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The Weekender Saturday, March 22, 2014

Iolans join in Statehouse rally

ROTARY

Eradicating polio a Rotary goal By BOB JOHNSON The Iola Register

People gathered at the Kansas Statehouse on Tuesday to urge lawmakers to expand Medicaid eligibility. Georgia Master, Jackie Chase and Bob Chase attended on Allen County’s behalf, as members of the Rural Health Initiative. DAN BRENNAN/KHI

Medicaid expansion a ‘moral, not political,’ cause By STEVEN SCHWARTZ The Iola Register

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early 200 people descended on the Statehouse Tuesday to voice their support for Medicaid expansion; they came away with equal amounts optimism and discouragement, according to two Iolans. Jackie Chase and Georgia Masterson were two of the representatives in Topeka, both appearing as part of the Rural Health Initiative. The rally was organized by the Kansas Medicaid Access Coalition. “It was enough to get their notice,” Masterson said of the group’s exercise. They had the chance to discuss the topic with Rep. Kent Thompson (who both Masterson

and Chase described as “open-minded” to any expansion decision), and had an appointment to meet with State Senator Caryn Tyson, who failed to show up for their meeting. While both Masterson and Chase described the event as “optimistic,” reality quickly set in. Despite the fact surveys prove Kansans support the expansion, most politicians aren’t keen to align themselves with anything to do with the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature legislation. “Until the governor’s election takes place, it’s probably not going to be something that is acted on,” Masterson said. “They (politicians) don’t want to

“We are leaving the poorest of the poor out there to fend for themselves. I can’t believe we would do this to our most vulnerable.” — Jackie Chase, Rural Health Initiative

Rotary International is within an eyelash of completing its ambitious effort to eradicate polio in the world through funding of vaccine. “We’re down to Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria,” Ellis Potter told Iola Rotarians Thursday. The fear of polio struck the heart of every parent until a vaccine was discovered in the 1950s. Eradicating polio became an ongoing project of Rotary clubs throughout the world 25 years ago. “We should have it done very soon,” Ellis said, although he allowed that political blockades have pre- Ellis Potter vented as much headway as the organization would like in the three countries where new cases continue to occur. “The day will come, though, when there is no more polio anywhere in the world,” he said. Polio, also referred to as infantile paralysis, is an infectious disease first recognized in 1840. It attacks the spinal cord, and at its height required “iron lung,” devices to help patients breathe. If they survived, many children were left as cripples. An effective vaccine was developed in the 1950s by Dr. Jonas Salk, which quickly reduced the number of polio cases. When Rotary International adopted its eradication program in 1988, there were 350,000 cases worldwide. By 2012, the last statistics available, that number had dwindled to 223.

See RALLY | Page A3

See POLIO | Page A4

Area forces join to rescue endangered children By STEVEN SCHWARTZ and KAYLA BANZET The Iola Register

County Attorney Wade Bowie, left, and Assistant County Attorney Christopher Phelan.

Quote of the day Vol. 116, No. 102

The law can give a voice to a child in need, in danger or in a state of neglect; but oftentimes the right answer is not always the clearest one. One thing always holds true — when in doubt, the children are top priority. “Handling cases that deal with kids is number one,” Allen County Attorney Wade Bowie said. Child endangerment cases can be some of the most difficult to prosecute, due to certain “gray areas.” Bowie said the cases are always different, and he and Assistant County Attorney Christopher Phelan must examine the facts separate of any prior situation. “Everything we do is fact-dependent and we have to evaluate the facts,” Bowie said. “They’re (law enforcement) always going to err on the side of caution.” Iola Police Chief Jared Warner echoed the sentiment. He said the officers take extra caution with cases involving children, and will do anything in their power to protect them. He said his office has seen 10 cases this year, which is significantly higher than normal. The county attorney’s office has already dealt with 35 cases this year. Of the 35, eight of them are truancy cases, which do not typically result in the child being removed from the home. See CHILDREN | Page A4 Aimeé Daniels is the executive director of CASA for

the southeast Kansas region.

“Look well into thyself; there is a source of strength which will always spring up if thou wilt always look there.” — Marcus Aurelius 75 Cents

Hi: 54 Lo: 29 Iola, KS


Saturday, March 22, 2014

Obituary

Police report

Barbara Bell

Vehicles burglarized

Barbara A. Bell, 76, of Kansas City, Kan., passed away on Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at Richmond Healthcare and Rehab in Richmond. Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m., Monday at the Feuerborn Family Funeral Service Chapel, Garnett, with burial at 1:30 p.m. at the Johnson County Memorial Garden, Overland Park. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Carlyle news The Carlyle Country Club met last Thursday in Humboldt. Jeanice Cress was hostess. There were 14 members and two guests present, Greta Ladd and Levi Miewes. The group met at the Wes Dewey Art Studio and saw Collin Haire’s glass blowing projects. From there they went to the Humboldt library for a business meeting and refreshments. Pastor Steve Traw’s message on Sunday at the Carlyle Presbyterian Church was “The Passover, A Beginning.” Those celebrating birthdays are Travis Smith on March 21 and Phyllis Loomis on Sunday. Anniversaries are Don and Ella Britt, March 17, Glen and Patty Herschberger, March 17, and Linda and Melvin Guenther, March 20. A fellowship dinner followed the service. Bible study is at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Alma Herchberger

Joanne McIntyre 365-2829 received word her sisterin-law, Elizabeth Yoder, was a patient in Olathe Medical Center with a broken hip. She is now in Garnett in a nursing home and doing well. Greg and Jackie McIntyre held a birthday party for their granddaughter, Zoey McIntyre, who turned 2 on March 6. Those attending were her parents, Zack and Kady McIntyre, rural Yates Center; Ashton and Brandon Birk, Gridley; Steve and Rita Porzio, Kincaid; Judy, Bruce and Ryan Cochran, Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee, Jim Henson, Iola; and Joanna McIntyre and Levi Sauerssig, Gridley.

Burn ban is lifted With calmer weather conditions forecast, the burn ban in Allen County was lifted Friday. Sheriff Bryan Murphy announced suspension of the ban. Murphy encouraged farmers, especially, to

be careful when burning fields. With a controlled burn, a call to dispatch headquarters, 365-1460, and local firefighters should be made, Murphy added, “so we’ll know what’s going on.”

Polio: Eradicated Continued from A1

Statistics to do with Rotary are staggering. Potter said the organization has 34,644 clubs in more than 200 countries and 1.2 million members, who speak 102 different languages. The organization has clubs for high school students (Interact) and younger adults (Rotaract), as well for volunteers (Rotary Community Corps). Rotary began in 1905 in Chicago when Paul Harris — its most notable founder — and three professional friends formed a club to become better acquainted. The name came from them rotating meetings among their offices. Iola’s Rotary Club dates to 1917, and, as are others, is comprised of business and professional people who put

“service above self.” Today’s Iola club has 48 members. “We’re here to serve the community,” Potter said. The club for years has helped with waste paper drives, and this summer will sponsor a car show at the Allen County Fair and a barbecue cookoff. Club members have picked up trash along nearby highways and often volunteer to help with many local projects. The Southwind Trail’s shelter three miles south of Iola was a Rotary project. The Iola club also has sent members to Chile and Easter Island to construct simple but effective eyeglasses for people who otherwise would go without and has been involved in water purification projects.

Threats reported

Holly Schomaker, Iola, reported to police officers several things were stolen from her vehicle while it was parked near her house Sunday in the 800 block of North Jefferson Street. On Monday Jamie Wilson reported an undisclosed amount of cash was stolen from her vehicle in the 800 block of North Street. Also on Monday Erin Splechter, 29, Iola, reported her vehicle was broken into in the 800 block of North Sycamore Street. Her checkbook, miscellaneous paperwork and an undisclosed amount of money were taken. Leo King Wood, 49, Iola, reported tools, tool boxes, and fishing poles were stolen from his vehicle March 13 in the 200 block of North Elm Street.

On Monday, Jacqueline Layton, 36, Iola, told officers she had received threatening phone calls. A suspect was named.

Drug arrest made On Tuesday, James Williams, 19, Iola, was arrested for possession of certain hallucinogenic drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, and no liability insurance following a traffic stop in the 600 block of North Cottonwood.

Playground fire reported On Wednesday, officers responded to a fire on the playground at Lincoln Elementary School. Damage was minimal.

Burglaries reported Donna Houser, 120 W. Garfield St., reported a burglary of her resi-

dence on Wednesday. On March 13, William Krone, Iola, told officers his residence was burglarized in the 700 block of East Street. Tools were stolen from the garage.

Arrests made John Cox Jr. was arrested for an Allen County District Court warrant on Wednesday. On March 13, Summer Salzwedel, 29, Iola, was arrested for a Chanute warrant. Kimberly Lorrainne Sigler was arrested on Sunday for driving under the influence of alcohol, not reporting an accident of an unattended vehicle and not rendering aid or giving information. David Lomon was arrested on March 14 for being a pedestrian under the influence of alcohol, after a disturbance on South State Street. Amy Callaway was

arrested on March 15 for a Chanute warrant. Jeffry Stanford was arrested for domestic battery and Mikeal J. Stanford was arrested for aggravated assault following an incident on Scott Street on March 15. Vanetta Cummings, 23, Iola, and Devon Simpson, 18, Iola, were arrested for furnishing alcohol to minors. Several juveniles also were taken into custody following an incident in the 600 block of North Chestnut Street.

Bicycle found Officers recovered a Next 20-inch boys bicycle in a ditch at Willow and Kansas Drive.

Bicycle stolen On March 15, Ronda Poffenbarger, 56, Iola, reported a brown and tan colored Rebel Mongoose bicycle stolen from her property in the 800 block of Wilson Lane.

Court report DISTRICT COURT Judge Daniel Creitz Domestic cases filed:

Ashley A. Allen vs. Aaron S. Taylor, divorce. State of Kansas vs. Samantha Genoble, non-divorce visitation, custody/support. State of Kansas vs. Derick Peterson, non-divorce visitation, custody/ support. Julie A. Smith vs. Kristofer Smith, divorce. State of Kansas vs. Shawn M. Cook, nondivorce visitation, custody/support. State of Kansas vs. Chrystal M. Miller, non-divorce visitation, custody/support. Shaylin Robb vs. Jacob D. Maley, protection from abuse. Barbara D. Smith vs. Craig J. Smith, divorce. Civil cases filed:

Michael W. Peres vs. Chase D. Ellis, automobile tort. Marriage filed:

licenses

Kerry J. Rogers and Patricia L. Bender.

Today

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MAGISTRATE COURT Judge Thomas Saxton Convicted of speeding or other violations with fines assessed:

Amy M. Williams, Camdenton, Mo., 80/65, $132.50. Andrew K. Johnston, Paola, 89/65, $237. Ricky W. Henson, Gas, 70/55, $171. Michael W. Rowland, Tulsa, 73/55, $189. Michael W. Scheffer, Olathe, 78/65, $159. Rachel B. Bowers, Elsmore, 78/65, $159. Luke Bunch, Pittsburg, 78/65, $159. Alyson E. Sobanek, Oolagah, Okla., 81/65, $177. Wayne L.A. Kirkland, Garnett, interference with a law enforcement officer, $258. Derryl L. Aiello, Elsmore, 76/55, $210. Shelli L. Sinclair, Iola, no seat belt, $10. Linda A.R. Farrill, Iola, disorderly conduct, 30 days jail, $543. Ronald Holthaus, St. Cloud, Minn., 75/65, $141. Jason A. Atkinson, Iola, no seat belt, $10. Diversions filed:

Erica Stoll, Iola, dis-

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Temperature High Thursday 72 Low Thursday 37 High a year ago 35 Low a year ago 29 Sunrise 7:22 a.m.

Sunset 7:35 p.m.

— NOTICE —

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays for Iola carriers. D E A D L IN E F O R O U T -O F -T O W N C A R R IE R S IS 6:30 P .M . W E E K D A Y S A N D 9:30 S A T U R D A Y . Ifyou have not received your paper by deadline, please callyour carrier first. Ifunable to reach your carrier, callthe R egister office at 365-2111. R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

Cedarbrook Estates

2800 N. Cottonwood Street • Iola

OPEN HOUSE Thurs., Mar. 27 • 3-7 p.m. Bring the family!

KICKS COUNTRY IN IOLA Trading Post — 8 a.m. - 9 a.m.

orderly conduct, $433. Chelsie N. Tomlinson, Iola, transporting an open container, $446. Heather Trester, Iola, driving under the influence, $1,121. Ralph O. Wilson, Iola, driving under the influence, $1,121. Matthew R. Mertz, Merriam, 80/65, $196. Criminal cases filed:

Andrew J. Nelson, Iola, possession of drug paraphernalia. Ashley D. Houk, Moran, burglary, theft, criminal damage to property, attempted burglary, criminal trespassing. Timothy L. Toumberlin, Moran, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of hallucinogenic drugs, possession of opiates. Andrew S. Berthot, Humboldt, burglary, attempted theft. Lavell L. Rucker, Topeka, distribution of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia. Cassandra D. Hines, Stark, transporting an

Monday

Tomorrow

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 365-2111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R ural C arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Iola Spring Cleanup!

A2

• Affordable Housing for ages 55 and over • Maintenance free, one level garden apartments • 2 bedroom, one bathroom • All appliances included, washer, dryer, microwave, etc. • Clubhouse with water features • Peaceful, quiet, neighborhood Leasing Information: (620) 365-2400 Applicants must meet income restrictions

open container, possession of hallucinogenic drugs. Levi G. Palet, Chanute, possession of hallucinogenic drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, transporting an open container. Timothy E.D. Rogers, Iola, distribution of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia. Juvenile cases filed:

Cody A. Conner, et al, purchase/consumption of liquor by a minor. Jesse D. Zimmerman, et al, purchase/consumption of liquor by a minor. Contract cases filed:

Madeline L. Cooper vs. Teri Mitchell, landlord/tenant unlawful detainer. Labette Health vs. Jared Jenkins, debt collection. Diebolt Lumber & Supply vs. Extreme Roofing LLC, debt collection. Small claims filed:

LaHarpe Telephone Company vs. Shelby A. Miller.

All Items should be out before 6 a.m. on March 31st, 2014

Mar. 31 st - April 4 th, 2014 No calls accepted after Noon on March 28, 2014

Gather up your things you don’t want or need and call 365-4903 before Noon on Friday, March 28 to schedule a pickup.

YES...we pick up Yard Debris, Freon Free Appliances, Furniture, Small Lumber and Miscellaneous Items. Please separate yard waste from household items.

Items must be located by the street or alley.

NO...Tires, Auto

Parts, Hazardous Materials, Wet or Lead Based Paint, Ammunition, Demolition or Construction Debris.... If any of these items are mixed with the regular debris the City will not pick up at that address. If you have any questions call: 365-4903 or 365-4910

The Iola Register

Published Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings except New Year’s day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas, by The Iola Register Inc., 302 S. Washington, P.O. Box 767, Iola, Kansas 66749. (620) 365-2111. Periodicals postage paid at Iola, Kansas. Member Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for publication all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. Subscription rates by carrier in Iola: One year, $107.32; six months, $58.17; three months, $33.60; one month, $11.65. By motor: One year, $129; six months, $73.71; three months, $41.60; one month, $17.24. By mail in Kansas: One year, $131.16; six months, $74.80; three months, $43.89; one month, $17.89. By mail out of state: One year, $141.35; six months, $76.02; three months, $44.97; one month, $17.91. Internet: One year, $100; six months, $55; one month, $10 All prices include 8.04% sales taxes. Postal regulations require subscriptions to be paid in advance. USPS 268-460 Postmaster: Send address changes to The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749.


www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Rally: Advocating for expansion Continued from A1

support something that may affect them in the future,� Chase said. The issue is highly partisan and polarized, they said, but more so in the Statehouse than on a local level. Masterson and Chase, Democrat and Republican, respectively, said the issue is more moral than political — at least that’s how it should be viewed. “I think it blurs the boundaries, I’m a Republican,� Chase said. “The most important issue is the moral issue.� ACCORDING to a report from the Kansas Health Institute, around 80,000 Kansas fall into the “Medicaid gap� that has been created by the lack of expansion. When the Affordable Care Act was drafted, Masterson said, it was designed to rely on

cooperation between the state and federal government. When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that ACA was constitutional, they also stipulated that states could not be forced

“We are leaving the poorest of the poor out there to fend for themselves,� Chase said. “I can’t believe we would do this to our most vulnerable.�

It’s not just in Topeka. I think most middle class and wealthy people don’t realize how hard it is. It’s heartbreaking. — Georgia Masterson

to expand the Medicaid funding. This is where “the gap� comes into play. Without the expansion, single, childless adults are not eligible for Medicaid despite their income and adults with children are only eligible if they earn less than 32 percent of the poverty level — around $630 a month for a threeperson household, according to the KHI report.

Masterson said there is a misconception that the issues are not as urgent as people make them out to be. “It’s not just in Topeka. I think most middle class and wealthy people don’t realize how hard it is,� Masterson said. “It’s heartbreaking.� And the impoverished are not the only affected parties. Chase said Allen County Regional Hospi-

18 MINUTE WASH AND 18 MINUTE DRY. É” 

A3

Iola rec calendar

tal, now a county-funded entity, is facing dramatic reductions in funding from the federal government. The guidelines of the ACA anticipated Medicaid coverage to increase, reducing the support needed from the federal government. Without Medicaid expansion the hospital will not see an increase in coverage, while experiencing a reduction in funding. “The potential for that will be devastating for our hospital,� Masterson said. “It’s not just the hospital, it’s Allen County, it’s our own tax dollars,� Chase added. “It does hurt people in this community, not just the people who can’t get health insurance.� All anyone can do is voice their opinion, both said, and hope that someone can see their side of the story, Masterson said.

365-4990, brad.yoder@cityofiola.com.

Sunday

Quilting group, 6-8 p.m., Bass Community Building, 505 N. Buckeye St., call Helen Sutton, 365-3375.

Monday-Wednesday

Open walking, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Recreation Community Building, will not meet Thursday or Friday.

Monday, Wednesday

Seniorcise class, 9-10 a.m., Recreation Community Building, will not meet Friday.

Tuesday, Friday

Water exercise class, 9-10 a.m., Super 8 Motel, Pauline Hawk instructor, call 365-5565.

Coming events Youth dance classes, Recreation Community Building, classes offered Monday evenings beginning April 7. Register at the rec office by April 4. Boys or girls enrolled in preschool through sixth grade may participate. Youth summer ball program, register online or at the rec office by April 11. Boys and girls ages 4-14 by the appropriate cutoff date may participate. Line dance class, Bass Community Building, 505 N. Buckeye St., Monday, March 31, April 21, May 5, 19, 7-9 p.m, age appropriate children are welcome when accompanied by adult, no preregistration required, call Scott Boan, 365-3108.

