to the patients, and I had to fill forms about the patient’s prescriptions. It was very different from France and I had to learn again how it works in a community pharmacy. I got lost for the first day then I got used to the environment very quickly. I really liked my internship and I was sad when I had to leave. During these 6 weeks, I had enough time to go for excursions. I saw wonderful landscapes! I visited big cities and especially markets and also small villages. I saw waterfalls, I fed monkeys in the forest and I went on a safari to see elephants. I took a lot of pictures as memories of this unforgettable SEP adventure in Ghana. At the end of my stay, it felt like home. I found friends and I found happiness. It was really hard to say goodbye because I had too many good memories and I didn’t want to leave. But I hope one day I will come back to Africa to experience other adventures and magical moments.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Ghana By Adrian Dove – Jones Hello Everyone, My name is Adrian Jones-Dove and I am a student pharmacist from the USA. Over the summer of 2017, I was fortunate to be accepted into a Student Exchange Program with the GPSA program at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology located in Kumasi, Ghana. I was even more fortunate that during my exchange period, the 6th Annual IPSF African Pharmaceutical Symposium occurred and I was able to take part in the wonderful program. It is an event where all of the African Pharmacy schools who are a part of the African IPSF, sent representatives to the host country (which happened to be Ghana this year) to take part in the festivities.

The first part of the symposium was a pre-

session that included small group sessions titled “Leaders in Training”. This gave very valuable and applicable information on how to improve our leadership skills. After the pre-sessions, the main symposium began. This year’s topic was “Integration of Orthodox and Complementary Medicine to Enhance Health Delivery in Africa.” It was an event that incorporated seminars from distinguished speakers in the field of pharmacy, interesting workshops, many opportunities for networking, socio-cultural activities, and even multiple excursions to the beach or museums of Ghana. Some of the events offered were: learning how to make hand sanitizer, clinical skills events and a patient counselling competition. I learned a lot about pharmacognosy and even more so, about the difference and similarities between pharmacy education system in the U.S. and Africa. It also was an absolute blast meeting all the various students from countries such as Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, Egypt, Tanzania, and Sierra Leone just to name a few. Multiple continent spanning friendships were made, many of whom I hope to keep in contact with for years to come.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Ghana By Adrian Dove – Jones With the conclusion of the symposium I was directed to the Ghanaian Pharmaceutical Industry. There I was graciously accepted as pharmacy intern to the Tradewinds Chemist Ltd company. The company makes various drugs to improve the health of their customers and I was able to observe (and even assist) how they made several of their products. My main duty however, was to serve in their Quality Control department. This department took samples of the drugs at every stage of production and made sure they held up to their high standards. It was eye-opening: the level of rigor, diligence, and attention to detail that goes into making sure every product that left the factory was worthy of the Tradewinds logo. It definitely left an impression that may have even stimulated a curiosity for industrial pharmacy that I didn’t even know I had. Overall, I am truly happy I decided to come and expose myself to these new and highly rewarding experiences. I highly encourage anyone considering a similar opportunity to take the plunge and go for it.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Zimbabwe

By Bakani Ncube

There are some places on Earth that you just have to experience for yourself. Places so unique in the landscape and so rich in culture and heritage that only a first-hand encounter will do them justice. Our beautiful country, Zimbabwe, is one such place. You will hear many different answers. Some will say that it is our people’s friendliness, the way we wrap each visitor in genuine hospitality and warmth. Others will tell you about our sound infrastructure that enables visitors to explore the country extensively, allowing them to indulge in the luxury fit for kings and queens.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Zimbabwe

