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Track: IMS Invitational brings in hundreds See B1

THE IOLA REGISTER Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Iola native at shooting location

COUNTY

IMS band outgrows bandstand By BOB JOHNSON The Iola Register

Surging enthusiasm for instrumental music at Iola Middle School has caused the school’s band to outgrow the bandstand on the courthouse lawn. Jack Stanley, IMS principal, told county commissioners Tuesday the school would like to have its annual spring outdoor concert on the east side of the courthouse square, to accommodate 100 seventhand eighth-grade members. Commissioners gave their blessing. Next year’s band promises to be even larger, with 50 sixth graders involved this year. “We’ll probably have 115 in the band then,” he said. Those who attend the concert are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blanSee BAND | Page A6

By KAYLA BANZET The Iola Register

Davis: Kansas can do better By SUSAN LYNN The Iola Register

PITTSBURG — At some point Kansas legislators will need to reconcile the state budget. The state is on track to end the fiscal year with $250 million, down from $500 million forlas year. For 2016, the ending balance is projected to be zero. Five years from now, $490 million in cuts will be necessary to end the year with a zero balance. For State Rep. Paul Davis, D-Lawrence, and presumptive

gubernatorial candidate, the answer to saving a sinking budget is to stop the massive tax breaks and take advantage of existing federal programs, such as expanding Medicaid. Davis, 41, was in Pittsburg Tuesday to address its Rotary club and then meet with Randy Casen, chief executive officer of Mt. Carmel Regional Medical Center. Between meetings he met with this Register reporter. UNLESS the Kansas economy “takes off,” the state budget is on a trajectory to tank, Davis said.

“The income tax comprises 42 percent of the state general fund,” he said. In addition to cutting programs and services, the state has diverted $1 billion from the state’s transportation fund. In 2010, Davis was instrumental in passing the $8.28 billion 10-year transportation bill. “That alone was projected to create 175,000 new jobs,” he said. “Now, the program is getting deeper in debt and projects are being stalled.” Davis said Gov. Sam BrownSee DAVIS | Page A6

Sunday afternoon started out like any other day for Jeff Ashford and his wife and daughter. Ashford, who grew up in Iola and now lives in Shawnee, took his wife and daughter to the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City for a talent show. Little did the family know a shooting would take place at the building. “We got there in the front and I dropped my wife and daughter off,” Ashford said. “I went to park the car and then we were ushered into a room.” Ashford said they were held in the room for about an hour and a half and the group was told that there had been a shooting but they didn’t know any details.

See SHOOTING | Page A6

COUNTY

Old bridge may be reclaimed By BOB JOHNSON The Iola Register

This sign of General Funston hangs right outside the Allen County Historical Society. The sign is one of 16 placed are around the Iola square. REGISTER/KAYLA BANZET

Group brings Iola memories to square By KAYLA BANZET The Iola Register

Taking a walk down memory lane has become much easier on the Iola square. Attached to each light post is a metal sign with photos and information about that particular spot in Iola. Members of the Community Involvement Task Force and Pride conducted the year-long project. “Our mission statement is to beautify the town and get

people interested in the community,” Donna Houser said. A grant helped fund the project. A group of seven — Kara Godfrey, Shelia Lampe, Jim Smith, Houser, Mike and Nancy Ford and Judy Brigham — selected photos and information for the signs. “As you walk down the street the photo matches that area,” Houser said. Nancy Ford frequently used See SIGNS | Page A6

Quote of the day Vol. 116, No. 120

An iron bridge over Owl Creek two miles west of Humboldt is 103 years old and may live on, even though it will be replaced this summer. Allen County commissioners gave salvage rights to Thrive Allen County, which wants to move it to become part of a proposed adjunct to the Southwind Trail. David Toland, Thrive executive director, said a moving company would be available the middle of June to move the 60,000-pound, 60-foot span. Maybe earlier if the moving company has a job canceled, he said. Time is of the essence. Bill King, director of Public Works, said bids would be opened on June 1 for the bridge’s replacement and then it would be up to the contractor how quickly the bridge would need to be moved. That prompted commissioners to have Toland deal directly with the contractor. “Fair enough,” said Toland. “We’re just asking for the opportunity but understand if the contractor has to go forward and move the bridge,” Thrive will be left out of the loop. Commissioner Dick Works, with knowledge of a good many previous such projects, said he thought “the odds are pretty good” that moving the bridge in mid-June would work. “We’re just asking for a

shot,” Toland added, noting that the trail adjunct would be announced in full detail in a week or two after easements are finalized. The bridge would be part of a project that “would be open to the public,” he said. “It would be a public asset.” As for the existing trail between Iola and Humboldt, Toland observed that 4,000 bi-

will have 35 employees at the start. It will be the last stop for packages before home delivery by UPS. Word on site selection should come in six to 12 months, with other communities in southeast Kansas and southwest Missouri also vying for the business. A third piece of news was that Thrive is developing a

We’re just asking for the opportunity but understand if the contractor has to go forward and move the bridge. — David Toland, Thrive executive director

cyclists used the trail in JulyDecember 2013 by a Kansas Department of Transportation counter along the trail. “We’re sure there have been more walkers and hikers during the same time,” he said. The trail, together with the Prairie Spirit Trail that extends from Iola to Ottawa, “is bringing a lot of people to the county,” Toland said. A recent 100-mile race on the longer trail had participants and supporters packing local restaurants, he noted. Turning to economic development, Toland said five sites in Allen County had been identified for a fulfillment center for UPS. The center, which will be housed in a 15,000-square-foot building,

“We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.” — Jules Verne, French novelist 75 Cents

website to advertise Allen County sites for movie productions. Paul Porter, an Iolan whose initial movie, “Rabid Love,” recently was shown at Sterling Six Cinemas, told Toland movie locations are much in demand and that Midwest communities could offer lower costs and fresh places for filming. Toland said the old Allen County Hospital was just one of many local possible sites that filmmakers might find intriguing. An open house for potential developers will be at the old hospital in May. “It’s been shown five or six times in the last three or four months,” Toland added.

Hi: 66 Lo: 43 Iola, KS


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Police report Arrests made Ashley Michelle Dreisbach, Bronson, was arrested Friday for domestic battery in the 1500 block of 4800 Street. Samuel J. Van Patten IV, Iola, was arrested Monday for an outstanding warrant from Burlington Municipal Court.

The warrant cites violation of a protection from abuse order.

Vehicle crashes A vehicle driven by Margaret Barnett, Iola, struck a metal guard rail in front of the Gas post office Saturday. She was not injured.

Meetings Unity Club hears program Unity Club met Monday in the meeting room of the Community National Bank for the anniversary luncheon. Hostesses were Charlene Levans, Flo Haynes, Mandy Specht and Donna Houser. Twenty-four members were present. Barb Hafer was introduced as a new member. The program, given by Mary Osborne, was a review of the book “Killing Jesus,” by Bill O’Reilly. The book tells

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The Iola Register

the story of the struggle between good and evil.

Ambler presents at meeting The Iola Chapter of NARFE met April 7 at The New Greenery. The program, “Story Telling,” was given by Helen Ambler. She told of the importance of good story telling, especially with family members. Ten members were present. The next meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. on May 5 at The New Greenery.

A golden calf

Benefit raises nearly $20,000 for Genoble

By BOB JOHNSON The Iola Register

A calf sold at the Southeast Kansas Stockyard auction is very special to Kayla Genoble and her family. Kayla, 8, is suffering from osteosarcoma, a fast-growing bone cancer, which has put her parents, Angela Dryden and Michael Genoble, is financial straits. To help out, SEK Stockyard donated and sold a calf in a benefit Friday for the little girl. “We thought we might raise $4,000 or $5,000,” said John Adams, who with Josh Hermann and Scott Welch, owns the auction barn. “I’d hoped it might go as high as $10,000.” The result was $19,701.80. By the time the calf was ushered from the sale ring, sold for real at $1,276.80 and included in contributions, 38 buyers had participated in the benefit. Twelve of them contributed $1,000

each, and seven others donated between $500 and $800. “I looked around the crowd while the (benefit) sale was going on, and about half the crowd was in tears,” Adams said. “It was very emotional, quite moving,” said Hermann. Employees also were touched. Two of them donated their paychecks for the day. “The beef market is very competitive today,” Adams said, “but this shows that we all get along together. I started that calf at $100 each time and for quite a while one of the buyers bid $500 right afterward,” he said. “At the end of the day it really came together. It was a very humbling experience.” Other money is likely to come in. Adams said the event was posted on the stockyard’s Facebook page and “we’ve had people from western Kansas, from all over the state,

Scott Welch, left, John Adams and Josh Hermann, owners of Southeast Kansas Stockyards, raised nearly $20,000 last Friday to help Kayla Genoble, who is suffering from bone cancer. COURTESY PHOTO contact us and ask how they can help,” Adams said. Kayla’s parents attended the event, but she had to stay away because of fear that dust from the arena would be a complication. The

little girl did come out later and got hugs from the three auction owners. “I can’t tell you how proud I am of our industry and our friends for the help they gave Kayla,” Adams concluded.

Crest hires superintendent COLONY — Chuck Mahon, superintendent at Lakin High School, has been hired as the next superintendent of schools at Crest USD 479. Mahon also will serve as principal and

Business faces charges

Lincoln authors Lincoln students wrote stories for the Young Authors competition. Front row from left, Annalysia Prock, Scout Mathew, Alana Mader, Mariah Jelinek, MaKenna Eisenbrandt, Tavia Skahan, Paige Nickelson, Brooklyn Ellis, Keira Nickelson. Second row, Camri Moreno-Bockover, Kennedy Maier, Briggs Michael, Eli Adams, Macie Hoag, Khloeigh Schafer, Shianne Carter, Kaster Trabuc, Alex Smail. Third row, Hannah Kilby, Scarlett Higgason, Ally Ellis, Madison Adair, Anna Taylor, Tristan Mittelmeier, Eden Winkler, Tia Barton Fourth row: Kaylin Klubek, Olivia Kerr, Madison Swink, Ilennia Aguirre, Nate Haston, Kamri Hall, Kaya Adair, Justice Wilson, Hannah Dorsey. COURTESY PHOTO

Today

66

Friday

Tomorrow

49

43

Temperature High yesterday 57 Low last night 35 High a year ago 50 Low a year ago 43 Sunrise 6:45 a.m.

71

36

RECYCLE FOR THE FUTURE!

49

Precipitation 24 hours ending 7 a.m. 0 This month to date 4.52 Total year to date 5.484 Def. since Jan. 1 1.30 Sunset 7:58 p.m.

The Iola Register

Published Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings except New Year’s day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas, by The Iola Register Inc., 302 S. Washington, P.O. Box 767, Iola, Kansas 66749. (620) 365-2111. Periodicals postage paid at Iola, Kansas. Member Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for publication all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. Subscription rates by carrier in Iola: One year, $107.32; six months, $58.17; three months, $33.60; one month, $11.65. By motor: One year, $129; six months, $73.71; three months, $41.60; one month, $17.24. By mail in Kansas: One year, $131.16; six months, $74.80; three months, $43.89; one month, $17.89. By mail out of state: One year, $141.35; six months, $76.02; three months, $44.97; one month, $17.91. Internet: One year, $100; six months, $55; one month, $10 All prices include 8.04% sales taxes. Postal regulations require subscriptions to be paid in advance. USPS 268-460 Postmaster: Send address changes to The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749.

See us online at w w w .iolaregister.com C ontact the Iola R egister staffat new s@ iolaregister.com

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A Wichita man will soon learn his punishment for harboring a Chinese teenage girl who was working illegally at his restaurant. A notation Tuesday in U.S. District Court has moved up the sentencing for 33-year-old Yong “Tony” Lin to April 28. He has pleaded guilty to harboring an immigrant who was unlawfully in the United States. His 29-year-old wife, Zhuo Mei “Mandy” Weng, has pleaded guilty to hiding the crime. She will be sentenced on the same date before U.S. District Judge J. Thomas Marten.

The Marmaton Valley FFA Alumni thanks the following for helping make our annual worker auction a success. The FFA Alumni will use these funds to help with various FFA activities including scholarships and leadership conferences. Kevin and Annie Davis

Daryl and Sandy Drake

Alan and Lori Ensminger

Jeff and Laura Johnson

Ken Kale

Dale and Joan LaRue

Kyle McAloon

Gene and Karen Meiwes

Brandy Myers

Joe Pilcher

Russ and Stephanie Plaschka

PSI - Loren Korte

E.J. and Barb Siefker

Scott and Sara Stinnett

Randy and Joyce Storrer

Pat and Deb Tynon

Scott and Amy Welch

Ag Choice

Sherry Elmenhorst

Denny Lasley

A special thank you to Leon Thompson for being our auctioneer for the evening, Judy Bowman for the donation of the homemade quilts and the dependable people who donated the soup, chili and desserts.

THANK YOU!

head football coach at Crest High. He replaces Jerry Turner as superintendent and principal at Crest. Turner announced his resignation to become superintendent at West

Franklin USD 287 in Pomona. Brent Smith, Mahon’s predecessor at the Lancers’ helm, was relieved of his coaching duties earlier this year. He remains Crest’s transportation director.

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Veterinarian PROFESSIONAL, CARING STAFF Have you given much thought to your nose lately? If you are an allergy sufferer, you may think your nose’s only function is to be stuffed up or drain endlessly. What about your dog’s nose? We know that you pay attention to it because many of you tell us that your dog may be sick because his/her nose is dry. While there may be a bit of truth to that, there was nothing in my books in veterinary school regarding the nose as an indicator of fever or disease. Allergies and dryness aside, your dog’s nose is a truly remarkable thing! Most people know that a dog’s sense of smell is much better than ours. That makes them exceptional hunters, trackers, military dogs, etc. Dogs use their sense of smell like we use our eyes - it’s their most useful sense in terms of gathering information about their surroundings. Researchers have recently used this comparison as a way of indicating just how good a dog’s sense of smell really is. Their findings state that, “What humans can smell at a third of a mile, a dog could smell more than 3,000 miles away and still see as well.” Wow! That’s a pretty potent sniffer! That level of accuracy can be linked to our brain and the number of receptors found in our noses. Those receptors send information to a specific part of the brain for “interpretation”. People have just 5 million receptors in their noses compared to man’s best friend who has more than 220 million receptors! All of those extra receptors make it possible for them to smell things at levels that are undetectable to us. Other features, such as floppy ears and skin folds (think of a bloodhound) help dogs “trap” scents, making them excellent hunters. Because of their incredible ability to be trained to smell and identify very specific scents, dogs are seeing increasing use in the medical field as well. For example, dogs have been trained to be able to detect glucose levels in people with diabetes and warn them before a potentially dangerous situation occurs. Dogs have also been able to identify people with cancer before some hightech machines can find the disease - but that does NOT mean you should seek your dog’s nose before visiting your doctor for any reason! On a final note, we do a lot of research on a dog’s ability to pick up on very subtle scents, but what about cats? It seems as though little research has been done in that field yet...but if it were done, I would anticipate their findings to read something like this, “We have found that a cat uses it’s nose mostly for turning in an upward direction as a result of displeasure toward their owner for one or more of the following reasons: owner fed at wrong time, owner fed wrong food, owner fed in wrong color of bowl, owner allowed another animal into home, owner wants to interact at inconvenient times, etc...” Well, you get the picture! Consult the veterinarians at

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Colony

State poet launches project Welcome to National Poetry Month. We’re excited to debut the Poet Laureate project and to invite you to be a part of it, both as reader and as writer. HomeWords will be a weekly column, syndicated in newspapers around our great state. Our column explores the concept of “home” — a longheld Kansas value — from micro to macro: from the mobile home of the body, to the room or house we live in, to the land that anchors us, to the sky that envelops it all. To explore these big themes, we’ll use a very little poem. The American Cinquain is just five lines long, each line having — in order — 2, 4, 6, 8, and 2 syllables. It’s a simple, dynamic form

Wyatt Townley Kansas Poet Laureate that both beginners and longtime poets can write successfully. The first imaginative cinquain below comes to us from Jo McDougall of Leawood. I like how she approaches the body as geography, then finishes with a little geometry. I’ve changed into a map of Kansas, life’s contours following roads and fields the wind has squared.

Jo McDougall, a native of DeWitt, Ark., has lived in Kansas — with some interruptions — for over 20 years, and published a memoir and five Jo McDougal books of poetry. Poets and poets-to-be of all ages from Kansas are invited to submit to HomeWords. For guidelines, visit www.kansashumanities.org. The Kansas Humanities Council is a nonprofit organization that supports community-based cultural programs and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.

Food, housing up for March By RICARDO LOPEZ Los Angeles Times

March, a measurement that shows average price changes in goods and services purchased by Americans. In the past 12 months, overall core inflation — excluding the volatile food and energy indexes — rose 1.7 percent. Recent drought and other extreme weather patterns have driven up the price of beef to all-time highs and that was reflected in the government’s food index, which rose 0.4 percent in March, following an identical increase the month before. The index showed much steeper increases in certain food categories. The index for poultry, meats and eggs, for instance, showed a second consecutive increase of 1.2 percent last month. The energy index, which includes gas pric-

Food and housing costs rose sharply in March, but overall inflation remained low, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday. The federal government’s consumer price index rose 0.2 percent in

5th Annual

Easter Candy Parade

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Calendar

T h u r s d ay - C o u n t y bus to Iola; MondaySeekers Not Slackers 4-H Club, Lone Elm Community Building, 7 p.m.; Jolly Dozen Club, City Hall community room, 7 p.m.; TuesdayAllen/Anderson Deer Creek Watershed, City Hall community room, 8 p.m.

School calendar

Thursday-Forensics Night at Crest, 6 p.m.; Wednesday-FFA to Paola.

Meal site

Friday-fish, macaroni and tomato, peas, bread, sunshine fruit; Monday-Salisbury steak, mashed potato, gravy, lima beans, bread, pears; Wednesday-live music, Vision cards accepted-baked chicken, tossed salad, Caribbean blend veggies, roll, crank-orange fluff. Phone 620-852-3450 for reservations.

Churches

es, declined in March, falling 0.1 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said. The rental index showed an uptick of 0.3 percent in March, signaling higher rent prices. In the past 12 months, the shelter index has increased 2.7 percent.

Mrs. Morris Luedke

852-3379

wide brush cleanup is Monday. If you need help in getting limbs from your street to the dump, phone 620-8523530 and they will try to assist you. Arts and Crafts Fair

some leaders to walk children from station to station. This year’s theme is “Workshop of Wonders, Imagine and Build with God.” The date is June 16-20, begins at 8:30 a.m. and dismisses at 11:30 daily.

WWCWC

Working Wonders CWC was called to order by President Danelle McGhee April 9 with eight present. Genna Gallaher served refreshments. Roll call was answered with a “Spring Cleaning Task”. Bev Wittmer presented devotions and read the story, “Father, I Wanted a Car Not a Bible.” Julia Martin is the speaker and will sing at the May 5 Spring Banquet. Graduates this year are Jacob Riebel and Kadyn Utley. The summer picnic was set for Father’s Day, June 15 at 5 p.m. at the city park. A wedding shower for Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee is May 17 at 7 p.m.

Pastor Mark McCoy presented the sermon “The Storychapter 26-The Hour of Darkness,”at Sunday’s service at the Christian Church. Spring Banquet May 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall community room. All women are invited. Bring a salad and a guest; wedding shower for Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee. Scripture presented at the United Methodist Church Palm Sunday was Psalm 118:1,2,19-29 and Matthew 21:1-11. Pastor Dorothy Welch presented the sermon “Cheers, Jeers, and Tears.”

Easter Egg Hunt

The next VBS meeting is at 2 p.m. April 27 . at the Methodist Church. Needed are a pre-school teacher and

Brush cleanup

Vacation Bible School

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The annual Easter Egg Hunt begins at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at the Colony ball park for children up through 5th grade. FCCLA is hosting. Sponsors are Garnett State Savings Bank, Colony Branch and Colony Lions Club. In the event of bad weather, the event will be held at the Crest school auditorium. Last day of the city-

The 11th annual Arts and Crafts fair will be from 8:30 a.m.to 3 p.m. April 27 at the Lone Elm community building. An assortment of items are for sale – embroidery, quilts, aprons, tea towels, wood ornaments, yard accessories, fruit and vegetable plants, purses, children’s clothing and more. Proceeds go to the upkeep of the community building. Homemade pies will be sold. Seekers Not Slackers 4-H Club will serve breakfast and lunch. Phone Mrs. Tim Moody 620-439-5528 if you have questions. Crest High

Three Crest students will compete in the state music competition April 26 at Stuckey Middle School in Wichita. At the regional music competition held at Allen Community College, Brandon Braillier, Ivan Godderz and Laurel Godderz each received the best rating of “I” earning them the right to compete in the state competion. Around town

Doris Moore observed her 96th birthday April 9. She moved that day to Guest Home Estates VII, 806 W. 4th St., Room 106, Garnett, KS 66032. Doris and her husband, Earl, who passed away in 1997, moved to Colony in 1966. He taught at Crest and she gave piano lessons from her home until they retired.

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Kansas to mandate autism health coverage

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is preparing to sign legislation that will require health insurance plans to provide coverage for some services for children with autism, starting next year. Brownback scheduled

a Wednesday morning signing ceremony at the satellite University of Kansas campus in Overland Park. Local legislators and parents have been vocal supporters of efforts to ensure that health plans cover the diagnosis and treatment of autism in young children. The bill would require group health plans for companies with 51 or

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2 Oklahomans die in Kansas Turnpike accident

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Two women from Oklahoma died when their car collided with a pickup truck driven by a man going the wrong way on the Kansas Turnpike. The Kansas Highway Patrol says the accident occurred Tuesday night

on Interstate 35 in Wichita. The patrol says the driver, 65-year-old Donald Fifer of Haysville, was driving south in the northbound lanes when his truck hit a vehicle head-on, struck a guardrail and overturned before starting on fire. He was hospitalized in Wichita. The driver of the second vehicle, 38-yearold Lori Uchiyama, of Blackwell, Okla., and her passenger, 33-yearold Elizabeth Goodno, of Ponca City, Okla., were killed. Investigators are trying to determine why Fifer was driving the wrong way. The accident closed the turnpike for several hours.

— NOTICE —

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays for Iola carriers. D E A D L IN E F O R O U T -O F -T O W N C A R R IE R S IS 6:30 P .M . W E E K D A Y S A N D 9:30 S A T U R D A Y . Ifyou have not received your paper by deadline, please callyour carrier first. Ifunable to reach your carrier, callthe R egister office at 365-2111. R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

Mountain Oyster Feed Fundraiser Saturday, April 19 • 6-8 p.m . All proceeds will be used towards July 4 Community Fireworks Display Additional meats available: chicken fried steak or chicken fried chicken

10 per plate, members and guests $

Iola Elks Lodge • 202 S. Jeffereson Special thanks to Moon’s Market!