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Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Children: Cases are most difficult, important to charge Continued from A1

The law states that endangerment of a child is a situation where they “may” be in dangerous situation: Endangering a child is knowingly and unreasonably causing or permitting a child under the age of 18 years to be placed in a situation in which the child’s life, body or health may be endangered. The next level of charge is “aggravated endangerment,” which essentially replaces the “may be endangered” with “is endangered.” Bowie said numerous types of situations can qualify as an endangerment case. Recently in the district court, cases have come up involving drug charges and driving under the influence. If a child is surrounded by a drug-making environment — like a methamphetamine lab — Bowie said oftentimes endangerment charges will be filed. However, the level of severity can differ if the drugs or other dangerous objects are readily available to the child or kept away from them. Phelan said in a circumstance where a driver is under the influence with children in the vehicle, parent or not, endangerment charges will be filed by the county attorney. It’s environmentally driven,” Phelan said. But the possibilities don’t end there. Bowie said there can even be considerations if the parents knowingly allow their underage children to be involved with criminal or dangerous activity — some parents may not even make the connection. Something both attorneys made very clear, endangerment and abuse are two different charges, but are closely related. “They are next to each oth-

er in the statutes,” Bowie said. An abuse charge is filed only if physical harm comes to the child, and Phelan said the endangerment charges are more common than abuse charges. “It’s not one of the most common charges,” Phelan said. “Most people want to be good parents.” A DECISION on whether to charge a defendant is only

trict court judges for children who need care during abuse or neglect and in some cases child endangerment,” Aimeé Daniels, executive director of CASA said. Daniels said neglect of a child is when a parent fails to provide for a child. This could be unsanitary conditions, not providing proper clothing, not taking the child to the doctor and refusing services for a child’s disability. Neglect is a

The trauma of taking a child out of the home is significant. And if there’s not a family member for them to stay with, they will end up with strangers. — Allen County Attorney Wade Bowie

the first step in the decision making process, and any action from that point forward can and will have an impact on the child. “The trauma of taking a child out of the home is significant,” Bowie said. “And if there’s not a family member for them to stay with, they will end up with strangers.” If danger is imminent, both attorneys said the child must be removed from the home as soon as possible — what they called a “child in need of care case,” which is separate from endangerment or abuse. One does not require the other. The end goal is what is best for the child, Phelan pointed out, not to remove the child from the home. “Reintegration is the case’s goal, we want the child to be back home,” he said. CASA, Court Appointed Special Advocates, becomes a part of this process to help the child. “We’re appointed by dis-

civil court case and usually stems from poverty, she said. “The majority of parents don’t neglect their children on purpose,” Daniels said. “With that being said, sometimes they don’t seek employment or have a drug problem.” Neglect is usually reported by educators, relatives or daycare providers. In such cases, a petition is drafted as a civil matter. CASA reviews all cases but only take on the most complicated and serious matters. Warner said the police respond immediately to a child in need of care. They will remove them from the home, and place them in police protective custody, and the advocates take the reins from there. “We match advocates to a case,” Daniels said. “Some advocates prefer working with a specific age group or some are uncomfortable with certain cases. We try to meet the advocate’s needs as well.”

CASA advocates try to make the child as comfortable as possible and eventually help the child return home. There are 18 advocates at CASA currently. “There’s a common misconception that we take kids out of the home for no reason,” Bowie added. The advocate meets with the child face to face at least once a month. Most advocates visit more than once and they attend all the hearings in court. There are also family planning meetings that help the family so the child can return home. “They stick with them all the way through until the end,” Daniels said. “It creates a close relationship with the children and the advocate.” If the problems can be fixed immediately, Bowie said he may refer the case to the Department of Children and Family Services (DCF) before any further action is taken. But, oftentimes removal from the home is the best option and the child will be placed into police protective care for up to 72 hours. He said if there is endangerment, that can mean there are “multiple issues in the home” from which the child needs to be removed. AS BOWIE pointed out, it is not the court’s duty to remove a child from their home, and they have just as much of a duty to not file a charge if the situation does not demand it — and that can be the most difficult part. “Educating parents is part of it,” Bowie said. The line between endangerment and other things can be blurry, and they need to know as much as possible for both of their sakes. “I don’t have to file a charge in each situation,” he said. “We want to help maintain

the family unit.” Daniels said there are ways to keep that family unit together. The Department of Children and Family Services does have a voluntary program for parenting skills and classes to give them advice. The program teaches the family how to budget and explains what benefits they have available to them. The Douglas County Citizens Committee on Alcoholism also has a contract with the DCF to assist a family before problems arise. “They can go into the home and work with the family and talk about poverty, child behavior and resources,” Daniels said. “If more people sought help there would be less endangerment.” Both Bowie and Phelan agreed that voluntary action on the parents’ part is the optimal resolution, and something that can be monitored by the courts if need be. But, they also said they will not hesitate to act if they need to. “We don’t want to do it,” Bowie said. “But we will if we have to.”

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 365-2111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R ural C arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

Our Traditional



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A few kind words from a former resident about…

Windsor Place. “I had hip replacement surgery in November. Since I live by myself, my doctor didn’t want me to go home right after surgery. He recommended Windsor Place. I knew of Windsor Place and had heard good things about it. My experience at Windsor Place was great. I enjoyed activities like resident council meetings, bible study and bingo. The staff was always sure to include you if you wanted to participate. The food is very good. If you didn’t want what was on the menu, all you had to do was request something else and the cooks would do their best to accommodate you. I was impressed with the staff and how flexible they were. They would help you with whatever you needed even if it wasn’t their job. Even the administration was directly involved in caring for the residents. The best part about Windsor Place was the therapy department. I’ve had therapy at other places and none compares to Windsor Place. When it was time for me to go home, Katie, one of the therapists, went to my house to see if it was safe and setup so that I could care for myself. Windsor Place did everything they could to make sure I would succeed when I went back home.” – Ruby Cook, Former Resident at Windsor Place This winter, Ruby Cook spent about 6 weeks with us at Windsor Place to recover from a hip replacement surgery. When it was time for Ruby to return to her own home, she had some nice things to say about Windsor Place. We just wanted to

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Opinion A5 The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

~ Journalism that makes a difference

Moral Mondays: A time to redirect our compass Kansas had its own Moral Monday, but it was on Tuesday. In Georgia, protestors flooded the state capitol Monday against the Legislature’s refusal to expand Medicaid guidelines as provided in the Affordable Care Act. It was the ninth consecutive Monday activists have convened at the capitol in a movement they call Moral Monday, an offshoot of Truthful Tuesdays begun last year in South Carolina.

Susan Lynn Register editor

Topeka experienced a much milder version of protests Tuesday when about 200, including several Iolans, went to the state capitol in hopes of conveying to legislators the advantages of expanding Medicaid offerings. If supporting Medicaid expansion somehow aligns them with President Obama,

EDUCATION Restore funding to cuts enacted. no Kansas Republican will come within a mile of the measure. As with our Southern neighbors, Kansas now belongs to the right wing. As never before, an ultra-conservative governor and Legislature are suppressing citizens’ rights in Kansas. To wit: • Kansas children are being deprived of an adequate education through underfinanced schools. Funding is so low the Kansas Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional; • Access to affordable health care is being denied through cumbersome new regulations and fees imposed on the health care navigators as well as the state’s own refusal to promote the federal program; • The freedom to vote is being restricted; 11,000 voter registrations hang in limbo because of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s cam-

MEDICAID Yes! Expand services. paign against immigrants; • Legislators are invading the classroom. A bill before the Kansas Senate controls how students are taught, including sex education material; • And tougher rules for public assistance have been enacted, oppressing the poor with cuts to food stamps, help with childcare expenses and temporary assistance. LET’S TAKE the last issue first. Because of new tax laws, the wealthiest are enjoying a 2 percent cut in their income taxes. For the average millionaire, that means a reduction of about $21,087 a year. Meanwhile, our poorest have witnessed an increase of 1.3 percent in taxes because of the elimination of certain credits, including those for purchases of food, for expenditures on rent and for what they paid in childcare. Today, Kansas is in com-

INCOME TAXES Make them fair.

ELECTIONS Encourage participation.

pany with Mississippi and Alabama as the only states that tax food sales and do not provide any relief for such a tax for low-income residents. Up until 2012, families with incomes of less than $17,700 could claim $91 per family member to offset the sales tax they paid on food. For a single parent family with two children, that could mean the difference of $246, or 2 percent of their annual income. If Kansas were to expand Medicaid, about 80,000 would receive health care coverage, many for the first time. Realize as federal taxpayers we are paying for the expansion enjoyed in other states. As of Friday afternoon, Kansas has said goodbye to $85 million in federal aid since Jan. 1, had we participated in the expansion. To see the current tally, go to http://howmuchhasksleftonthetable.com. As for voting rights, Kobach is intent on keeping Kansas as a frontrunner

in discrimination. Kobach “won” a ruling for Kansas Wednesday when a federal judge said we could enforce a two-tiered voting system requiring proof of citizenship when registering to vote. Kobach maintains the extra paper trail is necessary to combat illegal citizens from voting. Since Kobach began this campaign, seven cases of voter fraud have been determined in Kansas over the last 13 years. Seven. “An epidemic,” he proclaims. YOU DON’T have to be a bleeding heart liberal to feel Kansas is straying from the polestar that has long guided us to value education, to have compassion for our poor, to have a fair tax system, and to promote democracy. Increasingly, we are letting ourselves be led by politicians who don’t have our best interests at heart. Moral Mondays should be every day.

Area woman on minimal means saved from financial ruin

ACA health plan a lifesaver for local For one Allen County woman John Robertson is as much a knight in shining armor as was Sir Galahad. Robertson, under auspices of Thrive Allen County, works as a navigator to help people obtain health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act Marketplace The woman, who prefers not to be identified, retired not long ago with every intention of living quietly in her little corner of the world. She qualified for a Social Security allotment of about $900 a month. That’s not a great deal but with no debt and no dependents, she figured it would be sufficient. The catch arose when she went shopping for health insurance, which previously had been a perk of her employment. The best she could do on the private market was a policy with monthly premiums of $540, which ate up 60 percent of her monthly Social Security payment. She was forced to cash in a modest IRA in January to make her new insurance payments. It will be another two years before she qualifies for Medicare. Because Kansas has not expanded its Medicaid guidelines, the woman is caught in what is called the Medicaid Gap. Her current income of $10,800 is below the federal poverty level of $11,700 for an individual, the benchmark that qualifies individuals to receive tax credits to help pay for health insurance under the new ACA. The thinking on the federal government’s part was that for those who live on less than the federal poverty guideline, their states would enroll them into their Medicaid programs, which the feds have agreed to help pay for an expanded program. Kansas’ current Medicaid

At Week’s End Bob Johnson

program is especially restrictive because its benefits apply only to those who have a disability, are pregnant, or who have dependants. For this single woman, no matter how destitute, she would never qualify for Medicaid benefits. If Kansas were to expand Medicaid, those restrictions would no longer apply. The only consideration for benefits would be one’s income. The woman, thus, was forced into a terrible situation. This is where Robertson’s magic came into play. “Let’s see what we can do,” he said, when the distressed woman came to his office Wednesday evening. Seems the money being withdrawn from her IRA policy can be considered taxable income and when added to her Social Security income nudges her up to the federal poverty level. She now qualifies for tax credits under the Affordable Care Act. Her new premium is $110 a month. Remember, it was $540, and without the Affordable Care Act would have remained at that level. The new plan also includes dental insurance and deductibles as good or better than she had before. I DOUBT the woman’s situation differs much from many others in Allen County. ACA enrollment remains open through the end of March. Take advantage. You may be just as ecstatic with the results as this woman was.

Letter to the editor Dear editor,

Why do the gay people insist on everyone knowing they’re gay, like it is something to celebrate? Kansas deserves a shiny gold star for not crumbling under the pressure to allow gay marriages. Laws can be changed or new laws written and gay

marriages will still be wrong. If gay marriages are approved, what’s next? Grandma marrying a granddaughter? Two brothers marrying for tax purposes, insurance, welfare, or Social Security? Sound ridiculous? Gay marriages and every Tom, Dick and Harry carrying a

loaded gun ready to shoot anyone who looks cross-eyed at them used to sound ridiculous. (Still does, actually). If a person chooses to become a chef, they should expect there to be heat in the kitchen. Bonnie Johnson, Iola, Kan.

Alookbackintime  40 Years Ago Week of March 23, 1974

HUMBOLDT — Humboldt Industries, Inc., has been sold to Smithco, Inc., of Wayne, Pa. Smithco has been the exclusive sales representative for Humboldt Industries since it began local operations in 1965. No changes are planned in the local operation and Cecil Carey will continue as president and plant manager. ***** Fifteen production workers have been called back to IMP Boats here to build cruisers and other special models for which orders have been received, Jim Fitzpat-

rick, president, told the Register this morning. ***** The Iola post office has a coin-operated duplicating machine, which has been placed in the lobby. Clyde Sharp, Iola postmaster, said the Iola office is one of four in southeast Kansas outfitted with one of the copiers under a new customer-convenience program being tested by the Postal Service. The copies cost 10 cents each. ***** All seats for the Count Basie Concert at the Bowlus Fine Arts Center tonight have been sold, Dale Creitz, center director, said this

morning. Even the tickets for the folding chairs placed in the auditorium to provide additional seating are gone. ***** Roe Spencer, owner of Spencer and Sons clothing store at 10 S. Washington, will open a new store, The Clothesout, in about two weeks in the Iola State Bank building at the intersection of Jefferson and Madison streets. Spencer said that the boys’ and men’s clothing merchandise will include overruns, mill ends and distressed merchandise ranging in price from $1 to $50. The store will be open from 1 to 5 p.m. seven days a week.


A6

Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Engagements Rochelle McGhee and Jerald Smart Rochelle Nicole McGee, Westphalia, and Jerald Dustin Smart, Iola, will come together in marriage on June 7, 2014 at Lil’ Toledo Lodge and Event Center. Rochelle is the daughter of Darren and Cindy McGhee, Westphalia. She is the granddaughter of Gareld and Shirley McGhee, Colony, and Ron and Wilma Atchison, Princeton. She graduated from Anderson County High School in 2009. She received her associate degree

Jenna Sigg and Brandon Hesse Jenna Sigg, Iola, and Brandon Hesse, Iola, will be married on April 26, 2014, at St. John’s Catholic Church, Iola. Jenna is the daughter of Mitchell and the late Peggy Sigg, Iola. She is the granddaughter of Mary and the late Donald Martin, Iola, John Sigg, Iola, and Linda Sigg, Iola. She graduated from Iola High School in

2009 and from Allen Community College in 2011. She is employed at Sigg Motors. Brandon is the son of Brad and Cindy Hesse. He is the grandson of Gene and Elva Dean Smith, Gas, the late Francis Hesse, St. Marys, and the late Kathy Hesse, St. Marys. He graduated from Iola High School in 2004 and is employed at Sigg Motors.

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in animal science from Allen Community College and then attended Fort Hays State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in general agriculture. Jerald is the son of Jerald and Vicki Smart, Scipio. He is the grandson of Marvin and Rita Stanley, Elsmore, and Bob and Thelma Culler, Colony. He graduated from Iola High School in 2003. He has been with BNSF Railroad since 2007 in the track maintenance department.

Misty Thompson and Anders Wibskov Misty Dawn Thompson, Lawrence, and Anders Holger Berry Wibskov, Lawrence, will unite in marriage on May 14, 2014, in Positano, Italy. Misty is the daughter of Daniel and Jackie Thompson, Iola. She is an Iola High School and University of Kansas graduate. She is employed at PGi, Olathe. Anders is the son of Jorgen Wibskov, Farmington, Mo., and Krista Goering, Lawrence. He is a graduate of North St. Francois High School, Bonne Terre, Mo., and the University of Kansas. He is employed at the Oread Hotel, Lawrence. The couple will host a reception at the Oread Hotel on May 31.

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Emily Callahan and Joshua Tidd Joshua is the son of the late Julie Tidd and David and Laura Tidd, Iola. He graduated from Iola High School in 2008 and Pittsburg State University in 2012 with a bachelor of music degree in trombone performance. He will graduate in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a Master of Music in trombone performance. He is currently employed by the University of Nebraska as a teaching assistant.

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The parents of Emily Callahan and Joshua Tidd announce their engagement and upcoming marriage on May 17, 2014. Emily is the daughter of Richard and Alicia Callahan, Palmyra, Neb. She will graduate in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a bachelor of music degree in piano performance. She was home-schooled K-12 and graduated in 2010. She is self-employed as a piano teacher.

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Sports Daily The Iola Register

NCAA tourney note

Due to the Register’s early deadline Friday, scores from the NCAA Tournament involving Kansas, Kansas State and Wichita State were unavailable for today’s issue.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

B

THE TEAM TIME FORGOT Humboldt’s 1963-64 basketball team featured one of the most remarkable starting lineups ever in southeast Kansas. But a heartbreaking loss in the state championship game left the Cubs as only a footnote in local sports lore. By RICHARD LUKEN The Iola Register

T

here’s a reason it’s called March Madness, with its rich history of euphoria and heartbreak. History books are filled with stories of the most powerful Goliaths being slain by seemingly outmatched Davids. A cold night shooting, untimely foul trouble or a fateful bounce or two can undo just about anyone. Just ask Bill Stange, one of the starters on a team many consider among the greatest high school basketball squads ever to lace ’em up in these parts. That 50 years have passed since the 1964 Cubs took the court has done little to dampen Stange’s memories of the star-crossed, magical season. But for others, including the participants, memories of the ’64 Cubs have gone by the wayside. “You know, I hadn’t thought about that game in years,” said Steve Honeycutt, one of the senior stalwarts who later became a fan favorite and twoyear all-conference player at Kansas State University. “It’s been so long, I don’t remember a lot,” said Craig Adams, another starter who grew up to become a teacher, coach and administrator at Wellsville High School. QUITE A LINEUP

Hopes were high for Humboldt entering the winter of 1963, thanks in large part to Humboldt’s dynamic trio of seniors. Earl Seyfert, Steve Honeycutt and Joe Henrichs all played key roles the previous year as the Cubs advanced to the Class A State Tournament and were returning for their senior seasons. At 6 feet, 8 inches, Seyfert dominated the court on both offense and defense. At 6-3, Henrichs also had plenty of length to cause match-up problems, particularly because of his shooting. “Joe was such a great shooter,” Stange said. “He could hit from almost anywhere.” Henrichs was limited in his scoring only because of the

The 1963-64 Humboldt High Cubs, front from left, Bill Stange, Craig Adams, Steve Honeycutt and Bob Jones; second row from left, Ronnie Owens, Earl Seyfert and Joe Henrichs. PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL STANGE

era in which he played. Remember, the 3-point line was decades away from being enacted at the high school ranks. “I’d have loved to have seen how many points he would have gotten with the 3-point line,” Stange said. If defenses converged on those two, the 6-foot Honeycutt was more than able to pick up the slack at guard. While he, too, was capable of scoring in bunches, Honeycutt’s greatest attribute was at the other end. “I loved playing defense,” Honeycutt said. While his teammates con-

trolled the game with their height, Honeycutt utilized his quickness and speed to harass opposing guards. Rounding out the starting lineup was Stange, at 6-1, another front line player in there to do the unsung work — pull in key rebounds, set screens for Seyfert to do his handiwork and get an occasional putback. Likewise, Adams helped steady the ship at guard when the need arose. “Every starting lineup needs a weak link,” Adams joked. “I was it.” Equally lanky Ronnie Owens, 6-3, came off the bench

when a teammate tired. “We were confident,” Honeycutt said. “We thought we could have a special season that year.” SOMETHING SPECIAL

The 1963-64 season was the capstone for the youths who had forged friendships as youths growing up together in small town America. Honeycutt, Henrichs, Stange and Adams all grew up within a few blocks of each other, playing baseball, basketball or whatever sport beckoned. Seyfert moved to town by the time he was 10

and joined the group. They were more than skilled athletes. “Steve and Earl’s fathers were pastors,” Stange said. “Joe’s father might as well have been.” They also excelled in the classroom. By the time they graduated, Henrichs was Humboldt’s valedictorian; Seyfert the salutatorian. Honeycutt and Stange were National Honor Society students. “I’m pretty sure I’m the only one in the group who ever said a cuss word,” Stange joked. The Cubs gave fans a glimpse of their potential during their eighth-grade year when they rolled through the season with a 9-0 record in 1959-60. “We knew then we had a pretty special group,” said Honeycutt. “There weren’t many 6-2 middle-schoolers like Earl was.” Sure enough, Seyfert almost immediately earned a starting spot for the Cubs when he entered high school. Henrichs and Honeycutt joined him in the starting lineup by their junior years. The ’63 Cubs made it to the state playoffs, where they were eliminated in the first round by Buhler, 55-41. When Stange and Adams joined the starting lineup the next season, the team was ready to roll. The Cubs won their first 15 games by an average of 28 points. Only once during the regular season did a team stay within single digits. Humboldt’s players were soft-spoken on and off the court, happy to let their games do their talking. Stange remembered entering the regional tournament against Garnett, a team Humboldt had defeated twice during the regular season by an average of 29. “But Garnett’s players let it be known they weren’t that impressed with our team,” Stange recalled. “They said they were going to beat us at regionals.” Instead, Humboldt limited Garnett to 26 points in their regional opener, winning by 32. See HISTORY | Page B3

Independence adds to Allen Red Devil misery on diamond By RICHARD LUKEN The Iola Register

John Prohaska took the loss in a 12-3 defeat, despite allowing only one run in five innings, with 11 strikeouts. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

Forgive Val McLean if he heads to the pharmacy for mass quantities of antivenom in the near future. His Allen Community College Red Devils have been plenty snakebit on the diamond this week. One day after losing a gut-wrenching 7-5 decision to Butler, the Red Devils returned home Thursday for a doubleheader against Independence. The visiting Pirates battered Allen pitching to the tune of 12-3 and 22-11. The losses keep Allen winless in Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division play at 0-14. The Red Devils are 5-19 overall. “We have to regroup,” McLean said. “Wednesday’s loss was a heartbreaker, and in our second game Thursday we walked 11 guys and had five or six errors. You can’t be successful playing that way.” Wednesday’s loss may have been the most painful of them all. Starter Chase Cunningham was working on a no-hitter through 7 1/3 innings, with ACC on top 5-0,

when it fell apart in a hurry. Butler’s Logan Beard grounded a one-out single up the middle to break up the no-hitter. An infield single followed, prompting McLean to call on Logan Bausch for relief. Allen’s relieving corps couldn’t stop the bleeding. A walk, double and passed ball cut Allen’s lead to 5-3 before two more walks loaded the bases with two out. A fielding error by Allen’s Camron Myers allowed two runs to score and tie the game. Michael Bird, who opened the inning with a ground-out, broke the tie with a frozen rope to center. Allen got a two-out walk in the top of the ninth but a ground ball ended the game. Two Butler errors staked the Red Devils to a 2-0 lead. Kyle Foster had an RBI single and Drew Walden smacked a sacrifice fly for the second run. Kyle Foster tripled to lead off the top of the eighth, and scored on Austin Griffin’s RBI single. Trever Kreifel scored on a wild pitch. Camdon Myers pushed the lead to 5-0 with an RBI single.