By Bakani Ncube

Yet others will tell you about our magnificent natural wonders including the Victoria Falls, the mighty Zambezi river, the ancient baobab trees, the precariously balancing rocks found in many parts of the country as well as intricate ecosystems and biodiversity. You will be told about monuments that bear testimony to humanity and our predecessor’s ingenuity and courage, particularly the great construction feats of Lake Kariba and its dam wall as well as the incredible Great Zimbabwe, where the spirits of its former Shona inhabitants appear to still magically linger. In Zimbabwe, the student exchange program is very interesting and we promise you will leave fully satisfied and nostalgia shall be a norm from the moment you touchdown in your home country. We offer practice in community pharmacy, both in the downtown CBD area and in upmarket locations, wholesale and distribution pharmacy, hospital pharmacy as well as industrial pharmacy. Placements are also with host families so that you get a better sense of the culture and lifestyle in Zimbabwe first hand from one of our pharmacists or pharmacy students. The post-SEP tour is a definite must do and it is tailor made just for you as you add or remove activities based on your interests. Come to Zimbabwe: the world of wonders.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Tanzania By Birgit Reisenhofer,

This essay on my SEP experience is dedicated to my host SEO Anania and all my friends that I‘ve made during my wonderful stay in ... wait, let‘s see if you can guess where I went for my SEP. At the beginning of July 2016 my journey started - it was my first trip alone, to a continent I’d never been before. Even if my family and friends were worried about me at first, I was really looking forward to my little adventure. When I arrived, the local pharmaceutical students’ association (TAPSA) welcomed me very warmly at the airport and invited me to a welcome dinner. My SEP internship started with an orientation day at Muhimbili University of Health Allied Sciences (MUHAS) and Muhimbili National Hospital (NMH) some days later. During my time at NMH I rotated mostly through the emergency and infectious wards but I was also introduced to pharmacists from other departments including cardiac, maternity and paediatrics. I dealt a lot with malaria and HIV treatments and saw many patients with asthmatic issues and open-wounds at the resuscitation rooms. Once I even observed a leg surgery and its medical treatment at the theatre. I really enjoyed going to the ward rounds with the pharmacy students and the intern pharmacists because they always explained the medical treatments to me. Besides this I was also allowed to deliver medicine under supervision and I learnt to deal with Jeeva, their hospital’s computer system. Moreover, they taught me some essential words in Swahili because even if all the treatments were documented in English by the doctors and interns, most of the patients didn‘t speak English.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Tanzania By Birgit Reisenhofer,

Do you already know where I went for SEP? During my SEP we also visited TFDA, a food and drug authority, where we were shown their registration procedure and laboratories of quality control, and a local pharmaceutical company named Zenufa where we observed the production of tablets and capsules and helped a little bit in the QA/QC labs. I was also able to attend classes at MUHAS University. In the weekends we traveled a lot; for example, a safari at Mikumi National Park, a one-day visit to Kiromo village to experience the villager‘s daily life, another day to Bagamoyo where we saw historical slavery sites, then we travelled to Zanzibar to visit the Prison Island and swam with dolphins. Finally, we went for a hike to Lushoto where we walked through the Magamba rainforest, visited the Soni waterfalls and had an amazing view from Irente Viewpoint. SEP definitely doesn‘t stand just for a common Student Exchange Program, but in my case also for loads of Safaris, Experiences and Private developments! Did you realise that I was in Tanzania, a country in West Africa, situated on the Indian Ocean? It was one of the best experiences of my life. I can‘t describe how much I miss the evenings at Coco Beach, eating cassava and listening to the ocean or their music. The students had such a positive attitude, they smiled and shined every single day and lip-read all my wishes. Because of them I felt safe and welcome, they made my SEP definitely unforgettable! Asante sana, marafiki zangu! (Thank you very much, my friends!) Do you want to have your own incredible SEP experience like me? Apply now! Birgit Reisenhofer, AFÖP Austria SEP in Tanzania 2016

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Uganda By Safari Justin & Ahadi Christian,

Safari Justin and Ahadi Christian participated in the Student Exchange Program from March to May 2017. Both of them are students in their 6th year of pharmacy studies at the Université Officielle de Bukavu (UOB) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and are members of the Club des Etudiants en Pharmacie de l’UOB (CEP-UOB). They were hosted in Kampala by the Makerere University Pharmacy Student’s Association (MUPSA) of Uganda where they completed two months of an industrial internship at Cipla Quality Chemical Industry Limited (Cipla QCIL) in Kampala. Here is their testimony, acknowledgement and impression of the SEP: Our participation in the IPSF-SEP by performing a two-month-long industry internship in KampalaUganda was a very great and relevant experience in our academic curriculum and for our future career as pharmacists.