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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A6

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Signs: Group promotes Iola history Continued from A1

her wizardry with a computer photo program to fix some of the damaged photos. Godfrey pulled up a photo of police officers on her computer that had faded and had been taped back together. Godfrey said Ford was able to make that photo, and many others,

look brand new. When it was time to decide what information should be put on the sign Godfrey thought less was more. “People want more of the quirky facts,” she said. “Things that are more of an interest.” Godfrey said the information isn’t all from the early 1800s. In-

cluded are places that people today would remember. Once the photos and text were selected the group had the information transformed into a vinyl format that was then affixed to aluminum templates. “We had Elizabeth from the Shirt Shop help us place the vinyl reproduction on the

signs,” Houser said. The project became a community effort. The city electric crew helped make the hangers for the signs and other members of the city helped hang the signs. “I’ve heard a lot of good comments on the signs,” Godfrey said. There are 16 signs around the square.

Shooter: Local ties to tragedy Continued from A1

Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, 73, went on a deadly shooting spree. Cross is known for being related to racist organizations like the Ku Klux Klan. Two people were shot at the Center and another was at the Village Shalom Retirement Center. “When I realized what had happened I was like wow,” Ashford said. “The scary

thing is we went in through the front and the shooting was in the back.” Ashford has no doubt that this was a targeted hate crime and finds it disturbing. He said while waiting in the room, there was a World War II display that he read about Hitler and the Holocaust. To find out later that a hate crime was committed shocked him. “It’s a real small

I wish I could have helped those people but it wasn’t in the cards. — Jeff Ashford

world,” he said. “I wish I could have helped those people but it wasn’t in the cards.”

Now that he has had time to process, Ashford has begun asking himself what he would have done to protect his family. “I believe in the right to carry (a gun) but I don’t carry,” he said. “If I was carrying maybe I could have stopped him. Maybe I could have done something. It doesn’t matter what side of the debate you’re on, but how will you protect yourself.”

Davis: Budget hot topic in state Continued from A1

back’s “roadmap” for Kansas projected job creation for 33,000. By refusing to expand the Medicaid guidelines, Kansas is denying an estimated 155,000 residents health insurance, Davis said. This not only hurts Kansas citizens, but also health care professionals. Davis is a proponent of Kansas joining the 26 other states, including those with Republican leadership, that have expanded their Medicaid guidelines to provide health insurance to U.S. citizens making up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level. Kansas would receive $700 million a year to participate in the program for the next two years. After then, the state assumes up to 10 percent of the operating costs. “We’re paying for the expansion through our federal taxes, but not reaping any of the rewards of the program,” he said. “That money is going to some other state. We should be able to utilize our contribution here in Kansas. It’s also a heck of an economic development tool.” As an industry, health care is typically a high-

paying and fast-growing field. For hospitals, especially, the lack of participation in the expansion of Medicaid hits hard at their budgets. Before the Affordable Care Act was enacted, hospitals were reimbursed through Medicare to see patients who did not have health insurance. Part of the ACA legislation was that hospitals would agree to forego Medicare reimbursements to treat the indigent if they received health insurance through their state’s Medicaid program. When states like Kansas failed to open the umbrella to cover all, hospitals were left without reimbursements on both fronts. “I’m afraid what this will mean to small, rural hospitals” that heavily rely on reimbursements from state and federal programs, Davis said. “Already some have closed.” TEACHERS are feeling underappreciated, Davis said in regards to recent legislation that eliminates protections afforded through tenure. “That was a punch in the gut,” he said. Both of Davis’ parents are educators. His mother taught second grade

in Lawrence; his father taught city management at the University of Kansas. “I’m convinced the previous system worked well. Bad teachers could be let go. You didn’t see any principals or administrators lobbying for this change. “If a teacher is fired, he deserves to know why,” Davis said of a teacher’s right to due process. Davis also was critical of the legislature’s treatment of the judicial branch. “The legislature is trying to bully the judicial branch. It’s pretty awful. This is a co-equal branch of government,” he said. Recent legislation includes withholding funding to courts, usurping power from the chief justice and enacting higher fees to citizens. REPUBLICANS pledging support to Davis has been a pleasant surprise, he said. As for the campaign, Davis said he hopes it stays “on track” and doesn’t becomes a “referendum on ‘Obamacare.’” He takes aim at current TV ads being run by Brownback that portray him as a strong advocate for public schools. “His record has not re-

flected that at all,” Davis said. As for Brownback’s push for all-day kindergarten statewide, Davis replied, “If schools were adequately funded, they wouldn’t have to ask for special funds to run a necessary program like kindergarten.” Davis said a “pretty straight” line can be drawn between what makes a moderate and a conservative Republican. “It’s how they view the purpose of government. The far right wants to use government as a tool to promote a social agenda. Moderates don’t,” he said. Such issues include supporting tax breaks and vouchers for private schools and telling public school districts what subjects they can teach, such as sex education, Davis said, as brought forth by Sen. Mary Pilcher Cook of Wichita. Davis, who serves as House minority leader, laughed when asked if he considered himself an ambitious person. “I don’t think you can be too ambitious and be a Democrat in Kansas,” he said. In the House of Representatives 33 of 125 seats are held by Democrats. In the Senate, eight of 40.

Prepping for breakfast Phyllis Lueker dishes up fruit for this morning’s Lenten breakfast at First Christian Church. This was the last of the local church events for the Easter season. REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Professors endorse social media policy LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — More than 80 distinguished professors have endorsed a new proposed social media policy for Kansas universities. The Lawrence Journal-World reported the professors, from several universities, sent a letter to the Kansas Board of Regents saying the proposed policy “exemplifies the role of scholarship for public intellectuals in a democracy.” The new policy was proposed by a work group formed by the

regents. It proposed a strictly advisory social media policy for university faculty and staff. That would replace a policy that allows university administrators to discipline or fire employees who they believe have improperly used social media. Opponents said the policy was too broad and restrained free speech. The regents passed the current policy in December after a University of Kansas professor posted an anti-NRA tweet on Twitter.

Band: IMS grows

Continued from A1

kets to spread on the lawn. IN OTHER news, commissioners: — Were told work on four miles of Delaware Road reconstruction, starting at the old Zillah School and running east, would start next week. Completion is expected in about a month. — Asked Bill King, director of Public Works, to look into erection of lights at the corner of Oregon Road and U.S. 169, directly east of Allen County Regional Hospital. Commissioner

Tom Williams said he thought lights would make the intersection safer for motorists and ambulances going to and coming from the hospital. — Gave all employees 90 days to use compensatory time. Before, rules varied between departments. — Approved including smoking cessation prescriptions on drug cards for employees. County Clerk Sherrie Riebel estimated 25 employees were smokers. As part of the county’s new wellness program smokers will be encouraged to kick the habit.

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Opinion A7 The Iola Register

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

~ Journalism that makes a difference

Trying to make sense of terrorism Tuesday’s marking of the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings was a sober event. Probably the most poignant of participants was little Jane Richard, 8, whose prosthetic leg appeared through the bottom of her navy blue dress. Her other leg was lost to the bombings. Beside her were her parents, Denise and Bill, also seriously injured. Denise sustained a head injury and lost the vision of one eye. Bill suffered shrapnel wounds, burns and severe hearing loss. Miraculously, a brother, Henry, 12, was not injured by the blasts. But brother Martin, then 8, was killed. Like many Bostonians, the Richard family made the marathon a family outing, reveling in the pageantry of Patriot’s Day. In all, three were killed by the blasts, 16 lost limbs, 264 suffered lesser injuries, and thousands still bear emotional scars from the senseless violence carried out by two brothers in the throes of Islamic extremism. A fourth fatality was a police officer caught in the crossfire in the pursuit of the two brothers. SUNDAY afternoon, Kan-

sas City was the scene of similar violence. A grandfather and grandson were shot and killed while in their car in the parking lot of a Jewish community center. The boy was to audition for a musical. The assailant then went to a nearby retirement home and shot and killed a woman who was there to visit her mother. “Heil Hitler!” the alleged assailant shouted from the police car upon his arrest. Grandfather and grandson were Methodists. The woman Catholic. EVERY DAY we read of bombings around the world, mostly confined to the Middle East and Africa. Most are done in the name of some political or religious ideology. They happen with such frequency they barely make most news outlets these days. At this coming Monday’s Boston Marathon, 9,000 additional runners are expected along with 1 million spectators. Twice the usual number. “Boston Strong” is plastered on billboards and banners. Unlike other parts of the world, terror does not rule our lives. For that, we are thankful. — Susan Lynn

A�look�back�in�time � 30 Years Ago Week of April 13, 1984

Bob Kleier, who grew up in Gas City, has purchased the Farm Fresh Grocery store in Iola. He said he intends to keep the operation pretty much as is. Charlie Morin will continue to be the store manager. ***** Back 35 years ago when Elmer Belknap was operating a dairy at the north end of

Jefferson Street, son Jimmy helped out with the chores. Today James Belknap is president of Steffen Dairy Foods Co. in Wichita. ***** Dennis Krouse, former manager of the Moran Co-op who pleaded guilty to misappropriating co-op funds, was placed on five-year probation yesterday by District Judge John White.

‘There’s no place like Kansas’

New tourism slogan rather catchy Kansas doesn’t get great mileage out of its tourism slogans. Maybe we’re just too great to articulate in mere words. We always remember that Texas is “like a whole other country.” As for Kansas, are we the “Land of Ahs”? “As big as you think”? Or maybe something else to do with “The Wizard of Oz”? The latest state tourism slogan is in part a reference to the movie many Kansas would just as soon distance themselves from. Unveiled this week, the new message is “There’s no place like Kansas.” Other than the Oz connotation, it’s not a bad theme. Kansas can do some things with the notion that we have some uniqueness to our state that makes it a special place to visit, if not live. No mountains or ocean but some stunning landscapes nonetheless. Quirky sights such as the “Garden of Eden” in Lucas. Good food and warm hospitality. Leisure places. The video and television spots create a sense of re-

Maybe “no place like Kansas” works better as a resident retention campaign, which, given the population trends, maybe should be the focus anyway.

laxation and wonder about our fair state. And the theme song, “Sunflowers,” an original recording by Clearwater native Logan Mize, is catchy. Hutchinson is among seven communities with its own TV spot. Dodge City is another. MARKETING campaigns aren’t done well by committee, but no doubt Kansans will have their opinions on “no place like Kansas.” For many, it is likely to make them think of Oz, and “no place like home” doesn’t work too well as a tourism slogan since you’re trying to get people to leave home to come visit Kansas. We wouldn’t be surprised if some people extended “There’s no place like Kansas” to describe some of the wackos and their shenanigans

in the Statehouse these days. Maybe “no place like Kansas” works better as a resident retention campaign, which, given the population trends, maybe should be the focus anyway. It also can play well for in-state tourism, encouraging the “staycation.” But whether for tourism or retention, the effort can’t stop with the creative. The state needs to budget money to spend on marketing. In the past, Kansas has ranked near the bottom of states in spending on marketing and promotion. One of these days we might land on a slogan that sticks. In the meantime, what we do with the message probably is more important than finding the universally winning message. ­— The Hutchinson News

Koch brothers benefit from Affordable Care Act The Koch brothers did their best to link select Kansas lawmakers to controversial Obamacare as a way to torpedo their campaigns. Several state lawmakers — namely traditional, more moderate Republicans who wouldn’t serve as puppets for a far-right agenda coveted by Gov. Sam Brownback and other Koch allies — were targeted in the August 2012 GOP primary, The Koch-funded Americans for Prosperity and Kansas Chamber unleashed last-minute, misleading ads

designed to take down lawmakers who dared to challenge their radical pursuits. Unfortunately, many voters fell for the outlandish claims that lawmakers who were targeted somehow supported the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. It was bunk, of course, as those singled out had nothing to do with the federal law upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. As if that wasn’t enough, the Koch-AFP-Kansas Chamber camp recently dredged up Obamacare again in calling

for repeal of Kansas’ Renewable Portfolio Standard. While it clearly was another absurd claim, they argued the RPS was just another costly mandate. Yet the chief critic — giant oil-and-gas conglomerate Koch Industries — has long reaped the benefit of taxpayer subsidies involving energy production, among other government-related deals. And now it appears Obamacare wasn’t such a problem after all for Koch Industries, as the company benefited from the same health-care

reform the Kochs say they detest. Koch Industries reportedly was among big corporations that reaped millions of dollars from the Affordable Care Act, even as the Kochs continued to support GOP candidates who have vowed to work on repeal of the law. Federal records show Koch Industries benefited from a temporary provision of the health-care law in an Early Retiree Reinsurance Program, which helped the company pay health insurance costs for retirees not covered

by Medicare. The records show Koch Industries applied for and received $1.4 million in early retiree subsidies. So, an Affordable Care Act in place to help the uninsured, seniors and young adults with coverage also has something in it for large businesses. The Kochs, like others, took advantage. Kansans should keep such hypocrisy in mind when the next Koch-financed onslaught of political advertising materializes. ­— The Garden City Telegram

How to contact your elected officials

President Barack Obama, (Democrat) 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. Washington D.C., 20500; phone (switchboard): (202) 456-1414; (comments): (202) 456-1111

Gov. Sam Brownback, (Republican) Capital, 300 S.W. 10th Ave., Suite 212S, Topeka, KS 66612-1590; phone: (785) 296-3232; www.governor.ks.gov/ comments/comment.htm

U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, (Republican) 109 Hart Senate Office Building Washington D.C., 20510; phone: (202) 224-4774; Email: www.roberts. senate.gov/public/index. cfm?p=EmailPat

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, (Republican) Russell Senate Office Building, Room 354, Washington D.C., 20510; phone: (202) 224-6521; Pittsburg: 306 N. Broadway, Suite 125, Pittsburg, KS, 66762; (620) 232-2286. Email: moran. senate.gov/public/index. cfm/e-mail-jerry

Rep. Lynn Jenkins, (Republican) 130 Cannon House Office Building, Washington D.C., 20515; phone: (202) 225-6601; Pittsburg: 701 N. Broadway, Pittsburg, KS 66762; phone: (620) 231-5966. Email: lynnjenkins.house. gov/contact-me/

Sen. Caryn Tyson, (Republican) State Capitol-236 E Topeka, KS 66612 phone: (785) 296-6838; e-mail: caryn.tyson@senate.ks.gov or 19984 County Rd. 1077 Parker, KS 66072 phone: (913) 898-2366

Rep. Kent Thompson, (Republican) House District No. 9, phone: (785)-296-7673 State Capitol, Room 268W, 300 SW Tenth Ave. Topeka, KS 66612, or phone: 620-496-2255 1816 2800 St., LaHarpe, KS 66751. email: kent.thompson@ house.ks.gov


A8

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

292 missing, 4 dead in South Korean ferry disaster SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A ferry carrying 459 people, mostly high school students on an overnight trip to a tourist island, sank off South Korea’s southern coast today, leaving nearly 300 people missing despite a frantic, hours-long rescue by dozens of ships and helicopters. At least four people were confirmed dead and 55 injured. The high number of people unaccounted for — likely trapped in the ship or floating in the ocean — raised fears that the death toll could rise drastically, making it one of South Korea’s biggest ferry disasters since 1993, when 292 people died. One student, Lim Hyung-min, told broadcaster YTN after being rescued that he and other students jumped into the

ocean wearing life jackets and then swam to a nearby rescue boat. “As the ferry was shaking and tilting, we all tripped and bumped into each another,” Lim said, adding that some people were bleeding. Once he jumped, the ocean “was so cold. ... I was hurrying, thinking that I wanted to live.” Local television stations broadcast live pictures of the ship, Sewol, listing to its side and slowly sinking as passengers jumped out or were winched up by helicopters. At least 87 vessels and 18 aircraft swarmed around the stricken ship. Rescuers clambered over its sides, pulling out passengers wearing orange life jackets. But the ship overturned completely and continued to sink slowly. Within a few

hours only its blue-andwhite bow stuck out of the water. Very soon, that too disappeared. Some 160 coast guard and navy divers searched for survivors inside the ship’s wreckage a few miles from Byeongpung Island, which is not far from the mainland. The

area is about 290 miles from Seoul. Those rescued — wet, stunned and many without shoes — were brought to nearby Jindo Island, where medical teams wrapped them in pink blankets and checked them for injuries before settling them down on

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The Iola Register

INSIDE

Iola track team competes — B5

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Standouts lead the way at IMS Invitational More than 900 youngsters from 20 schools filled Iola’s Riverside Park from stem to stern to compete in the Iola Middle School Invitational Track meet. There were several local standouts, including Iola’s Tayton Driskel, a three-time gold medalist in the 100- and 200-meter dashes and the long jump. Meanwhile, Iola’s Olivia Taylor brought home the gold medal in the eighth-grade girls 1600-meter run, and Evan Sigg had the top honors in the eighth-grade boys discus. Marmaton Valley’s Makayla Brooks took first in the eighth-grade girls 200-meter dash. Due to a computer malfunction, results from several girls races, including the 100- and 400-meter dashes, the seventhgrade girls 1600, the 100-meter hurdles and long jump, shot put and discus were unavailable by press time. Results for Iola, Humboldt and Marmaton Valley follow.

21

Iola Invitational Boys Seventh Grade 1. Royster, 113; 3. Iola, 65; 8. Humboldt,

100 meters — 1. Tayton Driskel, I, 12.33 200 meters — 1. Driskel, I, 25.86 1600 meters — 3. Cole Regehr, I, 5:38.74; 6. Breton Plumlee, I, 5:45.70 100m hurdles — 7. Tim Komma, I, 19.16 4x200 relay — 6. Iola (David Petty, Trevor Stover, Komma, Dylan Newland), 2:09.08 4x400 relay — 2. Iola (Komma, Petty, Newland, Driskel), 4:41.02; 6. Humboldt (Ryan Sellman, Tucker Hurst, Teryn John-

At left, Iola Middle School’s Dylan Newland, left, receives the baton from Trevor Stover in a relay race Tuesday at the IMS Invitational. Above, Iola’s Olivia Taylor wins the girls 1600-meter run. The meet featured more than 900 athletes from 20 schools.

See TRACK | Page B3

REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Iola golfers find right strokes PITTSBURG — Iola High’s Mustangs are right where head coach Doug Kerr wants them to be with their golf games. Fresh off taking second in their season-opener last week in Independence, the Mustangs did one better, taking

home first place at the Pittsburg Invitational. Meanwhile, Iola’s Kaden Macha made it 2-for-2, winning his second individual title of the season with an even par 72. He was three strokes better than his nearest competitor, Independence’s Cal-

vin Hugo (75). Kerr said Macha’s opening hole set the tone. After Macha duffed his approach shot, the ball was sitting on the edge of the green, 40 or so yards from the hole. See GOLF | Page B4

Iola High’s Derrick Weir pitches a complete game Tuesday in the first game of a doubleheader against Prairie View. Iola lost the game, 5-4, before rallying to win the nightcap, 2-1. REGISTER/KAYLA BANZET

Iola High’s Shelby Reno fields a ground ball Tuesday in the Fillies’ doubleheader against Prairie View. The Fillies had a tough go of it, falling 6-0 and 1-0 to fall to 3-3 in Pioneer League play. REGISTER/KAYLA BANZET

Fillies’ strong pitching not enough Offense was hard to come by for Iola High’s Fillies Tuesday. The Fillies never could find any offensive traction against visiting Prairie View, falling 6-0 and 1-0. The 1-0 defeat was particularly painful as Iola stranded runners in each of the first four innings, including leaving two on in both the first and second frames. Iola then left the bases full in the bottom of the fourth before Prairie View’s Amanda Moore settled down to retire the last 10 Filly

batters in order. Mackenzie Weseloh was the tough-luck loser, despite giving up only five hits and three walks in seven innings. She struck out seven. Moore was able to escape after Weseloh and Shelby Reno each reached on singles in the first inning. Jadyn Sigg reached on an error in the second, and Taylor Heslop singled before Moore wiggled out of trouble. Sigg then singled with one out in the fourth before Hes-

lop reached on an error and Ashlie Shields worked a twoout walk to load the bases. But Moore retired Weseloh on a fly ball to center to end the threat. “That play was huge,” Fillies head coach Vince Coons said. “Mackenzie really cranked it, and I just knew it was going to hit the gap, and we’d have three runs. But the ball just sort of died in the win, and their centerfielder See FILLIES | Page B4

Mustangs earn split Iola High’s Mustangs took it to the brink Tuesday, as both games of a doubleheader against visiting Prairie View came down to the last batters. In the opener, the Buffalos rallied for two runs in the top of the seventh inning, to turn a 4-3 deficit into a 5-4 victory before Iola returned the favor with Derrick Weir’s walk-off double in the bottom of the seventh inning of the nightcap for a 2-1 win. The split keeps Iola’s record even on the season at 4-4. The Mustangs are at 4-2 in Pioneer League action. “It was a couple of good

pitchers’ duels, but we still need to play better,” Iola head coach Mark Percy said. The opener was a bitter pill to swallow as the Mustangs held a 4-3 lead behind Weir’s pitching. Kaleb Konitzer’s leadoff homer in the seventh tied the score before Tommy Thayer reached on a Mustang error and came around to score on a wild pitch. The Mustangs didn’t go quietly, however. Thealvin Minor and Ethan Sigg both worked for walks to put runners on first

See MUSTANGS | Page B4


B2

Classifieds Wednesday. April 16, 2014

Wanted to Buy

BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS FOR OVER 30 YEARS, highest prices paid for collector coins, Jon Minor 620-365-8161.

Personals MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 877391-1010. WERE YOU IMPLEMENTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had a this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

Services Offered HAIL OF A SALE! CONTRACTOR SPECIAL, (2) 2 col. X 2” Display Ads + (1) 10-15 word Classified Line Ad for 1 month, FOR ONLY $100. Contact Sarah or Pam at The Iola Register 620-365-2111. SHAUGHNESSY BROS. CONSTRUCTION, LLC. Carpentry and painting service Siding and windows 620-365-6815, 620-3655323 or 620-228-1303 STORAGE & RV OF IOLA WEST HIGHWAY 54, 620-365-2200. Regular/Boat/RV storage, LP gas, fenced, supervised, www. iolarvparkandstorage.com IOLA MINI-STORAGE 323 N. Jefferson Call 620-365-3178 or 365-6163 ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control. FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-888-720-5583. SUPERIOR BUILDERS. New Buildings, Remodeling, Concrete, Painting and All Your Carpenter Needs, including replacement windows and vinyl siding. 620-365-6684 H & J CONSTRUCTION No job too small! Roofing, remodeling, repairs, new construction, garages, pole barns & more! Chuck Swart 620-717-1880 HALEY & SONS QUALITY RESTORATION Roofing and Home Repairs of all types Insured & References 620-223-2399 home, 417-321-0905 cell. GARDEN TILLING, haul dirt & gravel and haul your trash away, 620-228-9466. BORDER TO BORDER ROOFING LLC Residential & Commercial Roofing - Guttering KS State Licensed Free Estimates - Fully Insured Parsons, Pittsburg, Chanute 888-399-7766

CNAs. Windsor Place is hiring for our 2-10 shift and our 10-6 shift. Please apply in person at 600 E. Garfield. We are looking for people who care and want to make a difference. EOE. NURSE, OUTPATIENT COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER, full-time position in Humboldt working with psychiatric staff. Requires Kansas RN license, will consider LPN. Nurse assistant to medical staff in an outpatient community mental health center. Daytime position. Computer skills required. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resumes to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, call 620-365-8641, fax 620-365-8642, or email bstanley@sekmhc.org, EOE/AA.