Foster went 3-for-4 with a triple, while Sean Maruo had a pair of singles. Trey Francis, Griffin and Myers also singled. Cunningham allowed two hits and three walks in 7 1/3 innings with five strikeouts. Bausch surrendered a hit and two walks, while Chris McPherson gave up a hit and walk in his relief stint. JOHN PROHASKA looked to give Allen a lift in his start in Thursday’s opener. He delivered in dominating fashion, striking out 11 in five innings and allowed just two hits, but exited trailing 1-0. Butler tacked on two in the top of the sixth to lead 3-0 before Drew Walden closed the gap with a windaided two-run home run. The wind didn’t add to distance, which was well clear of the left field fence. Rather, it pushed the hooking foul ball just into fair territory as it passed the foul pole. Myers followed Walden’s blast with a double, still with nobody See ACC | Page B6


B2

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Personals MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 877391-1010.

Public Notices TRI-VALLEY BOARD MEETS MARCH 27TH at 6p.m. at Pizza Hut, 1612 N. State, Iola.

Coming Events BENEFIT BAKE SALE, Sunday March 23, 8a.m.-6p.m., at Walmart. YATES CENTER RACEWAY, 1139 OSAGE RD, YATES CENTER, KS. Go Kart Track will open for the 2014 season. March 29th and April 13th we will have Practice Runs starting 2p.m., $20 for Kart and Driver, $10 Pit Pass for non-drivers. General Admission will be free for Practice Dates. 2014 Race Day’s will be announced at a later date. Facebook: Y.C. Raceway, 620-5833480, 620-496-7455.

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The CITY OF IOLA is now accepting applications for the following seasonal positions for summer 2014: • Cashier • Concession Stand Worker • Swim Lesson Instructors Qualified applicants must be at least 14 years old. • Lifeguards Qualified applicants must be at least 15 years old. • Slide Attendant • Assistant Swim Team Instructor • Umpire • Score Keepers Qualified applicants must be at least 16 years old. • Pool Manager • Head Swim Team Instructor • Morning Work Manager • Swim Lesson Coordinator Qualified applicants must be at least 18 years old. Pre-employment drug screen required. Seasonal job application forms are available at the Recreation Office or the City Clerk’s Office. EEO / ADA

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$500 SIGN ON BONUS FOR QUALIFIED CDL DRIVERS! Hopper bottom company with regional, dedicated runs, home on weekends. Benefits include, paid vacation, company contributed health insurance, safety incentive bonus. Call Dan at RC TRUCKING INC., Gridley, KS, 620-437-6616.

MANPOWER OF CHANUTE, 406 E. MAIN, 620-431-0001, has several openings for LONG TERM GENERAL LABOR positions. If you have not applied with us please do so at www. manpowerjobs.com, must be able to pass background check and drug screen.

TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR, full-time opening in Independence with Connections Transportation, a non-emergency medical transportation company. Duties include day-to-day oversight of staff and vehicles, training, grant compliance, and related duties. Bachelor’s degree in Human Services, Business or Marketing with emphasis on Human Services or related field experience. Management, logistics, and grant reporting experience preferred. Proven communication skills required. To apply, please email resumes to: hr@fourcounty. com or mail to: Human Resources, Four County MHC, PO Box 688, Independence, KS 67301. Four County MHC., d.b.a. Connections, is an EOE. DESERET HEALTH AND REHAB AT YATES CENTER has openings for CNA/CMA. Fulltime, all shifts, competitive wages. Application may be picked up at 801 S. Fry, Yates Center, KS 66783, 620-625-2111. CHILDREN’S CASE MANAGER, full-time. Bachelor’s degree preferred in Psychology, Sociology, Education. Will consider other degrees. May consider Associate’s degree and relevant experience working with children. Requires empathetic, patient individual with organizational and computer skills, good communication, team oriented, able to work independently. Benefits. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resume to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, 620-3658641, EOE/AA. CITY OF LAHARPE is now taking applications for a TEMPORARY MAINTENANCE WORKER. Successful candidates will be self-motivated, mechanically inclined, willing to do physical labor and must pass a drug screening. Apply at LaHarpe City Hall, 902 S. Washington, LaHarpe. FT/PT TEMPORARY MAINTENANCE WORKER. The City of Gas is seeking an individual for the FT/PT temporary position of city maintenance worker. Duties include, but are not limited to; trash collection, repair of the city’s water lines; waste water collection sites; maintenance of streets, park and cemetery. Requirements: high school diploma, valid KS driver’s license, able to lift 70 pounds, ability to work well with the public, and must pass drug screening. Salary will be based on experience. Applications are available at City Hall, 228 N. Taylor, Gas. NURSE, OUTPATIENT COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER, full-time position in Humboldt working with psychiatric staff. Requires Kansas RN license, will consider LPN. Nurse assistant to medical staff in an outpatient community mental health center. Daytime position. Computer skills required. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resumes to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, call 620-365-8641, fax 620-365-8642, or email bstanley@sekmhc.org, EOE/AA.

SUMMER JOBS Children’s Aide Interviewing Now! Great summer job working with youth. Good experience for college students seeking related career. Good role model. 28-30 hours/week. Late May to early August. Clean driving record and reliable transportation. Minimum 18 years. Drug screen required. Applications at Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, 304 N. Jefferson Ave. Questions, call Michelle 620-365-5717. EOE/AA. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening for INVENTORY TECHNICIAN (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high school diploma/GED. Applicant must have extensive industry experience, knowledge of basic hand tools & what they are used for. Must be able to run heavy equipment, i.e. fork lift, skid steer, etc., use cutting torch & welder. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. and work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd., Chanute, KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening for WELL SERVICING RIG HAND (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high school diploma/GED. Applicant will operate a variety of hand tools & hydraulic tools & equipment, drive crew-truck, rig-trucks, obtain Class B/Class A CDL within 90 days of employment. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. and work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd, Chanute, KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer.

Poultry & Livestock (12) COW/CALF PAIRS WITH BLACK/BWF CALVES, 2 weeks-7 months old, some 3-1 packages, $2,350/pair, 620-3631145 or 620-363-4521.

Farm Miscellaneous FARMLAND FOR RENT, 88 tilled acres, near Kincaid, call 913-271-8733. WILL BALE YOUR HAY ON SHARES, Moran, Bronson, Uniontown area. Call Travis 620-768-9244.

Merchandise for Sale MEDICAL GUARDIAN - Toprated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month, 877-531-3048. PURCHASE PHOTOS TAKEN AT AREA SPORTS EVENTS, click the photos link at www.iolaregister.com

CLO is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping adults and children w ith severe developm entaldisabilities achieve personally satisfying and fulfilling lifestyle.

STORAGE & RV OF IOLA WEST HIGHWAY 54, 620-365-2200. Regular/Boat/RV storage, LP gas, fenced, supervised, www. iolarvparkandstorage.com

SUPERIOR BUILDERS. New Buildings, Remodeling, Concrete, Painting and All Your Carpenter Needs, including replacement windows and vinyl siding. 620-365-6684

A daily history of Allen County since 1867

Performs all plant maintenance functions including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, heating and air conditioning and welding. Have understanding and ability to read blueprints and diagrams. Responsible for troubleshooting and repairing plant equipment. Follow diagrams and blueprints showing locations of wiring and equipment. Knowledge of and ability to work with 3 phase. Candidate for this position must be able to perform task in electronic field to include - PLC Debug and repair, understanding of ladder logic, Allen Bradley 1395 drive experience desired. Candidate must require little or no supervision. Strong mechanical aptitude and ability to work well with your hands. Minimum Education and Experience Required 2 year associate degree in engineering technology is desired or equivalent work experience. Other Successful applicant will be required to furnish their own adequate tools to complete responsible tasks stated above. Must complete extensive training required related to Safety/Emergency training and procedures. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

SHAUGHNESSY BROS. CONSTRUCTION, LLC. Carpentry and painting service Siding and windows 620-365-6815, 620-3655323 or 620-228-1303

ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control. FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-888-720-5583.

REGISTER

Certified Medication Aide

MECHANIC WANTED for farm implement & tractor business. Must have valid driver’s license. Drug screen required. EOE. Benefits package. Apply in person Storrer Implement Inc., 1801 East St., Iola, 620-365-5692.

Services Offered

IOLA MINI-STORAGE 323 N. Jefferson Call 620-365-3178 or 365-6163

IOLA

CNA

Steve Kelly - Auctioneer 620-404-0050

BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS FOR OVER 30 YEARS, highest prices paid for collector coins, Jon Minor 620-365-8161.

THE

NOW HIRING

GARDEN TILLING in Iola and surrounding area, Derrek McKarnin 620-363-3004.

Wanted to Buy

 Beginning salary is $27,000 to new college graduate or to someone with commensurate experience in newspapers.  Comes with full benefits and an employer-match IRA plan. 

Personal Service Insurance

4-K Ranch - Owner

For complete listing & Photos: www.kellyandcompanysales.com

Looking for a full-time reporter who is eager to become a part of the community. Photography and layout skills a plus.

Services Offered

6- Balers

3 - Bush Hogs

Help Wanted

Contact Susan Lynn, editor and publisher, at editorial@iolaregister.com or 620-365-2111. 

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6 - Rakes/Tedders 3 - Round Bale Wrap System

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS ONLINE! JUST GO TO www.iolaregister.com

Help Wanted

Auctions

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The Iola Register

Carlisle Transportation Products LLC in their Fort Scott, KS facility is currently conducting a search for: Electrical Engineer req# 329, Plant Controller req# 357 and Environmental Health and Safety Manager req# 360. Back to Basics: The future is bright for our industry and Company. We’ve gone back to basics to re-capture the spirit of American manufacturing and American value-based, customer-driven initiatives. Learning from the past with a common vision for the future, you can rely on Carlisle belts today and tomorrow. We Know What Works: Quality products, made in the US heartland, by American workers focused upon product quality and customer satisfaction. Back to the USA: Carlisle belts are proudly made by craftsmen in state-of-the-art ISOregistered manufacturing facilities in Springfield, Missouri and Fort Scott, Kansas. CTP is a nearly 100 year old company. Please visit our careers section of www.carlisletransportationproducts.com, look for the interactive jobs portal of the careers section, requisition #329-Engineer, requisition #357Controller, requisition # 360-EHS Manager. Carlisle Transportation Products LLC is a global manufacturing company of specialty tire, wheel and power transmission products. CTP offers an excellent benefit package including but not limited to 10 paid holidays per year, 2 weeks of vacation after one completed year of service, continuous improvement incentives, 401K and group medical/dental/vision plans. Equal Opportunity Employer CTP participates in E-Verify. The employer will provide the Social Security Administration (SSA) and, if necessary, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with information from each new employees I-9 to confirm work authorization.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES (620) 365-2111

All ads are 10 word minimum, must run consecutive days. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. day before publication; GARAGE SALE SPECIAL: Paper & Web only, no shopper: 3 Days $1 per word

N ow hiring for the follow ing positions: 56 H our W eekend D irect Support Professional Q ualifications include: M ust be at least 20 Years ofage; M inim um ofhigh schooldiplom a or GED; O peration of m otor vehicle. Current and valid driver’s license. M eet ALL ofCLO ’s driving guidelines. Experience w orking w ith persons w ho have disabilities a plus. Full-Tim e Benefits include: M edicalHealth Reim bursem ent Account, Dental, and Paid Tim e O ff. Earn $468.08 a w eekend and have your w eekdays off! Please apply online at w w w .clokan.org or in person at 201 W estStreet, Iola, KS 66749. Call620-365-7119 for m ore inform ation. EO E

Now Hiring Gates Corporation is a worldwide leader in the production of hydraulic hose. We are a growing company and are looking for only the finest employees for our manufacturing operation.

Full-Time & Part-Time Positions Available On Evenings & Night Shifts. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

Gates Corporation 1450 Montana Road Iola, Kansas

Equal Opportunity Employer

Paper, Web and Shopper 6 Days • $1.85/WORD 12 Days • $2.35/WORD 18 Days • $3.25/WORD 26 Days • $4.00/WORD

ADDITIONS Blind Box • $5 Centering • $2 Photo • $5


www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

History: Magical season remembered

B3

Continued from B1

The Garnett win set up a showdown with Gardner, the host school for the regional tournament. “Gardner had just built its new high school, and they were giving us a tour before the game,” Stange recalled. Their guide, Gardner’s principal, took the players through a large cafeteria that doubled as a banquet hall. It was there, Stange said, the principal told the Cub players that Gardner planned to host its celebratory dinner after winning the regional tournament. “We didn’t say a word,” Stange said. Instead, the Cubs rolled that night over Gardner, winning 83-36. The game led to a humorous encounter years later for Adams as he started his teaching career in Wellsville after he introduced himself to another young teacher. “Not that Humboldt,” his coworker cried. “You’ve gotta be kidding me.” Adams learned the Gardner coaches were so confident of victory they prematurely called off classes the following Monday to celebrate. “Sorry we ruined their fun,” Adams laughed. The Cubs secured a return trip to the state tournament in Hutchinson with a 37-27 win over Bonner Springs. They opened state competition with a 56-46 win over Colby and a 67-56 romp over Haven to set up a showdown with an old nemesis, Buhler. “Buhler had lost quite a few players from the season before,” Stange said. “They weren’t supposed to be as good.” Buhler certainly wasn’t supposed to be the one facing Humboldt for the title. That honor was designated for Beloit, and their

“We played a good team that day. I’d have loved to have won it, but we just got beat.” — Bill Stange, on Humboldt’s 51-49 loss to Buhler in the 1964 state title game

Bill Stange, left, and Craig Adams today. REGISTER/STEVEN SCHWARTZ

head coach, Gene Keady. Beloit and Humboldt were tapped prior to the tournament as the cofavorites. Buhler’s 72-68 semifinal win changed those plans. THE GAME

Buhler had no match for Humboldt’s height, with only one player standing taller than 6-1. But the Crusaders were anything but small. “They were a bunch of farm boys,” Stange said. “They were thick, powerful. We were all skinny and slow.” The game started on an ominous note for Humboldt. Three early fouls sent Seyfert to the bench by the midpoint of the second quarter, depriving the Cubs of their biggest offensive and defensive weapon. In his stead, Henrichs picked up the slack, draining jumper after jumper to keep things close. How close? A Hutchinson reporter noted the game featured 11 ties and so many lead changes, “you needed a calculator to keep count.” The score was tied at 47-all when Buhler’s John Gaddert drove in for a layup to give the Crusaders a 49-47 lead with just over two minutes remaining. While memories have

faded for many involved — “I really don’t recall a lot about the game,” Adams said — those final two minutes are like yesterday for Stange. After a Cub timeout, Honeycutt found himself open in the corner with 1:36 left. His jumper tied the score at 49-49. Buhler was content to hold the ball for the final shot, patiently moving the ball around the perimeter until guard Rod Franz found Bruce Ediger gliding under the basket for the layup — 51-49. Six seconds remained as Humboldt called timeout with the hopes of getting up a final shot. Head coach Ed Hankins’ instructions were simple. “He told us that somebody needed to put it up for Seyfert,” Stange said. Honeycutt raced upcourt, passing to Stange on the far wing. “I was probably 15 to 18 feet from the basket, just a bit farther than what I was used to shooting,” Stange said. But with time running short, he had no choice. With nary a moment’s hesitation — and Seyfert camped beneath the basket as instructed — Stange let it fly. The ball hit the rim, bounced up, then hit the rim a second time. The second bounce

4 S te p s To

Kind e rg a rte n Attention USD #257 Parents with

KINDERGARTEN AGE CHILDREN who will be entering kindergarten this Aug. (Children must be 5 on or before Aug. 31, 2014)

Step 1

Please call any of these elementary schools ASAP:

We need to know your child’s name and birthday.

LINCOLN . . . 365-4820 JEFFERSON 365-4840 McKINLEY . . 365-4860

Step 2

Mon., March 24

KINDERGARTEN ROUND-UP

6:30 p.m.

Jefferson Gym 300 S. Jefferson

USD 257 Districtwide Meeting

KINDERGARTEN SCREENING McKinley 365-4860

Jefferson 365-4840

Lincoln 365-4820

Important immunizations, physicals, visitation schedule and pre-enrollment information will be available.