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#Discover Student Exchange Program (SEP) in Uganda By Safari Justin & Ahadi Christian,

The MUPSA-Uganda, through its Executive Committee, particularly its President and SEO Mr. Ronald Amaza and Ms. Yvonne Nyamigisha, respectively, facilitated our placement in a leading pharmaceutical industry in Uganda. Their kindness, availability, collaboration and enthusiasm made our stay in Kampala truly amazing. They didn’t only facilitate the site of our placement, but they also helped us find good accommodation and discover beautiful Kampala. The entire MUPSA team will remain in our memories always. Our integration in the industry was very easy and quick thanks to the teamwork spirit which the Cipla team embraces. Their warm welcome, kindness, mentorship spirit and collaboration helped us learn many things about the drugs manufacturing process. The areas that were improved due to this industrial training include managerial skills, interpersonal relations, teamwork, knowledge concerning the manufacturing process of solid dosage forms, and documentation required for a pharmaceutical industry. We cannot end this testimony without thanking those who made our participation in the SEP possible. We are very thankful to the CEP-UOB (our home association), the MUPSA for hosting us and the excellent scholarship system BEBUC (Bourse d’Excellence Bringmann aux Universités Congolaise) for the financial support they provided during our travel and stay in Uganda.

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Preparing for Student Exchange Program in African Regional Office

Jacob Enchill, IPSF Chairperson of African Regional Office 2017-18 All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveller is unaware. We live in a world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures we can have, if only we seek them with our eyes open. To embark on this journey, you must adhere to these steps;

Pre-SEP

During this step, one must go through the procedure of selection by the association you are representing by applying through the database along with your CV and motivational letter. Then, the three associations you have elected for the SEP undertake a selection process. When selected, you can begin negotiations with the host SEO regarding accommodation, tours, schedules, etc. You may need to apply for a visa at this time, book your flight, sign a waiver of liability provided by the home SEO and, last but not the least, pack your bags.

During SEP Upon arrival at your destination, it’s important to become familiar with your surroundings including finding out where to change money, buy food, the distance from your internship site to your accommodation, investigate SIM cards and Local Exchange Officer (LEO) accessibility. The schedule agreed on with the LEO must be adhered to. Take photos and upload using the necessary hashtags. Make sure you don’t miss your return flight or overstay the amount of days issued in the visa.

Post-SEP Upon arrival back home, fill in the evaluation form on the database, alert both your home SEO and host SEO of safe arrival and you should expect your certificate relatively soon.

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11 tips for an unforgettable exchange Mr. Martin Koprivnikar Krajnc Student Exchange Committee (SEC) 2015-16 & Mr. Alvin Edem Kobla Akpalu Student Exchange Committee (SEC) 2015-16 1. Bring an extra bag or backpack. It will be useful for day or weekend trips. 2. Bring an unlocked phone. It will be much easier to communicate with the host and other SEP students via phone calls and messages. 3. Bring your camera and/or video recorder to make sure you capture all the exciting moments. Don’t forget to bring your laptop/tablet and phone chargers! 4. Bring a travel first aid kit. If you are on a certain medication, don’t forget to include them in your luggage and make sure you will not run out while you are on exchange. 5. Check the electronic standards of your destination country and make sure you pack your luggage accordingly. 6. Don’t forget to stay in touch with your parents/friends! Although, it’s important not to be too addicted to the internet. Remember to immerse yourself in the experience. 7. Check the alcohol and cigarette limits in your host country, you may only be allowed to bring a certain amount before renewing your supply at the duty-free shop. 8. Download useful apps: an offline map application, specific apps for public transportation or transportation in general, camera apps, etc. 9. Bring useful things including a beer/wine opener, lighter, padlock, clear tape. 10. Read about the country you are supposed to go and research which places you can visit and explore . 11. In the end, when you are in the host country, enjoy nature, try sports and activities that you haven’t done before, try to learn something traditional, try the local food and also don’t forget to share your experience with other students who want to do SEP by posting your photos on social media and hash tagging them with #IPSFSEP and #mySEPadventure! Enjoy your SEP experience