NOW HIRING

CNA

Certified Nurse’s Aide

1 & 2 Shifts st

Fountain Villa 2620 N. Kentucky • Iola

Permanent part-time sales clerk with personality for children/ladies apparel store. Must be clean, dependable and honest with a willingness to work weekdays as well as Saturdays. Submit completed application or resume to Sophisticated Rose, 19S. Jefferson, Iola. No phone calls please.

620-365-9018

PSI, Inc.

Personal Service Insurance Loren Korte

12 licensed insurance agents to better serve you IOLA HUMBOLDT MORAN 365-6908 473-3831 237-4631

Real Estate Wanted WANTING TO BUY HOME ON CONTRACT, outside city limits within 20 mile radius of Iola, $1,500 down, $300/month, text information to 620-2282544.

CREST USD 479 is accepting applications for the position of HEAD CUSTODIAN. Position is open until filled. Contact Crest Board Office at 620-852-3540.

TASKS INCLUDE: Answering the phone, assist customers at the counter, input classifieds and send to pagination daily, post payments, balance out daily cash, credit cards and Paypal, contact expired subscribers about renewing and contact potential classified advertisers. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES: Working knowledge of data entry, Microsoft Word and Excel, a valid driver’s license and insurance. EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE: High school degree or equivalent and must have experience in hands-on customer service and in system data entry. WORK ENVIRONMENT: This position works primarily in the office but may be required to deliver papers or fill in as a substitute carrier.

Stop by to pick up an application today!

THE

IOLA

REGISTER A daily history of Allen County since 1867

Carriers Wanted T HE

I OLA R EGISTER

is currently looking for a Carrier for the following: Route 41 (Northwest Section of Humboldt)

Deliver the Iola Register to approx. 35 subscribers.

& Route 44

(Southwest Section of Humboldt)

Deliver the Iola Register to approx. 30 subscribers. Good first job with good pay & rewards.

Please contact Susan Locke at

(620) 365-2111

for more information.

Now Hiring

Lawn & Garden

COMPOSTED COW MANURE, $30 pickup load, Harry 620-365-9176.

ANDERSON COUNTY HOSPITAL, Saint Luke’s Health System has the following positions open: Medical Assistant, full-time day shift at Family Care Center. EMT, full-time day shift (Monday-Friday) in EMS. Patient Access Rep, full-time evening shift in Admitting. Clinical Lab Scientist or Medical Lab Technician, full-time day shift in Lab. Paramedic, part-time as needed in EMS. Registered Nurse, parttime as needed (PRN) in Med/ Surg. Registered Nurse, parttime as needed (PRN) in Family Care Center. Housekeeper, parttime as needed in Environment Services. Apply online at www. saintlukeshealthsystem .org/jobs, see online posting for more information on each open position. We hire only non-tobacco users. EOE.

Marketing Clerk

Life • Health • Home • Auto • Crop Commercial • Farm

LADYBUG GREENHOUSE, 731 S. KENTUCKY, IOLA, Open Monday-Saturday 8:306:30, Sunday 11-6:30, 620-3653997.

ADULT CASE MANAGER, IOLA OFFICE, FULL-TIME. Become a treatment team member supporting individuals in the community and assisting them in the rehabilitation process to meet their goals. Empathetic, well organized, self-reliant with good interpersonal skills. Basic computer skills. Prefer BA/BS, will consider A.A. with relevant work experience combined. KBI, Child Abuse Registry, Motor Vehicle Record and alcohol/drug screening required. Benefits. CHILDREN’S CASE MANAGER, FULL-TIME. Requires empathetic, patient individual with organizational and computer skills, good communication, team oriented, able to work independently. Bachelor’s degree preferred in Psychology, Sociology, Education. Will consider other degrees. May consider associate’s degree and relevant experience working with children. KBI, Child Abuse Registry, Motor Vehicle Record and alcohol/drug screening required. Benefits. Send resume to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, phone 620-365-8641, EOE/AA.

Part-time position at The lola Register, approximately 271⁄2 hours weekdays, beginning May 1. This position will work closely with all departments of The lola Register. Duties require daily contact with our advertisers, custom printing customers, subscribers and carriers, both on the phone and in person. Must be able to work well with the public. Good time management skills and computer skills are essential.

Eddie Abbott

Call for your personal in-home consultation.

nd

Apply in person. Ask for Jodie or Meredith.

GUNITE POOL CONSTRUCTION Renovation & Decking Interior/ Exterior Stone Tile Installation Over 20 years experience Webb’s Pool Construction 918-633-4385 • Custom Cabinetry • Flooring • Granite Countertops

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS ONLINE! JUST GO TO www.iolaregister.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Gates Corporation is a worldwide leader in the production of hydraulic hose. We are a growing company and are looking for only the finest employees for our manufacturing operation.

Full-Time & Part-Time Positions Available On Evenings & Night Shifts. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

Gates Corporation 1450 Montana Road Iola, Kansas

Equal Opportunity Employer

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES (620) 365-2111

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The Iola Register

Help Wanted

NOW HIRING

CMA

Certified Medication Aide

1st & 2nd Shifts

Apply in person. Ask for Jodie or Meredith.

Fountain Villa 2620 N. Kentucky • Iola

EXPERIENCED CDL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Local hauling, home every night, advancement opportunities available. Hours are 7-5p.m. Monday-Friday. Insurance and 401K are available. Excellent safety practices and attendance a must, 620-664-7449. ADMINISTRATIVE/LEGAL ASSISTANT. Seeking personable individual. Will be required to run office, dictation, prepare legal documents, and bookkeeping. Must have HS diploma, administrative experience, working knowledge on MS Word & Excel. Send resume: long@jratty.kscoxmail.com or fax 620-473-5034, EOE. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening in our Maintenance Department for “Tire Technician” (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high levels of mechanical aptitude, working knowledge of mechanical systems, on the job experience a plus. Able to work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd., Chanute KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer. MEDICAL OFFICE ASST/RECEPTIONIST. Full-time position in Iola. Requires personable individual who enjoys working with the public. Must be detail oriented, good interpersonal and organizational skills, team oriented, and computer literate. Previous medical and insurance billing experience preferred. Minimum high school diploma required, prefer associate degree. Send resume to: Robert Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749. Call for information 620-365-8641, EOE/AA.

“Partners In Excellence” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800528-7825 www.butlertransport. com Drivers - CDL-A. Train and work for us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7885 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com Exp. Flatbed Drivers: Regional opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great pay! 800-277-0212 or driveforprime. com EXPERIENCED DRIVER OR RECENT GRAD? With Swift, you can grow to be an awardwinning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The very best, choose Swift. • Great Miles = Great Pay • Late-Model Equipment Available • Regional Opportunities • Great Career Path • Paid Vacation • Excellent Benefits Please Call: (602) 714-9455 Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton Pickup trucks to deliver RV’s. $750 Sign-on Bonus, 4 Terminals and 8 Backhaul Locations. Call 866-764-1601 or www.foremosttransport.com. TSI Kansas, Inc. is seeking qualified OTR Drivers! Two years experience, clean MVR. Pay up to .45cpm, Medical Insurance. Apply at tsikansas.com and call 785-632-5183.

Poultry & Livestock REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE, 15 months to 2 years. Most bulls from A-I several heifer bulls. Breed leading EPDs, semen tested and tested for BVD, Gauthier 4-D Angus, 620-215-2079.

All ads are 10 word minimum, must run consecutive days. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. day before publication; GARAGE SALE SPECIAL: Paper & Web only, no shopper: 3 Days $1 per word

Real Estate for Rent 1224 N. COTTONWOOD, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, CH/CA, close to college, $500 monthly, $500 deposit, Monday-Friday 620-365-7663.

Real Estate for Rent QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE HOMES available for rent now, www.growiola.com IOLA, 305 S. 4TH, 3 BEDROOM, $500 monthly plus deposit, 620-365-9424. MORAN, 2 BEDROOM, $375 monthly plus deposit, 620-3659424. 218 S. CHESTNUT, 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath, $400 monthly plus $400 deposit, 620-363-2202. IOLA, 624 N. OHIO, 2-3 BEDROOM, very nice, CH/CA, appliances, attached double garage, fenced backyard, $795 monthly, 620-496-6161 or 620-496-2222.

Real Estate for Sale

Allen County Realty Inc. 620-365-3178 John Brocker. . . . . . 620-365-6892 Carolynn Krohn. . . 620-365-9379 Jack Franklin. . . . . . 620-365-5764 Brian Coltrane . . . . 620-496-5424 Dewey Stotler. . . . . 620-363-2491 Candace McRae,. . . 816-916-7051 www.allencountyrealty.com

Poultry & Livestock

Farm Machinery

Cut your STUDENT LOAN payments in HALF or more, even if late or in default. Get relief FAST, much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 1-855-344-0846.

CONTRACT SALESPERSONS sell aerial photography of farms, commission basis, $1,200-$2,500 weekly depending on sales experience, travel required. More info at msphotosd.com or call 877/882-3566

MORAN, 207 W. RANDOLPH, 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT AVAILABLE NOW! Cable, water, trash & lawn care included, $355 rent, $350 deposit, 620-2374331 or 620-939-4800.

For consignment please call Scotty (620) 363-4390 • Josh (620) 363 0086 John (620) 365-9885 Watch for list to be in The Iola Register!

PART-TIME DUMP TRUCK DRIVER NEEDED, flexible schedule, work 2-3 days/week, 2 years CDL driving experience required. Must have clean MVR and able to pass physical and drug screen. Call Dennis, RVB Trucking Inc., 620-365-6823, 620-496-7600.

Anthony, Kansas is seeking Water/Wastewater Operator. High School Diploma/GED and valid driver’s license required. Applications and complete job description: www.anthonykansas. org. 620-842-5434. EOE. Open until filled.

Apartment for Rent

Spring Consignment Auction Sunday, April 27th

GEHL 116.5 DISC MOWER, very good shape, 620-496-2452 or 620-496-8544.

CATALYST ARTIFICIAL LIFT CO., MACHINE OPERATORS NEEDED for 1st shift Monday-Friday 6a.m.-4:30p.m. and 2nd shift Monday-Thursday 2:30p.m.-1a.m. Knowledge in reading measuring instruments (calipers, tape measures, etc.) will be required. Experience with CNC machines a plus, but job training will be provided. Dependable, on time individuals need only apply. All training will take place during 1st shift before transition to 2nd shift. A SHIFT SUPERVISOR IS ALSO NEEDED for 2nd shift MondayThursday 2:30p.m.-1a.m. Knowledge in machine programming and set-up is required. Some leadership and supervisory experience will be necessary. Apply in person at: 2702 N. State St., Iola, KS 66749 or send resumes to: BSCHR@bellsupplystores.com

CREATIVE CLIPS BOARDING & GROOMING Clean, Affordable. Shots required. If you want the best, forget the rest! Call Jeanne 620-363-8272

P.O. Box 130 • Gas, KS 365-6968 • sekstockyard@yahoo.com

PART-TIME OFFICE POSITION IN IOLA, must have customer service skills and be honest/dependable. Send resume: 225 E. 21st, Pittsburg, KS 66762.

SONIC DRIVE-IN OF IOLA, KS, NEEDS GOOD DEPENDABLE PEOPLE! DAY/NIGHT COOKS and CAR HOPS. Good wages for good workers! Pass drug & background screenings. Apply in person ONLY. No phone calls please. EOE.

Pets and Supplies

Help Wanted

Financial

GUARANTEED INCOME FOR YOUR RETIREMENT. Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income in retirement! CALL for FREE copy of our SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity Quotes from A-Rated companies! 1-800741-8244.

Real Estate for Sale FOR SALE BY OWNER, SMALL HOME ON THE EDGE OF COLONY. Free gas, open living & kitchen area, full finished walk-out basement to large patio, basement newly carpeted, 15 lots, several fenced w/woven wire, city utilities/sewer, small shed. Must see to appreciate, 620852-3520. NEW, 3 BEDROOM, 6 years no property tax, 620-228-2231. COUNTRY HOME, 3-1/2 ACRES, 3 BEDROOM, 1-1/2 bath, large living room, mud/ utility room, lots of storage, hot water heat, CA, attached 2 car garage, detached garage w/storage room, 2 storage buildings, fireplace, $120,000, 620-365-5820.

Merchandise for Sale MEDICAL GUARDIAN - Toprated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month, 877-531-3048.

420 N. KENTUCKY, 3 BEDROOM, 1-1/2 bath, attached garage, privacy fence, 620-2284186.

PURCHASE PHOTOS TAKEN AT AREA SPORTS EVENTS, click the photos link at www.iolaregister.com

C allO ur H om e Loan Experts In Iola • (620)365-6000

40 GALLON WATER HEATERS, 6-year warranty, Natural Gas $299, LP $343, Electric $250, D&R Plumbing, 204 N. Washington, Iola, 620-365-2704. DISH TV RETAILER, starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installation! Call now 1-800-3497308.. SPRING CLEANING sale at Mid-America Piano now thru April 19. Pre-owned pianos from $488, organs $288 and up. Benches, moving equipment, tools, music, accessories, priced to sell fast! Mid-America Piano, Manhattan, 800-950-3774, www. piano4u.com Your Land is Your Down Payment. And we’ll match your tax refund up to $8,000. Singles starting at $39,900. Doubles starting at $59,900. Less than perfect credit OK! 866-858-6862

M onica Sellm an

Travis Riley

In H um boldt• (620)473-2211

Angela Lushbough

Member

Steve H oag

Low Secondary M arketRates

20-& 30-Year Fixed Rates ExcellentIn-house Financing Take advantage oflow interestrates.Ask us about refinancing your hom e.

Paper, Web and Shopper 6 Days • $1.85/WORD 12 Days • $2.35/WORD 18 Days • $3.25/WORD 26 Days • $4.00/WORD

ADDITIONS Blind Box • $5 Centering • $2 Photo • $5


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The Iola Register

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

B3

SCENES FROM THE IMS INVITATIONAL

Above, Iola Middle School’s Tayton Driskel departs from the starting line in the 100-meter dash at Tuesday’s IMS Invitational. Below at left, Hunter Mittelmeier runs a race. Below at right, Colbi Riley runs the hurdles.

Senior Spotlight Iola High School Class of 2014

Iola’s Becky Carlson, top right, and Phil Honeycutt, right, were among the scores of volunteers who assisted with Tuesdays’ Iola Middle School Invitational. The mammoth meet drew more than 900 athletes from 20 area schools. REGISTER/ BOB JOHNSON

Justice Hutton

Justice is the daughter of David and Angela Thompson. She is a member of the Harvest Baptist Church, National Honor Society, basketball, cross country, Hooligans and STUCO. Her hobbies include hunting and cooking. She works part-time at Bolling’s Meat Market and Deli. After high school she is planning to attend Allen Community College and complete a prevet program then go to Kansas State University to become a veterinarian. Her high school highlights are the relationships with the teachers, the football games and throwing flour at the last football game.

Dakota Jones

Dakota is the son of Sandy and Rusty Jones. He is active in FFA and enjoys fishing and hunting. He works part-time at Jumpstart Travel Center. After high school he plans to attend Allen Community College. Dakota said his high school highlight was being the top food salesman for three years for FFA.

Travis Rieske Travis is the son of Jason and Jennifer Tarter. His activities include wrestling and FFA. When he is not in school he likes to hang out with his friends. Travis works for a farmer from spring to fall until wrestling starts. Travis said he will probably go to John Deere technical school at Fort Scott. His high school highlight was competing in sports.

This special weekly feature is a cooperative effort of The Iola Register &...

“Committed to our Community” Iola - 120 E. Madison (620) 365-6000 www.MyBankCNB.com

Humboldt - 116 N. 8th (620) 473-2211

Iola Middle School relay team members Kassy Shelby, from left, Hailei Gregg, Piper Moore and Ashleigh Nicholas await their turn to run at Tuesday’s IMS Invitational at Riverside Park. REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Track: Meet draws 900 athletes Continued from B1 son, David Watts), 5:12.06 Long jump — 1. Driskel, 17’8” Shot put — 3. Kolt Knoblich, I, 31’4 1/4”; 8. Stover, I, 27’4” Discus — 2. Hurst, H, 92’; 3. Johnson, H, 92’; 6. Hunter Preston, I, 79’9”; 7. Matt Karr, I, 77’7” High jump — 5. Bo Bigelow, H, 4’4” Eighth grade 1. Parsons, 101; 5. Humboldt, 34; 11. Iola, 24; 12. Marmaton Valley, 20 100 meters — 5. Trevor Wilson, MV, 12.50 400 meters — 4. Jacob Barker, H, 1:02.01; 8. Zach Cokely, I, 1:03.82

RECYCLE FOR THE FUTURE!

800 meters — 8. Ethan Holloway, I, 2:42.57 1600 meters — 4. Justice Pugh, MV, 5:45.38; 7. Holloway, I, 5:51.72 3200 meters — 2. Pugh, MV, 11:50.87 100-meter hurdles — 5. Isaac Vink, 17.98 4x200 relay — 8. Iola (Cale Barnhart, Holloway, Caden Knavel, Vink), 2:00.02 4x400 relay — 3. Humboldt (Caleb Hart, Noah Johnson, Hesston Murrow and Barker), 4:31.54; 4. Iola (Vink, Cokely, Knavel, Barnhart), 4:32.91 Long jump — 5. Jacob Barker, H, 16’6”; 6. Wilson, MV, 16’5 3/4” Shot put — 2. Johnson, H, 38’11”;  Discus — 1. Evan Sigg, I, 111’2”; 2. Johnson, H, 106’4” High jump — 6. Collin Gillespie, H, 5’ Girls Seventh grade 1 (tie). Independence and Parsons, 30; 7. Iola, 19.5; 8. Humboldt, 12; 11. Marmaton Valley, 6 200 meters — 6. Morgan Mauk, H, 30.97; 7. Savannah Puckett, 31.23; 8. Kaylie Johnson, H, 31.40 800 meters — 4. Aricah McCall, H, 2:56.04; 8. Madisyn Holloway, I, 2:59.73

4x100 relay — 3. Iola (Kassy Shelby, Ashleigh Nicholas, Piper Moore, Hailei Gregg), 1:00.62 4x200 relay — 3. Iola (Natalie DeGrado, Gregg, Shelby, Shaylee Sutterby), 2:12.72 4x400 relay — 3. Iola (Holloway, Moore, Shelby, Paige Burrough), 5:11.37; 6. Humboldt (McCall, Camrie Farran, Mauk, Johnson), 5:25.51 High jump — 5. Patricia Outlan, MV, 3’10”; 8. Jennifer Tidd, I, 3’8” Eighth grade 3. Marmaton Valley, 33; 5. Iola, 22; 14. Humboldt, 6.3 200 meters — 1. Makayla Brooks, MV, 29.20 800 meters — 3. Olivia Taylor, I, 2:45.73; 8. Shelby Yoho, MV, 2:57.75 1600 meters — 1. Taylor, I, 5:53.53; 3. Yoho, MV, 6:23.11 4x100 relay — 3. Marmaton Valley (Shayla Brooks, Clara Boyd, Emily Smart, M. Brooks), 57.82 4x200 relay — 5. Marmaton Valley (Megan Ensminger, Boyd, Smart, Yoho), 2:10.68 4x400 relay — 3. Iola (Madison Carlin, Carley Cescon, Taylor, Katie Bauer), 5:03.91; 7. Humboldt (Britnee Works, Lizzie Myers, Kaiti Carpenter, Rylan Wilhite), 5:17.61


B4

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Ventura sharp as Royals knock off Astros, 4-2 By KRISTIE RIEKEN The Associated Press

HOUSTON (AP) — Kansas City rookie Yordano Ventura entered Tuesday night’s game winless in four career starts dating to last season despite posting a 2.53 ERA in those games. On Tuesday night, he pitched seven solid innings and finally got his

Sports Calendar Iola High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, JV vs. PITTSBURG, 4:30 p.m. Monday, JV baseball vs. WELLSVILLE, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, at Wellsville, 4:30 p.m. High School Tennis Friday, at Chanute, 3 p.m. High School Golf Monday, JV at Anderson County, 3:30 a.m. Tuesday, at Osawatomie, 1 p.m. High School Track Today, at Coffeyville, 3:30 p.m. Middle School Track April 25, at Fredonia, 3 p.m. Middle School Golf Today, at Coffeyville, 3 p.m. Monday, at Mound City, 3 p.m.

Humboldt High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, at Yates Center High School Track Friday, at Pitt State Relays High School Golf Tuesday, at Fredonia

Crest High School Track April 24, SCC Invitational (at Burlington)

Southern Coffey Co. High School Track Today, at Yates Center Monday, Waverly Invitational (at Burlington) April 24, SCC INVITATIONAL (at Burlington)

Marmaton Valley High School Baseball/Softball Monday, vs. UNIONTOWN High School High School Track Tuesday, at Waverly High School Golf Thursday, JV at JayhawkLinn Monday, at Oswego Tuesday, JV at West Franklin

Yates Center High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, vs. HUMBOLDT High School Track April 25, at Fredonia High School Golf Tuesday, at Fredonia

Allen Baseball Thursday, at Fort Scott, 1 p.m. Saturday, FORT SCOTT, 1 p.m. April 22, HUTCHINSON, 3 p.m. April 24, KANSAS CITY, KAN., 3 p.m. Softball Thursday, at Maple Woods, 2 p.m. April 23, COTTEY COLLEGE, 2 p.m.

first victory as the Royals beat the Houston Astros 4-2. “I’m just really proud for him because that was like his fifth time he’s gone for his first win and he’s had an opportunity to win ballgames two or three times and we couldn’t hold it for him,” Royals manager Ned Yost said. “To finally get that out of the way for him, to get his first major league win was big for all of us tonight.” Omar Infante homered and drove in two runs for the Royals. Ventura (1-0), an elite prospect with a 100 mph fastball, allowed four hits and one earned run with seven strikeouts in seven innings — both career highs. His seven strikeouts were the most by a Kansas City rookie since Will Smith also fanned seven on Sept. 11, 2012.