Step 3

was crucial. “It would have been a tough shot, but Earl could have gotten the rebound for the putback,” Stange said. “But the second bounce meant he was off balance.” Seyfert could only deflect the ball as the final horn sounded. Buhler’s fans swarmed the court to celebrate; Humboldt’s players and fans sat in stunned silence. Stange saw cheerleaders and other supporters wiping away tears. He wasn’t as distraught. “We played a good team that day,” he said. “I’d have loved to have won it, but we just got beat.” Honeycutt wasn’t as diplomatic. “I was mad,” he said. “We should have won. We didn’t play to our strength, which was Earl.” STAYING TOGETHER

The end of the basketball season didn’t mean the end of the close-knit bond between Humboldt’s quintet. Honeycutt and Seyfert shared the court many times after that, as teammates at Kansas State. Three Cubs, in fact, signed up to play basketball for Tex Winter’s Wildcats. Seyfert picked K-State over such schools as the University of Kansas and John Wooden’s UCLA juggernaut. (He owns the distinction of being invited by both Winter and Wooden to attend the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four showdown between Kansas State and UCLA that spring in Kansas City, Mo. Seyfert picked KSU shortly after that, even though Wooden’s Bruins won the game and one game later the NCAA title.) Honeycutt admits he was an afterthought to the Kansas State recruiters. “Tex came down to see Earl, and that’s how he saw me play,” Honeycutt said. “I was only about 5-11, 145 pounds, and I wasn’t a very good ball handler.” But Honeycutt showed

8 a.m.-3 p.m. Riverside Park Community Building

Visitation will be arranged at this time.

Step 4

KINDERGARTEN VISITATION ~ Sign up during round-up or screening ~

Or call school to make arrangements if not made previously. Jefferson Visitation McKinley Visitation Lincoln Visitation 365-4840 365-4860 365-4820

enough raw ability and court savvy to draw a scholarship offer. He redshirted his sophomore season at KSU, and used the year away from the court to advantage. “I worked primarily on dribbling with my left hand,” he said. “It got to the point that I was primarily left-handed with the ball the rest of my career.” Like at Humboldt, both left a legacy at Kansas State. Seyfert and Honeycutt were voted team co-captains in the 1967-68 season, with Honeycutt averaging a team-leading 14.4 points per game, and Seyfert just behind at 13.8. Honeycutt earned allBig 8 honors his junior and senior years. Seyfert was equally impressive in the classroom. He was named an academic AllAmerican following his senior year. “It was fun, knowing I could hold my own against some of the best players in the country,” Honeycutt said, where he faced future NBA stars such as Kansas’ Jo Jo White and Nebraska’s Stu Lance. Neither Seyfert nor Honeycutt played professionally, although both were drafted by NBA teams. Seyfert was picked in the 13th round of the 1968 draft by the Philadelphia 76ers. Honeycutt was drafted in the 17th round a year later by Seattle. Honeycutt eschewed reporting to camp because of an illness that struck him late his senior season. “I dropped quite a bit of weight and was too weak to even try out,” he said. “Besides that, I had a four-year commitment to Air Force on my horizon.” Likewise, Seyfert entered the military after his days in Manhattan. He played for a select Army team sporting

To n I n O rc h a M

2 Days - Mar. 27 & 28

Call school for screening appointment if you didn’t schedule at Round-Up.

Earl Seyfert, left, and Steve Honeycutt starred on the basketball court for Humboldt High and later at Kansas State University. PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK STEINER

$

such teammates as current Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski. He played professionally overseas in the Philippines for a couple of years before hanging up his sneakers and entering the professional world. Seyfert became president and chief executive officer of Maestas Glass Company in Albuquerque, N.M. Attempts to reach Seyfert for the article went unanswered. LOSING A FRIEND

Joe Henrichs played on Kansas State’s freshman team — freshmen weren’t allowed to play varsity those years — before giving up basketball to focus solely on his studies as a sophomore. Tragedy struck on a wet, foggy morning on Feb. 27, 1966. Henrichs was a passenger on a Cessna 150, piloted by a KSU classmate and amateur pilot that crashed near a farm just south of Emporia. Both Henrichs and the pilot, 19-year-old Douglas Peters of Ellinwood, were killed. Henrichs had celebrated his 20th birthday three weeks earlier. They were returning to Manhattan after spending the weekend with Henrichs’ family in Humboldt. “It was such a shock — so sad,” Honeycutt said. “I remember as a kid riding to my brother’s basketball games with Joe and his parents. He played the organ at church. He was a good, good young man.” THE TEAM THAT TIME FORGOT

The bond between the old teammates slowly dissipated through the years. After graduating from Pittsburg State, Stange stuck around southeast Kansas. He was among See HISTORY | Page B4

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FLYNN APPLIANCE & HI-DEF CENTER 11 N. Jefferson • East side Iola square • (888) 702-9390 or (620) 365-2538 Open Mon.-Thur. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-1 p.m.


B4

Saturday, March 22, 2014

The Wally Pipp syndrome What became a legendary career for Earl Seyfert at Humboldt High School began in a Wally Pipp sort of way. Pipp, baseball fans with a penchant for history will remember, showed up at Yankee Stadium one day in 1925 with a headache. The Yanks’ first baseman was given the day off by Manager Miller Huggins, with Lou Gehrig starting in his place. Gehrig went on to play

At Week’s End

uled to start at center, was sidelined because of an illness. Seyfert, a tall and promising freshman, took his place. Seyfert scored 14 points (according to the writer’s memory) and grabbed about as many rebounds. He went on to play 78 games, scored 1,251 points and led Humboldt to a second place finish in the state tournament in 1964, a loss that still nags at Cub faithful.

Bob Johnson

2,130 consecutive games at first. In the first game of the 1960-61 high school season, Humboldt opened at Burlington. Dan Hardwood, a senior sched-

History: Cubs reflect on ’64 Continued from B3

the first employees at Iola’s Berg Manufacturing (later Haldex) plant before moving to Tramec Corporation when it opened. He then was among the founders of Precision Pump before retiring. Stange now runs a hunting lodge northwest of Humboldt. Adams moved to Wellsville, where he taught and later became an administrator. His son, Josh, was hired last year as Wellsville High principal. His daughter teaches third grade. Retired, he lives in Olathe. Both Stange and Adams remained involved with youth athletics af-

W

t i W

younger brother, Phil — the school has not had a ceremony to honor the 1964 squad. The team was briefly recalled by long-time Cub faithful during the spring of 2013 when last year’s Humboldt squad rolled through the basketball season undefeated. Last year’s Humboldt team eventually broke the ’64 Cubs’ school record winning streak en route to a second-place finish at the state playoffs. Honeycutt is hopeful to see his former teammates again. “I’d love to have us get together,” he said. “It’d be great to talk about old times.”

ter their playing days. Stange officiated basketball and football for more than 18 years. Adams coached for several years in addition to his teaching duties. After college, Honeycutt fulfilled his military obligation with the Air Force before a 35-year career with Conoco Phillips. Now retired, he lives in Magnolia, Texas. “It was probably at our 20-year reunion that we last saw each other,” Honeycutt said. “And that was 30 years ago.” Unlike Humboldt’s 1969 state champion squad — which featured Earl’s younger brother, Lynn, and Honeycutt’s

p i h ors

! s hU

Calvary United Methodist Church Jackson & Walnut St., Iola

“The Cross Shines Brightly at Calvary” Sunday Worship.................9:15 a.m. Sunday School ................10:30 a.m. Rev. Gene McIntosh, pastor Office: 620-365-3883 Parsonage: 620-365-3893

Carlyle Presbyterian Church 29 Covert St., Carlyle

Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Bible Study............... Tuesday 3 p.m.

First Assembly of God

1020 E. Carpenter, Iola Sunday School (All Ages). . . . . . . .9 a.m. Teens First Sunday...................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Sunday Praise & Prayer...........6 p.m. Kids First Wednesday. ........6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Class...........7 p.m. iolafirstag.org

To n I n O h c r Ma

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Humboldt United Methodist Church

St. John’s Catholic Church

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship..................11 a.m. MS/HS Youth...........................5 p.m.

Saturday Evening...............5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m.

806 N. 9th, Humboldt

Nursery provided

310 S. Jefferson, Iola

(at St. Joseph’s, Yates Center......8 a.m.)

Wednesday P.S.R. Classes...6:30 p.m. September thru May Confessions Saturday. . .4:30 - 5 p.m.

Paul Miller, pastor

Marge Cox, pastor

620-365-2492

620-473-3242

620-365-2277

LaHarpe Baptist Mission

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church

Sunday School......................10 a.m. Morning Worship..................11 a.m. Sunday Evening......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service................7 p.m.

Sunday Worship..8:15 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School...................9:30 a.m.

First Baptist Church 7 & Osage, Humboldt th

Sunday School...................9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:50 a.m. Sunday Evening

Kids Bible Club..................5:30 p.m. Evening Service......................7 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study. .7 p.m. Rev Jerry Neeley, pastor 620-473-2481

First Christian Church 1608 Oregon Rd., Iola

“Lead-Feed Tend” - John 21.15 - 17

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m. Bible Study.............................6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer.............6:30 p.m.

Sunday School immediately after service

fcciola@acek.com

Steve Traw, pastor

Dave McGullion, pastor Travis Riley, youth pastor

620-365-9728

620-365-3436

Community of Christ

First Presbyterian Church

East 54 Hwy., Iola

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

302 E. Madison, Iola

901 S. Main, LaHarpe

Duwayne Bearden, pastor 620-228-1829

Moran United Methodist Church Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Sunday School ..................8:45 a.m. James Stigall, pastor

Father John P. Miller

910 Amos St., Humboldt

David E. Meier, pastor 620-473-2343

Friends Home Lutheran Church Savonburg

Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship.....................11 a.m. PMA Sidney Hose

620-237-4442

620-754-3314

Northcott Church

St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church

12425 SW. Barton Rd., Colony

202 S. Walnut, Iola

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship. . . .10:45 a.m.

Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Sunday School.................10:45 a.m. Wednesday Kids Club.............3 p.m.

Wednesday Evening Prayer as announced

Gary Murphey, pastor

Jennifer Loeb, pastor

620-365-2683

Sunday School........................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Sunday Evening......................6 p.m. Mike Farran, pastor

Holy Eucharist and Sermon at 9 a.m. followed by coffee and fellowship.

Rev. Jan Chubb

620-365-3481

620-363-4828 620-237-4255

620-365-7306

Fellowship Regional Church

Grace Lutheran Church

Trinity Lutheran Church

214 W. Madison, Iola

117 E. Miller Rd., Iola

Poplar Grove Baptist Church

Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m.

Sunday School.........................9 a.m. Adult Bible Class....................9 a.m. Worship Service...............10:30 a.m.

Streaming live on Sunday morning at www.thecruxchurch.com

305 Mulberry, Humboldt Come Let Us Worship The Lord

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:45 a.m. Wednesday Service................7 p.m.

430 N. Grant, Garnett

Saturday Men & Womens Bible Study..................................9 a.m. Sunday School........................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study..........6 p.m.

Jeff Cokely Jared Ellis Luke Bycroft

Rev. Bruce Kristalyn

Rev. Jon Gray

Ervin A. Daughtery Jr., pastor

620-365-6468

620-473-3063

785-448-6930

First Baptist Church

Harvest Baptist Church

Salem United Methodist Church

Wesley United Methodist Church

801 N. Cottonwood, Iola

Sunday School...................9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m. on 1370 KIOL 11 a.m.

Sunday Evening Worship. .......6 p.m. Wednesday - Youth/Children...6 p.m. Dr. Michael Quinn, pastor Jonathan Palmer, worship/Youth Minister 620-365-2779

406 S. Walnut, Iola

Family Prayer/Fellowship Hour 9:15 a.m. For the Entire Family! Main Worship Service at 10:30 a.m. Youth Group on Sunday Evenings at 6:30 p.m.

3 mi. west, 2 mi. south of Iola “Little White Church in the Country”

Sunday School......................10 a.m. Sunday Worship....................11 a.m.

Tony Godfrey, pastor

Rev. Gene McIntosh, pastor

620-365-3688 620-228-2522

620-365-3883

Madison & Buckeye

Contemporary Praise............9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Middle School UMYF.............6 p.m. Combined Youth................7:30 p.m. High School UMYF................8 p.m. Rev. Trudy Kenyon Anderson 620-365-2285


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Merchandise for Sale

Wanted to Rent

40 GALLON WATER HEATERS, 6-year warranty, Natural Gas $299, LP $343, Electric $250, D&R Plumbing, 204 N. Washington, Iola, 620-365-2704.

PASTURE & HAY GROUND, around Iola area, 620-228-4852.

DISH TV RETAILER, starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installation! Call now 1-800-3497308. Your Land is Your Down Payment. And we’ll match your tax refund up to $8,000. Singles starting at $39,900. Doubles starting at $59,900. Less than perfect credit OK! 866-858-6862 HARD PLASTIC TUBS, approx. 15 gallon, great for tomatoes, flowers, $4, 620-228-2048.

Pets and Supplies CREATIVE CLIPS BOARDING & GROOMING Clean, Affordable. Shots required. If you want the best, forget the rest! Call Jeanne 620-363-8272

Garage Sales BENEFIT BAKE SALE, Sunday March 23, 8a.m.-6p.m., at Walmart. IOLA AMERICAN LEGION GARAGE SALE SATURDAY, MARCH 29TH, 52-FAMILY SALE, $10 to reserve your table before March 22nd, ONLY 10 TABLES LEFT. Call Durenda Frye 620-625-2075. GAS, 202 N. MAIN, Thursday/Friday Noon-6, Saturday 8-Noon, MULTI-FAMILY. Kid’s clothes, lots of miscellaneous.

Real Estate for Rent QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE HOMES available for rent now, www.growiola.com IOLA, 305 S. 4TH, 3 BEDROOM, $500 monthly plus deposit, 620-365-9424. 1224 N. COTTONWOOD, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, CH/CA, close to college, $500 monthly, $500 deposit, Monday-Friday 620-365-7663. MORAN, 2 BEDROOM, $375 monthly plus deposit, 620-3659424. IOLA, 2 BEDROOM HOUSE, garage, $525 monthly, 913-5923885.

Real Estate for Sale Allen County Realty Inc. 620-365-3178 John Brocker. . . . . . 620-365-6892 Carolynn Krohn. . . 620-365-9379 Jack Franklin. . . . . . 620-365-5764 Brian Coltrane . . . . 620-496-5424 Dewey Stotler. . . . . 620-363-2491 Candace McRae,. . . 816-916-7051 www.allencountyrealty.com

C allO ur H om e Loan Experts In Iola • (620)365-6000

Travis Riley

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Apartment for Rent 318 N. WASHINGTON, 1 BEDROOM, cable/water included, no pets, 620-496-6787.

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Moible Homes for Rent LAHARPE, 210 TAYLOR, 3 BEDROOM TRAILER HOUSE, $350 monthly, $350 deposit, 620496-2345 or 620-496-8825. 1 BEDROOM, to qualified applicant, 620-228-4549. MORAN, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, free water/mowing, $325 monthly, 785-204-1585.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

The Iola Register

Member

Low Secondary M arketRates

20-& 30-Year Fixed Rates ExcellentIn-house Financing Take advantage oflow interestrates.Ask us about refinancing your hom e.

Real Estate for Sale FSBO, GAS, 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, CH/CA, garage, 3 lots (corner), $65,000, 620-380-1159. 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, full basement house on 8 acres south of LaHarpe, attached garage, 40x80 shop w/concrete floor, 36x36 outbuilding, rural water, 620364-6380.

B5

Real Estate for Sale IOLA, 315 N. TENNESSEE, 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, ranch style, attached garage, move in ready, appliances negotiable, $59,500, call 913-980-3793. 160 ACRES, NORTHEAST ALLEN COUNTY, 68 acres farmland, 87 acres pasture, 40x100 large covered shed, dairy barn plus other outbuildings, rural water, 620-364-6380.

Doctor: Injured reliever ‘lucky guy’ GOODYEAR, Ariz. (AP) — Cincinnati Reds closer Aroldis Chapman underwent a 2½-hour operation Thursday to repair a broken bone above his left eye but has no other serious injuries after being hit in the face by a line drive in a spring training game. Team medical director Dr. Timothy Kremchek said Chapman could begin throwing off a mound in six to eight weeks, a timetable that could get him back in games in late May. The left-hander with a fastball that has reached 105 mph could start exercising and throwing on flat ground in a couple of weeks, Kremchek said. He called Chapman “a very lucky guy.” The surgery was performed by cranial facial plastic surgeon Dr. Ed Joganic. Kremchek said earlier that a metal plate would be inserted in the bone above Chapman’s left

eyebrows and would remain there permanently. Chapman has a mild concussion and no injury to his eye. “He’s feeling better and he has some pain management. We’re optimistic that he is going to be on the mend,” Reds manager Bryan Price said after meeting with players Thursday morning at the team’s spring training facility. “Obviously, we’ll stay in touch. We will make sure we follow the process as we continue to get familiar with the injury itself. We will let him know how much support he has and that we care about him.” Hopefully, we will see him here very soon.” Cincinnati catcher Brayan Pena, a fellow Cuban and Chapman’s close friend, was one of several Reds players who visited the injured pitcher Wednesday night and spoke to him on the phone Thursday morning.

DAILY CRYPTOQUOTES - Here’s how to work it:

Wanted to Rent MASSAGE THERAPIST & PEDICURIST LOOKING FOR SPACE TO RENT IN IOLA, 620-473-0322.

Public notice (First published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2014) NOTICE OF HEARING LAHARPE, KANSAS, TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that the City of LaHarpe, KS, is considering granting a request to re-zone 1002 S. Jefferson from a residential zone to a commercial zone for the purposes of establishing an automobile shop within the City Limits of LaHarpe, Kansas. A public hearing concerning this proposal will be held on March 25th, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. The public hearing will take place at LaHarpe City Hall, which is located at 902 S. Washington. If there are any concerns, questions, or objections regarding this proposed re-zoning, you are invited to appear at the public hearing to let your voice be heard. (3) 18,22

ZITS

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE 

by Chris Browne

by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

BLONDIE

BABY BLUES

by Kirkman & Scott

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

HI AND LOIS

by Chance Browne BEETLE BAILEY

by Young and Drake

by Tom Batiuk

by Mort Walker


B6

Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

ACC: Indy sweeps Continued from B1

out, but a strikeout, a liner and Levi Ashmore’s grounder to third — he was out by a cat’s whisker — to end the threat. Butler broke the game open with nine runs in the top of the seventh against a pair of Allen relievers. THE GRIZZLIES’ bats stayed alive in Game 2. They scored in every inning but the seventh. Butler led 7-0 before Chase Egelston’s grand slam in the third pulled Allen to within 7-5. But Independence responded with five in the

top of the fourth, one in the fifth, and five in the sixth to put the last nail in the Devils’ coffin. The Grizzlies racked up 17 hits and were issued 11 walks, while the Red Devils committed six errors. Stats from Thursday were incomplete — scoring plays from Allen’s two-run ninth inning were unavailable — but we know Francis had three singles, while Egelston homered, Griffin had a triple and Cole Slusser and Maruo each doubled. Ashmore added a single. The Red Devils return to action today with a doubleheader at Independence.

Schaub on move?

Chase Egelston hits a grand slam Thursday in Allen Community College’s 22-11 loss to Independence. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

HOUSTON (AP) — The Houston Texans are nearing a deal to trade quarterback Matt Schaub to the Oakland Raiders, a person familiar with the negotiations said Friday. The person spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the deal was not yet complete. Schaub was Houston’s starter from 2007 until last season, when he was benched in favor of Case Keenum

after a terrible start to the year. The Texans were expected to contend for a Super Bowl last season, but instead became the NFL’s worst team, sinking to 2-14, which tied the worst record in franchise history. It was clear after last season that Schaub didn’t have a future in Houston, but his departure looked to be imminent on Thursday night when the Texans signed veteran quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick.

QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE Compelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answers

HOT TOPICS: 3 ISSUES GENERATING A BUZZ

NO SECOND THOUGHTS One streak is over and another continues at Hendrick Motorsports. Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s streak of consecutive top-two finishes came to a thundering halt at Bristol Motor Speedway, where NASCAR’s Most Popular Driver finished 24th in the No. 88 Chevrolet. Earnhardt opened the season by winning the Daytona 500, then scored second-place finishes at Phoenix and Las Vegas. For those first three outings, the 39-year-old driver had an average finish of 1.3. Now add in the 24th at Bristol and Earnhardt’s average finish in 2014 is 7.0. Jeff Gordon, who drives the No. 24 Chevy, kept his streak going at Bristol. Gordon has scored four consecutive top-10 finishes since the season opened at Daytona. And just to show how stats can be skewed, Gordon now has a better finishing average than Earnhardt. Gordon’s average finish in 2014 is 6.25. “The whole team did an awesome job,� Gordon said after his seventhplace effort at Bristol. “We had a really good race car at different times throughout the night. It’s crazy, when we went back racing after the rain delay we just completely wore out the left-front tire in just like 20 or 30 laps. I mean we were going backwards in a hurry. Thankfully for that competition caution, but we fixed that and got the car better, and drove up into the top five, I was pretty happy.� Earnhardt? No comment.

side by side in the closing laps in a heated battle for 10th-place honors. Larson prevailed in his No. 42 Chevy while Dillon was 11th. “It’s crazy to think it’s kind of a disappointing finish for the way we ran for most of the race, but all in all it was a good race,� Larson said. “It was a lot of fun racing with Austin there at the end. I definitely had to get up on the wheel and get the elbows up and try not to make any mistakes.� Now each rookie has one top-10 finish. Dillon was ninth in the Daytona 500.

KENSETH’S ROUGH RIDE Matt Kenseth led a race-high 165 laps at Bristol, but by the time the race ended, his No. 20 Toyota was battered and bent, and he finished 13th. Kenseth was rearended at high speed during a caution when Timmy Hill, driving the No. 33 Chevy, blasted his rear bumper. Later in the race, Kenseth got into “the marbles� and tagged the wall a couple of times before regaining control of his Camry. When asked “How was the race?� Kenseth could only shrug. “I don’t think we have enough time for me to tell you all about it.� What about the hit from Hill? “He hit me going like 4,000 miles an hour,� Kenseth said.

AP/ROSS D. FRANKLIN

Jeff Gordon hasn’t finished outside the top 10 since November. A big pile of points could come in handy in September, but a win would be nicer.

ROOKIE RUNNERS The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Rookie of the Year battle was defined at Bristol when Kyle Larson and Austin Dillon raced

Associated Press / WADE PAYNE

Mixing Cheez-Its with Frosted Flakes? Now there’s something that deserves a caution flag. Is it time to do something about bump-drafting in the flag stand? Let’s assume NASCAR officials will take a wait-and-see approach to this one. If it happens again, expect drastic measures: That’s right, a press release announcing immediate changes.

What triggered this possibility? Sunday night at Bristol, with the 500th and (long-awaited) final lap approaching, someone in the flag stand apparently leaned into an override switch that turned on the track’s caution lights. Once the error was uncovered, but before NASCAR could gather everyone back together for a return to green, the rains returned and Carl Edwards carried his big smile to Victory Lane. Right now it’ll be viewed as a freak accident, but if it happens again, expect NASCAR’s Boys in R&D to develop an officially licensed Caution Light Underride Switch to go in the tower, where it will take precedence over the Override Switch. Or something like that.

Can you get me excited about Fontana this week? Here’s your good news: NASCAR’s great “unforeseen� doesn’t know geography. It can show its face at any longitude or latitude. The unpredictable wins, tumbles and personality clashes — all part of NASCAR’s timehonored recipe — often happen when (and where) you least expect them.

GODWIN’S FONTANA PICKS Godwin Kelly has covered NASCAR for 33 years. Reach him at godwin.kelly@newsjrnl.com or follow him on Twitter: @godwinkelly

Winner: Jimmie Johnson Rest of the top five: Kurt Busch, Brad Keselowski, Kasey Kahne, Matt Kenseth Dark horse: Aric Almirola

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Disappointment: Jeff Gordon First one out: David Gilliland Don’t be surprised if: Johnson checks out on the field to plant his flag for the Chase.

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Saturday, March 22, 2014

Obituary

Police report

Barbara Bell

Vehicles burglarized

Barbara A. Bell, 76, of Kansas City, Kan., passed away on Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at Richmond Healthcare and Rehab in Richmond. Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m., Monday at the Feuerborn Family Funeral Service Chapel, Garnett, with burial at 1:30 p.m. at the Johnson County Memorial Garden, Overland Park. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Carlyle news The Carlyle Country Club met last Thursday in Humboldt. Jeanice Cress was hostess. There were 14 members and two guests present, Greta Ladd and Levi Miewes. The group met at the Wes Dewey Art Studio and saw Collin Haire’s glass blowing projects. From there they went to the Humboldt library for a business meeting and refreshments. Pastor Steve Traw’s message on Sunday at the Carlyle Presbyterian Church was “The Passover, A Beginning.” Those celebrating birthdays are Travis Smith on March 21 and Phyllis Loomis on Sunday. Anniversaries are Don and Ella Britt, March 17, Glen and Patty Herschberger, March 17, and Linda and Melvin Guenther, March 20. A fellowship dinner followed the service. Bible study is at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Alma Herchberger

Joanne McIntyre 365-2829 received word her sisterin-law, Elizabeth Yoder, was a patient in Olathe Medical Center with a broken hip. She is now in Garnett in a nursing home and doing well. Greg and Jackie McIntyre held a birthday party for their granddaughter, Zoey McIntyre, who turned 2 on March 6. Those attending were her parents, Zack and Kady McIntyre, rural Yates Center; Ashton and Brandon Birk, Gridley; Steve and Rita Porzio, Kincaid; Judy, Bruce and Ryan Cochran, Dustin Smart and Rochelle McGhee, Jim Henson, Iola; and Joanna McIntyre and Levi Sauerssig, Gridley.

Burn ban is lifted With calmer weather conditions forecast, the burn ban in Allen County was lifted Friday. Sheriff Bryan Murphy announced suspension of the ban. Murphy encouraged farmers, especially, to

be careful when burning fields. With a controlled burn, a call to dispatch headquarters, 365-1460, and local firefighters should be made, Murphy added, “so we’ll know what’s going on.”

Polio: Eradicated Continued from A1

Statistics to do with Rotary are staggering. Potter said the organization has 34,644 clubs in more than 200 countries and 1.2 million members, who speak 102 different languages. The organization has clubs for high school students (Interact) and younger adults (Rotaract), as well for volunteers (Rotary Community Corps). Rotary began in 1905 in Chicago when Paul Harris — its most notable founder — and three professional friends formed a club to become better acquainted. The name came from them rotating meetings among their offices. Iola’s Rotary Club dates to 1917, and, as are others, is comprised of business and professional people who put

“service above self.” Today’s Iola club has 48 members. “We’re here to serve the community,” Potter said. The club for years has helped with waste paper drives, and this summer will sponsor a car show at the Allen County Fair and a barbecue cookoff. Club members have picked up trash along nearby highways and often volunteer to help with many local projects. The Southwind Trail’s shelter three miles south of Iola was a Rotary project. The Iola club also has sent members to Chile and Easter Island to construct simple but effective eyeglasses for people who otherwise would go without and has been involved in water purification projects.

Threats reported

Holly Schomaker, Iola, reported to police officers several things were stolen from her vehicle while it was parked near her house Sunday in the 800 block of North Jefferson Street. On Monday Jamie Wilson reported an undisclosed amount of cash was stolen from her vehicle in the 800 block of North Street. Also on Monday Erin Splechter, 29, Iola, reported her vehicle was broken into in the 800 block of North Sycamore Street. Her checkbook, miscellaneous paperwork and an undisclosed amount of money were taken. Leo King Wood, 49, Iola, reported tools, tool boxes, and fishing poles were stolen from his vehicle March 13 in the 200 block of North Elm Street.

On Monday, Jacqueline Layton, 36, Iola, told officers she had received threatening phone calls. A suspect was named.

Drug arrest made On Tuesday, James Williams, 19, Iola, was arrested for possession of certain hallucinogenic drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, and no liability insurance following a traffic stop in the 600 block of North Cottonwood.

Playground fire reported On Wednesday, officers responded to a fire on the playground at Lincoln Elementary School. Damage was minimal.

Burglaries reported Donna Houser, 120 W. Garfield St., reported a burglary of her resi-

dence on Wednesday. On March 13, William Krone, Iola, told officers his residence was burglarized in the 700 block of East Street. Tools were stolen from the garage.

Arrests made John Cox Jr. was arrested for an Allen County District Court warrant on Wednesday. On March 13, Summer Salzwedel, 29, Iola, was arrested for a Chanute warrant. Kimberly Lorrainne Sigler was arrested on Sunday for driving under the influence of alcohol, not reporting an accident of an unattended vehicle and not rendering aid or giving information. David Lomon was arrested on March 14 for being a pedestrian under the influence of alcohol, after a disturbance on South State Street. Amy Callaway was

arrested on March 15 for a Chanute warrant. Jeffry Stanford was arrested for domestic battery and Mikeal J. Stanford was arrested for aggravated assault following an incident on Scott Street on March 15. Vanetta Cummings, 23, Iola, and Devon Simpson, 18, Iola, were arrested for furnishing alcohol to minors. Several juveniles also were taken into custody following an incident in the 600 block of North Chestnut Street.

Bicycle found Officers recovered a Next 20-inch boys bicycle in a ditch at Willow and Kansas Drive.

Bicycle stolen On March 15, Ronda Poffenbarger, 56, Iola, reported a brown and tan colored Rebel Mongoose bicycle stolen from her property in the 800 block of Wilson Lane.

Court report DISTRICT COURT Judge Daniel Creitz Domestic cases filed:

Ashley A. Allen vs. Aaron S. Taylor, divorce. State of Kansas vs. Samantha Genoble, non-divorce visitation, custody/support. State of Kansas vs. Derick Peterson, non-divorce visitation, custody/ support. Julie A. Smith vs. Kristofer Smith, divorce. State of Kansas vs. Shawn M. Cook, nondivorce visitation, custody/support. State of Kansas vs. Chrystal M. Miller, non-divorce visitation, custody/support. Shaylin Robb vs. Jacob D. Maley, protection from abuse. Barbara D. Smith vs. Craig J. Smith, divorce. Civil cases filed:

Michael W. Peres vs. Chase D. Ellis, automobile tort. Marriage filed:

licenses

Kerry J. Rogers and Patricia L. Bender.

Today

54

29

MAGISTRATE COURT Judge Thomas Saxton Convicted of speeding or other violations with fines assessed:

Amy M. Williams, Camdenton, Mo., 80/65, $132.50. Andrew K. Johnston, Paola, 89/65, $237. Ricky W. Henson, Gas, 70/55, $171. Michael W. Rowland, Tulsa, 73/55, $189. Michael W. Scheffer, Olathe, 78/65, $159. Rachel B. Bowers, Elsmore, 78/65, $159. Luke Bunch, Pittsburg, 78/65, $159. Alyson E. Sobanek, Oolagah, Okla., 81/65, $177. Wayne L.A. Kirkland, Garnett, interference with a law enforcement officer, $258. Derryl L. Aiello, Elsmore, 76/55, $210. Shelli L. Sinclair, Iola, no seat belt, $10. Linda A.R. Farrill, Iola, disorderly conduct, 30 days jail, $543. Ronald Holthaus, St. Cloud, Minn., 75/65, $141. Jason A. Atkinson, Iola, no seat belt, $10. Diversions filed:

Erica Stoll, Iola, dis-

48

52

28

28

Temperature High Thursday 72 Low Thursday 37 High a year ago 35 Low a year ago 29 Sunrise 7:22 a.m.

Sunset 7:35 p.m.

— NOTICE —

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays for Iola carriers. D E A D L IN E F O R O U T -O F -T O W N C A R R IE R S IS 6:30 P .M . W E E K D A Y S A N D 9:30 S A T U R D A Y . Ifyou have not received your paper by deadline, please callyour carrier first. Ifunable to reach your carrier, callthe R egister office at 365-2111. R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

Cedarbrook Estates

2800 N. Cottonwood Street • Iola

OPEN HOUSE Thurs., Mar. 27 • 3-7 p.m. Bring the family!

KICKS COUNTRY IN IOLA Trading Post — 8 a.m. - 9 a.m.

orderly conduct, $433. Chelsie N. Tomlinson, Iola, transporting an open container, $446. Heather Trester, Iola, driving under the influence, $1,121. Ralph O. Wilson, Iola, driving under the influence, $1,121. Matthew R. Mertz, Merriam, 80/65, $196. Criminal cases filed:

Andrew J. Nelson, Iola, possession of drug paraphernalia. Ashley D. Houk, Moran, burglary, theft, criminal damage to property, attempted burglary, criminal trespassing. Timothy L. Toumberlin, Moran, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of hallucinogenic drugs, possession of opiates. Andrew S. Berthot, Humboldt, burglary, attempted theft. Lavell L. Rucker, Topeka, distribution of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia. Cassandra D. Hines, Stark, transporting an

Monday

Tomorrow

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 365-2111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R ural C arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

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The Iola Register

Iola Spring Cleanup!

A2

• Affordable Housing for ages 55 and over • Maintenance free, one level garden apartments • 2 bedroom, one bathroom • All appliances included, washer, dryer, microwave, etc. • Clubhouse with water features • Peaceful, quiet, neighborhood Leasing Information: (620) 365-2400 Applicants must meet income restrictions

open container, possession of hallucinogenic drugs. Levi G. Palet, Chanute, possession of hallucinogenic drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, transporting an open container. Timothy E.D. Rogers, Iola, distribution of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia. Juvenile cases filed:

Cody A. Conner, et al, purchase/consumption of liquor by a minor. Jesse D. Zimmerman, et al, purchase/consumption of liquor by a minor. Contract cases filed:

Madeline L. Cooper vs. Teri Mitchell, landlord/tenant unlawful detainer. Labette Health vs. Jared Jenkins, debt collection. Diebolt Lumber & Supply vs. Extreme Roofing LLC, debt collection. Small claims filed:

LaHarpe Telephone Company vs. Shelby A. Miller.

All Items should be out before 6 a.m. on March 31st, 2014

Mar. 31 st - April 4 th, 2014 No calls accepted after Noon on March 28, 2014

Gather up your things you don’t want or need and call 365-4903 before Noon on Friday, March 28 to schedule a pickup.

YES...we pick up Yard Debris, Freon Free Appliances, Furniture, Small Lumber and Miscellaneous Items. Please separate yard waste from household items.

Items must be located by the street or alley.

NO...Tires, Auto

Parts, Hazardous Materials, Wet or Lead Based Paint, Ammunition, Demolition or Construction Debris.... If any of these items are mixed with the regular debris the City will not pick up at that address. If you have any questions call: 365-4903 or 365-4910

The Iola Register

Published Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings except New Year’s day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas, by The Iola Register Inc., 302 S. Washington, P.O. Box 767, Iola, Kansas 66749. (620) 365-2111. Periodicals postage paid at Iola, Kansas. Member Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for publication all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. Subscription rates by carrier in Iola: One year, $107.32; six months, $58.17; three months, $33.60; one month, $11.65. By motor: One year, $129; six months, $73.71; three months, $41.60; one month, $17.24. By mail in Kansas: One year, $131.16; six months, $74.80; three months, $43.89; one month, $17.89. By mail out of state: One year, $141.35; six months, $76.02; three months, $44.97; one month, $17.91. Internet: One year, $100; six months, $55; one month, $10 All prices include 8.04% sales taxes. Postal regulations require subscriptions to be paid in advance. USPS 268-460 Postmaster: Send address changes to The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749.


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The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Rally: Advocating for expansion Continued from A1

support something that may affect them in the future,� Chase said. The issue is highly partisan and polarized, they said, but more so in the Statehouse than on a local level. Masterson and Chase, Democrat and Republican, respectively, said the issue is more moral than political — at least that’s how it should be viewed. “I think it blurs the boundaries, I’m a Republican,� Chase said. “The most important issue is the moral issue.� ACCORDING to a report from the Kansas Health Institute, around 80,000 Kansas fall into the “Medicaid gap� that has been created by the lack of expansion. When the Affordable Care Act was drafted, Masterson said, it was designed to rely on

cooperation between the state and federal government. When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that ACA was constitutional, they also stipulated that states could not be forced

“We are leaving the poorest of the poor out there to fend for themselves,� Chase said. “I can’t believe we would do this to our most vulnerable.�

It’s not just in Topeka. I think most middle class and wealthy people don’t realize how hard it is. It’s heartbreaking. — Georgia Masterson

to expand the Medicaid funding. This is where “the gap� comes into play. Without the expansion, single, childless adults are not eligible for Medicaid despite their income and adults with children are only eligible if they earn less than 32 percent of the poverty level — around $630 a month for a threeperson household, according to the KHI report.

Masterson said there is a misconception that the issues are not as urgent as people make them out to be. “It’s not just in Topeka. I think most middle class and wealthy people don’t realize how hard it is,� Masterson said. “It’s heartbreaking.� And the impoverished are not the only affected parties. Chase said Allen County Regional Hospi-

18 MINUTE WASH AND 18 MINUTE DRY. É” 

A3

Iola rec calendar

tal, now a county-funded entity, is facing dramatic reductions in funding from the federal government. The guidelines of the ACA anticipated Medicaid coverage to increase, reducing the support needed from the federal government. Without Medicaid expansion the hospital will not see an increase in coverage, while experiencing a reduction in funding. “The potential for that will be devastating for our hospital,� Masterson said. “It’s not just the hospital, it’s Allen County, it’s our own tax dollars,� Chase added. “It does hurt people in this community, not just the people who can’t get health insurance.� All anyone can do is voice their opinion, both said, and hope that someone can see their side of the story, Masterson said.

365-4990, brad.yoder@cityofiola.com.

Sunday

Quilting group, 6-8 p.m., Bass Community Building, 505 N. Buckeye St., call Helen Sutton, 365-3375.

Monday-Wednesday

Open walking, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Recreation Community Building, will not meet Thursday or Friday.

Monday, Wednesday

Seniorcise class, 9-10 a.m., Recreation Community Building, will not meet Friday.

Tuesday, Friday

Water exercise class, 9-10 a.m., Super 8 Motel, Pauline Hawk instructor, call 365-5565.

Coming events Youth dance classes, Recreation Community Building, classes offered Monday evenings beginning April 7. Register at the rec office by April 4. Boys or girls enrolled in preschool through sixth grade may participate. Youth summer ball program, register online or at the rec office by April 11. Boys and girls ages 4-14 by the appropriate cutoff date may participate. Line dance class, Bass Community Building, 505 N. Buckeye St., Monday, March 31, April 21, May 5, 19, 7-9 p.m, age appropriate children are welcome when accompanied by adult, no preregistration required, call Scott Boan, 365-3108.