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Life of a Student Exchange Officer My name is Ruth Ngwiri, a third year pharmacy student at the United States International UniversityAfrica (USIU). Our local pharmacy association at USIU has been part of the Pharmacy Students’ Association of Kenya (KePhSa) for three years now. KePhSa prides itself on being in a beautiful country that is full of diversity, culture and opportunities. I was elected as the Student Exchange Officer on the 9th October, 2016. My goals during my mandate were to create awareness about the SEP, respond to appropriate emails, connect students interested in exchange programs to SEOs at their various destination of choice and to make arrangements for incoming students. I have been able to keep in touch with other SEOs and CPs on the AfRO group on Whatsapp ever since, along with taking part in monthly Skype conferences with my colleagues and our SEP buddy, Shakila from Rwanda. Why do I love coordinating SEP? I love being able to help exchange students achieve their dreams of going to a strange land to experience new things and coming back with more maturity, more social poise and fuelled with a drive to confront challenges outside their comfort zone. To me, SEP is about making new connections against all odds, including distance, race and language. It means having another family away from home. It is about self-development and awareness while developing opinions and striving to attain new goals. It has been a wonderful and eye opening experience to work with the IPSF family. I have been able to be in touch with our colleagues worldwide and have borrowed a leaf from their book with regards to their great work ethic. I am grateful for this opportunity and wish everyone in the pharmily a great career ahead! Regards, Ruth Ngwiri

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program For more information about SEP offering countries, visit “https://www.ipsf.org/countries” and under each country, you will find detailed information about your country of interest.

Rwanda

Visa •

Some travellers can receive a visa upon arrival, but from January 2018 Rwanda will be offering visa-on-arrival for ALL citizens of the world. More country-specific visa info can be found by accessing the following link: https://www.migration. gov.rw/index.php?id=13 A tourist visa is $30 USD for one month, easier to obtain within 2 weeks of arrival. The East African Tourist Visa, which is $100 USD, grants you multiple entry access to Rwanda, Kenya and Uganda. You can pay in cash or by credit card.

• •

Vaccinations • • • •

Yellow Fever- bring your yellow fever vaccination card with you in case you’re asked to show it at customs. Typhoid and malaria prophylaxis - malarone, doxycycline, etc For other recommendations (such as bug spray and sunscreen), please visit: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/rwanda

Money • • •

Credit cards are widely accepted in Kigali but you can carry cash too. The maximum amount of Rwandan Francs you can withdraw per transaction at an ATM is 200,000 RWF (about $270 USD) and most machines will allow two withdrawals of 200,000 RWF. If you bring USD make sure all bills are newer than 2006 to change at the Forex Bureau.

Phone & Internet • • •

Most coffee shops have WiFi as well as other institutions such as hospitals. There are three main telecom companies in Rwanda: MTN, Tigo and Airtel. The wider consensus is that MTN appears to be the best. You can purchase a 3G sim card for 1,000 RWF ($1.25) as well as airtime (minutes for talking and data bundles) and scratch cards from street vendors all over town. You can also purchase a very cheap phone for use during your stay ($15).

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Rwanda Transportation •

• •

Motorcycle taxis are the most common form of transportation in Kigali (locally known as motos). If you plan to travel by moto, we strongly recommend using SafeMotos – they have apps for Android and iOS where you can order a safe driver right to your door. They also provide better helmets for their riders. (highest price: 1000 RWF – $1.75). A taxi cab is faster but more expensive and you can expect to pay between 8,000 and 10,000 RWF ($11 to $14 USD), there is also an app for it on Android 250TAXI. The slowest but the cheapest option is the bus (fares vary depending on where you are travelling from and your destination). They stop working at 10PM.