Yordano Ventura pitches in a game earlier this season. On Tuesday, Ventua pitched seven solid innings in a 4-2 Kansas City Royals win over Houston. MCT FILE PHOTO BY JOHN SLEEZER

“I feel really good,” Ventura said in Spanish through a translator. “I feel that the team supported me and played

Mustangs: Split Continued from B1

second with nobody out. But pinch runner Ben Cooper was called out on a controversial call on a Buffalo pickoff attempt. The Mustang coaches protested to no avail. “We were going to put on a bunt to get the runners to second and third, but the pickoff changed everything,” Percy said. An infield pop-up and a ground ball ended the game. “Half our lineup is struggling with the bats,” Percy said. Trailing 1-0, Iola rallied for two runs with two out in the bottom of the third. Trent Latta, Drew Faulhaber, Weir and Ethan Scheibmeir put together consecutive singles, with Faulhaber and Scheibmeir collecting RBIs. Prairie View responded with two in the top of the fourth to take a 3-2 lead before Iola retook the upper hand in the fifth. Faulhaber and Weir were both hit by pitches and advanced to second and third on a Buffalo error. Sigg’s single drove both home for a 4-3 lead. Weir surrendered eight hits with five strikeouts. Latta singled twice, as did Weir. Faulhaber, Scheibmeir and Sigg had

one single each. LATTA WAS up to the challenge on the mound in game two. He matched Prairie View’s Jordan Fulks, out for out, in an old-fashioned pitchers’ duel. Coleson Wiggin led the way to the Mustangs’ first run in the second when he and Sigg singled with one out. Kohl Endicott walked to load the bases. Another walk to Caleb Alexander forced in Wiggin to put Iola in front, 1-0. Prairie View tied the score when Austin Dimmett doubled, moved to third on a ground ball and scored on a steal of home. Latta wiggled out of trouble in the fifth after Konitzer tripled with one out. Latta got a key Fulks strikeout before ending the inning with a ground ball. He allowed a one-out single in the sixth before picking off the baserunner. He allowed just six hits in his complete game victory with one walk and seven strikeouts. Faulhaber went 2-for-4 with a double, while Latta, Weir, Wiggin and Sigg all singled. Iola travels to Wellsville Tuesday for another key Pioneer League matchup.

Fillies: Lose pair Continued from B1

made a great extension to catch it.” Prairie View’s Kallie Konitzer doubled to lead off the fourth, moved to third on a passed ball and scored on Maggie Brown’s sacrifice fly for the only run of the game. Weseloh, Hannah Endicott, Reno, Sigg and Heslop had Iola’s only hits. “I tried pushing the action, and wound up getting a couple of our runners thrown out trying to go for extra bases,” Coons said. “We just didn’t get the hits we needed.” went right defensively in the opener as the Fillies committed seven errors, leading to five unearned runs. “They did a good job of forcing us into mistakes by trying for the extra base,” Coons said. Endicott took the loss, despite giving up just four hits and three NOT

MUCH

walks. She struck out five. Meanwhile, Brown limited the Fillies to just two hits, singles by Sigg in the second inning and Shields in the third. “Both Hannah and Mackenzie were super,” Coons said. “Hannah pitched her heart out, and Mackenzie did a good job of moving the ball in and out. “We’re so close to becoming an excellent team,” he continued. “We just are not quite there yet.” IOLA’S junior varsity

fell in both games of its doubleheader, 13-1 and 16-0. Emily McKarnin had a single and scored a run in the first game. Lexi Heslop and Taylor Heslop also had singles. Taylor Sell’s secondinning single was the Fillies JV’s only hit in the nightcap. The Fillies (3-3 in Pioneer League play and 3-5 overall) return to action Tuesday at Wellsville.

really good defense and scored a lot of runs for me. It gives me a lot of satisfaction so I can keep working hard to help the team win.” Infante had a solo shot in the first inning off Lucas Harrell (0-3) and added an RBI in the third inning as the Royals found some offense after managing just five runs combined as they were swept in a weekend

series at Minnesota. Eric Hosmer and Billy Butler had an RBI each for Kansas City and Lorenzo Cain had a pair of hits for his fourth multihit game this season. “We just got a couple of timely hits today and as an offense we need to do a better job of that,” Hosmer said. “The way our pitchers have thrown we’ve got to find a way to produce runs for them and tonight we did a good job of that.” Carlos Corporan homered in the fifth inning for the Astros, who have scored two runs or fewer in three of their past four games. Harrell gave up five hits and four runs in five innings and has allowed 14 runs in three starts combined this season. Ventura had retired 12 of the last 13 batters when Corporan launched his homer into the first row of the seats in right field with one out in the fifth inning to cut the lead to 4-2. He got back on track after that and didn’t allow another hit until Matt Dominguez singled to start the seventh inning. He walked Jonathan Vil-

lar with two outs, but ended the threat and his night when he retired Dexter Fowler after a short coaching visit to the mound. Wade Davis pitched a perfect eighth before Greg Holland struck out the side in the ninth for his fourth save. He has converted 13 straight save opportunities dating to Sept. 7. Infante put Kansas City up early with his solo homer to the Crawford Boxes in left field with one out in the first inning. Fowler hit a leadoff double and reached third on a one-out single by Jason Castro. Fowler scored on an error by Ventura with two outs on a pickoff attempt to first base to tie it at 1-1. Infante grounded into a forceout that scored Cain, who had led off the inning with a single, to make it 2-1 in the third inning. Hosmer followed with an RBI double to push the lead to 3-1. A single by Nori Aoki followed by a pair of walks loaded the bases for Kansas City with one out in the fifth, and Butler’s sacrifice fly pushed the lead to 4-1.

Golf: Iola tops at Pittsburg Continued from B1

“He was just hoping to get it close with his first putt,” Kerr said. Instead, Macha drained the birdie putt, while his two fellow competitors had bogeys. The Mustangs wound up four strikes ahead of Independence — the same team that edged Iola for the team title last week — 315 to 319.

“I thought this course was tougher,” Kerr said, “and we shaved five strokes off our score from last week. Everybody did a great job today.” Drake Dieker and Shane Walden both carded 80s, while Weston Hines shot an 83. Matt Jacobs finished at 89, and Adam Peterson at 94.

“Drake’s round was key,” Kerr said. “We moved him up in our rotation so he was playing against some better players. He responded with the best round of golf he’s had in a while.” Iola resumes action Tuesday at Osawatomie. The Mustang junior varsity is at Anderson County Monday.

GRADUATION TIME IS NEAR! Honor your graduate with a special tribute on our

“You’ve Come a Long Way Baby” pages to appear prior to each High School’s graduation IN LIVING COLOR! Just stop by or send a baby picture of your graduate along with the coupon below including your message and check or money order for $28 to The Iola Register.

Don’t be shy, celebrate! Congratulations Graduate! Love, Your Family

We’ll place it in an ad complete with a graduation cap! Hurry! Deadline is Monday, May 5, 2014. CLIP AND MAIL ALONG WITH PAYMENT AND PICTURE TO: The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749, Attn. Grad Ads, bring by the Register office at 302 S. Washington during business hours or use drop slot or e-mail your information, photo & message to registerdisplay@gmail.com. Name (Person Placing Ad) Address _____________________________________ Phone _______________________ Graduate’s Name & High School Message___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Credit Card # 3 Digit Code on Back of Card

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

B5

On track

Iola High’s Jessica Oakley, left, throws the discus Tuesday at the Coffeyville Invitational track meet, while the Mustangs’ Jeremy Spears, above, competes in the steeplechase. A full report of Tuesday’s track meet will be in Wednesday’s Register. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

Mourners reflect on anniversary of Boston Marathon attack Two arrested after backpacks found, detonated by police By DENISE LAVOIE The Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — Survivors, first responders and relatives of those killed in the Boston Marathon bombing marked the anniversary Tuesday with tributes that combined sorrow over the loss of innocent victims with pride over the city’s resilience in the face of a

terror attack. “This day will always be hard, but this place will always be strong,” former Mayor Thomas Menino told an invitation-only audience of about 2,500 people at the Hynes Convention Center, not far from the finish line, where two pressure cooker bombs hidden in backpacks killed three people and

injured more than 260 others a year ago. Vice President Joe Biden, who attended the ceremony, said the courage shown by survivors and those who lost loved ones is an inspiration for other Americans dealing with loss and tragedy. “You have become the face of America’s resolve,” he said. Biden also praised the 36,000 runners who plan to run the marathon next week, saying they will send a message to terrorists.

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“America will never, ever, ever stand down,” he said, to loud applause. He added, “We own the finish line.” In the evening, after the tributes were over and most people had left, a man behaving suspiciously near the finish line dropped a backpack containing a rice cooker, police said. The man, who walked barefoot in a street in pouring rain, was taken into custody and was being charged with possession of a hoax device and disturbing the peace, Police Superintendent Randall Halstead said. The backpack was blown up by the bomb squad as a precaution as was a second unattended backpack found nearby, police said, and no injuries were reported. Halstead didn’t release the identity of the man in custody and wouldn’t say what was in the second backpack or who owned it. IN

WASHINGTON,

President Barack Obama observed the anniversary of last year’s deadly marathon attack with a private moment of silence at the White House. “Today, we recognize the incredible courage and leadership of so many Bostonians in the wake of unspeakable tragedy,” Obama said in a statement. “And we offer our deepest gratitude to the courageous firefighters, police officers, medical professionals, runners and spectators who, in an instant, displayed the spirit Boston was built on — perseverance, freedom and love.” Obama said this year’s race, scheduled for April 21, will “show the world the meaning of Boston Strong as a city chooses to run again.” say Chechen

AUTHORITIES

two

ethnic

“We never should have met this way, but we are thankful for each other.” — Patrick Downes, injured in attack

brothers who lived in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan and the Dagestan region of Russia planned and orchestrated the marathon bombings on April 15, 2013. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died following a shootout with police days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is awaiting a trial in which he faces a possible death sentence. Prosecutors say the brothers also killed MIT police Officer Sean Collier days after the bombings in an attempt to steal his gun. Prosecutors have said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev left a hand-scrawled confession condemning U.S. actions in Muslim countries on the inside wall of a boat in which he was found hiding following the police shootout. At the tribute, several survivors of the bombing alluded to their injuries but focused on the strength they’ve drawn from fellow survivors, first responders, doctors, nurses and strangers who have offered them support. “We should never have met this way, but we are so grateful for each other,” said Patrick Downes, a newlywed who was injured along with his wife. Each lost a left leg below the knee in the bombings. Downes described Boston Strong, the slogan coined after the attack, as a movement that symbolizes the city’s de-

termination to recover. He called the people who died “our guardian angels.” “We will carry them in our hearts,” he said. Downes said the city on April 21 will “show the world what Boston represents.” He added, “For our guardian angels, let them hear us roar.” Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a ballroom dancer who lost her left leg below the knee and has recently returned to performing on a prosthetic leg, said she’s learned over the last year that no milestone is too small to celebrate, including walking into a non-handicapped bathroom stall for the first time and “doing a happy dance.” Gov. Deval Patrick spoke of how the attack has drawn people closer. “There are no strangers here,” he repeated throughout his speech. Carlos Arredondo, the cowboy hat-wearing spectator who was hailed as a hero for helping the wounded after the bombings, said he went to the tribute ceremony to support survivors and their families. “You can see how the whole community gathered together to support them and remember,” Arredondo said. After the tributes, many of those in attendance walked in the rain to the finish line for a moment of silence that coincided with the time when the bombs went off. Bells rang, and a flag was raised by transit agency police Officer Richard Donohue, who was badly injured during a shootout with the bombing suspects. Earlier in the day, a wreath-laying ceremony drew the families of the three people killed last year — Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lu Lingzi — and Collier’s relatives.

Retired hockey players sue NHL MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Another group of former NHL players has joined the fight for compensation for head injuries they say they incurred while playing, while at the same time targeting the violence of the game that they believe brought about those injuries.

Retired players Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett filed a class action lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday alleging that the league has promoted fighting and downplayed the risk of head injuries that come from it. “I think the glorified violence is really

the Achilles heel for the NHL,” said Charles “Bucky” Zimmerman, an attorney at Zimmerman Reed that filed the lawsuit on behalf of the players. “If anything comes of this, the focus on the glorified violence and perhaps the change to that will be a good thing.”


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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Former social services chief dies Boys, Girls Clubs get federal grant lobbyist for a statewide nonprofit council advocating for the disabled. F o r mer Gov. John Carlin called Harder “a very Robert Harder special human being,” The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. Carlin, a Democrat, was governor from 1979 to 1987, and Harder served as his secretary of social and rehabilitation services. “Bob Harder was as good as public servant, public administrator as I’ve ever known for sure,” Carlin said. “Bob was a joy to be around, but he was usually pretty serious business most of the time.” Harder was born June 4, 1929, in Horton, the son of a Methodist minister.

Harder himself earned two advanced theology degrees and became a pastor at a Methodist church in east Topeka in 1958. Starting in 1961, he served six years in the Kansas House as a Democrat. In 1967, he left the Legislature for then-Democratic Gov. Robert Docking’s administration and helped set up the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services. He served as the state’s first SRS secretary, starting in 1969, and kept the job until 1987. He returned to the position briefly after Democratic Gov. Joan Finney took office in 1991 and later became her secretary of health and environment. Republican Gov. Sam Brownback reorganized social services and health care agencies in 2012, creating the Department for Children and Families.

Corn crop off to slow start ST. LOUIS (AP) — Most years about this time, northern Illinois farmer Monty Whipple, like so many Midwest growers, would be riding high in his monstrous tractor, kicking up dust while planting corn in hundreds of acres. But this spring has kept him sidelined, and he’s anything but alone. Spring planting across much of the nation’s Corn Belt is sputtering, foiled by rainy and chilly conditions that in broad stretches have left the ground either too soggy or too cold for effective seeding. As of Sunday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says, just 3 percent of the U.S. corn crop was sown, half the dismal pace of last year, when one of the wettest springs on record got farmers in many states off to the slowest start in decades. In Illinois, just 1 percent of this year’s corn has been planted — onetenth of the average pace of the previous five years. Farmers in other key corn-producing states — Iowa, Nebraska and Indiana — were equally idle, the USDA says. Missouri has 9 percent of its crop in the field, down from 16 percent this time a year ago. Still, Whipple and other growers in Illinois and Missouri aren’t sound-

ing alarms, noting that today’s bigger, more efficient planting machines can make up for lost time. Such was the case last year, when more than 40 percent of Illinois’ corn crop got planted in just one week in mid-May. The USDA says corn planting traditionally

“I can’t be in the field, so this is a good job to get done while waiting,” he said, though he admitted he’s “starting to get a little frustrated.” He guessed it will be another week before he can begin planting corn. “We just haven’t had that week or two of good weather, and

We just haven’t had that week or two of good weather, and there’s a lot of work to be done. — Monty Whipple, Illinois farmer

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Boys and Girls Clubs of Topeka have been selected to receive more than $272,000 from the U.S. Department of Education to provide an integrated physical activity and nutrition pro-

gram. The agency on Tuesday announced the award, one of 67 grants made nationwide to distribute $33 million to local education agencies. Agencies receiving the grants are required

to use the funds to initiate, expand or enhance physical education and nutrition education programs. The activities include after-school programs for children in kindergarten through 12th grade.

Senior Spotlight Iola High School Class of 2014 Arion Kunkler

Arion is the son of Damaris Kunkler and Shae Garrett. His activities in school include cross country, track, football and attending Wesley United Methodist Church. His hobbies include hanging out with friends and collecting shoes. After high school he will move to Colorado to live with his father and attend a community college in Denver. Senior year football, basketball, Hooligans and going to Taco Bell after the home games were high school highlights for Arion.

Scout Henry Scout is the daughter of Tom Henry and Angela Henry. She is active in FFA, Interact and Cheerleading. She was the football manager, sang in the church choir and was yearbook editor. Scout said she likes to work, hangout with her family and friends, cheer and watch Netflix. She works as a teacher in the SafeBase afterschool program. She is unsure where she would like to attend college after high school but plans to major in agribusiness and minor in agronomy with an international language influence. Scout said her four years in high school have been a blast. She said there isn’t a way to pick one particular highlight although she did enjoy National Convention freshman through junior year.

Jacob Rhoads

begins about this time, with that task typically in full swing from April 21 through May 23. And the agency notes that even with last year’s frustratingly slow start to planting, U.S. farmers still reaped a record 13.9 billion bushels of corn and the third-biggest soybean crop on record. “There’s really not any need to be concerned,” Illinois Farm Bureau spokesman John Hawkins said. At least not yet, as Whipple waits for spring to stop acting like winter. With a fresh batch of snow on his roughly 800 acres of farmland near Utica in LaSalle County, he spent Tuesday hauling stored grain to a barge and felt productive.

there’s a lot of work to be done.” But he said he has resisted the urge to rush in a crop when the soil is marginal, saying “you only get one shot at this.” Near Missouri’s Warrenton, west of St. Louis, Keith Witt said only one or two local farmers have any corn planted — for bragging rights, if anything. But with 3,500 acres soaked by six inches of rain over the past 10 days or so, Witt guesses he’ll have to wait until the end of next week to start planting. Expectations of more rain within days soured any hope of getting in the fields now to plant half of his acreage with corn, then the other half later with beans.

Jacob is the son of Erin and Phillip Rhoads. His activities include football for four years, track for one year, baseball for two years and youth group. Jacob enjoys fishing, hunting, playing sports and being outdoors. He wants to graduate high school then play college football. After college he wants to travel the world then find a place to settle down and start his life. His high school highlights were going to state in baseball last year and getting second in state, being back to back Pioneer League champions in football and being a homecoming candidate for football 2013. Also, breaking Mr. D’s freshman javelin record was a highlight.

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TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Robert C. Harder, a former Kansas legislator who helped create the agency that became the state Department for Children and Families, has died from a brain tumor, his family said. He was 84. According to an obituary supplied by the family, Harder died Saturday at his home at Brewster Place. His memorial service was scheduled for this afternoon at First United Methodist Church in Topeka. Harder served in the Cabinets of five governors from both political parties and his 18 continuous years as head of the Kansas’ largest social services agency made him the longest-serving state Cabinet secretary. After leaving state government, he was the legislative liaison for the United Methodist Church and a volunteer

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B7

Emotional harm can start physical harm Dear Carolyn: My husband and I are at an impasse in our relationship. We cannot see each other’s points of view and are just existing in a miserable state. I’ve begged for marriage counseling for a year, which just yesterday he reluctantly agreed to. However, he has basically stated that when marriage counseling fails (not if), “I give up.” We have kids and we love each other, we just can’t seem to live together right now. Am I wasting my time saving a relationship that he sees as doomed? — Marriage on the Cliff He agreed to marriage counseling, so go. Even if it fails, counseling won’t have been a waste because it’s a basic step before giving up altogether. That may seem silly, but it can be important to be able to tell yourself you “tried everything.” And, if you choose well, your therapist can help you through whatever the

Tell Me About It Carolyn Hax next step happens to be. One suggestion before you start: Go into counseling looking for new ways to understand what’s happening, new ways to frame your marriage, new ways to speak to your husband, vs. a new way to save the marriage or get your husband to see your side. Set only the goals that are within your control. Re: Marriages “failing”:

I hate that term. I read the other day about someone’s marriage failing after 35 years and three kids. Um, no. It ended. Lots of good came out of it, and then things changed, and it ended. “Failed” makes it sound as if the fact of being married is the accomplishment. It is also terribly

judgmental. OK, said my piece. — Anonymous Quite well, thanks. We were talking about the possibility that counseling would fail, but the argument still applies. Thank you for taking my question last week [about disagreements with my boyfriend]. I was surprised when you included the domestic violence link because he had never been violent. He still hasn’t been, but that weekend he yelled at me pretty bad, and systematically insulted my entire character. When we talked normally he said he was purposely trying to hurt my feelings. He admitted he should have communicated better, but never apologized for yelling, though I apologized for “setting him off” multiple times. I broke up with him. — Different Perspectives again Every person who becomes violent was, preceding that point, not violent.

Plus, domestic violence education is applicable to situations of verbal/ emotional abuse, because they’re just different points on the same continuum. When someone thinks it’s okay to cause you deliberate harm in one way, how much of a leap is it to another kind of deliberate harm? As for why I made abuse connections when you hadn’t even mentioned yelling, it was this: “He feels that if we go somewhere together we SHOULD spend every second together.” That’s classic control, which is a predictor of relationship violence. It’s in the warning-signs section of the pamphlet. Even though you broke up (phew), I think you still would benefit from reading more on the topic. “The Gift of Fear” by Gavin de Becker is eyeopening, and a quick and absorbing read. Take care.

the Petition.

collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Prepared By: South & Associates, P.C. Blair Gisi (KS # 24096) 245 N. Waco, Suite 400 Wichita, KS 67202 (316)684-7733 (316)684-7766 (Fax) Attorneys For Plaintiff (167051)

Public notice (First published in The Iola Register on April 9, 2014) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT Great Southern Bank Plaintiff, vs. Jocelyn K. Sheets; John Doe (Tenant/Occupant); Mary Doe (Tenant/Occupant); Unknown Spouse, if any, of Jocelyn K. Sheets,

Townsite to the City of Iola, commonly known as 206 West Jackson, Iola, KS 66749 (the “Property”) and all those defendants who have not otherwise been served are required to plead to the Petition on or before the 20th day of May, 2014, in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas. If you fail to plead, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon

NOTICE Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to

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Defendants.