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A4

Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Children: Cases are most difficult, important to charge Continued from A1

The law states that endangerment of a child is a situation where they “may” be in dangerous situation: Endangering a child is knowingly and unreasonably causing or permitting a child under the age of 18 years to be placed in a situation in which the child’s life, body or health may be endangered. The next level of charge is “aggravated endangerment,” which essentially replaces the “may be endangered” with “is endangered.” Bowie said numerous types of situations can qualify as an endangerment case. Recently in the district court, cases have come up involving drug charges and driving under the influence. If a child is surrounded by a drug-making environment — like a methamphetamine lab — Bowie said oftentimes endangerment charges will be filed. However, the level of severity can differ if the drugs or other dangerous objects are readily available to the child or kept away from them. Phelan said in a circumstance where a driver is under the influence with children in the vehicle, parent or not, endangerment charges will be filed by the county attorney. It’s environmentally driven,” Phelan said. But the possibilities don’t end there. Bowie said there can even be considerations if the parents knowingly allow their underage children to be involved with criminal or dangerous activity — some parents may not even make the connection. Something both attorneys made very clear, endangerment and abuse are two different charges, but are closely related. “They are next to each oth-

er in the statutes,” Bowie said. An abuse charge is filed only if physical harm comes to the child, and Phelan said the endangerment charges are more common than abuse charges. “It’s not one of the most common charges,” Phelan said. “Most people want to be good parents.” A DECISION on whether to charge a defendant is only

trict court judges for children who need care during abuse or neglect and in some cases child endangerment,” Aimeé Daniels, executive director of CASA said. Daniels said neglect of a child is when a parent fails to provide for a child. This could be unsanitary conditions, not providing proper clothing, not taking the child to the doctor and refusing services for a child’s disability. Neglect is a

The trauma of taking a child out of the home is significant. And if there’s not a family member for them to stay with, they will end up with strangers. — Allen County Attorney Wade Bowie

the first step in the decision making process, and any action from that point forward can and will have an impact on the child. “The trauma of taking a child out of the home is significant,” Bowie said. “And if there’s not a family member for them to stay with, they will end up with strangers.” If danger is imminent, both attorneys said the child must be removed from the home as soon as possible — what they called a “child in need of care case,” which is separate from endangerment or abuse. One does not require the other. The end goal is what is best for the child, Phelan pointed out, not to remove the child from the home. “Reintegration is the case’s goal, we want the child to be back home,” he said. CASA, Court Appointed Special Advocates, becomes a part of this process to help the child. “We’re appointed by dis-

civil court case and usually stems from poverty, she said. “The majority of parents don’t neglect their children on purpose,” Daniels said. “With that being said, sometimes they don’t seek employment or have a drug problem.” Neglect is usually reported by educators, relatives or daycare providers. In such cases, a petition is drafted as a civil matter. CASA reviews all cases but only take on the most complicated and serious matters. Warner said the police respond immediately to a child in need of care. They will remove them from the home, and place them in police protective custody, and the advocates take the reins from there. “We match advocates to a case,” Daniels said. “Some advocates prefer working with a specific age group or some are uncomfortable with certain cases. We try to meet the advocate’s needs as well.”

CASA advocates try to make the child as comfortable as possible and eventually help the child return home. There are 18 advocates at CASA currently. “There’s a common misconception that we take kids out of the home for no reason,” Bowie added. The advocate meets with the child face to face at least once a month. Most advocates visit more than once and they attend all the hearings in court. There are also family planning meetings that help the family so the child can return home. “They stick with them all the way through until the end,” Daniels said. “It creates a close relationship with the children and the advocate.” If the problems can be fixed immediately, Bowie said he may refer the case to the Department of Children and Family Services (DCF) before any further action is taken. But, oftentimes removal from the home is the best option and the child will be placed into police protective care for up to 72 hours. He said if there is endangerment, that can mean there are “multiple issues in the home” from which the child needs to be removed. AS BOWIE pointed out, it is not the court’s duty to remove a child from their home, and they have just as much of a duty to not file a charge if the situation does not demand it — and that can be the most difficult part. “Educating parents is part of it,” Bowie said. The line between endangerment and other things can be blurry, and they need to know as much as possible for both of their sakes. “I don’t have to file a charge in each situation,” he said. “We want to help maintain

the family unit.” Daniels said there are ways to keep that family unit together. The Department of Children and Family Services does have a voluntary program for parenting skills and classes to give them advice. The program teaches the family how to budget and explains what benefits they have available to them. The Douglas County Citizens Committee on Alcoholism also has a contract with the DCF to assist a family before problems arise. “They can go into the home and work with the family and talk about poverty, child behavior and resources,” Daniels said. “If more people sought help there would be less endangerment.” Both Bowie and Phelan agreed that voluntary action on the parents’ part is the optimal resolution, and something that can be monitored by the courts if need be. But, they also said they will not hesitate to act if they need to. “We don’t want to do it,” Bowie said. “But we will if we have to.”

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofT he Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 365-2111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R ural C arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

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Opinion A5 The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

~ Journalism that makes a difference

Moral Mondays: A time to redirect our compass Kansas had its own Moral Monday, but it was on Tuesday. In Georgia, protestors flooded the state capitol Monday against the Legislature’s refusal to expand Medicaid guidelines as provided in the Affordable Care Act. It was the ninth consecutive Monday activists have convened at the capitol in a movement they call Moral Monday, an offshoot of Truthful Tuesdays begun last year in South Carolina.

Susan Lynn Register editor

Topeka experienced a much milder version of protests Tuesday when about 200, including several Iolans, went to the state capitol in hopes of conveying to legislators the advantages of expanding Medicaid offerings. If supporting Medicaid expansion somehow aligns them with President Obama,

EDUCATION Restore funding to cuts enacted. no Kansas Republican will come within a mile of the measure. As with our Southern neighbors, Kansas now belongs to the right wing. As never before, an ultra-conservative governor and Legislature are suppressing citizens’ rights in Kansas. To wit: • Kansas children are being deprived of an adequate education through underfinanced schools. Funding is so low the Kansas Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional; • Access to affordable health care is being denied through cumbersome new regulations and fees imposed on the health care navigators as well as the state’s own refusal to promote the federal program; • The freedom to vote is being restricted; 11,000 voter registrations hang in limbo because of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s cam-

MEDICAID Yes! Expand services. paign against immigrants; • Legislators are invading the classroom. A bill before the Kansas Senate controls how students are taught, including sex education material; • And tougher rules for public assistance have been enacted, oppressing the poor with cuts to food stamps, help with childcare expenses and temporary assistance. LET’S TAKE the last issue first. Because of new tax laws, the wealthiest are enjoying a 2 percent cut in their income taxes. For the average millionaire, that means a reduction of about $21,087 a year. Meanwhile, our poorest have witnessed an increase of 1.3 percent in taxes because of the elimination of certain credits, including those for purchases of food, for expenditures on rent and for what they paid in childcare. Today, Kansas is in com-

INCOME TAXES Make them fair.

ELECTIONS Encourage participation.

pany with Mississippi and Alabama as the only states that tax food sales and do not provide any relief for such a tax for low-income residents. Up until 2012, families with incomes of less than $17,700 could claim $91 per family member to offset the sales tax they paid on food. For a single parent family with two children, that could mean the difference of $246, or 2 percent of their annual income. If Kansas were to expand Medicaid, about 80,000 would receive health care coverage, many for the first time. Realize as federal taxpayers we are paying for the expansion enjoyed in other states. As of Friday afternoon, Kansas has said goodbye to $85 million in federal aid since Jan. 1, had we participated in the expansion. To see the current tally, go to http://howmuchhasksleftonthetable.com. As for voting rights, Kobach is intent on keeping Kansas as a frontrunner

in discrimination. Kobach “won” a ruling for Kansas Wednesday when a federal judge said we could enforce a two-tiered voting system requiring proof of citizenship when registering to vote. Kobach maintains the extra paper trail is necessary to combat illegal citizens from voting. Since Kobach began this campaign, seven cases of voter fraud have been determined in Kansas over the last 13 years. Seven. “An epidemic,” he proclaims. YOU DON’T have to be a bleeding heart liberal to feel Kansas is straying from the polestar that has long guided us to value education, to have compassion for our poor, to have a fair tax system, and to promote democracy. Increasingly, we are letting ourselves be led by politicians who don’t have our best interests at heart. Moral Mondays should be every day.

Area woman on minimal means saved from financial ruin

ACA health plan a lifesaver for local For one Allen County woman John Robertson is as much a knight in shining armor as was Sir Galahad. Robertson, under auspices of Thrive Allen County, works as a navigator to help people obtain health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act Marketplace The woman, who prefers not to be identified, retired not long ago with every intention of living quietly in her little corner of the world. She qualified for a Social Security allotment of about $900 a month. That’s not a great deal but with no debt and no dependents, she figured it would be sufficient. The catch arose when she went shopping for health insurance, which previously had been a perk of her employment. The best she could do on the private market was a policy with monthly premiums of $540, which ate up 60 percent of her monthly Social Security payment. She was forced to cash in a modest IRA in January to make her new insurance payments. It will be another two years before she qualifies for Medicare. Because Kansas has not expanded its Medicaid guidelines, the woman is caught in what is called the Medicaid Gap. Her current income of $10,800 is below the federal poverty level of $11,700 for an individual, the benchmark that qualifies individuals to receive tax credits to help pay for health insurance under the new ACA. The thinking on the federal government’s part was that for those who live on less than the federal poverty guideline, their states would enroll them into their Medicaid programs, which the feds have agreed to help pay for an expanded program. Kansas’ current Medicaid

At Week’s End Bob Johnson

program is especially restrictive because its benefits apply only to those who have a disability, are pregnant, or who have dependants. For this single woman, no matter how destitute, she would never qualify for Medicaid benefits. If Kansas were to expand Medicaid, those restrictions would no longer apply. The only consideration for benefits would be one’s income. The woman, thus, was forced into a terrible situation. This is where Robertson’s magic came into play. “Let’s see what we can do,” he said, when the distressed woman came to his office Wednesday evening. Seems the money being withdrawn from her IRA policy can be considered taxable income and when added to her Social Security income nudges her up to the federal poverty level. She now qualifies for tax credits under the Affordable Care Act. Her new premium is $110 a month. Remember, it was $540, and without the Affordable Care Act would have remained at that level. The new plan also includes dental insurance and deductibles as good or better than she had before. I DOUBT the woman’s situation differs much from many others in Allen County. ACA enrollment remains open through the end of March. Take advantage. You may be just as ecstatic with the results as this woman was.

Letter to the editor Dear editor,

Why do the gay people insist on everyone knowing they’re gay, like it is something to celebrate? Kansas deserves a shiny gold star for not crumbling under the pressure to allow gay marriages. Laws can be changed or new laws written and gay

marriages will still be wrong. If gay marriages are approved, what’s next? Grandma marrying a granddaughter? Two brothers marrying for tax purposes, insurance, welfare, or Social Security? Sound ridiculous? Gay marriages and every Tom, Dick and Harry carrying a

loaded gun ready to shoot anyone who looks cross-eyed at them used to sound ridiculous. (Still does, actually). If a person chooses to become a chef, they should expect there to be heat in the kitchen. Bonnie Johnson, Iola, Kan.

Alookbackintime  40 Years Ago Week of March 23, 1974

HUMBOLDT — Humboldt Industries, Inc., has been sold to Smithco, Inc., of Wayne, Pa. Smithco has been the exclusive sales representative for Humboldt Industries since it began local operations in 1965. No changes are planned in the local operation and Cecil Carey will continue as president and plant manager. ***** Fifteen production workers have been called back to IMP Boats here to build cruisers and other special models for which orders have been received, Jim Fitzpat-

rick, president, told the Register this morning. ***** The Iola post office has a coin-operated duplicating machine, which has been placed in the lobby. Clyde Sharp, Iola postmaster, said the Iola office is one of four in southeast Kansas outfitted with one of the copiers under a new customer-convenience program being tested by the Postal Service. The copies cost 10 cents each. ***** All seats for the Count Basie Concert at the Bowlus Fine Arts Center tonight have been sold, Dale Creitz, center director, said this

morning. Even the tickets for the folding chairs placed in the auditorium to provide additional seating are gone. ***** Roe Spencer, owner of Spencer and Sons clothing store at 10 S. Washington, will open a new store, The Clothesout, in about two weeks in the Iola State Bank building at the intersection of Jefferson and Madison streets. Spencer said that the boys’ and men’s clothing merchandise will include overruns, mill ends and distressed merchandise ranging in price from $1 to $50. The store will be open from 1 to 5 p.m. seven days a week.


A6

Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Engagements Rochelle McGhee and Jerald Smart Rochelle Nicole McGee, Westphalia, and Jerald Dustin Smart, Iola, will come together in marriage on June 7, 2014 at Lil’ Toledo Lodge and Event Center. Rochelle is the daughter of Darren and Cindy McGhee, Westphalia. She is the granddaughter of Gareld and Shirley McGhee, Colony, and Ron and Wilma Atchison, Princeton. She graduated from Anderson County High School in 2009. She received her associate degree

Jenna Sigg and Brandon Hesse Jenna Sigg, Iola, and Brandon Hesse, Iola, will be married on April 26, 2014, at St. John’s Catholic Church, Iola. Jenna is the daughter of Mitchell and the late Peggy Sigg, Iola. She is the granddaughter of Mary and the late Donald Martin, Iola, John Sigg, Iola, and Linda Sigg, Iola. She graduated from Iola High School in

2009 and from Allen Community College in 2011. She is employed at Sigg Motors. Brandon is the son of Brad and Cindy Hesse. He is the grandson of Gene and Elva Dean Smith, Gas, the late Francis Hesse, St. Marys, and the late Kathy Hesse, St. Marys. He graduated from Iola High School in 2004 and is employed at Sigg Motors.

T:7”

in animal science from Allen Community College and then attended Fort Hays State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in general agriculture. Jerald is the son of Jerald and Vicki Smart, Scipio. He is the grandson of Marvin and Rita Stanley, Elsmore, and Bob and Thelma Culler, Colony. He graduated from Iola High School in 2003. He has been with BNSF Railroad since 2007 in the track maintenance department.

Misty Thompson and Anders Wibskov Misty Dawn Thompson, Lawrence, and Anders Holger Berry Wibskov, Lawrence, will unite in marriage on May 14, 2014, in Positano, Italy. Misty is the daughter of Daniel and Jackie Thompson, Iola. She is an Iola High School and University of Kansas graduate. She is employed at PGi, Olathe. Anders is the son of Jorgen Wibskov, Farmington, Mo., and Krista Goering, Lawrence. He is a graduate of North St. Francois High School, Bonne Terre, Mo., and the University of Kansas. He is employed at the Oread Hotel, Lawrence. The couple will host a reception at the Oread Hotel on May 31.

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Emily Callahan and Joshua Tidd Joshua is the son of the late Julie Tidd and David and Laura Tidd, Iola. He graduated from Iola High School in 2008 and Pittsburg State University in 2012 with a bachelor of music degree in trombone performance. He will graduate in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a Master of Music in trombone performance. He is currently employed by the University of Nebraska as a teaching assistant.

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The parents of Emily Callahan and Joshua Tidd announce their engagement and upcoming marriage on May 17, 2014. Emily is the daughter of Richard and Alicia Callahan, Palmyra, Neb. She will graduate in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a bachelor of music degree in piano performance. She was home-schooled K-12 and graduated in 2010. She is self-employed as a piano teacher.

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Sports Daily The Iola Register

NCAA tourney note

Due to the Register’s early deadline Friday, scores from the NCAA Tournament involving Kansas, Kansas State and Wichita State were unavailable for today’s issue.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

B

THE TEAM TIME FORGOT Humboldt’s 1963-64 basketball team featured one of the most remarkable starting lineups ever in southeast Kansas. But a heartbreaking loss in the state championship game left the Cubs as only a footnote in local sports lore. By RICHARD LUKEN The Iola Register

T

here’s a reason it’s called March Madness, with its rich history of euphoria and heartbreak. History books are filled with stories of the most powerful Goliaths being slain by seemingly outmatched Davids. A cold night shooting, untimely foul trouble or a fateful bounce or two can undo just about anyone. Just ask Bill Stange, one of the starters on a team many consider among the greatest high school basketball squads ever to lace ’em up in these parts. That 50 years have passed since the 1964 Cubs took the court has done little to dampen Stange’s memories of the star-crossed, magical season. But for others, including the participants, memories of the ’64 Cubs have gone by the wayside. “You know, I hadn’t thought about that game in years,” said Steve Honeycutt, one of the senior stalwarts who later became a fan favorite and twoyear all-conference player at Kansas State University. “It’s been so long, I don’t remember a lot,” said Craig Adams, another starter who grew up to become a teacher, coach and administrator at Wellsville High School. QUITE A LINEUP

Hopes were high for Humboldt entering the winter of 1963, thanks in large part to Humboldt’s dynamic trio of seniors. Earl Seyfert, Steve Honeycutt and Joe Henrichs all played key roles the previous year as the Cubs advanced to the Class A State Tournament and were returning for their senior seasons. At 6 feet, 8 inches, Seyfert dominated the court on both offense and defense. At 6-3, Henrichs also had plenty of length to cause match-up problems, particularly because of his shooting. “Joe was such a great shooter,” Stange said. “He could hit from almost anywhere.” Henrichs was limited in his scoring only because of the

The 1963-64 Humboldt High Cubs, front from left, Bill Stange, Craig Adams, Steve Honeycutt and Bob Jones; second row from left, Ronnie Owens, Earl Seyfert and Joe Henrichs. PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL STANGE

era in which he played. Remember, the 3-point line was decades away from being enacted at the high school ranks. “I’d have loved to have seen how many points he would have gotten with the 3-point line,” Stange said. If defenses converged on those two, the 6-foot Honeycutt was more than able to pick up the slack at guard. While he, too, was capable of scoring in bunches, Honeycutt’s greatest attribute was at the other end. “I loved playing defense,” Honeycutt said. While his teammates con-

trolled the game with their height, Honeycutt utilized his quickness and speed to harass opposing guards. Rounding out the starting lineup was Stange, at 6-1, another front line player in there to do the unsung work — pull in key rebounds, set screens for Seyfert to do his handiwork and get an occasional putback. Likewise, Adams helped steady the ship at guard when the need arose. “Every starting lineup needs a weak link,” Adams joked. “I was it.” Equally lanky Ronnie Owens, 6-3, came off the bench

when a teammate tired. “We were confident,” Honeycutt said. “We thought we could have a special season that year.” SOMETHING SPECIAL

The 1963-64 season was the capstone for the youths who had forged friendships as youths growing up together in small town America. Honeycutt, Henrichs, Stange and Adams all grew up within a few blocks of each other, playing baseball, basketball or whatever sport beckoned. Seyfert moved to town by the time he was 10

and joined the group. They were more than skilled athletes. “Steve and Earl’s fathers were pastors,” Stange said. “Joe’s father might as well have been.” They also excelled in the classroom. By the time they graduated, Henrichs was Humboldt’s valedictorian; Seyfert the salutatorian. Honeycutt and Stange were National Honor Society students. “I’m pretty sure I’m the only one in the group who ever said a cuss word,” Stange joked. The Cubs gave fans a glimpse of their potential during their eighth-grade year when they rolled through the season with a 9-0 record in 1959-60. “We knew then we had a pretty special group,” said Honeycutt. “There weren’t many 6-2 middle-schoolers like Earl was.” Sure enough, Seyfert almost immediately earned a starting spot for the Cubs when he entered high school. Henrichs and Honeycutt joined him in the starting lineup by their junior years. The ’63 Cubs made it to the state playoffs, where they were eliminated in the first round by Buhler, 55-41. When Stange and Adams joined the starting lineup the next season, the team was ready to roll. The Cubs won their first 15 games by an average of 28 points. Only once during the regular season did a team stay within single digits. Humboldt’s players were soft-spoken on and off the court, happy to let their games do their talking. Stange remembered entering the regional tournament against Garnett, a team Humboldt had defeated twice during the regular season by an average of 29. “But Garnett’s players let it be known they weren’t that impressed with our team,” Stange recalled. “They said they were going to beat us at regionals.” Instead, Humboldt limited Garnett to 26 points in their regional opener, winning by 32. See HISTORY | Page B3

Independence adds to Allen Red Devil misery on diamond By RICHARD LUKEN The Iola Register

John Prohaska took the loss in a 12-3 defeat, despite allowing only one run in five innings, with 11 strikeouts. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

Forgive Val McLean if he heads to the pharmacy for mass quantities of antivenom in the near future. His Allen Community College Red Devils have been plenty snakebit on the diamond this week. One day after losing a gut-wrenching 7-5 decision to Butler, the Red Devils returned home Thursday for a doubleheader against Independence. The visiting Pirates battered Allen pitching to the tune of 12-3 and 22-11. The losses keep Allen winless in Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division play at 0-14. The Red Devils are 5-19 overall. “We have to regroup,” McLean said. “Wednesday’s loss was a heartbreaker, and in our second game Thursday we walked 11 guys and had five or six errors. You can’t be successful playing that way.” Wednesday’s loss may have been the most painful of them all. Starter Chase Cunningham was working on a no-hitter through 7 1/3 innings, with ACC on top 5-0,

when it fell apart in a hurry. Butler’s Logan Beard grounded a one-out single up the middle to break up the no-hitter. An infield single followed, prompting McLean to call on Logan Bausch for relief. Allen’s relieving corps couldn’t stop the bleeding. A walk, double and passed ball cut Allen’s lead to 5-3 before two more walks loaded the bases with two out. A fielding error by Allen’s Camron Myers allowed two runs to score and tie the game. Michael Bird, who opened the inning with a ground-out, broke the tie with a frozen rope to center. Allen got a two-out walk in the top of the ninth but a ground ball ended the game. Two Butler errors staked the Red Devils to a 2-0 lead. Kyle Foster had an RBI single and Drew Walden smacked a sacrifice fly for the second run. Kyle Foster tripled to lead off the top of the eighth, and scored on Austin Griffin’s RBI single. Trever Kreifel scored on a wild pitch. Camdon Myers pushed the lead to 5-0 with an RBI single.