Basic Kinyarwanda The main language spoken in Rwanda is Kinyarwanda. French is widespread among seniors and English among juniors although all 3 are spoken by many people who are in contact with visitors. English How are you? I’m fine Thank you

Kinyarwanda Bite? Ni byiza! Murakoze

Basic Facts about Rwanda • • • • • • • •

Local Time: GMT +2 International Dialing code: +250 Weekend: Saturday (last Saturday of the month is an off day Umuganda) and Sunday (church day as many Rwandans are Christians). Electricity: 220 volts, round 2 pin (most common) & square 3 pin sockets Currency: Rwandan Francs. Kigali is a safe city but stay cautious about your belongings. Tap water is not safe to drink; buying drinking water is very cheap and some places have coolers e.g hospitals. Kigali (the capital) is about 5,000 ft (1,500 m) above sea level so the weather is around 20 degrees Celsius (during the June-August period, it is very sunny and warm)

Basic Customs in Rwanda •

Acquaintances shake hands and friends kiss on the cheek (3 times if it’s been long time or 1 time.) Men to men don’t peck. • Expect a relaxed attitude about time; often 15 mins can lapse for scheduled time • Dress code is relaxed and functional (button shirt and jeans at internship) and light clothing for June-August warm weather (sunglasses too!) • Smoking is banned in all closed public and work premises including catering and accommodation establishments. It is allowed, however, in open air areas. • Rwandans stare and have direct eye contact (don’t get offended). They also have minimal personal space Foods and Drinks to try: • Local coffee is brewed in many cafes and tropical fruit juice is freshly made and served in many restaurants • Isombe stew served with plantain or Ugali with fish • Chapati with rice, beans and avocado served with beef sauce • Rice cooked in coconut juice with cabbage and pork

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Rwanda

Where to go Inside Kigali

Gisozi Genocide Memorial • You can walk through the exhibits for free • You can take pictures outside but they charge you $25 USD to take pictures of the exhibits Inema Arts Gallery • Various painting and sculpture exhibitions. They hold yoga on Thursdays. Museums: Kandt House and Presidential Palace • Kandt House was the first modern house built in Kigali and was later converted into a museum with a snake zoo. • Presidential Palace is the former Presidential residence that was converted into a museum. It is also the crash site of the former President’s plane. Mt. Kigali Hiking: go hiking on the many trails of Mt.Kigali with a great view at the top Kigali Up!: a music festival that is held in July and has many artists from the African region come to perform. The festival also has Spoken Word poetry. Visit the open air markets where you’ll find a huge variety of products for sale; from Kitenge clothes to foods such as pineapple and passionfruit (haggling is allowed).

Outside of Kigali

Volcanoes National Park • Home of the famous gorillas (super expensive, costs $750/hour to see gorillas. • Much cheaper to go camping and trekking to Bisoke Nyungwe Forest Canopy • Beautiful forest and many types of monkeys and birds to see. • Cheap places to stay: KCCEM guesthouse or Gisakura guesthouse Akagera National Park • A car is required for this park so you can drive through it to see lions, zebras, etc • Find a local friend with a car or book through a tour company that will pick you up and drive you

Lake Kivu • You can stay in the towns of Gisenyi or Kibuye. • A reasonably priced place in Gisenyi is Paradis Malahide. • You can stay in a tent there for cheaper than a room and they provide a mattress, pillow, blanket and towel. • They have a bathroom you can use with flushing toilets, shower, and running water in the sink. • You can canoe on the lake for free or pay $50 to go on their motor boat for 1 hour SEE YOU IN RWANDA!!!