Case No. 14CV22 Court Number: Pursuant to K.S.A. Chapter 60 NOTICE OF SUIT THE STATE OF KANSAS, to the above-named defendants and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any deceased defendants; the unknown spouses of any defendants; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of any defendants that are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of any defendants that are or were partners or in partnership; the unknown guardians, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any legal disability; and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any person alleged to be deceased, and all other persons who are or may be concerned. You are notified that a Petition has been filed in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas, praying to foreclose a real estate mortgage on the following described real estate: LOT TWO (2) AND THREE (3), BLOCK FIFTY-FIVE (55), ORIGINAL TOWNSITE TO THE CITY OF IOLA ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Lots Two (2) and Three (3), Block Fifty-Five (55), Original

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A year after explosion, West is on the mend WEST, Texas (MCT) — Two flags, tattered by an explosion blocks away, have flown at half-staff at the Emergency Medical Services station since shortly after a fertilizer mixing operation blew up April 17, 2013, devastating this quiet Central Texas town and killing 15. The dead included three out-of-town men attending a course at the EMS facility, who then joined local volunteer firefighters to fight the blaze. Tommy Muska, the ruddy-faced mayor of this traditional Czech community, teared up and went offmessage about West’s efforts to rebuild as his 1990 Ford pickup edged toward the frayed, faded American and Lone Star flags. “Look at that. That’s pretty much how many of us feel — beat up but still flying.” said Muska, an insurance agent whose father was also the town’s mayor. He was thrust into the headline-snaring disaster, followed by months of delicate dealings with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, state agencies, lawyers, myriad reporters, aid agencies and 2,800 shaken residents. In fits and starts, and sometimes punctuated by raw emotion, the town of West is on the mend. Residential streets in the district closest to the blast at West Fertilizer are crowded with trucks delivering bricks, rock and roofing material. A few homes, like that of a town doctor, are still boarded up. But new construction has given the streets the appearance of a suburban subdivision busily being pieced together by teams of workers. The city has received $3.2 million in state funds

and will get $1.3 million in project reimbursements from FEMA. West expects to end up with new infrastructure, from sewers and streets to a rebuilt park. Muska is hoping to lasso $4.4 million more from the state. After a methodical if slow start, West’s nonprofit Long-Term Recovery Center has disbursed $1.6 million and will have exhausted its remaining $2 million by June or July. Then it will try to raise an additional $500,000 for more building materials, said its new executive director, Suzanne Hack. The Volunteer Fire Department, which lost five members in the explosion, has received new donated vehicles to replace the three fire trucks that were destroyed. The Catholic Church’s Austin Diocese, through the St. Vincent de Paul Society, distributed 219 “house in a box” units that included basic furniture and household items that a family might have lost in the blast. In all, it has spent $1.6 million on various relief efforts, from covering drug prescriptions to providing temporary housing, spokeswoman Christina Gonzalez said. An additional $553,812 remains to be used in West. Companies seeking new sites for factories still bypass West, but residents point to the large new truck stop and retail store, Slovacek’s, on the west side of I-35, owned by a Czech sausage maker from Snook. And, Muska crows, the city’s sales tax receipts were up 13 percent in February, the most recent tally available. Muska knew he hit a nerve when he publicly suggested that a fertil-

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izer mixing plant, needed to supply local farmers, might be rebuilt nearby. Waco area TV stations repeated the story over several news cycles after the mayor spoke at a town meeting in late March. If one is ever built, it will be made of concrete and steel — not using rickety, 50-year-old wooden bins — with the ammonium nitrate stored in thick-walled bunkers, the mayor later asserted. The chemical, stored in huge quantities just outside the city, was responsible for the destruction and loss of life. “It’s going to be a hard sell,” Muska told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “It’s hard for some people, harder for some. It’s hard for me. They were upset I ever brought it up. I was just putting my toe in the water.” An outsider in this tightly woven community has become the face of renewal in some of the hardesthit and poorest neighborhoods.

Eleanor Castro talks on the phone in her home in West, Texas, Tuesday. Castro’s home was damaged in the fertilizer plant explosion last year. (Max Faulkner/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT)

Since January, John Raimer has toiled as construction chief for the Long-Term Recovery Center, which has spearheaded home rebuilding and repair for people with no insurance or not enough. The nonprofit, a unit of the West Foundation, has become a lightning rod of frustration and criticism, which likely led to the res-

ignation in November of its first director. At 54, Raimer, a goateed Floridian, is something of an itinerant do-gooder, having given up his electrical engineering job with the municipal electric company in Gainesville. He had an epiphany of sorts during disaster duty several years ago in Louisiana. He called his company to say

he had found his life’s calling and told them to get his retirement papers ready. Since then, he has done hands-on relief work after hurricanes elsewhere in Louisiana, in Alabama and New Jersey. In Alabama, Raimer learned that a group of motorcyclists would do it their way, no matter what he might have instructed.


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Police report Arrests made Ashley Michelle Dreisbach, Bronson, was arrested Friday for domestic battery in the 1500 block of 4800 Street. Samuel J. Van Patten IV, Iola, was arrested Monday for an outstanding warrant from Burlington Municipal Court.

The warrant cites violation of a protection from abuse order.

Vehicle crashes A vehicle driven by Margaret Barnett, Iola, struck a metal guard rail in front of the Gas post office Saturday. She was not injured.

Meetings Unity Club hears program Unity Club met Monday in the meeting room of the Community National Bank for the anniversary luncheon. Hostesses were Charlene Levans, Flo Haynes, Mandy Specht and Donna Houser. Twenty-four members were present. Barb Hafer was introduced as a new member. The program, given by Mary Osborne, was a review of the book “Killing Jesus,” by Bill O’Reilly. The book tells

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The Iola Register

the story of the struggle between good and evil.

Ambler presents at meeting The Iola Chapter of NARFE met April 7 at The New Greenery. The program, “Story Telling,” was given by Helen Ambler. She told of the importance of good story telling, especially with family members. Ten members were present. The next meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. on May 5 at The New Greenery.

A golden calf

Benefit raises nearly $20,000 for Genoble

By BOB JOHNSON The Iola Register

A calf sold at the Southeast Kansas Stockyard auction is very special to Kayla Genoble and her family. Kayla, 8, is suffering from osteosarcoma, a fast-growing bone cancer, which has put her parents, Angela Dryden and Michael Genoble, is financial straits. To help out, SEK Stockyard donated and sold a calf in a benefit Friday for the little girl. “We thought we might raise $4,000 or $5,000,” said John Adams, who with Josh Hermann and Scott Welch, owns the auction barn. “I’d hoped it might go as high as $10,000.” The result was $19,701.80. By the time the calf was ushered from the sale ring, sold for real at $1,276.80 and included in contributions, 38 buyers had participated in the benefit. Twelve of them contributed $1,000

each, and seven others donated between $500 and $800. “I looked around the crowd while the (benefit) sale was going on, and about half the crowd was in tears,” Adams said. “It was very emotional, quite moving,” said Hermann. Employees also were touched. Two of them donated their paychecks for the day. “The beef market is very competitive today,” Adams said, “but this shows that we all get along together. I started that calf at $100 each time and for quite a while one of the buyers bid $500 right afterward,” he said. “At the end of the day it really came together. It was a very humbling experience.” Other money is likely to come in. Adams said the event was posted on the stockyard’s Facebook page and “we’ve had people from western Kansas, from all over the state,

Scott Welch, left, John Adams and Josh Hermann, owners of Southeast Kansas Stockyards, raised nearly $20,000 last Friday to help Kayla Genoble, who is suffering from bone cancer. COURTESY PHOTO contact us and ask how they can help,” Adams said. Kayla’s parents attended the event, but she had to stay away because of fear that dust from the arena would be a complication. The

little girl did come out later and got hugs from the three auction owners. “I can’t tell you how proud I am of our industry and our friends for the help they gave Kayla,” Adams concluded.

Crest hires superintendent COLONY — Chuck Mahon, superintendent at Lakin High School, has been hired as the next superintendent of schools at Crest USD 479. Mahon also will serve as principal and

Business faces charges

Lincoln authors Lincoln students wrote stories for the Young Authors competition. Front row from left, Annalysia Prock, Scout Mathew, Alana Mader, Mariah Jelinek, MaKenna Eisenbrandt, Tavia Skahan, Paige Nickelson, Brooklyn Ellis, Keira Nickelson. Second row, Camri Moreno-Bockover, Kennedy Maier, Briggs Michael, Eli Adams, Macie Hoag, Khloeigh Schafer, Shianne Carter, Kaster Trabuc, Alex Smail. Third row, Hannah Kilby, Scarlett Higgason, Ally Ellis, Madison Adair, Anna Taylor, Tristan Mittelmeier, Eden Winkler, Tia Barton Fourth row: Kaylin Klubek, Olivia Kerr, Madison Swink, Ilennia Aguirre, Nate Haston, Kamri Hall, Kaya Adair, Justice Wilson, Hannah Dorsey. COURTESY PHOTO

Today

66

Friday

Tomorrow

49

43

Temperature High yesterday 57 Low last night 35 High a year ago 50 Low a year ago 43 Sunrise 6:45 a.m.

71

36

RECYCLE FOR THE FUTURE!

49

Precipitation 24 hours ending 7 a.m. 0 This month to date 4.52 Total year to date 5.484 Def. since Jan. 1 1.30 Sunset 7:58 p.m.

The Iola Register

Published Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings except New Year’s day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas, by The Iola Register Inc., 302 S. Washington, P.O. Box 767, Iola, Kansas 66749. (620) 365-2111. Periodicals postage paid at Iola, Kansas. Member Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for publication all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. Subscription rates by carrier in Iola: One year, $107.32; six months, $58.17; three months, $33.60; one month, $11.65. By motor: One year, $129; six months, $73.71; three months, $41.60; one month, $17.24. By mail in Kansas: One year, $131.16; six months, $74.80; three months, $43.89; one month, $17.89. By mail out of state: One year, $141.35; six months, $76.02; three months, $44.97; one month, $17.91. Internet: One year, $100; six months, $55; one month, $10 All prices include 8.04% sales taxes. Postal regulations require subscriptions to be paid in advance. USPS 268-460 Postmaster: Send address changes to The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749.

See us online at w w w .iolaregister.com C ontact the Iola R egister staffat new s@ iolaregister.com

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A Wichita man will soon learn his punishment for harboring a Chinese teenage girl who was working illegally at his restaurant. A notation Tuesday in U.S. District Court has moved up the sentencing for 33-year-old Yong “Tony” Lin to April 28. He has pleaded guilty to harboring an immigrant who was unlawfully in the United States. His 29-year-old wife, Zhuo Mei “Mandy” Weng, has pleaded guilty to hiding the crime. She will be sentenced on the same date before U.S. District Judge J. Thomas Marten.

The Marmaton Valley FFA Alumni thanks the following for helping make our annual worker auction a success. The FFA Alumni will use these funds to help with various FFA activities including scholarships and leadership conferences. Kevin and Annie Davis

Daryl and Sandy Drake

Alan and Lori Ensminger

Jeff and Laura Johnson

Ken Kale

Dale and Joan LaRue

Kyle McAloon

Gene and Karen Meiwes

Brandy Myers

Joe Pilcher

Russ and Stephanie Plaschka

PSI - Loren Korte

E.J. and Barb Siefker

Scott and Sara Stinnett

Randy and Joyce Storrer

Pat and Deb Tynon

Scott and Amy Welch

Ag Choice

Sherry Elmenhorst

Denny Lasley

A special thank you to Leon Thompson for being our auctioneer for the evening, Judy Bowman for the donation of the homemade quilts and the dependable people who donated the soup, chili and desserts.

THANK YOU!

head football coach at Crest High. He replaces Jerry Turner as superintendent and principal at Crest. Turner announced his resignation to become superintendent at West

Franklin USD 287 in Pomona. Brent Smith, Mahon’s predecessor at the Lancers’ helm, was relieved of his coaching duties earlier this year. He remains Crest’s transportation director.

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Veterinarian PROFESSIONAL, CARING STAFF Have you given much thought to your nose lately? If you are an allergy sufferer, you may think your nose’s only function is to be stuffed up or drain endlessly. What about your dog’s nose? We know that you pay attention to it because many of you tell us that your dog may be sick because his/her nose is dry. While there may be a bit of truth to that, there was nothing in my books in veterinary school regarding the nose as an indicator of fever or disease. Allergies and dryness aside, your dog’s nose is a truly remarkable thing! Most people know that a dog’s sense of smell is much better than ours. That makes them exceptional hunters, trackers, military dogs, etc. Dogs use their sense of smell like we use our eyes - it’s their most useful sense in terms of gathering information about their surroundings. Researchers have recently used this comparison as a way of indicating just how good a dog’s sense of smell really is. Their findings state that, “What humans can smell at a third of a mile, a dog could smell more than 3,000 miles away and still see as well.” Wow! That’s a pretty potent sniffer! That level of accuracy can be linked to our brain and the number of receptors found in our noses. Those receptors send information to a specific part of the brain for “interpretation”. People have just 5 million receptors in their noses compared to man’s best friend who has more than 220 million receptors! All of those extra receptors make it possible for them to smell things at levels that are undetectable to us. Other features, such as floppy ears and skin folds (think of a bloodhound) help dogs “trap” scents, making them excellent hunters. Because of their incredible ability to be trained to smell and identify very specific scents, dogs are seeing increasing use in the medical field as well. For example, dogs have been trained to be able to detect glucose levels in people with diabetes and warn them before a potentially dangerous situation occurs. Dogs have also been able to identify people with cancer before some hightech machines can find the disease - but that does NOT mean you should seek your dog’s nose before visiting your doctor for any reason! On a final note, we do a lot of research on a dog’s ability to pick up on very subtle scents, but what about cats? It seems as though little research has been done in that field yet...but if it were done, I would anticipate their findings to read something like this, “We have found that a cat uses it’s nose mostly for turning in an upward direction as a result of displeasure toward their owner for one or more of the following reasons: owner fed at wrong time, owner fed wrong food, owner fed in wrong color of bowl, owner allowed another animal into home, owner wants to interact at inconvenient times, etc...” Well, you get the picture! Consult the veterinarians at

RED BARN VETERINARY SERVICE for more information regarding Allergy Season.


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Colony

State poet launches project Welcome to National Poetry Month. We’re excited to debut the Poet Laureate project and to invite you to be a part of it, both as reader and as writer. HomeWords will be a weekly column, syndicated in newspapers around our great state. Our column explores the concept of “home” — a longheld Kansas value — from micro to macro: from the mobile home of the body, to the room or house we live in, to the land that anchors us, to the sky that envelops it all. To explore these big themes, we’ll use a very little poem. The American Cinquain is just five lines long, each line having — in order — 2, 4, 6, 8, and 2 syllables. It’s a simple, dynamic form

Wyatt Townley Kansas Poet Laureate that both beginners and longtime poets can write successfully. The first imaginative cinquain below comes to us from Jo McDougall of Leawood. I like how she approaches the body as geography, then finishes with a little geometry. I’ve changed into a map of Kansas, life’s contours following roads and fields the wind has squared.

Jo McDougall, a native of DeWitt, Ark., has lived in Kansas — with some interruptions — for over 20 years, and published a memoir and five Jo McDougal books of poetry. Poets and poets-to-be of all ages from Kansas are invited to submit to HomeWords. For guidelines, visit www.kansashumanities.org. The Kansas Humanities Council is a nonprofit organization that supports community-based cultural programs and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.

Food, housing up for March By RICARDO LOPEZ Los Angeles Times

March, a measurement that shows average price changes in goods and services purchased by Americans. In the past 12 months, overall core inflation — excluding the volatile food and energy indexes — rose 1.7 percent. Recent drought and other extreme weather patterns have driven up the price of beef to all-time highs and that was reflected in the government’s food index, which rose 0.4 percent in March, following an identical increase the month before. The index showed much steeper increases in certain food categories. The index for poultry, meats and eggs, for instance, showed a second consecutive increase of 1.2 percent last month. The energy index, which includes gas pric-

Food and housing costs rose sharply in March, but overall inflation remained low, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday. The federal government’s consumer price index rose 0.2 percent in

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Calendar

T h u r s d ay - C o u n t y bus to Iola; MondaySeekers Not Slackers 4-H Club, Lone Elm Community Building, 7 p.m.; Jolly Dozen Club, City Hall community room, 7 p.m.; TuesdayAllen/Anderson Deer Creek Watershed, City Hall community room, 8 p.m.

School calendar

Thursday-Forensics Night at Crest, 6 p.m.; Wednesday-FFA to Paola.

Meal site

Friday-fish, macaroni and tomato, peas, bread, sunshine fruit; Monday-Salisbury steak, mashed potato, gravy, lima beans, bread, pears; Wednesday-live music, Vision cards accepted-baked chicken, tossed salad, Caribbean blend veggies, roll, crank-orange fluff. Phone 620-852-3450 for reservations.

Churches

es, declined in March, falling 0.1 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said. The rental index showed an uptick of 0.3 percent in March, signaling higher rent prices. In the past 12 months, the shelter index has increased 2.7 percent.

Mrs. Morris Luedke

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wide brush cleanup is Monday. If you need help in getting limbs from your street to the dump, phone 620-8523530 and they will try to assist you. Arts and Crafts Fair

some leaders to walk children from station to station. This year’s theme is “Workshop of Wonders, Imagine and Build with God.” The date is June 16-20, begins at 8:30 a.m. and dismisses at 11:30 daily.

WWCWC

Working Wonders CWC was called to order by President Danelle McGhee April 9 with eight present. Genna Gallaher served refreshments. Roll call was answered with a “Spring Cleaning Task”. Bev Wittmer presented devotions and read the story, “Father, I Wanted a Car Not a Bible.” Julia Martin is the speaker and will sing at the May 5 Spring Banquet. Graduates this year are Jacob Riebel and Kadyn Utley. The summer picnic was set for Father’s Day, June 15 at 5 p.m. at the city park. A wedding shower for Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee is May 17 at 7 p.m.

Pastor Mark McCoy presented the sermon “The Storychapter 26-The Hour of Darkness,”at Sunday’s service at the Christian Church. Spring Banquet May 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall community room. All women are invited. Bring a salad and a guest; wedding shower for Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee. Scripture presented at the United Methodist Church Palm Sunday was Psalm 118:1,2,19-29 and Matthew 21:1-11. Pastor Dorothy Welch presented the sermon “Cheers, Jeers, and Tears.”

Easter Egg Hunt

The next VBS meeting is at 2 p.m. April 27 . at the Methodist Church. Needed are a pre-school teacher and

Brush cleanup

Vacation Bible School

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The annual Easter Egg Hunt begins at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at the Colony ball park for children up through 5th grade. FCCLA is hosting. Sponsors are Garnett State Savings Bank, Colony Branch and Colony Lions Club. In the event of bad weather, the event will be held at the Crest school auditorium. Last day of the city-

The 11th annual Arts and Crafts fair will be from 8:30 a.m.to 3 p.m. April 27 at the Lone Elm community building. An assortment of items are for sale – embroidery, quilts, aprons, tea towels, wood ornaments, yard accessories, fruit and vegetable plants, purses, children’s clothing and more. Proceeds go to the upkeep of the community building. Homemade pies will be sold. Seekers Not Slackers 4-H Club will serve breakfast and lunch. Phone Mrs. Tim Moody 620-439-5528 if you have questions. Crest High

Three Crest students will compete in the state music competition April 26 at Stuckey Middle School in Wichita. At the regional music competition held at Allen Community College, Brandon Braillier, Ivan Godderz and Laurel Godderz each received the best rating of “I” earning them the right to compete in the state competion. Around town

Doris Moore observed her 96th birthday April 9. She moved that day to Guest Home Estates VII, 806 W. 4th St., Room 106, Garnett, KS 66032. Doris and her husband, Earl, who passed away in 1997, moved to Colony in 1966. He taught at Crest and she gave piano lessons from her home until they retired.

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Kansas to mandate autism health coverage

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is preparing to sign legislation that will require health insurance plans to provide coverage for some services for children with autism, starting next year. Brownback scheduled

a Wednesday morning signing ceremony at the satellite University of Kansas campus in Overland Park. Local legislators and parents have been vocal supporters of efforts to ensure that health plans cover the diagnosis and treatment of autism in young children. The bill would require group health plans for companies with 51 or

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2 Oklahomans die in Kansas Turnpike accident

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Two women from Oklahoma died when their car collided with a pickup truck driven by a man going the wrong way on the Kansas Turnpike. The Kansas Highway Patrol says the accident occurred Tuesday night

on Interstate 35 in Wichita. The patrol says the driver, 65-year-old Donald Fifer of Haysville, was driving south in the northbound lanes when his truck hit a vehicle head-on, struck a guardrail and overturned before starting on fire. He was hospitalized in Wichita. The driver of the second vehicle, 38-yearold Lori Uchiyama, of Blackwell, Okla., and her passenger, 33-yearold Elizabeth Goodno, of Ponca City, Okla., were killed. Investigators are trying to determine why Fifer was driving the wrong way. The accident closed the turnpike for several hours.

— NOTICE —

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays for Iola carriers. D E A D L IN E F O R O U T -O F -T O W N C A R R IE R S IS 6:30 P .M . W E E K D A Y S A N D 9:30 S A T U R D A Y . Ifyou have not received your paper by deadline, please callyour carrier first. Ifunable to reach your carrier, callthe R egister office at 365-2111. R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

Mountain Oyster Feed Fundraiser Saturday, April 19 • 6-8 p.m . All proceeds will be used towards July 4 Community Fireworks Display Additional meats available: chicken fried steak or chicken fried chicken

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Iola Elks Lodge • 202 S. Jeffereson Special thanks to Moon’s Market!


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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A6

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Signs: Group promotes Iola history Continued from A1

her wizardry with a computer photo program to fix some of the damaged photos. Godfrey pulled up a photo of police officers on her computer that had faded and had been taped back together. Godfrey said Ford was able to make that photo, and many others,

look brand new. When it was time to decide what information should be put on the sign Godfrey thought less was more. “People want more of the quirky facts,” she said. “Things that are more of an interest.” Godfrey said the information isn’t all from the early 1800s. In-

cluded are places that people today would remember. Once the photos and text were selected the group had the information transformed into a vinyl format that was then affixed to aluminum templates. “We had Elizabeth from the Shirt Shop help us place the vinyl reproduction on the

signs,” Houser said. The project became a community effort. The city electric crew helped make the hangers for the signs and other members of the city helped hang the signs. “I’ve heard a lot of good comments on the signs,” Godfrey said. There are 16 signs around the square.

Shooter: Local ties to tragedy Continued from A1

Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, 73, went on a deadly shooting spree. Cross is known for being related to racist organizations like the Ku Klux Klan. Two people were shot at the Center and another was at the Village Shalom Retirement Center. “When I realized what had happened I was like wow,” Ashford said. “The scary

thing is we went in through the front and the shooting was in the back.” Ashford has no doubt that this was a targeted hate crime and finds it disturbing. He said while waiting in the room, there was a World War II display that he read about Hitler and the Holocaust. To find out later that a hate crime was committed shocked him. “It’s a real small

I wish I could have helped those people but it wasn’t in the cards. — Jeff Ashford

world,” he said. “I wish I could have helped those people but it wasn’t in the cards.”

Now that he has had time to process, Ashford has begun asking himself what he would have done to protect his family. “I believe in the right to carry (a gun) but I don’t carry,” he said. “If I was carrying maybe I could have stopped him. Maybe I could have done something. It doesn’t matter what side of the debate you’re on, but how will you protect yourself.”