Foster went 3-for-4 with a triple, while Sean Maruo had a pair of singles. Trey Francis, Griffin and Myers also singled. Cunningham allowed two hits and three walks in 7 1/3 innings with five strikeouts. Bausch surrendered a hit and two walks, while Chris McPherson gave up a hit and walk in his relief stint. JOHN PROHASKA looked to give Allen a lift in his start in Thursday’s opener. He delivered in dominating fashion, striking out 11 in five innings and allowed just two hits, but exited trailing 1-0. Butler tacked on two in the top of the sixth to lead 3-0 before Drew Walden closed the gap with a windaided two-run home run. The wind didn’t add to distance, which was well clear of the left field fence. Rather, it pushed the hooking foul ball just into fair territory as it passed the foul pole. Myers followed Walden’s blast with a double, still with nobody See ACC | Page B6


B2

Classifieds Saturday, March 22, 2014

Auctions

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Personals MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 877391-1010.

Public Notices TRI-VALLEY BOARD MEETS MARCH 27TH at 6p.m. at Pizza Hut, 1612 N. State, Iola.

Coming Events BENEFIT BAKE SALE, Sunday March 23, 8a.m.-6p.m., at Walmart. YATES CENTER RACEWAY, 1139 OSAGE RD, YATES CENTER, KS. Go Kart Track will open for the 2014 season. March 29th and April 13th we will have Practice Runs starting 2p.m., $20 for Kart and Driver, $10 Pit Pass for non-drivers. General Admission will be free for Practice Dates. 2014 Race Day’s will be announced at a later date. Facebook: Y.C. Raceway, 620-5833480, 620-496-7455.

Now Hiring For

H & J CONSTRUCTION No job too small! Roofing, remodeling, repairs, new construction, garages, pole barns & more! Chuck Swart 620-717-1880 • Custom Cabinetry • Flooring • Granite Countertops Eddie Abbott

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The CITY OF IOLA is now accepting applications for the following seasonal positions for summer 2014: • Cashier • Concession Stand Worker • Swim Lesson Instructors Qualified applicants must be at least 14 years old. • Lifeguards Qualified applicants must be at least 15 years old. • Slide Attendant • Assistant Swim Team Instructor • Umpire • Score Keepers Qualified applicants must be at least 16 years old. • Pool Manager • Head Swim Team Instructor • Morning Work Manager • Swim Lesson Coordinator Qualified applicants must be at least 18 years old. Pre-employment drug screen required. Seasonal job application forms are available at the Recreation Office or the City Clerk’s Office. EEO / ADA

Equal Opportunity Employer

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Help Wanted

$500 SIGN ON BONUS FOR QUALIFIED CDL DRIVERS! Hopper bottom company with regional, dedicated runs, home on weekends. Benefits include, paid vacation, company contributed health insurance, safety incentive bonus. Call Dan at RC TRUCKING INC., Gridley, KS, 620-437-6616.

MANPOWER OF CHANUTE, 406 E. MAIN, 620-431-0001, has several openings for LONG TERM GENERAL LABOR positions. If you have not applied with us please do so at www. manpowerjobs.com, must be able to pass background check and drug screen.

TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR, full-time opening in Independence with Connections Transportation, a non-emergency medical transportation company. Duties include day-to-day oversight of staff and vehicles, training, grant compliance, and related duties. Bachelor’s degree in Human Services, Business or Marketing with emphasis on Human Services or related field experience. Management, logistics, and grant reporting experience preferred. Proven communication skills required. To apply, please email resumes to: hr@fourcounty. com or mail to: Human Resources, Four County MHC, PO Box 688, Independence, KS 67301. Four County MHC., d.b.a. Connections, is an EOE. DESERET HEALTH AND REHAB AT YATES CENTER has openings for CNA/CMA. Fulltime, all shifts, competitive wages. Application may be picked up at 801 S. Fry, Yates Center, KS 66783, 620-625-2111. CHILDREN’S CASE MANAGER, full-time. Bachelor’s degree preferred in Psychology, Sociology, Education. Will consider other degrees. May consider Associate’s degree and relevant experience working with children. Requires empathetic, patient individual with organizational and computer skills, good communication, team oriented, able to work independently. Benefits. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resume to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, 620-3658641, EOE/AA. CITY OF LAHARPE is now taking applications for a TEMPORARY MAINTENANCE WORKER. Successful candidates will be self-motivated, mechanically inclined, willing to do physical labor and must pass a drug screening. Apply at LaHarpe City Hall, 902 S. Washington, LaHarpe. FT/PT TEMPORARY MAINTENANCE WORKER. The City of Gas is seeking an individual for the FT/PT temporary position of city maintenance worker. Duties include, but are not limited to; trash collection, repair of the city’s water lines; waste water collection sites; maintenance of streets, park and cemetery. Requirements: high school diploma, valid KS driver’s license, able to lift 70 pounds, ability to work well with the public, and must pass drug screening. Salary will be based on experience. Applications are available at City Hall, 228 N. Taylor, Gas. NURSE, OUTPATIENT COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER, full-time position in Humboldt working with psychiatric staff. Requires Kansas RN license, will consider LPN. Nurse assistant to medical staff in an outpatient community mental health center. Daytime position. Computer skills required. Drug test, good driving record, KBI clearance and child abuse check required. Send resumes to: Robert F. Chase, Executive Director, Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, PO Box 807, Iola, KS 66749, call 620-365-8641, fax 620-365-8642, or email bstanley@sekmhc.org, EOE/AA.

SUMMER JOBS Children’s Aide Interviewing Now! Great summer job working with youth. Good experience for college students seeking related career. Good role model. 28-30 hours/week. Late May to early August. Clean driving record and reliable transportation. Minimum 18 years. Drug screen required. Applications at Southeast Kansas Mental Health Center, 304 N. Jefferson Ave. Questions, call Michelle 620-365-5717. EOE/AA. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening for INVENTORY TECHNICIAN (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high school diploma/GED. Applicant must have extensive industry experience, knowledge of basic hand tools & what they are used for. Must be able to run heavy equipment, i.e. fork lift, skid steer, etc., use cutting torch & welder. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. and work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd., Chanute, KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer. POSTROCK ENERGY has immediate opening for WELL SERVICING RIG HAND (located in SE Kansas). Successful applicants must have clean driving record, able to pass pre-employment physical and drug screen. Qualifications: high school diploma/GED. Applicant will operate a variety of hand tools & hydraulic tools & equipment, drive crew-truck, rig-trucks, obtain Class B/Class A CDL within 90 days of employment. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. and work in hot, cold or inclement conditions. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, stock plan, 401K, vacations and holiday pay. Apply at: PostRock Energy Services Corporation, 4402 Johnson Rd, Chanute, KS 66720. PostRock is an equal opportunity employer.

Poultry & Livestock (12) COW/CALF PAIRS WITH BLACK/BWF CALVES, 2 weeks-7 months old, some 3-1 packages, $2,350/pair, 620-3631145 or 620-363-4521.

Farm Miscellaneous FARMLAND FOR RENT, 88 tilled acres, near Kincaid, call 913-271-8733. WILL BALE YOUR HAY ON SHARES, Moran, Bronson, Uniontown area. Call Travis 620-768-9244.

Merchandise for Sale MEDICAL GUARDIAN - Toprated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month, 877-531-3048. PURCHASE PHOTOS TAKEN AT AREA SPORTS EVENTS, click the photos link at www.iolaregister.com

CLO is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping adults and children w ith severe developm entaldisabilities achieve personally satisfying and fulfilling lifestyle.

STORAGE & RV OF IOLA WEST HIGHWAY 54, 620-365-2200. Regular/Boat/RV storage, LP gas, fenced, supervised, www. iolarvparkandstorage.com

SUPERIOR BUILDERS. New Buildings, Remodeling, Concrete, Painting and All Your Carpenter Needs, including replacement windows and vinyl siding. 620-365-6684

A daily history of Allen County since 1867

Performs all plant maintenance functions including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, heating and air conditioning and welding. Have understanding and ability to read blueprints and diagrams. Responsible for troubleshooting and repairing plant equipment. Follow diagrams and blueprints showing locations of wiring and equipment. Knowledge of and ability to work with 3 phase. Candidate for this position must be able to perform task in electronic field to include - PLC Debug and repair, understanding of ladder logic, Allen Bradley 1395 drive experience desired. Candidate must require little or no supervision. Strong mechanical aptitude and ability to work well with your hands. Minimum Education and Experience Required 2 year associate degree in engineering technology is desired or equivalent work experience. Other Successful applicant will be required to furnish their own adequate tools to complete responsible tasks stated above. Must complete extensive training required related to Safety/Emergency training and procedures. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

SHAUGHNESSY BROS. CONSTRUCTION, LLC. Carpentry and painting service Siding and windows 620-365-6815, 620-3655323 or 620-228-1303

ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control. FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-888-720-5583.

REGISTER

Certified Medication Aide

MECHANIC WANTED for farm implement & tractor business. Must have valid driver’s license. Drug screen required. EOE. Benefits package. Apply in person Storrer Implement Inc., 1801 East St., Iola, 620-365-5692.

Services Offered

IOLA MINI-STORAGE 323 N. Jefferson Call 620-365-3178 or 365-6163

IOLA

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Steve Kelly - Auctioneer 620-404-0050

BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS FOR OVER 30 YEARS, highest prices paid for collector coins, Jon Minor 620-365-8161.

THE

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Wanted to Buy

 Beginning salary is $27,000 to new college graduate or to someone with commensurate experience in newspapers.  Comes with full benefits and an employer-match IRA plan. 

Personal Service Insurance

4-K Ranch - Owner

For complete listing & Photos: www.kellyandcompanysales.com

Looking for a full-time reporter who is eager to become a part of the community. Photography and layout skills a plus.

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The Iola Register

Carlisle Transportation Products LLC in their Fort Scott, KS facility is currently conducting a search for: Electrical Engineer req# 329, Plant Controller req# 357 and Environmental Health and Safety Manager req# 360. Back to Basics: The future is bright for our industry and Company. We’ve gone back to basics to re-capture the spirit of American manufacturing and American value-based, customer-driven initiatives. Learning from the past with a common vision for the future, you can rely on Carlisle belts today and tomorrow. We Know What Works: Quality products, made in the US heartland, by American workers focused upon product quality and customer satisfaction. Back to the USA: Carlisle belts are proudly made by craftsmen in state-of-the-art ISOregistered manufacturing facilities in Springfield, Missouri and Fort Scott, Kansas. CTP is a nearly 100 year old company. Please visit our careers section of www.carlisletransportationproducts.com, look for the interactive jobs portal of the careers section, requisition #329-Engineer, requisition #357Controller, requisition # 360-EHS Manager. Carlisle Transportation Products LLC is a global manufacturing company of specialty tire, wheel and power transmission products. CTP offers an excellent benefit package including but not limited to 10 paid holidays per year, 2 weeks of vacation after one completed year of service, continuous improvement incentives, 401K and group medical/dental/vision plans. Equal Opportunity Employer CTP participates in E-Verify. The employer will provide the Social Security Administration (SSA) and, if necessary, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with information from each new employees I-9 to confirm work authorization.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES (620) 365-2111

All ads are 10 word minimum, must run consecutive days. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. day before publication; GARAGE SALE SPECIAL: Paper & Web only, no shopper: 3 Days $1 per word

N ow hiring for the follow ing positions: 56 H our W eekend D irect Support Professional Q ualifications include: M ust be at least 20 Years ofage; M inim um ofhigh schooldiplom a or GED; O peration of m otor vehicle. Current and valid driver’s license. M eet ALL ofCLO ’s driving guidelines. Experience w orking w ith persons w ho have disabilities a plus. Full-Tim e Benefits include: M edicalHealth Reim bursem ent Account, Dental, and Paid Tim e O ff. Earn $468.08 a w eekend and have your w eekdays off! Please apply online at w w w .clokan.org or in person at 201 W estStreet, Iola, KS 66749. Call620-365-7119 for m ore inform ation. EO E

Now Hiring Gates Corporation is a worldwide leader in the production of hydraulic hose. We are a growing company and are looking for only the finest employees for our manufacturing operation.

Full-Time & Part-Time Positions Available On Evenings & Night Shifts. Please apply in person. Applications will be taken Weekdays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications must be completed in the facility. GED or high school diploma required. Pre-employment background checks & drug screen required.

Gates Corporation 1450 Montana Road Iola, Kansas

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The Iola Register

Saturday, March 22, 2014

History: Magical season remembered

B3

Continued from B1

The Garnett win set up a showdown with Gardner, the host school for the regional tournament. “Gardner had just built its new high school, and they were giving us a tour before the game,” Stange recalled. Their guide, Gardner’s principal, took the players through a large cafeteria that doubled as a banquet hall. It was there, Stange said, the principal told the Cub players that Gardner planned to host its celebratory dinner after winning the regional tournament. “We didn’t say a word,” Stange said. Instead, the Cubs rolled that night over Gardner, winning 83-36. The game led to a humorous encounter years later for Adams as he started his teaching career in Wellsville after he introduced himself to another young teacher. “Not that Humboldt,” his coworker cried. “You’ve gotta be kidding me.” Adams learned the Gardner coaches were so confident of victory they prematurely called off classes the following Monday to celebrate. “Sorry we ruined their fun,” Adams laughed. The Cubs secured a return trip to the state tournament in Hutchinson with a 37-27 win over Bonner Springs. They opened state competition with a 56-46 win over Colby and a 67-56 romp over Haven to set up a showdown with an old nemesis, Buhler. “Buhler had lost quite a few players from the season before,” Stange said. “They weren’t supposed to be as good.” Buhler certainly wasn’t supposed to be the one facing Humboldt for the title. That honor was designated for Beloit, and their

“We played a good team that day. I’d have loved to have won it, but we just got beat.” — Bill Stange, on Humboldt’s 51-49 loss to Buhler in the 1964 state title game

Bill Stange, left, and Craig Adams today. REGISTER/STEVEN SCHWARTZ

head coach, Gene Keady. Beloit and Humboldt were tapped prior to the tournament as the cofavorites. Buhler’s 72-68 semifinal win changed those plans. THE GAME

Buhler had no match for Humboldt’s height, with only one player standing taller than 6-1. But the Crusaders were anything but small. “They were a bunch of farm boys,” Stange said. “They were thick, powerful. We were all skinny and slow.” The game started on an ominous note for Humboldt. Three early fouls sent Seyfert to the bench by the midpoint of the second quarter, depriving the Cubs of their biggest offensive and defensive weapon. In his stead, Henrichs picked up the slack, draining jumper after jumper to keep things close. How close? A Hutchinson reporter noted the game featured 11 ties and so many lead changes, “you needed a calculator to keep count.” The score was tied at 47-all when Buhler’s John Gaddert drove in for a layup to give the Crusaders a 49-47 lead with just over two minutes remaining. While memories have

faded for many involved — “I really don’t recall a lot about the game,” Adams said — those final two minutes are like yesterday for Stange. After a Cub timeout, Honeycutt found himself open in the corner with 1:36 left. His jumper tied the score at 49-49. Buhler was content to hold the ball for the final shot, patiently moving the ball around the perimeter until guard Rod Franz found Bruce Ediger gliding under the basket for the layup — 51-49. Six seconds remained as Humboldt called timeout with the hopes of getting up a final shot. Head coach Ed Hankins’ instructions were simple. “He told us that somebody needed to put it up for Seyfert,” Stange said. Honeycutt raced upcourt, passing to Stange on the far wing. “I was probably 15 to 18 feet from the basket, just a bit farther than what I was used to shooting,” Stange said. But with time running short, he had no choice. With nary a moment’s hesitation — and Seyfert camped beneath the basket as instructed — Stange let it fly. The ball hit the rim, bounced up, then hit the rim a second time. The second bounce

4 S te p s To

Kind e rg a rte n Attention USD #257 Parents with

KINDERGARTEN AGE CHILDREN who will be entering kindergarten this Aug. (Children must be 5 on or before Aug. 31, 2014)

Step 1

Please call any of these elementary schools ASAP:

We need to know your child’s name and birthday.

LINCOLN . . . 365-4820 JEFFERSON 365-4840 McKINLEY . . 365-4860

Step 2

Mon., March 24

KINDERGARTEN ROUND-UP

6:30 p.m.

Jefferson Gym 300 S. Jefferson

USD 257 Districtwide Meeting

KINDERGARTEN SCREENING McKinley 365-4860

Jefferson 365-4840

Lincoln 365-4820

Important immunizations, physicals, visitation schedule and pre-enrollment information will be available.

Step 3

was crucial. “It would have been a tough shot, but Earl could have gotten the rebound for the putback,” Stange said. “But the second bounce meant he was off balance.” Seyfert could only deflect the ball as the final horn sounded. Buhler’s fans swarmed the court to celebrate; Humboldt’s players and fans sat in stunned silence. Stange saw cheerleaders and other supporters wiping away tears. He wasn’t as distraught. “We played a good team that day,” he said. “I’d have loved to have won it, but we just got beat.” Honeycutt wasn’t as diplomatic. “I was mad,” he said. “We should have won. We didn’t play to our strength, which was Earl.” STAYING TOGETHER

The end of the basketball season didn’t mean the end of the close-knit bond between Humboldt’s quintet. Honeycutt and Seyfert shared the court many times after that, as teammates at Kansas State. Three Cubs, in fact, signed up to play basketball for Tex Winter’s Wildcats. Seyfert picked K-State over such schools as the University of Kansas and John Wooden’s UCLA juggernaut. (He owns the distinction of being invited by both Winter and Wooden to attend the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four showdown between Kansas State and UCLA that spring in Kansas City, Mo. Seyfert picked KSU shortly after that, even though Wooden’s Bruins won the game and one game later the NCAA title.) Honeycutt admits he was an afterthought to the Kansas State recruiters. “Tex came down to see Earl, and that’s how he saw me play,” Honeycutt said. “I was only about 5-11, 145 pounds, and I wasn’t a very good ball handler.” But Honeycutt showed

8 a.m.-3 p.m. Riverside Park Community Building

Visitation will be arranged at this time.