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Ghana

REQUIREMENTS. •

Visas. Foreign nationals of the following countries can enter Ghana without visas: ECOWAS countries plus Botswana, Egypt, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Singapore, Swaziland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda and Zimbabwe. For information about obtaining visas for Ghana, visit the official website of the Ghana Immigration Service (ghanaimmigration.org/countries_n ot_visas.html)

• Vaccines required include:

Yellow fever, Hepatitis A, B and C, Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) and Diphtheria-Tetanus. Visitors from non-malaria endemic zones need malaria prophylactic treatments before, during, and after their stay (contact your GP) . • Currency. Ghana cedi and pesewas. • Language. English is the official language. But there are over 40 local languages spoken with Twi being the most popular. TO NOTE • Do not kiss or smoke in public . • Take off your cap when talking to the elderly or people in higher positions (e.g. your boss, or the president). • Handshakes are the standard gesture in common pleasantries. Shake hands, wave, and hand things over with your right hand. • Ghanaians are a very ‘group/family oriented’ culture and not too big on privacy. It is normal for friends/family/neighbors to drop by without calling first and they may expect you to do same. Don’t find it weird to see people staring or others in your personal space. If you feel uncomfortable, just explain nicely that you are not used to this custom. • Bargaining for price reduction in open markets is practically the norm. Usually there’s a reduction in the price. • In a restaurant there’s no need to tip when there’s a service charge. Ghanaians aren’t completely opposed to tipping though. • Remove your headphones or earpieces when communicating. • Taxis and trotros (public transportation which is usually a lot cheaper) are the major forms of transportation. • Always agree on the fare for the taxi before boarding. • GMT in Ghana means “Ghana Man Time” so always arrive to a party at least 30 minutes late (everyone else will too). However, punctuality is paramount for formal events. • Do not feel bad or too ‘out of place’ if you do not get something right. Just apologize and explain that you’re not a local. No one will expect you to act Ghanaian after that. Instead, they’ll make it their responsibility to make you feel at home and part of them. SEP in AfRo Region Newsletter

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Ghana

PLACES TO VISIT

Wildlife & Birding • Kakum/Mole/Nihi Suhein National Parks • Shia Hills • Tafi Atome Monkey Santuary • Bobri Forest Butterfly Sanctuary • Paga Crocodile Pond Museums / memorial centres • Armed Forces • Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Museum • W.E.B Dubois History/ Diaspora • Elimina/Osu/Cape Coast Castle • James/Good-hope/Sao Tiago da • Mina forts • Manyhia/Ga–Manste Palace Scenic and natural Beauty • Labadi/Busua/Krokrobite/Bojo Beaches • Boti/Wli/Kintampp Waterfall • Umbrella Rock • Volta/Nzulezu/Bosomstwi Lakes & Rivers • Afadja Mountain • Aburi Gardens FOODS TO TRY • Fufu with groundnut/palm-nut/light soup • Banku with okro stew or soup/tilapia • Waakye • Kenkey with fish • Jollof rice •

Local soups, stews, sauces, and porridges

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program KENYA Requirements:

Passport: an application for a single entry visa costs $51 and is available upon arrival at the airport or can also be purchased prior to travel. Visit the Kenyan High Commission website for the list of Nationals exempted from visa. Vaccines: Yellow Fever, Malaria Language: English, Kiswahili Currency: Kenyan Shillings

Where to go: Nairobi National Park, Nairobi Museum, Snake Park, Karura Forest, Ngong Hills, Mt. Longonot

When to go • •

Warmest and driest: December to March Rainy and coldest: May to July

Tipping: No tipping for matatus (local transportation), only tip when impressed by the service (usually 10% for restaurants and bartenders) • • •

Always agree on the price with the matatu conductor or taxi driver beforehand. There is no need to tip if a restaurant has added a service charge.. At times, bargaining for a service can lead to a cheaper charge.

Foods to try: Nyamachoma with ugali, mukimo, chapati, pilau, and githeri Basic Kiswahili: Hello-Habari yako?, Goodbye- Kwaheri, Please-Tafadhali, Thankyou- Asante, You’re welcome-Karibu, English- Kizungu/Kiingereza, Yes- Ndio, No- Hapana. Do you speak English?- Unazungumza kiingereza?