Davis: Budget hot topic in state Continued from A1

back’s “roadmap” for Kansas projected job creation for 33,000. By refusing to expand the Medicaid guidelines, Kansas is denying an estimated 155,000 residents health insurance, Davis said. This not only hurts Kansas citizens, but also health care professionals. Davis is a proponent of Kansas joining the 26 other states, including those with Republican leadership, that have expanded their Medicaid guidelines to provide health insurance to U.S. citizens making up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level. Kansas would receive $700 million a year to participate in the program for the next two years. After then, the state assumes up to 10 percent of the operating costs. “We’re paying for the expansion through our federal taxes, but not reaping any of the rewards of the program,” he said. “That money is going to some other state. We should be able to utilize our contribution here in Kansas. It’s also a heck of an economic development tool.” As an industry, health care is typically a high-

paying and fast-growing field. For hospitals, especially, the lack of participation in the expansion of Medicaid hits hard at their budgets. Before the Affordable Care Act was enacted, hospitals were reimbursed through Medicare to see patients who did not have health insurance. Part of the ACA legislation was that hospitals would agree to forego Medicare reimbursements to treat the indigent if they received health insurance through their state’s Medicaid program. When states like Kansas failed to open the umbrella to cover all, hospitals were left without reimbursements on both fronts. “I’m afraid what this will mean to small, rural hospitals” that heavily rely on reimbursements from state and federal programs, Davis said. “Already some have closed.” TEACHERS are feeling underappreciated, Davis said in regards to recent legislation that eliminates protections afforded through tenure. “That was a punch in the gut,” he said. Both of Davis’ parents are educators. His mother taught second grade

in Lawrence; his father taught city management at the University of Kansas. “I’m convinced the previous system worked well. Bad teachers could be let go. You didn’t see any principals or administrators lobbying for this change. “If a teacher is fired, he deserves to know why,” Davis said of a teacher’s right to due process. Davis also was critical of the legislature’s treatment of the judicial branch. “The legislature is trying to bully the judicial branch. It’s pretty awful. This is a co-equal branch of government,” he said. Recent legislation includes withholding funding to courts, usurping power from the chief justice and enacting higher fees to citizens. REPUBLICANS pledging support to Davis has been a pleasant surprise, he said. As for the campaign, Davis said he hopes it stays “on track” and doesn’t becomes a “referendum on ‘Obamacare.’” He takes aim at current TV ads being run by Brownback that portray him as a strong advocate for public schools. “His record has not re-

flected that at all,” Davis said. As for Brownback’s push for all-day kindergarten statewide, Davis replied, “If schools were adequately funded, they wouldn’t have to ask for special funds to run a necessary program like kindergarten.” Davis said a “pretty straight” line can be drawn between what makes a moderate and a conservative Republican. “It’s how they view the purpose of government. The far right wants to use government as a tool to promote a social agenda. Moderates don’t,” he said. Such issues include supporting tax breaks and vouchers for private schools and telling public school districts what subjects they can teach, such as sex education, Davis said, as brought forth by Sen. Mary Pilcher Cook of Wichita. Davis, who serves as House minority leader, laughed when asked if he considered himself an ambitious person. “I don’t think you can be too ambitious and be a Democrat in Kansas,” he said. In the House of Representatives 33 of 125 seats are held by Democrats. In the Senate, eight of 40.

Prepping for breakfast Phyllis Lueker dishes up fruit for this morning’s Lenten breakfast at First Christian Church. This was the last of the local church events for the Easter season. REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Professors endorse social media policy LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — More than 80 distinguished professors have endorsed a new proposed social media policy for Kansas universities. The Lawrence Journal-World reported the professors, from several universities, sent a letter to the Kansas Board of Regents saying the proposed policy “exemplifies the role of scholarship for public intellectuals in a democracy.” The new policy was proposed by a work group formed by the

regents. It proposed a strictly advisory social media policy for university faculty and staff. That would replace a policy that allows university administrators to discipline or fire employees who they believe have improperly used social media. Opponents said the policy was too broad and restrained free speech. The regents passed the current policy in December after a University of Kansas professor posted an anti-NRA tweet on Twitter.

Band: IMS grows

Continued from A1

kets to spread on the lawn. IN OTHER news, commissioners: — Were told work on four miles of Delaware Road reconstruction, starting at the old Zillah School and running east, would start next week. Completion is expected in about a month. — Asked Bill King, director of Public Works, to look into erection of lights at the corner of Oregon Road and U.S. 169, directly east of Allen County Regional Hospital. Commissioner

Tom Williams said he thought lights would make the intersection safer for motorists and ambulances going to and coming from the hospital. — Gave all employees 90 days to use compensatory time. Before, rules varied between departments. — Approved including smoking cessation prescriptions on drug cards for employees. County Clerk Sherrie Riebel estimated 25 employees were smokers. As part of the county’s new wellness program smokers will be encouraged to kick the habit.

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Opinion A7 The Iola Register

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

~ Journalism that makes a difference

Trying to make sense of terrorism Tuesday’s marking of the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings was a sober event. Probably the most poignant of participants was little Jane Richard, 8, whose prosthetic leg appeared through the bottom of her navy blue dress. Her other leg was lost to the bombings. Beside her were her parents, Denise and Bill, also seriously injured. Denise sustained a head injury and lost the vision of one eye. Bill suffered shrapnel wounds, burns and severe hearing loss. Miraculously, a brother, Henry, 12, was not injured by the blasts. But brother Martin, then 8, was killed. Like many Bostonians, the Richard family made the marathon a family outing, reveling in the pageantry of Patriot’s Day. In all, three were killed by the blasts, 16 lost limbs, 264 suffered lesser injuries, and thousands still bear emotional scars from the senseless violence carried out by two brothers in the throes of Islamic extremism. A fourth fatality was a police officer caught in the crossfire in the pursuit of the two brothers. SUNDAY afternoon, Kan-

sas City was the scene of similar violence. A grandfather and grandson were shot and killed while in their car in the parking lot of a Jewish community center. The boy was to audition for a musical. The assailant then went to a nearby retirement home and shot and killed a woman who was there to visit her mother. “Heil Hitler!” the alleged assailant shouted from the police car upon his arrest. Grandfather and grandson were Methodists. The woman Catholic. EVERY DAY we read of bombings around the world, mostly confined to the Middle East and Africa. Most are done in the name of some political or religious ideology. They happen with such frequency they barely make most news outlets these days. At this coming Monday’s Boston Marathon, 9,000 additional runners are expected along with 1 million spectators. Twice the usual number. “Boston Strong” is plastered on billboards and banners. Unlike other parts of the world, terror does not rule our lives. For that, we are thankful. — Susan Lynn

A�look�back�in�time � 30 Years Ago Week of April 13, 1984

Bob Kleier, who grew up in Gas City, has purchased the Farm Fresh Grocery store in Iola. He said he intends to keep the operation pretty much as is. Charlie Morin will continue to be the store manager. ***** Back 35 years ago when Elmer Belknap was operating a dairy at the north end of

Jefferson Street, son Jimmy helped out with the chores. Today James Belknap is president of Steffen Dairy Foods Co. in Wichita. ***** Dennis Krouse, former manager of the Moran Co-op who pleaded guilty to misappropriating co-op funds, was placed on five-year probation yesterday by District Judge John White.

‘There’s no place like Kansas’

New tourism slogan rather catchy Kansas doesn’t get great mileage out of its tourism slogans. Maybe we’re just too great to articulate in mere words. We always remember that Texas is “like a whole other country.” As for Kansas, are we the “Land of Ahs”? “As big as you think”? Or maybe something else to do with “The Wizard of Oz”? The latest state tourism slogan is in part a reference to the movie many Kansas would just as soon distance themselves from. Unveiled this week, the new message is “There’s no place like Kansas.” Other than the Oz connotation, it’s not a bad theme. Kansas can do some things with the notion that we have some uniqueness to our state that makes it a special place to visit, if not live. No mountains or ocean but some stunning landscapes nonetheless. Quirky sights such as the “Garden of Eden” in Lucas. Good food and warm hospitality. Leisure places. The video and television spots create a sense of re-

Maybe “no place like Kansas” works better as a resident retention campaign, which, given the population trends, maybe should be the focus anyway.

laxation and wonder about our fair state. And the theme song, “Sunflowers,” an original recording by Clearwater native Logan Mize, is catchy. Hutchinson is among seven communities with its own TV spot. Dodge City is another. MARKETING campaigns aren’t done well by committee, but no doubt Kansans will have their opinions on “no place like Kansas.” For many, it is likely to make them think of Oz, and “no place like home” doesn’t work too well as a tourism slogan since you’re trying to get people to leave home to come visit Kansas. We wouldn’t be surprised if some people extended “There’s no place like Kansas” to describe some of the wackos and their shenanigans

in the Statehouse these days. Maybe “no place like Kansas” works better as a resident retention campaign, which, given the population trends, maybe should be the focus anyway. It also can play well for in-state tourism, encouraging the “staycation.” But whether for tourism or retention, the effort can’t stop with the creative. The state needs to budget money to spend on marketing. In the past, Kansas has ranked near the bottom of states in spending on marketing and promotion. One of these days we might land on a slogan that sticks. In the meantime, what we do with the message probably is more important than finding the universally winning message. ­— The Hutchinson News

Koch brothers benefit from Affordable Care Act The Koch brothers did their best to link select Kansas lawmakers to controversial Obamacare as a way to torpedo their campaigns. Several state lawmakers — namely traditional, more moderate Republicans who wouldn’t serve as puppets for a far-right agenda coveted by Gov. Sam Brownback and other Koch allies — were targeted in the August 2012 GOP primary, The Koch-funded Americans for Prosperity and Kansas Chamber unleashed last-minute, misleading ads

designed to take down lawmakers who dared to challenge their radical pursuits. Unfortunately, many voters fell for the outlandish claims that lawmakers who were targeted somehow supported the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. It was bunk, of course, as those singled out had nothing to do with the federal law upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. As if that wasn’t enough, the Koch-AFP-Kansas Chamber camp recently dredged up Obamacare again in calling

for repeal of Kansas’ Renewable Portfolio Standard. While it clearly was another absurd claim, they argued the RPS was just another costly mandate. Yet the chief critic — giant oil-and-gas conglomerate Koch Industries — has long reaped the benefit of taxpayer subsidies involving energy production, among other government-related deals. And now it appears Obamacare wasn’t such a problem after all for Koch Industries, as the company benefited from the same health-care

reform the Kochs say they detest. Koch Industries reportedly was among big corporations that reaped millions of dollars from the Affordable Care Act, even as the Kochs continued to support GOP candidates who have vowed to work on repeal of the law. Federal records show Koch Industries benefited from a temporary provision of the health-care law in an Early Retiree Reinsurance Program, which helped the company pay health insurance costs for retirees not covered

by Medicare. The records show Koch Industries applied for and received $1.4 million in early retiree subsidies. So, an Affordable Care Act in place to help the uninsured, seniors and young adults with coverage also has something in it for large businesses. The Kochs, like others, took advantage. Kansans should keep such hypocrisy in mind when the next Koch-financed onslaught of political advertising materializes. ­— The Garden City Telegram

How to contact your elected officials

President Barack Obama, (Democrat) 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. Washington D.C., 20500; phone (switchboard): (202) 456-1414; (comments): (202) 456-1111

Gov. Sam Brownback, (Republican) Capital, 300 S.W. 10th Ave., Suite 212S, Topeka, KS 66612-1590; phone: (785) 296-3232; www.governor.ks.gov/ comments/comment.htm

U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, (Republican) 109 Hart Senate Office Building Washington D.C., 20510; phone: (202) 224-4774; Email: www.roberts. senate.gov/public/index. cfm?p=EmailPat

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, (Republican) Russell Senate Office Building, Room 354, Washington D.C., 20510; phone: (202) 224-6521; Pittsburg: 306 N. Broadway, Suite 125, Pittsburg, KS, 66762; (620) 232-2286. Email: moran. senate.gov/public/index. cfm/e-mail-jerry

Rep. Lynn Jenkins, (Republican) 130 Cannon House Office Building, Washington D.C., 20515; phone: (202) 225-6601; Pittsburg: 701 N. Broadway, Pittsburg, KS 66762; phone: (620) 231-5966. Email: lynnjenkins.house. gov/contact-me/

Sen. Caryn Tyson, (Republican) State Capitol-236 E Topeka, KS 66612 phone: (785) 296-6838; e-mail: caryn.tyson@senate.ks.gov or 19984 County Rd. 1077 Parker, KS 66072 phone: (913) 898-2366

Rep. Kent Thompson, (Republican) House District No. 9, phone: (785)-296-7673 State Capitol, Room 268W, 300 SW Tenth Ave. Topeka, KS 66612, or phone: 620-496-2255 1816 2800 St., LaHarpe, KS 66751. email: kent.thompson@ house.ks.gov


A8

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

292 missing, 4 dead in South Korean ferry disaster SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A ferry carrying 459 people, mostly high school students on an overnight trip to a tourist island, sank off South Korea’s southern coast today, leaving nearly 300 people missing despite a frantic, hours-long rescue by dozens of ships and helicopters. At least four people were confirmed dead and 55 injured. The high number of people unaccounted for — likely trapped in the ship or floating in the ocean — raised fears that the death toll could rise drastically, making it one of South Korea’s biggest ferry disasters since 1993, when 292 people died. One student, Lim Hyung-min, told broadcaster YTN after being rescued that he and other students jumped into the

ocean wearing life jackets and then swam to a nearby rescue boat. “As the ferry was shaking and tilting, we all tripped and bumped into each another,” Lim said, adding that some people were bleeding. Once he jumped, the ocean “was so cold. ... I was hurrying, thinking that I wanted to live.” Local television stations broadcast live pictures of the ship, Sewol, listing to its side and slowly sinking as passengers jumped out or were winched up by helicopters. At least 87 vessels and 18 aircraft swarmed around the stricken ship. Rescuers clambered over its sides, pulling out passengers wearing orange life jackets. But the ship overturned completely and continued to sink slowly. Within a few

hours only its blue-andwhite bow stuck out of the water. Very soon, that too disappeared. Some 160 coast guard and navy divers searched for survivors inside the ship’s wreckage a few miles from Byeongpung Island, which is not far from the mainland. The

area is about 290 miles from Seoul. Those rescued — wet, stunned and many without shoes — were brought to nearby Jindo Island, where medical teams wrapped them in pink blankets and checked them for injuries before settling them down on

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The Iola Register

INSIDE

Iola track team competes — B5

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Standouts lead the way at IMS Invitational More than 900 youngsters from 20 schools filled Iola’s Riverside Park from stem to stern to compete in the Iola Middle School Invitational Track meet. There were several local standouts, including Iola’s Tayton Driskel, a three-time gold medalist in the 100- and 200-meter dashes and the long jump. Meanwhile, Iola’s Olivia Taylor brought home the gold medal in the eighth-grade girls 1600-meter run, and Evan Sigg had the top honors in the eighth-grade boys discus. Marmaton Valley’s Makayla Brooks took first in the eighth-grade girls 200-meter dash. Due to a computer malfunction, results from several girls races, including the 100- and 400-meter dashes, the seventhgrade girls 1600, the 100-meter hurdles and long jump, shot put and discus were unavailable by press time. Results for Iola, Humboldt and Marmaton Valley follow.

21

Iola Invitational Boys Seventh Grade 1. Royster, 113; 3. Iola, 65; 8. Humboldt,

100 meters — 1. Tayton Driskel, I, 12.33 200 meters — 1. Driskel, I, 25.86 1600 meters — 3. Cole Regehr, I, 5:38.74; 6. Breton Plumlee, I, 5:45.70 100m hurdles — 7. Tim Komma, I, 19.16 4x200 relay — 6. Iola (David Petty, Trevor Stover, Komma, Dylan Newland), 2:09.08 4x400 relay — 2. Iola (Komma, Petty, Newland, Driskel), 4:41.02; 6. Humboldt (Ryan Sellman, Tucker Hurst, Teryn John-

At left, Iola Middle School’s Dylan Newland, left, receives the baton from Trevor Stover in a relay race Tuesday at the IMS Invitational. Above, Iola’s Olivia Taylor wins the girls 1600-meter run. The meet featured more than 900 athletes from 20 schools.

See TRACK | Page B3

REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Iola golfers find right strokes PITTSBURG — Iola High’s Mustangs are right where head coach Doug Kerr wants them to be with their golf games. Fresh off taking second in their season-opener last week in Independence, the Mustangs did one better, taking

home first place at the Pittsburg Invitational. Meanwhile, Iola’s Kaden Macha made it 2-for-2, winning his second individual title of the season with an even par 72. He was three strokes better than his nearest competitor, Independence’s Cal-

vin Hugo (75). Kerr said Macha’s opening hole set the tone. After Macha duffed his approach shot, the ball was sitting on the edge of the green, 40 or so yards from the hole. See GOLF | Page B4

Iola High’s Derrick Weir pitches a complete game Tuesday in the first game of a doubleheader against Prairie View. Iola lost the game, 5-4, before rallying to win the nightcap, 2-1. REGISTER/KAYLA BANZET

Iola High’s Shelby Reno fields a ground ball Tuesday in the Fillies’ doubleheader against Prairie View. The Fillies had a tough go of it, falling 6-0 and 1-0 to fall to 3-3 in Pioneer League play. REGISTER/KAYLA BANZET

Fillies’ strong pitching not enough Offense was hard to come by for Iola High’s Fillies Tuesday. The Fillies never could find any offensive traction against visiting Prairie View, falling 6-0 and 1-0. The 1-0 defeat was particularly painful as Iola stranded runners in each of the first four innings, including leaving two on in both the first and second frames. Iola then left the bases full in the bottom of the fourth before Prairie View’s Amanda Moore settled down to retire the last 10 Filly

batters in order. Mackenzie Weseloh was the tough-luck loser, despite giving up only five hits and three walks in seven innings. She struck out seven. Moore was able to escape after Weseloh and Shelby Reno each reached on singles in the first inning. Jadyn Sigg reached on an error in the second, and Taylor Heslop singled before Moore wiggled out of trouble. Sigg then singled with one out in the fourth before Hes-

lop reached on an error and Ashlie Shields worked a twoout walk to load the bases. But Moore retired Weseloh on a fly ball to center to end the threat. “That play was huge,” Fillies head coach Vince Coons said. “Mackenzie really cranked it, and I just knew it was going to hit the gap, and we’d have three runs. But the ball just sort of died in the win, and their centerfielder See FILLIES | Page B4

Mustangs earn split Iola High’s Mustangs took it to the brink Tuesday, as both games of a doubleheader against visiting Prairie View came down to the last batters. In the opener, the Buffalos rallied for two runs in the top of the seventh inning, to turn a 4-3 deficit into a 5-4 victory before Iola returned the favor with Derrick Weir’s walk-off double in the bottom of the seventh inning of the nightcap for a 2-1 win. The split keeps Iola’s record even on the season at 4-4. The Mustangs are at 4-2 in Pioneer League action. “It was a couple of good

pitchers’ duels, but we still need to play better,” Iola head coach Mark Percy said. The opener was a bitter pill to swallow as the Mustangs held a 4-3 lead behind Weir’s pitching. Kaleb Konitzer’s leadoff homer in the seventh tied the score before Tommy Thayer reached on a Mustang error and came around to score on a wild pitch. The Mustangs didn’t go quietly, however. Thealvin Minor and Ethan Sigg both worked for walks to put runners on first

See MUSTANGS | Page B4


B2

Classifieds Wednesday. April 16, 2014

Wanted to Buy

BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS FOR OVER 30 YEARS, highest prices paid for collector coins, Jon Minor 620-365-8161.

Personals MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 877391-1010. WERE YOU IMPLEMENTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had a this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

Services Offered HAIL OF A SALE! CONTRACTOR SPECIAL, (2) 2 col. X 2” Display Ads + (1) 10-15 word Classified Line Ad for 1 month, FOR ONLY $100. Contact Sarah or Pam at The Iola Register 620-365-2111. SHAUGHNESSY BROS. CONSTRUCTION, LLC. Carpentry and painting service Siding and windows 620-365-6815, 620-3655323 or 620-228-1303 STORAGE & RV OF IOLA WEST HIGHWAY 54, 620-365-2200. Regular/Boat/RV storage, LP gas, fenced, supervised, www. iolarvparkandstorage.com IOLA MINI-STORAGE 323 N. Jefferson Call 620-365-3178 or 365-6163 ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control. FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-888-720-5583. SUPERIOR BUILDERS. New Buildings, Remodeling, Concrete, Painting and All Your Carpenter Needs, including replacement windows and vinyl siding. 620-365-6684 H & J CONSTRUCTION No job too small! Roofing, remodeling, repairs, new construction, garages, pole barns & more! Chuck Swart 620-717-1880 HALEY & SONS QUALITY RESTORATION Roofing and Home Repairs of all types Insured & References 620-223-2399 home, 417-321-0905 cell. GARDEN TILLING, haul dirt & gravel and haul your trash away, 620-228-9466. BORDER TO BORDER ROOFING LLC Residential & Commercial Roofing - Guttering KS State Licensed Free Estimates - Fully Insured Parsons, Pittsburg, Chanute 888-399-7766

CNAs. Windsor Place is hiring for our 2-10 shift and our 10-6 shift. Please apply in person at 600 E. Garfield. We are looking for people who care and want to make a difference. EOE. NURSE, OUTPATIENT COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER, full-time position in Humboldt working with psychiatric staff. Requires Kansas RN license, will consider LPN. Nurse assistant to medical staff in an outpatient community mental health center. Daytime position. Computer skills required. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resumes to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, call 620-365-8641, fax 620-365-8642, or email bstanley@sekmhc.org, EOE/AA.

NOW HIRING

CNA

Certified Nurse’s Aide

1 & 2 Shifts st

Fountain Villa 2620 N. Kentucky • Iola

Permanent part-time sales clerk with personality for children/ladies apparel store. Must be clean, dependable and honest with a willingness to work weekdays as well as Saturdays. Submit completed application or resume to Sophisticated Rose, 19S. Jefferson, Iola. No phone calls please.

620-365-9018

PSI, Inc.

Personal Service Insurance Loren Korte

12 licensed insurance agents to better serve you IOLA HUMBOLDT MORAN 365-6908 473-3831 237-4631

Real Estate Wanted WANTING TO BUY HOME ON CONTRACT, outside city limits within 20 mile radius of Iola, $1,500 down, $300/month, text information to 620-2282544.

CREST USD 479 is accepting applications for the position of HEAD CUSTODIAN. Position is open until filled. Contact Crest Board Office at 620-852-3540.

TASKS INCLUDE: Answering the phone, assist customers at the counter, input classifieds and send to pagination daily, post payments, balance out daily cash, credit cards and Paypal, contact expired subscribers about renewing and contact potential classified advertisers. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES: Working knowledge of data entry, Microsoft Word and Excel, a valid driver’s license and insurance. EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE: High school degree or equivalent and must have experience in hands-on customer service and in system data entry. WORK ENVIRONMENT: This position works primarily in the office but may be required to deliver papers or fill in as a substitute carrier.

Stop by to pick up an application today!

THE

IOLA

REGISTER A daily history of Allen County since 1867

Carriers Wanted T HE

I OLA R EGISTER

is currently looking for a Carrier for the following: Route 41 (Northwest Section of Humboldt)

Deliver the Iola Register to approx. 35 subscribers.

& Route 44

(Southwest Section of Humboldt)

Deliver the Iola Register to approx. 30 subscribers. Good first job with good pay & rewards.

Please contact Susan Locke at

(620) 365-2111

for more information.

Now Hiring

Lawn & Garden

COMPOSTED COW MANURE, $30 pickup load, Harry 620-365-9176.

ANDERSON COUNTY HOSPITAL, Saint Luke’s Health System has the following positions open: Medical Assistant, full-time day shift at Family Care Center. EMT, full-time day shift (Monday-Friday) in EMS. Patient Access Rep, full-time evening shift in Admitting. Clinical Lab Scientist or Medical Lab Technician, full-time day shift in Lab. Paramedic, part-time as needed in EMS. Registered Nurse, parttime as needed (PRN) in Med/ Surg. Registered Nurse, parttime as needed (PRN) in Family Care Center. Housekeeper, parttime as needed in Environment Services. Apply online at www. saintlukeshealthsystem .org/jobs, see online posting for more information on each open position. We hire only non-tobacco users. EOE.