Step 4

KINDERGARTEN VISITATION ~ Sign up during round-up or screening ~

Or call school to make arrangements if not made previously. Jefferson Visitation McKinley Visitation Lincoln Visitation 365-4840 365-4860 365-4820

enough raw ability and court savvy to draw a scholarship offer. He redshirted his sophomore season at KSU, and used the year away from the court to advantage. “I worked primarily on dribbling with my left hand,” he said. “It got to the point that I was primarily left-handed with the ball the rest of my career.” Like at Humboldt, both left a legacy at Kansas State. Seyfert and Honeycutt were voted team co-captains in the 1967-68 season, with Honeycutt averaging a team-leading 14.4 points per game, and Seyfert just behind at 13.8. Honeycutt earned allBig 8 honors his junior and senior years. Seyfert was equally impressive in the classroom. He was named an academic AllAmerican following his senior year. “It was fun, knowing I could hold my own against some of the best players in the country,” Honeycutt said, where he faced future NBA stars such as Kansas’ Jo Jo White and Nebraska’s Stu Lance. Neither Seyfert nor Honeycutt played professionally, although both were drafted by NBA teams. Seyfert was picked in the 13th round of the 1968 draft by the Philadelphia 76ers. Honeycutt was drafted in the 17th round a year later by Seattle. Honeycutt eschewed reporting to camp because of an illness that struck him late his senior season. “I dropped quite a bit of weight and was too weak to even try out,” he said. “Besides that, I had a four-year commitment to Air Force on my horizon.” Likewise, Seyfert entered the military after his days in Manhattan. He played for a select Army team sporting

To n I n O rc h a M

2 Days - Mar. 27 & 28

Call school for screening appointment if you didn’t schedule at Round-Up.

Earl Seyfert, left, and Steve Honeycutt starred on the basketball court for Humboldt High and later at Kansas State University. PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK STEINER

$

such teammates as current Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski. He played professionally overseas in the Philippines for a couple of years before hanging up his sneakers and entering the professional world. Seyfert became president and chief executive officer of Maestas Glass Company in Albuquerque, N.M. Attempts to reach Seyfert for the article went unanswered. LOSING A FRIEND

Joe Henrichs played on Kansas State’s freshman team — freshmen weren’t allowed to play varsity those years — before giving up basketball to focus solely on his studies as a sophomore. Tragedy struck on a wet, foggy morning on Feb. 27, 1966. Henrichs was a passenger on a Cessna 150, piloted by a KSU classmate and amateur pilot that crashed near a farm just south of Emporia. Both Henrichs and the pilot, 19-year-old Douglas Peters of Ellinwood, were killed. Henrichs had celebrated his 20th birthday three weeks earlier. They were returning to Manhattan after spending the weekend with Henrichs’ family in Humboldt. “It was such a shock — so sad,” Honeycutt said. “I remember as a kid riding to my brother’s basketball games with Joe and his parents. He played the organ at church. He was a good, good young man.” THE TEAM THAT TIME FORGOT

The bond between the old teammates slowly dissipated through the years. After graduating from Pittsburg State, Stange stuck around southeast Kansas. He was among See HISTORY | Page B4

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B4

Saturday, March 22, 2014

The Wally Pipp syndrome What became a legendary career for Earl Seyfert at Humboldt High School began in a Wally Pipp sort of way. Pipp, baseball fans with a penchant for history will remember, showed up at Yankee Stadium one day in 1925 with a headache. The Yanks’ first baseman was given the day off by Manager Miller Huggins, with Lou Gehrig starting in his place. Gehrig went on to play

At Week’s End

uled to start at center, was sidelined because of an illness. Seyfert, a tall and promising freshman, took his place. Seyfert scored 14 points (according to the writer’s memory) and grabbed about as many rebounds. He went on to play 78 games, scored 1,251 points and led Humboldt to a second place finish in the state tournament in 1964, a loss that still nags at Cub faithful.

Bob Johnson

2,130 consecutive games at first. In the first game of the 1960-61 high school season, Humboldt opened at Burlington. Dan Hardwood, a senior sched-

History: Cubs reflect on ’64 Continued from B3

the first employees at Iola’s Berg Manufacturing (later Haldex) plant before moving to Tramec Corporation when it opened. He then was among the founders of Precision Pump before retiring. Stange now runs a hunting lodge northwest of Humboldt. Adams moved to Wellsville, where he taught and later became an administrator. His son, Josh, was hired last year as Wellsville High principal. His daughter teaches third grade. Retired, he lives in Olathe. Both Stange and Adams remained involved with youth athletics af-

W

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younger brother, Phil — the school has not had a ceremony to honor the 1964 squad. The team was briefly recalled by long-time Cub faithful during the spring of 2013 when last year’s Humboldt squad rolled through the basketball season undefeated. Last year’s Humboldt team eventually broke the ’64 Cubs’ school record winning streak en route to a second-place finish at the state playoffs. Honeycutt is hopeful to see his former teammates again. “I’d love to have us get together,” he said. “It’d be great to talk about old times.”

ter their playing days. Stange officiated basketball and football for more than 18 years. Adams coached for several years in addition to his teaching duties. After college, Honeycutt fulfilled his military obligation with the Air Force before a 35-year career with Conoco Phillips. Now retired, he lives in Magnolia, Texas. “It was probably at our 20-year reunion that we last saw each other,” Honeycutt said. “And that was 30 years ago.” Unlike Humboldt’s 1969 state champion squad — which featured Earl’s younger brother, Lynn, and Honeycutt’s

p i h ors

! s hU

Calvary United Methodist Church Jackson & Walnut St., Iola

“The Cross Shines Brightly at Calvary” Sunday Worship.................9:15 a.m. Sunday School ................10:30 a.m. Rev. Gene McIntosh, pastor Office: 620-365-3883 Parsonage: 620-365-3893

Carlyle Presbyterian Church 29 Covert St., Carlyle

Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Bible Study............... Tuesday 3 p.m.

First Assembly of God

1020 E. Carpenter, Iola Sunday School (All Ages). . . . . . . .9 a.m. Teens First Sunday...................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Sunday Praise & Prayer...........6 p.m. Kids First Wednesday. ........6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Class...........7 p.m. iolafirstag.org

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Humboldt United Methodist Church

St. John’s Catholic Church

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship..................11 a.m. MS/HS Youth...........................5 p.m.

Saturday Evening...............5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m.

806 N. 9th, Humboldt

Nursery provided

310 S. Jefferson, Iola

(at St. Joseph’s, Yates Center......8 a.m.)

Wednesday P.S.R. Classes...6:30 p.m. September thru May Confessions Saturday. . .4:30 - 5 p.m.

Paul Miller, pastor

Marge Cox, pastor

620-365-2492

620-473-3242

620-365-2277

LaHarpe Baptist Mission

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church

Sunday School......................10 a.m. Morning Worship..................11 a.m. Sunday Evening......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service................7 p.m.

Sunday Worship..8:15 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School...................9:30 a.m.

First Baptist Church 7 & Osage, Humboldt th

Sunday School...................9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:50 a.m. Sunday Evening

Kids Bible Club..................5:30 p.m. Evening Service......................7 p.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study. .7 p.m. Rev Jerry Neeley, pastor 620-473-2481

First Christian Church 1608 Oregon Rd., Iola

“Lead-Feed Tend” - John 21.15 - 17

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m. Bible Study.............................6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer.............6:30 p.m.

Sunday School immediately after service

fcciola@acek.com

Steve Traw, pastor

Dave McGullion, pastor Travis Riley, youth pastor

620-365-9728

620-365-3436

Community of Christ

First Presbyterian Church

East 54 Hwy., Iola

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

302 E. Madison, Iola

901 S. Main, LaHarpe

Duwayne Bearden, pastor 620-228-1829

Moran United Methodist Church Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Sunday School ..................8:45 a.m. James Stigall, pastor

Father John P. Miller

910 Amos St., Humboldt

David E. Meier, pastor 620-473-2343

Friends Home Lutheran Church Savonburg

Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship.....................11 a.m. PMA Sidney Hose

620-237-4442

620-754-3314

Northcott Church

St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church

12425 SW. Barton Rd., Colony

202 S. Walnut, Iola

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship. . . .10:45 a.m.

Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Sunday School.................10:45 a.m. Wednesday Kids Club.............3 p.m.

Wednesday Evening Prayer as announced

Gary Murphey, pastor

Jennifer Loeb, pastor

620-365-2683

Sunday School........................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Sunday Evening......................6 p.m. Mike Farran, pastor

Holy Eucharist and Sermon at 9 a.m. followed by coffee and fellowship.

Rev. Jan Chubb

620-365-3481

620-363-4828 620-237-4255

620-365-7306

Fellowship Regional Church

Grace Lutheran Church

Trinity Lutheran Church

214 W. Madison, Iola

117 E. Miller Rd., Iola

Poplar Grove Baptist Church

Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m.

Sunday School.........................9 a.m. Adult Bible Class....................9 a.m. Worship Service...............10:30 a.m.

Streaming live on Sunday morning at www.thecruxchurch.com

305 Mulberry, Humboldt Come Let Us Worship The Lord

Sunday School...................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:45 a.m. Wednesday Service................7 p.m.

430 N. Grant, Garnett

Saturday Men & Womens Bible Study..................................9 a.m. Sunday School........................9 a.m. Sunday Worship....................10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study..........6 p.m.

Jeff Cokely Jared Ellis Luke Bycroft

Rev. Bruce Kristalyn

Rev. Jon Gray

Ervin A. Daughtery Jr., pastor

620-365-6468

620-473-3063

785-448-6930

First Baptist Church

Harvest Baptist Church

Salem United Methodist Church

Wesley United Methodist Church

801 N. Cottonwood, Iola

Sunday School...................9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship...............10:30 a.m. on 1370 KIOL 11 a.m.

Sunday Evening Worship. .......6 p.m. Wednesday - Youth/Children...6 p.m. Dr. Michael Quinn, pastor Jonathan Palmer, worship/Youth Minister 620-365-2779

406 S. Walnut, Iola

Family Prayer/Fellowship Hour 9:15 a.m. For the Entire Family! Main Worship Service at 10:30 a.m. Youth Group on Sunday Evenings at 6:30 p.m.

3 mi. west, 2 mi. south of Iola “Little White Church in the Country”

Sunday School......................10 a.m. Sunday Worship....................11 a.m.

Tony Godfrey, pastor

Rev. Gene McIntosh, pastor

620-365-3688 620-228-2522

620-365-3883

Madison & Buckeye

Contemporary Praise............9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship.................9:30 a.m. Middle School UMYF.............6 p.m. Combined Youth................7:30 p.m. High School UMYF................8 p.m. Rev. Trudy Kenyon Anderson 620-365-2285


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Merchandise for Sale

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Garage Sales BENEFIT BAKE SALE, Sunday March 23, 8a.m.-6p.m., at Walmart. IOLA AMERICAN LEGION GARAGE SALE SATURDAY, MARCH 29TH, 52-FAMILY SALE, $10 to reserve your table before March 22nd, ONLY 10 TABLES LEFT. Call Durenda Frye 620-625-2075. GAS, 202 N. MAIN, Thursday/Friday Noon-6, Saturday 8-Noon, MULTI-FAMILY. Kid’s clothes, lots of miscellaneous.

Real Estate for Rent QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE HOMES available for rent now, www.growiola.com IOLA, 305 S. 4TH, 3 BEDROOM, $500 monthly plus deposit, 620-365-9424. 1224 N. COTTONWOOD, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, CH/CA, close to college, $500 monthly, $500 deposit, Monday-Friday 620-365-7663. MORAN, 2 BEDROOM, $375 monthly plus deposit, 620-3659424. IOLA, 2 BEDROOM HOUSE, garage, $525 monthly, 913-5923885.

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Doctor: Injured reliever ‘lucky guy’ GOODYEAR, Ariz. (AP) — Cincinnati Reds closer Aroldis Chapman underwent a 2½-hour operation Thursday to repair a broken bone above his left eye but has no other serious injuries after being hit in the face by a line drive in a spring training game. Team medical director Dr. Timothy Kremchek said Chapman could begin throwing off a mound in six to eight weeks, a timetable that could get him back in games in late May. The left-hander with a fastball that has reached 105 mph could start exercising and throwing on flat ground in a couple of weeks, Kremchek said. He called Chapman “a very lucky guy.” The surgery was performed by cranial facial plastic surgeon Dr. Ed Joganic. Kremchek said earlier that a metal plate would be inserted in the bone above Chapman’s left

eyebrows and would remain there permanently. Chapman has a mild concussion and no injury to his eye. “He’s feeling better and he has some pain management. We’re optimistic that he is going to be on the mend,” Reds manager Bryan Price said after meeting with players Thursday morning at the team’s spring training facility. “Obviously, we’ll stay in touch. We will make sure we follow the process as we continue to get familiar with the injury itself. We will let him know how much support he has and that we care about him.” Hopefully, we will see him here very soon.” Cincinnati catcher Brayan Pena, a fellow Cuban and Chapman’s close friend, was one of several Reds players who visited the injured pitcher Wednesday night and spoke to him on the phone Thursday morning.

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Public notice (First published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2014) NOTICE OF HEARING LAHARPE, KANSAS, TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that the City of LaHarpe, KS, is considering granting a request to re-zone 1002 S. Jefferson from a residential zone to a commercial zone for the purposes of establishing an automobile shop within the City Limits of LaHarpe, Kansas. A public hearing concerning this proposal will be held on March 25th, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. The public hearing will take place at LaHarpe City Hall, which is located at 902 S. Washington. If there are any concerns, questions, or objections regarding this proposed re-zoning, you are invited to appear at the public hearing to let your voice be heard. (3) 18,22

ZITS

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE 

by Chris Browne

by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

BLONDIE

BABY BLUES

by Kirkman & Scott

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

HI AND LOIS

by Chance Browne BEETLE BAILEY

by Young and Drake

by Tom Batiuk

by Mort Walker


B6

Saturday, March 22, 2014

www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

ACC: Indy sweeps Continued from B1

out, but a strikeout, a liner and Levi Ashmore’s grounder to third — he was out by a cat’s whisker — to end the threat. Butler broke the game open with nine runs in the top of the seventh against a pair of Allen relievers. THE GRIZZLIES’ bats stayed alive in Game 2. They scored in every inning but the seventh. Butler led 7-0 before Chase Egelston’s grand slam in the third pulled Allen to within 7-5. But Independence responded with five in the

top of the fourth, one in the fifth, and five in the sixth to put the last nail in the Devils’ coffin. The Grizzlies racked up 17 hits and were issued 11 walks, while the Red Devils committed six errors. Stats from Thursday were incomplete — scoring plays from Allen’s two-run ninth inning were unavailable — but we know Francis had three singles, while Egelston homered, Griffin had a triple and Cole Slusser and Maruo each doubled. Ashmore added a single. The Red Devils return to action today with a doubleheader at Independence.

Schaub on move?

Chase Egelston hits a grand slam Thursday in Allen Community College’s 22-11 loss to Independence. REGISTER/RICHARD LUKEN

HOUSTON (AP) — The Houston Texans are nearing a deal to trade quarterback Matt Schaub to the Oakland Raiders, a person familiar with the negotiations said Friday. The person spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the deal was not yet complete. Schaub was Houston’s starter from 2007 until last season, when he was benched in favor of Case Keenum

after a terrible start to the year. The Texans were expected to contend for a Super Bowl last season, but instead became the NFL’s worst team, sinking to 2-14, which tied the worst record in franchise history. It was clear after last season that Schaub didn’t have a future in Houston, but his departure looked to be imminent on Thursday night when the Texans signed veteran quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick.

QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE Compelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answers

HOT TOPICS: 3 ISSUES GENERATING A BUZZ

NO SECOND THOUGHTS One streak is over and another continues at Hendrick Motorsports. Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s streak of consecutive top-two finishes came to a thundering halt at Bristol Motor Speedway, where NASCAR’s Most Popular Driver finished 24th in the No. 88 Chevrolet. Earnhardt opened the season by winning the Daytona 500, then scored second-place finishes at Phoenix and Las Vegas. For those first three outings, the 39-year-old driver had an average finish of 1.3. Now add in the 24th at Bristol and Earnhardt’s average finish in 2014 is 7.0. Jeff Gordon, who drives the No. 24 Chevy, kept his streak going at Bristol. Gordon has scored four consecutive top-10 finishes since the season opened at Daytona. And just to show how stats can be skewed, Gordon now has a better finishing average than Earnhardt. Gordon’s average finish in 2014 is 6.25. “The whole team did an awesome job,� Gordon said after his seventhplace effort at Bristol. “We had a really good race car at different times throughout the night. It’s crazy, when we went back racing after the rain delay we just completely wore out the left-front tire in just like 20 or 30 laps. I mean we were going backwards in a hurry. Thankfully for that competition caution, but we fixed that and got the car better, and drove up into the top five, I was pretty happy.� Earnhardt? No comment.

side by side in the closing laps in a heated battle for 10th-place honors. Larson prevailed in his No. 42 Chevy while Dillon was 11th. “It’s crazy to think it’s kind of a disappointing finish for the way we ran for most of the race, but all in all it was a good race,� Larson said. “It was a lot of fun racing with Austin there at the end. I definitely had to get up on the wheel and get the elbows up and try not to make any mistakes.� Now each rookie has one top-10 finish. Dillon was ninth in the Daytona 500.

KENSETH’S ROUGH RIDE Matt Kenseth led a race-high 165 laps at Bristol, but by the time the race ended, his No. 20 Toyota was battered and bent, and he finished 13th. Kenseth was rearended at high speed during a caution when Timmy Hill, driving the No. 33 Chevy, blasted his rear bumper. Later in the race, Kenseth got into “the marbles� and tagged the wall a couple of times before regaining control of his Camry. When asked “How was the race?� Kenseth could only shrug. “I don’t think we have enough time for me to tell you all about it.� What about the hit from Hill? “He hit me going like 4,000 miles an hour,� Kenseth said.

AP/ROSS D. FRANKLIN

Jeff Gordon hasn’t finished outside the top 10 since November. A big pile of points could come in handy in September, but a win would be nicer.

ROOKIE RUNNERS The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Rookie of the Year battle was defined at Bristol when Kyle Larson and Austin Dillon raced

Associated Press / WADE PAYNE

Mixing Cheez-Its with Frosted Flakes? Now there’s something that deserves a caution flag. Is it time to do something about bump-drafting in the flag stand? Let’s assume NASCAR officials will take a wait-and-see approach to this one. If it happens again, expect drastic measures: That’s right, a press release announcing immediate changes.

What triggered this possibility? Sunday night at Bristol, with the 500th and (long-awaited) final lap approaching, someone in the flag stand apparently leaned into an override switch that turned on the track’s caution lights. Once the error was uncovered, but before NASCAR could gather everyone back together for a return to green, the rains returned and Carl Edwards carried his big smile to Victory Lane. Right now it’ll be viewed as a freak accident, but if it happens again, expect NASCAR’s Boys in R&D to develop an officially licensed Caution Light Underride Switch to go in the tower, where it will take precedence over the Override Switch. Or something like that.

Can you get me excited about Fontana this week? Here’s your good news: NASCAR’s great “unforeseen� doesn’t know geography. It can show its face at any longitude or latitude. The unpredictable wins, tumbles and personality clashes — all part of NASCAR’s timehonored recipe — often happen when (and where) you least expect them.

GODWIN’S FONTANA PICKS Godwin Kelly has covered NASCAR for 33 years. Reach him at godwin.kelly@newsjrnl.com or follow him on Twitter: @godwinkelly

Winner: Jimmie Johnson Rest of the top five: Kurt Busch, Brad Keselowski, Kasey Kahne, Matt Kenseth Dark horse: Aric Almirola

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Disappointment: Jeff Gordon First one out: David Gilliland Don’t be surprised if: Johnson checks out on the field to plant his flag for the Chase.

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