General Advice: • • • •

Shake with your right hand. Haggling is expected in market stalls. Only offer prices you are willing to pay. Distance between Kenyans while conversing can be minimal. Expect a non-relaxed and relaxed attitude about punctuality on formal and informal meetings, respectively. You should arrive 30-45 minutes late for a party.

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Zimbabwe

Behaviour & Dress in Public • Feel free to wear what you feel comfortable in during your spare time. • Workplaces will require formal or semi-formal dressing. • Bring a laboratory coat. • If you are attending a church service, wear clothing that covers your body (i.e. no shorts, vests, slops/flip flops/slippers or exposed shoulders). This applies to any other sacred places. Things that you are allowed & not allowed to do • No drinking in public • Avoid kissing in public as it can be viewed as public indecency. Traditions and characteristics of the people • Punctuality is important in Zimbabwe so make every effort to arrive on time. • Being a former British colony, Zimbabwe is an English speaking country and this is the main language in the work environment and at educational institutions. Native languages such as Ndebele and Shona are also spoken depending on which part of the country you are in. • Depending on your personal preferences and level of comfortability with the other person, hugs may be given. If in doubt though, stick to a hand shake. • Most supermarkets open at 0800 and will close at 2030. Currency issues In Zimbabwe, we mostly use the United States Dollar (USD), but South African Rands (ZAR) and Botswana Pula may also be found. Euros are rarely used. The best currency to come with would be the USD already converted from your home country. Have some money on your bank card (Mastercard/ Visa) and some cash would be handy too in case the system is offline. You can swipe in shops to make payments.

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African Regional Office member associations offering Student Exchange Program Zimbabwe

Public transportation • • •

Public transport isn’t as efficient or reliable within the Central Business District (it is not scheduled/ timetabled). Taxis are a better mode of transport costing $2-$3 within the city and roughly $10 out to the suburbs from the CBD. Public transport between cities (mostly buses) are more reliable and are timetabled. They are a better mode of transport.

Food There are a wide range of traditional foods in Zimbabwe. Be sure to try sadza which is made from maize/cornmeal and any of the other local delicacies in traditional food restaurants that are around.

#DidYouKnow 1. Zimbabwe is in Southern Africa between the Zambezi and the Limpopo rivers. 2. The highest point in Zimbabwe is Mount Inyangani (2,592 m). 3. A number of natural shelters, occupied since early times, can be found in the Matobo Hills. The area also has a high concentration of rock art which provides a view of life in the Stone Age. 4. The name Zimbabwe was derived from the stone structures of Great Zimbabwe or Dzimbahwe, inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1986. 5. Great Zimbabwe was built by Shona (Bantu) people between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries. 6. Eight birds carved in soapstone have been found during excavations in the ruins of Great Zimbabwe. 7. During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, Great Zimbabwe controlled much of the ivory and gold trade in the region. 8. Stone structures were built in other areas of Zimbabwe such as Khami and Nalatale. 9. Artifacts from Europe and China have been found at Khami. Khami, like Great Zimbabwe, became a World Heritage site in 1986. 10. In November 1855, Dr David Livingstone, the Scottish explorer and missionary, saw Victoria Falls for the first time. Livingstone named the Falls after the British queen, Victoria. 11. The local name for the Victoria Falls is Mosi-oa-Tunya, “the smoke that thunders”. Victoria Falls became a World Heritage site in 1986. 12. Mana Pools National Park, on the banks of the Zambezi, is home to a large number of wild animals including the Nile crocodile. 13. Lake Kariba on the River Zambezi is one of the world’s largest manmade lakes. 14. On 18 April 1980 Zimbabwe became an independent state. 15. Zimbabwe has one of the highest literacy rates in Africa with 90% of the population literate.

Tourist attractions; Victoria Falls, Hwange National Park, Matopos National Park, Chimanimani District, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, National Heroes Acre, Khami Ruins, Great Zimbabwe Ruins, Chinhoyi caves, Mana Pool, Lake Kariba SEP in AfRo Region Newsletter

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New nl st  

AfRO Newsletter Issue #9

New nl st  

AfRO Newsletter Issue #9

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