Marketing Clerk

Life • Health • Home • Auto • Crop Commercial • Farm

LADYBUG GREENHOUSE, 731 S. KENTUCKY, IOLA, Open Monday-Saturday 8:306:30, Sunday 11-6:30, 620-3653997.

ADULT CASE MANAGER, IOLA OFFICE, FULL-TIME. Become a treatment team member supporting individuals in the community and assisting them in the rehabilitation process to meet their goals. Empathetic, well organized, self-reliant with good interpersonal skills. Basic computer skills. Prefer BA/BS, will consider A.A. with relevant work experience combined. KBI, Child Abuse Registry, Motor Vehicle Record and alcohol/drug screening required. Benefits. CHILDREN’S CASE MANAGER, FULL-TIME. Requires empathetic, patient individual with organizational and computer skills, good communication, team oriented, able to work independently. Bachelor’s degree preferred in Psychology, Sociology, Education. Will consider other degrees. May consider associate’s degree and relevant experience working with children. KBI, Child Abuse Registry, Motor Vehicle Record and alcohol/drug screening required. Benefits. Send resume to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, phone 620-365-8641, EOE/AA.

Part-time position at The lola Register, approximately 271⁄2 hours weekdays, beginning May 1. This position will work closely with all departments of The lola Register. Duties require daily contact with our advertisers, custom printing customers, subscribers and carriers, both on the phone and in person. Must be able to work well with the public. Good time management skills and computer skills are essential.

Eddie Abbott

Call for your personal in-home consultation.

nd

Apply in person. Ask for Jodie or Meredith.

GUNITE POOL CONSTRUCTION Renovation & Decking Interior/ Exterior Stone Tile Installation Over 20 years experience Webb’s Pool Construction 918-633-4385 • Custom Cabinetry • Flooring • Granite Countertops

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS ONLINE! JUST GO TO www.iolaregister.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Gates Corporation is a worldwide leader in the production of hydraulic hose. We are a growing company and are looking for only the finest employees for our manufacturing operation.

Full-Time & Part-Time Positions Available On Evenings & Night Shifts. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

Gates Corporation 1450 Montana Road Iola, Kansas

Equal Opportunity Employer

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES (620) 365-2111

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The Iola Register

Help Wanted

NOW HIRING

CMA

Certified Medication Aide

1st & 2nd Shifts

Apply in person. Ask for Jodie or Meredith.

Fountain Villa 2620 N. Kentucky • Iola

EXPERIENCED CDL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Local hauling, home every night, advancement opportunities available. Hours are 7-5p.m. Monday-Friday. Insurance and 401K are available. Excellent safety practices and attendance a must, 620-664-7449. ADMINISTRATIVE/LEGAL ASSISTANT. Seeking personable individual. Will be required to run office, dictation, prepare legal documents, and bookkeeping. Must have HS diploma, administrative experience, working knowledge on MS Word & Excel. Send resume: long@jratty.kscoxmail.com or fax 620-473-5034, EOE. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening in our Maintenance Department for “Tire Technician” (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high levels of mechanical aptitude, working knowledge of mechanical systems, on the job experience a plus. Able to work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd., Chanute KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer. MEDICAL OFFICE ASST/RECEPTIONIST. Full-time position in Iola. Requires personable individual who enjoys working with the public. Must be detail oriented, good interpersonal and organizational skills, team oriented, and computer literate. Previous medical and insurance billing experience preferred. Minimum high school diploma required, prefer associate degree. Send resume to: Robert Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749. Call for information 620-365-8641, EOE/AA.

“Partners In Excellence” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800528-7825 www.butlertransport. com Drivers - CDL-A. Train and work for us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7885 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com Exp. Flatbed Drivers: Regional opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great pay! 800-277-0212 or driveforprime. com EXPERIENCED DRIVER OR RECENT GRAD? With Swift, you can grow to be an awardwinning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The very best, choose Swift. • Great Miles = Great Pay • Late-Model Equipment Available • Regional Opportunities • Great Career Path • Paid Vacation • Excellent Benefits Please Call: (602) 714-9455 Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton Pickup trucks to deliver RV’s. $750 Sign-on Bonus, 4 Terminals and 8 Backhaul Locations. Call 866-764-1601 or www.foremosttransport.com. TSI Kansas, Inc. is seeking qualified OTR Drivers! Two years experience, clean MVR. Pay up to .45cpm, Medical Insurance. Apply at tsikansas.com and call 785-632-5183.

Poultry & Livestock REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE, 15 months to 2 years. Most bulls from A-I several heifer bulls. Breed leading EPDs, semen tested and tested for BVD, Gauthier 4-D Angus, 620-215-2079.

All ads are 10 word minimum, must run consecutive days. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. day before publication; GARAGE SALE SPECIAL: Paper & Web only, no shopper: 3 Days $1 per word

Real Estate for Rent 1224 N. COTTONWOOD, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, CH/CA, close to college, $500 monthly, $500 deposit, Monday-Friday 620-365-7663.

Real Estate for Rent QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE HOMES available for rent now, www.growiola.com IOLA, 305 S. 4TH, 3 BEDROOM, $500 monthly plus deposit, 620-365-9424. MORAN, 2 BEDROOM, $375 monthly plus deposit, 620-3659424. 218 S. CHESTNUT, 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath, $400 monthly plus $400 deposit, 620-363-2202. IOLA, 624 N. OHIO, 2-3 BEDROOM, very nice, CH/CA, appliances, attached double garage, fenced backyard, $795 monthly, 620-496-6161 or 620-496-2222.

Real Estate for Sale

Allen County Realty Inc. 620-365-3178 John Brocker. . . . . . 620-365-6892 Carolynn Krohn. . . 620-365-9379 Jack Franklin. . . . . . 620-365-5764 Brian Coltrane . . . . 620-496-5424 Dewey Stotler. . . . . 620-363-2491 Candace McRae,. . . 816-916-7051 www.allencountyrealty.com

Poultry & Livestock

Farm Machinery

Cut your STUDENT LOAN payments in HALF or more, even if late or in default. Get relief FAST, much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 1-855-344-0846.

CONTRACT SALESPERSONS sell aerial photography of farms, commission basis, $1,200-$2,500 weekly depending on sales experience, travel required. More info at msphotosd.com or call 877/882-3566

MORAN, 207 W. RANDOLPH, 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT AVAILABLE NOW! Cable, water, trash & lawn care included, $355 rent, $350 deposit, 620-2374331 or 620-939-4800.

For consignment please call Scotty (620) 363-4390 • Josh (620) 363 0086 John (620) 365-9885 Watch for list to be in The Iola Register!

PART-TIME DUMP TRUCK DRIVER NEEDED, flexible schedule, work 2-3 days/week, 2 years CDL driving experience required. Must have clean MVR and able to pass physical and drug screen. Call Dennis, RVB Trucking Inc., 620-365-6823, 620-496-7600.

Anthony, Kansas is seeking Water/Wastewater Operator. High School Diploma/GED and valid driver’s license required. Applications and complete job description: www.anthonykansas. org. 620-842-5434. EOE. Open until filled.

Apartment for Rent

Spring Consignment Auction Sunday, April 27th

GEHL 116.5 DISC MOWER, very good shape, 620-496-2452 or 620-496-8544.

CATALYST ARTIFICIAL LIFT CO., MACHINE OPERATORS NEEDED for 1st shift Monday-Friday 6a.m.-4:30p.m. and 2nd shift Monday-Thursday 2:30p.m.-1a.m. Knowledge in reading measuring instruments (calipers, tape measures, etc.) will be required. Experience with CNC machines a plus, but job training will be provided. Dependable, on time individuals need only apply. All training will take place during 1st shift before transition to 2nd shift. A SHIFT SUPERVISOR IS ALSO NEEDED for 2nd shift MondayThursday 2:30p.m.-1a.m. Knowledge in machine programming and set-up is required. Some leadership and supervisory experience will be necessary. Apply in person at: 2702 N. State St., Iola, KS 66749 or send resumes to: BSCHR@bellsupplystores.com

CREATIVE CLIPS BOARDING & GROOMING Clean, Affordable. Shots required. If you want the best, forget the rest! Call Jeanne 620-363-8272

P.O. Box 130 • Gas, KS 365-6968 • sekstockyard@yahoo.com

PART-TIME OFFICE POSITION IN IOLA, must have customer service skills and be honest/dependable. Send resume: 225 E. 21st, Pittsburg, KS 66762.

SONIC DRIVE-IN OF IOLA, KS, NEEDS GOOD DEPENDABLE PEOPLE! DAY/NIGHT COOKS and CAR HOPS. Good wages for good workers! Pass drug & background screenings. Apply in person ONLY. No phone calls please. EOE.

Pets and Supplies

Help Wanted

Financial

GUARANTEED INCOME FOR YOUR RETIREMENT. Avoid market risk & get guaranteed income in retirement! CALL for FREE copy of our SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus Annuity Quotes from A-Rated companies! 1-800741-8244.

Real Estate for Sale FOR SALE BY OWNER, SMALL HOME ON THE EDGE OF COLONY. Free gas, open living & kitchen area, full finished walk-out basement to large patio, basement newly carpeted, 15 lots, several fenced w/woven wire, city utilities/sewer, small shed. Must see to appreciate, 620852-3520. NEW, 3 BEDROOM, 6 years no property tax, 620-228-2231. COUNTRY HOME, 3-1/2 ACRES, 3 BEDROOM, 1-1/2 bath, large living room, mud/ utility room, lots of storage, hot water heat, CA, attached 2 car garage, detached garage w/storage room, 2 storage buildings, fireplace, $120,000, 620-365-5820.

Merchandise for Sale MEDICAL GUARDIAN - Toprated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month, 877-531-3048.

420 N. KENTUCKY, 3 BEDROOM, 1-1/2 bath, attached garage, privacy fence, 620-2284186.

PURCHASE PHOTOS TAKEN AT AREA SPORTS EVENTS, click the photos link at www.iolaregister.com

C allO ur H om e Loan Experts In Iola • (620)365-6000

40 GALLON WATER HEATERS, 6-year warranty, Natural Gas $299, LP $343, Electric $250, D&R Plumbing, 204 N. Washington, Iola, 620-365-2704. DISH TV RETAILER, starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installation! Call now 1-800-3497308.. SPRING CLEANING sale at Mid-America Piano now thru April 19. Pre-owned pianos from $488, organs $288 and up. Benches, moving equipment, tools, music, accessories, priced to sell fast! Mid-America Piano, Manhattan, 800-950-3774, www. piano4u.com Your Land is Your Down Payment. And we’ll match your tax refund up to $8,000. Singles starting at $39,900. Doubles starting at $59,900. Less than perfect credit OK! 866-858-6862

M onica Sellm an

Travis Riley

In H um boldt• (620)473-2211

Angela Lushbough

Member

Steve H oag

Low Secondary M arketRates

20-& 30-Year Fixed Rates ExcellentIn-house Financing Take advantage oflow interestrates.Ask us about refinancing your hom e.

Paper, Web and Shopper 6 Days • $1.85/WORD 12 Days • $2.35/WORD 18 Days • $3.25/WORD 26 Days • $4.00/WORD

ADDITIONS Blind Box • $5 Centering • $2 Photo • $5


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The Iola Register

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

B3

SCENES FROM THE IMS INVITATIONAL

Above, Iola Middle School’s Tayton Driskel departs from the starting line in the 100-meter dash at Tuesday’s IMS Invitational. Below at left, Hunter Mittelmeier runs a race. Below at right, Colbi Riley runs the hurdles.

Senior Spotlight Iola High School Class of 2014

Iola’s Becky Carlson, top right, and Phil Honeycutt, right, were among the scores of volunteers who assisted with Tuesdays’ Iola Middle School Invitational. The mammoth meet drew more than 900 athletes from 20 area schools. REGISTER/ BOB JOHNSON

Justice Hutton

Justice is the daughter of David and Angela Thompson. She is a member of the Harvest Baptist Church, National Honor Society, basketball, cross country, Hooligans and STUCO. Her hobbies include hunting and cooking. She works part-time at Bolling’s Meat Market and Deli. After high school she is planning to attend Allen Community College and complete a prevet program then go to Kansas State University to become a veterinarian. Her high school highlights are the relationships with the teachers, the football games and throwing flour at the last football game.

Dakota Jones

Dakota is the son of Sandy and Rusty Jones. He is active in FFA and enjoys fishing and hunting. He works part-time at Jumpstart Travel Center. After high school he plans to attend Allen Community College. Dakota said his high school highlight was being the top food salesman for three years for FFA.

Travis Rieske Travis is the son of Jason and Jennifer Tarter. His activities include wrestling and FFA. When he is not in school he likes to hang out with his friends. Travis works for a farmer from spring to fall until wrestling starts. Travis said he will probably go to John Deere technical school at Fort Scott. His high school highlight was competing in sports.

This special weekly feature is a cooperative effort of The Iola Register &...

“Committed to our Community” Iola - 120 E. Madison (620) 365-6000 www.MyBankCNB.com

Humboldt - 116 N. 8th (620) 473-2211

Iola Middle School relay team members Kassy Shelby, from left, Hailei Gregg, Piper Moore and Ashleigh Nicholas await their turn to run at Tuesday’s IMS Invitational at Riverside Park. REGISTER/BOB JOHNSON

Track: Meet draws 900 athletes Continued from B1 son, David Watts), 5:12.06 Long jump — 1. Driskel, 17’8” Shot put — 3. Kolt Knoblich, I, 31’4 1/4”; 8. Stover, I, 27’4” Discus — 2. Hurst, H, 92’; 3. Johnson, H, 92’; 6. Hunter Preston, I, 79’9”; 7. Matt Karr, I, 77’7” High jump — 5. Bo Bigelow, H, 4’4” Eighth grade 1. Parsons, 101; 5. Humboldt, 34; 11. Iola, 24; 12. Marmaton Valley, 20 100 meters — 5. Trevor Wilson, MV, 12.50 400 meters — 4. Jacob Barker, H, 1:02.01; 8. Zach Cokely, I, 1:03.82

RECYCLE FOR THE FUTURE!

800 meters — 8. Ethan Holloway, I, 2:42.57 1600 meters — 4. Justice Pugh, MV, 5:45.38; 7. Holloway, I, 5:51.72 3200 meters — 2. Pugh, MV, 11:50.87 100-meter hurdles — 5. Isaac Vink, 17.98 4x200 relay — 8. Iola (Cale Barnhart, Holloway, Caden Knavel, Vink), 2:00.02 4x400 relay — 3. Humboldt (Caleb Hart, Noah Johnson, Hesston Murrow and Barker), 4:31.54; 4. Iola (Vink, Cokely, Knavel, Barnhart), 4:32.91 Long jump — 5. Jacob Barker, H, 16’6”; 6. Wilson, MV, 16’5 3/4” Shot put — 2. Johnson, H, 38’11”;  Discus — 1. Evan Sigg, I, 111’2”; 2. Johnson, H, 106’4” High jump — 6. Collin Gillespie, H, 5’ Girls Seventh grade 1 (tie). Independence and Parsons, 30; 7. Iola, 19.5; 8. Humboldt, 12; 11. Marmaton Valley, 6 200 meters — 6. Morgan Mauk, H, 30.97; 7. Savannah Puckett, 31.23; 8. Kaylie Johnson, H, 31.40 800 meters — 4. Aricah McCall, H, 2:56.04; 8. Madisyn Holloway, I, 2:59.73

4x100 relay — 3. Iola (Kassy Shelby, Ashleigh Nicholas, Piper Moore, Hailei Gregg), 1:00.62 4x200 relay — 3. Iola (Natalie DeGrado, Gregg, Shelby, Shaylee Sutterby), 2:12.72 4x400 relay — 3. Iola (Holloway, Moore, Shelby, Paige Burrough), 5:11.37; 6. Humboldt (McCall, Camrie Farran, Mauk, Johnson), 5:25.51 High jump — 5. Patricia Outlan, MV, 3’10”; 8. Jennifer Tidd, I, 3’8” Eighth grade 3. Marmaton Valley, 33; 5. Iola, 22; 14. Humboldt, 6.3 200 meters — 1. Makayla Brooks, MV, 29.20 800 meters — 3. Olivia Taylor, I, 2:45.73; 8. Shelby Yoho, MV, 2:57.75 1600 meters — 1. Taylor, I, 5:53.53; 3. Yoho, MV, 6:23.11 4x100 relay — 3. Marmaton Valley (Shayla Brooks, Clara Boyd, Emily Smart, M. Brooks), 57.82 4x200 relay — 5. Marmaton Valley (Megan Ensminger, Boyd, Smart, Yoho), 2:10.68 4x400 relay — 3. Iola (Madison Carlin, Carley Cescon, Taylor, Katie Bauer), 5:03.91; 7. Humboldt (Britnee Works, Lizzie Myers, Kaiti Carpenter, Rylan Wilhite), 5:17.61


B4

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Ventura sharp as Royals knock off Astros, 4-2 By KRISTIE RIEKEN The Associated Press

HOUSTON (AP) — Kansas City rookie Yordano Ventura entered Tuesday night’s game winless in four career starts dating to last season despite posting a 2.53 ERA in those games. On Tuesday night, he pitched seven solid innings and finally got his

Sports Calendar Iola High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, JV vs. PITTSBURG, 4:30 p.m. Monday, JV baseball vs. WELLSVILLE, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, at Wellsville, 4:30 p.m. High School Tennis Friday, at Chanute, 3 p.m. High School Golf Monday, JV at Anderson County, 3:30 a.m. Tuesday, at Osawatomie, 1 p.m. High School Track Today, at Coffeyville, 3:30 p.m. Middle School Track April 25, at Fredonia, 3 p.m. Middle School Golf Today, at Coffeyville, 3 p.m. Monday, at Mound City, 3 p.m.

Humboldt High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, at Yates Center High School Track Friday, at Pitt State Relays High School Golf Tuesday, at Fredonia

Crest High School Track April 24, SCC Invitational (at Burlington)

Southern Coffey Co. High School Track Today, at Yates Center Monday, Waverly Invitational (at Burlington) April 24, SCC INVITATIONAL (at Burlington)

Marmaton Valley High School Baseball/Softball Monday, vs. UNIONTOWN High School High School Track Tuesday, at Waverly High School Golf Thursday, JV at JayhawkLinn Monday, at Oswego Tuesday, JV at West Franklin

Yates Center High School Baseball/Softball Thursday, vs. HUMBOLDT High School Track April 25, at Fredonia High School Golf Tuesday, at Fredonia

Allen Baseball Thursday, at Fort Scott, 1 p.m. Saturday, FORT SCOTT, 1 p.m. April 22, HUTCHINSON, 3 p.m. April 24, KANSAS CITY, KAN., 3 p.m. Softball Thursday, at Maple Woods, 2 p.m. April 23, COTTEY COLLEGE, 2 p.m.

first victory as the Royals beat the Houston Astros 4-2. “I’m just really proud for him because that was like his fifth time he’s gone for his first win and he’s had an opportunity to win ballgames two or three times and we couldn’t hold it for him,” Royals manager Ned Yost said. “To finally get that out of the way for him, to get his first major league win was big for all of us tonight.” Omar Infante homered and drove in two runs for the Royals. Ventura (1-0), an elite prospect with a 100 mph fastball, allowed four hits and one earned run with seven strikeouts in seven innings — both career highs. His seven strikeouts were the most by a Kansas City rookie since Will Smith also fanned seven on Sept. 11, 2012.

Yordano Ventura pitches in a game earlier this season. On Tuesday, Ventua pitched seven solid innings in a 4-2 Kansas City Royals win over Houston. MCT FILE PHOTO BY JOHN SLEEZER

“I feel really good,” Ventura said in Spanish through a translator. “I feel that the team supported me and played

Mustangs: Split Continued from B1

second with nobody out. But pinch runner Ben Cooper was called out on a controversial call on a Buffalo pickoff attempt. The Mustang coaches protested to no avail. “We were going to put on a bunt to get the runners to second and third, but the pickoff changed everything,” Percy said. An infield pop-up and a ground ball ended the game. “Half our lineup is struggling with the bats,” Percy said. Trailing 1-0, Iola rallied for two runs with two out in the bottom of the third. Trent Latta, Drew Faulhaber, Weir and Ethan Scheibmeir put together consecutive singles, with Faulhaber and Scheibmeir collecting RBIs. Prairie View responded with two in the top of the fourth to take a 3-2 lead before Iola retook the upper hand in the fifth. Faulhaber and Weir were both hit by pitches and advanced to second and third on a Buffalo error. Sigg’s single drove both home for a 4-3 lead. Weir surrendered eight hits with five strikeouts. Latta singled twice, as did Weir. Faulhaber, Scheibmeir and Sigg had

one single each. LATTA WAS up to the challenge on the mound in game two. He matched Prairie View’s Jordan Fulks, out for out, in an old-fashioned pitchers’ duel. Coleson Wiggin led the way to the Mustangs’ first run in the second when he and Sigg singled with one out. Kohl Endicott walked to load the bases. Another walk to Caleb Alexander forced in Wiggin to put Iola in front, 1-0. Prairie View tied the score when Austin Dimmett doubled, moved to third on a ground ball and scored on a steal of home. Latta wiggled out of trouble in the fifth after Konitzer tripled with one out. Latta got a key Fulks strikeout before ending the inning with a ground ball. He allowed a one-out single in the sixth before picking off the baserunner. He allowed just six hits in his complete game victory with one walk and seven strikeouts. Faulhaber went 2-for-4 with a double, while Latta, Weir, Wiggin and Sigg all singled. Iola travels to Wellsville Tuesday for another key Pioneer League matchup.

Fillies: Lose pair Continued from B1

made a great extension to catch it.” Prairie View’s Kallie Konitzer doubled to lead off the fourth, moved to third on a passed ball and scored on Maggie Brown’s sacrifice fly for the only run of the game. Weseloh, Hannah Endicott, Reno, Sigg and Heslop had Iola’s only hits. “I tried pushing the action, and wound up getting a couple of our runners thrown out trying to go for extra bases,” Coons said. “We just didn’t get the hits we needed.” went right defensively in the opener as the Fillies committed seven errors, leading to five unearned runs. “They did a good job of forcing us into mistakes by trying for the extra base,” Coons said. Endicott took the loss, despite giving up just four hits and three NOT

MUCH

walks. She struck out five. Meanwhile, Brown limited the Fillies to just two hits, singles by Sigg in the second inning and Shields in the third. “Both Hannah and Mackenzie were super,” Coons said. “Hannah pitched her heart out, and Mackenzie did a good job of moving the ball in and out. “We’re so close to becoming an excellent team,” he continued. “We just are not quite there yet.” IOLA’S junior varsity

fell in both games of its doubleheader, 13-1 and 16-0. Emily McKarnin had a single and scored a run in the first game. Lexi Heslop and Taylor Heslop also had singles. Taylor Sell’s secondinning single was the Fillies JV’s only hit in the nightcap. The Fillies (3-3 in Pioneer League play and 3-5 overall) return to action Tuesday at Wellsville.

really good defense and scored a lot of runs for me. It gives me a lot of satisfaction so I can keep working hard to help the team win.” Infante had a solo shot in the first inning off Lucas Harrell (0-3) and added an RBI in the third inning as the Royals found some offense after managing just five runs combined as they were swept in a weekend

series at Minnesota. Eric Hosmer and Billy Butler had an RBI each for Kansas City and Lorenzo Cain had a pair of hits for his fourth multihit game this season. “We just got a couple of timely hits today and as an offense we need to do a better job of that,” Hosmer said. “The way our pitchers have thrown we’ve got to find a way to produce runs for them and tonight we did a good job of that.” Carlos Corporan homered in the fifth inning for the Astros, who have scored two runs or fewer in three of their past four games. Harrell gave up five hits and four runs in five innings and has allowed 14 runs in three starts combined this season. Ventura had retired 12 of the last 13 batters when Corporan launched his homer into the first row of the seats in right field with one out in the fifth inning to cut the lead to 4-2. He got back on track after that and didn’t allow another hit until Matt Dominguez singled to start the seventh inning. He walked Jonathan Vil-

lar with two outs, but ended the threat and his night when he retired Dexter Fowler after a short coaching visit to the mound. Wade Davis pitched a perfect eighth before Greg Holland struck out the side in the ninth for his fourth save. He has converted 13 straight save opportunities dating to Sept. 7. Infante put Kansas City up early with his solo homer to the Crawford Boxes in left field with one out in the first inning. Fowler hit a leadoff double and reached third on a one-out single by Jason Castro. Fowler scored on an error by Ventura with two outs on a pickoff attempt to first base to tie it at 1-1. Infante grounded into a forceout that scored Cain, who had led off the inning with a single, to make it 2-1 in the third inning. Hosmer followed with an RBI double to push the lead to 3-1. A single by Nori Aoki followed by a pair of walks loaded the bases for Kansas City with one out in the fifth, and Butler’s sacrifice fly pushed the lead to 4-1.

Golf: Iola tops at Pittsburg Continued from B1

“He was just hoping to get it close with his first putt,” Kerr said. Instead, Macha drained the birdie putt, while his two fellow competitors had bogeys. The Mustangs wound up four strikes ahead of Independence — the same team that edged Iola for the team title last week — 315 to 319.

“I thought this course was tougher,” Kerr said, “and we shaved five strokes off our score from last week. Everybody did a great job today.” Drake Dieker and Shane Walden both carded 80s, while Weston Hines shot an 83. Matt Jacobs finished at 89, and Adam Peterson at 94.

“Drake’s round was key,” Kerr said. “We moved him up in our rotation so he was playing against some better players. He responded with the best round of golf he’s had in a while.” Iola resumes action Tuesday at Osawatomie. The Mustang junior varsity is at Anderson County Monday.

GRADUATION TIME IS NEAR! Honor your graduate with a special tribute on our

“You’ve Come a Long Way Baby” pages to appear prior to each High School’s graduation IN LIVING COLOR! Just stop by or send a baby picture of your graduate along with the coupon below including your message and check or money order for $28 to The Iola Register.

Don’t be shy, celebrate! Congratulations Graduate! Love, Your Family

We’ll place it in an ad complete with a graduation cap! Hurry! Deadline is Monday, May 5, 2014. CLIP AND MAIL ALONG WITH PAYMENT AND PICTURE TO: The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749, Attn. Grad Ads, bring by the Register office at 302 S. Washington during business hours or use drop slot or e-mail your information, photo & message to registerdisplay@gmail.com. Name (Person Placing Ad) Address _____________________________________ Phone _______________________ Graduate’s Name & High School Message___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Credit Card # 3 Digit Code on Back of Card

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

B5

On track

Iola High’s Jessica Oakley, left, throws the discus Tuesday at the Coffeyville Invitational track meet, while the Mustangs’ Jeremy Spears, above, competes in the steeplechase. A full report of Tuesday’s track meet will be in Wednesday’s Register. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

Mourners reflect on anniversary of Boston Marathon attack Two arrested after backpacks found, detonated by police By DENISE LAVOIE The Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — Survivors, first responders and relatives of those killed in the Boston Marathon bombing marked the anniversary Tuesday with tributes that combined sorrow over the loss of innocent victims with pride over the city’s resilience in the face of a

terror attack. “This day will always be hard, but this place will always be strong,” former Mayor Thomas Menino told an invitation-only audience of about 2,500 people at the Hynes Convention Center, not far from the finish line, where two pressure cooker bombs hidden in backpacks killed three people and

injured more than 260 others a year ago. Vice President Joe Biden, who attended the ceremony, said the courage shown by survivors and those who lost loved ones is an inspiration for other Americans dealing with loss and tragedy. “You have become the face of America’s resolve,” he said. Biden also praised the 36,000 runners who plan to run the marathon next week, saying they will send a message to terrorists.

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“America will never, ever, ever stand down,” he said, to loud applause. He added, “We own the finish line.” In the evening, after the tributes were over and most people had left, a man behaving suspiciously near the finish line dropped a backpack containing a rice cooker, police said. The man, who walked barefoot in a street in pouring rain, was taken into custody and was being charged with possession of a hoax device and disturbing the peace, Police Superintendent Randall Halstead said. The backpack was blown up by the bomb squad as a precaution as was a second unattended backpack found nearby, police said, and no injuries were reported. Halstead didn’t release the identity of the man in custody and wouldn’t say what was in the second backpack or who owned it. IN

WASHINGTON,

President Barack Obama observed the anniversary of last year’s deadly marathon attack with a private moment of silence at the White House. “Today, we recognize the incredible courage and leadership of so many Bostonians in the wake of unspeakable tragedy,” Obama said in a statement. “And we offer our deepest gratitude to the courageous firefighters, police officers, medical professionals, runners and spectators who, in an instant, displayed the spirit Boston was built on — perseverance, freedom and love.” Obama said this year’s race, scheduled for April 21, will “show the world the meaning of Boston Strong as a city chooses to run again.” say Chechen

AUTHORITIES

two

ethnic

“We never should have met this way, but we are thankful for each other.” — Patrick Downes, injured in attack

brothers who lived in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan and the Dagestan region of Russia planned and orchestrated the marathon bombings on April 15, 2013. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died following a shootout with police days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is awaiting a trial in which he faces a possible death sentence. Prosecutors say the brothers also killed MIT police Officer Sean Collier days after the bombings in an attempt to steal his gun. Prosecutors have said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev left a hand-scrawled confession condemning U.S. actions in Muslim countries on the inside wall of a boat in which he was found hiding following the police shootout. At the tribute, several survivors of the bombing alluded to their injuries but focused on the strength they’ve drawn from fellow survivors, first responders, doctors, nurses and strangers who have offered them support. “We should never have met this way, but we are so grateful for each other,” said Patrick Downes, a newlywed who was injured along with his wife. Each lost a left leg below the knee in the bombings. Downes described Boston Strong, the slogan coined after the attack, as a movement that symbolizes the city’s de-

termination to recover. He called the people who died “our guardian angels.” “We will carry them in our hearts,” he said. Downes said the city on April 21 will “show the world what Boston represents.” He added, “For our guardian angels, let them hear us roar.” Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a ballroom dancer who lost her left leg below the knee and has recently returned to performing on a prosthetic leg, said she’s learned over the last year that no milestone is too small to celebrate, including walking into a non-handicapped bathroom stall for the first time and “doing a happy dance.” Gov. Deval Patrick spoke of how the attack has drawn people closer. “There are no strangers here,” he repeated throughout his speech. Carlos Arredondo, the cowboy hat-wearing spectator who was hailed as a hero for helping the wounded after the bombings, said he went to the tribute ceremony to support survivors and their families. “You can see how the whole community gathered together to support them and remember,” Arredondo said. After the tributes, many of those in attendance walked in the rain to the finish line for a moment of silence that coincided with the time when the bombs went off. Bells rang, and a flag was raised by transit agency police Officer Richard Donohue, who was badly injured during a shootout with the bombing suspects. Earlier in the day, a wreath-laying ceremony drew the families of the three people killed last year — Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lu Lingzi — and Collier’s relatives.

Retired hockey players sue NHL MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Another group of former NHL players has joined the fight for compensation for head injuries they say they incurred while playing, while at the same time targeting the violence of the game that they believe brought about those injuries.

Retired players Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett filed a class action lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday alleging that the league has promoted fighting and downplayed the risk of head injuries that come from it. “I think the glorified violence is really

the Achilles heel for the NHL,” said Charles “Bucky” Zimmerman, an attorney at Zimmerman Reed that filed the lawsuit on behalf of the players. “If anything comes of this, the focus on the glorified violence and perhaps the change to that will be a good thing.”


B6

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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Former social services chief dies Boys, Girls Clubs get federal grant lobbyist for a statewide nonprofit council advocating for the disabled. F o r mer Gov. John Carlin called Harder “a very Robert Harder special human being,” The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. Carlin, a Democrat, was governor from 1979 to 1987, and Harder served as his secretary of social and rehabilitation services. “Bob Harder was as good as public servant, public administrator as I’ve ever known for sure,” Carlin said. “Bob was a joy to be around, but he was usually pretty serious business most of the time.” Harder was born June 4, 1929, in Horton, the son of a Methodist minister.

Harder himself earned two advanced theology degrees and became a pastor at a Methodist church in east Topeka in 1958. Starting in 1961, he served six years in the Kansas House as a Democrat. In 1967, he left the Legislature for then-Democratic Gov. Robert Docking’s administration and helped set up the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services. He served as the state’s first SRS secretary, starting in 1969, and kept the job until 1987. He returned to the position briefly after Democratic Gov. Joan Finney took office in 1991 and later became her secretary of health and environment. Republican Gov. Sam Brownback reorganized social services and health care agencies in 2012, creating the Department for Children and Families.

Corn crop off to slow start ST. LOUIS (AP) — Most years about this time, northern Illinois farmer Monty Whipple, like so many Midwest growers, would be riding high in his monstrous tractor, kicking up dust while planting corn in hundreds of acres. But this spring has kept him sidelined, and he’s anything but alone. Spring planting across much of the nation’s Corn Belt is sputtering, foiled by rainy and chilly conditions that in broad stretches have left the ground either too soggy or too cold for effective seeding. As of Sunday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says, just 3 percent of the U.S. corn crop was sown, half the dismal pace of last year, when one of the wettest springs on record got farmers in many states off to the slowest start in decades. In Illinois, just 1 percent of this year’s corn has been planted — onetenth of the average pace of the previous five years. Farmers in other key corn-producing states — Iowa, Nebraska and Indiana — were equally idle, the USDA says. Missouri has 9 percent of its crop in the field, down from 16 percent this time a year ago. Still, Whipple and other growers in Illinois and Missouri aren’t sound-

ing alarms, noting that today’s bigger, more efficient planting machines can make up for lost time. Such was the case last year, when more than 40 percent of Illinois’ corn crop got planted in just one week in mid-May. The USDA says corn planting traditionally

“I can’t be in the field, so this is a good job to get done while waiting,” he said, though he admitted he’s “starting to get a little frustrated.” He guessed it will be another week before he can begin planting corn. “We just haven’t had that week or two of good weather, and

We just haven’t had that week or two of good weather, and there’s a lot of work to be done. — Monty Whipple, Illinois farmer

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Boys and Girls Clubs of Topeka have been selected to receive more than $272,000 from the U.S. Department of Education to provide an integrated physical activity and nutrition pro-

gram. The agency on Tuesday announced the award, one of 67 grants made nationwide to distribute $33 million to local education agencies. Agencies receiving the grants are required

to use the funds to initiate, expand or enhance physical education and nutrition education programs. The activities include after-school programs for children in kindergarten through 12th grade.

Senior Spotlight Iola High School Class of 2014 Arion Kunkler

Arion is the son of Damaris Kunkler and Shae Garrett. His activities in school include cross country, track, football and attending Wesley United Methodist Church. His hobbies include hanging out with friends and collecting shoes. After high school he will move to Colorado to live with his father and attend a community college in Denver. Senior year football, basketball, Hooligans and going to Taco Bell after the home games were high school highlights for Arion.

Scout Henry Scout is the daughter of Tom Henry and Angela Henry. She is active in FFA, Interact and Cheerleading. She was the football manager, sang in the church choir and was yearbook editor. Scout said she likes to work, hangout with her family and friends, cheer and watch Netflix. She works as a teacher in the SafeBase afterschool program. She is unsure where she would like to attend college after high school but plans to major in agribusiness and minor in agronomy with an international language influence. Scout said her four years in high school have been a blast. She said there isn’t a way to pick one particular highlight although she did enjoy National Convention freshman through junior year.

Jacob Rhoads

begins about this time, with that task typically in full swing from April 21 through May 23. And the agency notes that even with last year’s frustratingly slow start to planting, U.S. farmers still reaped a record 13.9 billion bushels of corn and the third-biggest soybean crop on record. “There’s really not any need to be concerned,” Illinois Farm Bureau spokesman John Hawkins said. At least not yet, as Whipple waits for spring to stop acting like winter. With a fresh batch of snow on his roughly 800 acres of farmland near Utica in LaSalle County, he spent Tuesday hauling stored grain to a barge and felt productive.

there’s a lot of work to be done.” But he said he has resisted the urge to rush in a crop when the soil is marginal, saying “you only get one shot at this.” Near Missouri’s Warrenton, west of St. Louis, Keith Witt said only one or two local farmers have any corn planted — for bragging rights, if anything. But with 3,500 acres soaked by six inches of rain over the past 10 days or so, Witt guesses he’ll have to wait until the end of next week to start planting. Expectations of more rain within days soured any hope of getting in the fields now to plant half of his acreage with corn, then the other half later with beans.

Jacob is the son of Erin and Phillip Rhoads. His activities include football for four years, track for one year, baseball for two years and youth group. Jacob enjoys fishing, hunting, playing sports and being outdoors. He wants to graduate high school then play college football. After college he wants to travel the world then find a place to settle down and start his life. His high school highlights were going to state in baseball last year and getting second in state, being back to back Pioneer League champions in football and being a homecoming candidate for football 2013. Also, breaking Mr. D’s freshman javelin record was a highlight.

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TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Robert C. Harder, a former Kansas legislator who helped create the agency that became the state Department for Children and Families, has died from a brain tumor, his family said. He was 84. According to an obituary supplied by the family, Harder died Saturday at his home at Brewster Place. His memorial service was scheduled for this afternoon at First United Methodist Church in Topeka. Harder served in the Cabinets of five governors from both political parties and his 18 continuous years as head of the Kansas’ largest social services agency made him the longest-serving state Cabinet secretary. After leaving state government, he was the legislative liaison for the United Methodist Church and a volunteer

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B7

Emotional harm can start physical harm Dear Carolyn: My husband and I are at an impasse in our relationship. We cannot see each other’s points of view and are just existing in a miserable state. I’ve begged for marriage counseling for a year, which just yesterday he reluctantly agreed to. However, he has basically stated that when marriage counseling fails (not if), “I give up.” We have kids and we love each other, we just can’t seem to live together right now. Am I wasting my time saving a relationship that he sees as doomed? — Marriage on the Cliff He agreed to marriage counseling, so go. Even if it fails, counseling won’t have been a waste because it’s a basic step before giving up altogether. That may seem silly, but it can be important to be able to tell yourself you “tried everything.” And, if you choose well, your therapist can help you through whatever the

Tell Me About It Carolyn Hax next step happens to be. One suggestion before you start: Go into counseling looking for new ways to understand what’s happening, new ways to frame your marriage, new ways to speak to your husband, vs. a new way to save the marriage or get your husband to see your side. Set only the goals that are within your control. Re: Marriages “failing”:

I hate that term. I read the other day about someone’s marriage failing after 35 years and three kids. Um, no. It ended. Lots of good came out of it, and then things changed, and it ended. “Failed” makes it sound as if the fact of being married is the accomplishment. It is also terribly

judgmental. OK, said my piece. — Anonymous Quite well, thanks. We were talking about the possibility that counseling would fail, but the argument still applies. Thank you for taking my question last week [about disagreements with my boyfriend]. I was surprised when you included the domestic violence link because he had never been violent. He still hasn’t been, but that weekend he yelled at me pretty bad, and systematically insulted my entire character. When we talked normally he said he was purposely trying to hurt my feelings. He admitted he should have communicated better, but never apologized for yelling, though I apologized for “setting him off” multiple times. I broke up with him. — Different Perspectives again Every person who becomes violent was, preceding that point, not violent.

Plus, domestic violence education is applicable to situations of verbal/ emotional abuse, because they’re just different points on the same continuum. When someone thinks it’s okay to cause you deliberate harm in one way, how much of a leap is it to another kind of deliberate harm? As for why I made abuse connections when you hadn’t even mentioned yelling, it was this: “He feels that if we go somewhere together we SHOULD spend every second together.” That’s classic control, which is a predictor of relationship violence. It’s in the warning-signs section of the pamphlet. Even though you broke up (phew), I think you still would benefit from reading more on the topic. “The Gift of Fear” by Gavin de Becker is eyeopening, and a quick and absorbing read. Take care.

the Petition.

collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Prepared By: South & Associates, P.C. Blair Gisi (KS # 24096) 245 N. Waco, Suite 400 Wichita, KS 67202 (316)684-7733 (316)684-7766 (Fax) Attorneys For Plaintiff (167051)

Public notice (First published in The Iola Register on April 9, 2014) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT Great Southern Bank Plaintiff, vs. Jocelyn K. Sheets; John Doe (Tenant/Occupant); Mary Doe (Tenant/Occupant); Unknown Spouse, if any, of Jocelyn K. Sheets,

Townsite to the City of Iola, commonly known as 206 West Jackson, Iola, KS 66749 (the “Property”) and all those defendants who have not otherwise been served are required to plead to the Petition on or before the 20th day of May, 2014, in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas. If you fail to plead, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon

NOTICE Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to

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Defendants.

Case No. 14CV22 Court Number: Pursuant to K.S.A. Chapter 60 NOTICE OF SUIT THE STATE OF KANSAS, to the above-named defendants and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any deceased defendants; the unknown spouses of any defendants; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of any defendants that are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of any defendants that are or were partners or in partnership; the unknown guardians, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any legal disability; and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any person alleged to be deceased, and all other persons who are or may be concerned. You are notified that a Petition has been filed in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas, praying to foreclose a real estate mortgage on the following described real estate: LOT TWO (2) AND THREE (3), BLOCK FIFTY-FIVE (55), ORIGINAL TOWNSITE TO THE CITY OF IOLA ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Lots Two (2) and Three (3), Block Fifty-Five (55), Original

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B8

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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The Iola Register

A year after explosion, West is on the mend WEST, Texas (MCT) — Two flags, tattered by an explosion blocks away, have flown at half-staff at the Emergency Medical Services station since shortly after a fertilizer mixing operation blew up April 17, 2013, devastating this quiet Central Texas town and killing 15. The dead included three out-of-town men attending a course at the EMS facility, who then joined local volunteer firefighters to fight the blaze. Tommy Muska, the ruddy-faced mayor of this traditional Czech community, teared up and went offmessage about West’s efforts to rebuild as his 1990 Ford pickup edged toward the frayed, faded American and Lone Star flags. “Look at that. That’s pretty much how many of us feel — beat up but still flying.” said Muska, an insurance agent whose father was also the town’s mayor. He was thrust into the headline-snaring disaster, followed by months of delicate dealings with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, state agencies, lawyers, myriad reporters, aid agencies and 2,800 shaken residents. In fits and starts, and sometimes punctuated by raw emotion, the town of West is on the mend. Residential streets in the district closest to the blast at West Fertilizer are crowded with trucks delivering bricks, rock and roofing material. A few homes, like that of a town doctor, are still boarded up. But new construction has given the streets the appearance of a suburban subdivision busily being pieced together by teams of workers. The city has received $3.2 million in state funds

and will get $1.3 million in project reimbursements from FEMA. West expects to end up with new infrastructure, from sewers and streets to a rebuilt park. Muska is hoping to lasso $4.4 million more from the state. After a methodical if slow start, West’s nonprofit Long-Term Recovery Center has disbursed $1.6 million and will have exhausted its remaining $2 million by June or July. Then it will try to raise an additional $500,000 for more building materials, said its new executive director, Suzanne Hack. The Volunteer Fire Department, which lost five members in the explosion, has received new donated vehicles to replace the three fire trucks that were destroyed. The Catholic Church’s Austin Diocese, through the St. Vincent de Paul Society, distributed 219 “house in a box” units that included basic furniture and household items that a family might have lost in the blast. In all, it has spent $1.6 million on various relief efforts, from covering drug prescriptions to providing temporary housing, spokeswoman Christina Gonzalez said. An additional $553,812 remains to be used in West. Companies seeking new sites for factories still bypass West, but residents point to the large new truck stop and retail store, Slovacek’s, on the west side of I-35, owned by a Czech sausage maker from Snook. And, Muska crows, the city’s sales tax receipts were up 13 percent in February, the most recent tally available. Muska knew he hit a nerve when he publicly suggested that a fertil-

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izer mixing plant, needed to supply local farmers, might be rebuilt nearby. Waco area TV stations repeated the story over several news cycles after the mayor spoke at a town meeting in late March. If one is ever built, it will be made of concrete and steel — not using rickety, 50-year-old wooden bins — with the ammonium nitrate stored in thick-walled bunkers, the mayor later asserted. The chemical, stored in huge quantities just outside the city, was responsible for the destruction and loss of life. “It’s going to be a hard sell,” Muska told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “It’s hard for some people, harder for some. It’s hard for me. They were upset I ever brought it up. I was just putting my toe in the water.” An outsider in this tightly woven community has become the face of renewal in some of the hardesthit and poorest neighborhoods.

Eleanor Castro talks on the phone in her home in West, Texas, Tuesday. Castro’s home was damaged in the fertilizer plant explosion last year. (Max Faulkner/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT)

Since January, John Raimer has toiled as construction chief for the Long-Term Recovery Center, which has spearheaded home rebuilding and repair for people with no insurance or not enough. The nonprofit, a unit of the West Foundation, has become a lightning rod of frustration and criticism, which likely led to the res-

ignation in November of its first director. At 54, Raimer, a goateed Floridian, is something of an itinerant do-gooder, having given up his electrical engineering job with the municipal electric company in Gainesville. He had an epiphany of sorts during disaster duty several years ago in Louisiana. He called his company to say

he had found his life’s calling and told them to get his retirement papers ready. Since then, he has done hands-on relief work after hurricanes elsewhere in Louisiana, in Alabama and New Jersey. In Alabama, Raimer learned that a group of motorcyclists would do it their way, no matter what he might have instructed.

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