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IOLA REGISTER

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Gustin wins King of America See B1

Monday, April 1, 2013

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VOTE TUESDAY WARD 3 AND MAYOR Becker a veteran Myrick pushing for Wicoff ready for better marketing mayoral position in council seat By ALLISON TINN allison@iolaregister.com

Donald Becker hasn’t changed his campaign tactics since the first time he ran for and won a seat on the city council. “I originally didn’t have an agenda… and I still don’t have one,” Becker said. Becker said most citizens know what he stands for because of the way he has voted on council issues in the past. His main goal is to do right by the city for the

next two years before he steps d o w n for good — this will be the last Donald Becker time he runs. Becker said the duty of a city council member is very important, but would like to see someone eventually take over, someone younger. He believes younger See BECKER | Page A2

Rotarians ‘This Close’ to polio eradication

By ALLISON TINN

allison@iolaregister.com

Eugene Myrick’s attempt at gaining a seat on Iola council has him more confident this second time around. “Last time I didn’t get out much,” Myrick said. “This time I am going to knock on doors.” Myrick said he wants the seat on the council “not only (to help) the citizens in the Third Ward but all of Iola,” by developing better marketing strategies to draw in more businesses. “We need to market

o u r selves better to the world,” Myrick s a i d . “ W e Eugene Myrick n e e d to put more things on the website.” Myrick said the new hospital should be marketed. “Let industries know the city and the county are willing to work on tax incentives. I know See MYRICK | Page A2

By ALLISON TINN allison@iolaregister.com

Joel Wicoff has been sitting at the city council table for the past two years serving as president of city council and going through the growing pains that came with the eight seat city council. He has been training for mayor before he realized he would ever run for the position. Mayor Bill Shirley is stepping down from the role. “It was a job that needed to be done,” Wicoff said. “There is still a

lot to do in our c o m munity.” Wi c off said s o m e Joel Wicoff of the tasks needing to be done in the city are based on infrastructure, such as streets, water supply, housing and sewers. “It would be nice to have houses in all different price levels,” he said. See WICOFF | Page A4

LET THE HUNT BEGIN

By ALLISON TINN

allison@iolaregister.com

In the United States the days of polio outbreaks are a thing of the past and reported cases worldwide are down to 200. That largely is due to the efforts of Rotarians, whose international movement spearheaded the eradication of the disease in 1985. Since then organizations such as UNICEF and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have backed the cause. Rotary has created the “This Close” polio awareness campaign, which through public service announcements pushes to create a polio-free world. Major figures such as Bill and Melinda Gates, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and actor Jackie Chan have joined the effort. Three countries still reporting cases of polio are Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Iola Rotary is trying to “raise our community members’ awareness of polio to get more donations,” longtime Rotarian Ellis Potter said. Donations would help fund the immunization trips and the purchase of more live vaccines, which must be kept

Register/Bob Johnson

A picture-perfect Sunday afternoon drew more than 1,000 people to Riverside Park for the First Assembly of God Church’s fourth annual Easter egg hunt, which included all sorts of games and food booths. At top from left, Tia Barton, 7, pulls a plastic duck from a puddle to win a prize; Janie Myrick, 2, is enthusiastic about collecting eggs; Bethany Miller, 5, enjoys cotton candy, and Jacob Elliss, 10, pumps away to inflate a balloon to its bursting point.

See POLIO | Page A4

Moran man safe after wash-off Larry Reinhart is thankful for Shane Smith as Moran chief of police. About 5 p.m. Saturday Reinhart, 76, rural Moran, tried to drive through water rushing over 5000 Street about a mile south of U.S. 54. Its force was such that the water pushed Reinhart’s pickup truck off the road into a ditch, filled with water and rising from a rainstorm. With his truck disabled and unable to get out by himself, Reinhart called 911. Within minutes Smith answered the See RESCUE | Page A4

Courtesy photo/Allen County Sheriff’s Department

Shane Smith, Moran chief of police, far right, and Moran volunteer firefighters help Larry Reinhart, in red cap, to safety after his pickup truck was washed off 5000 Street southeast of Moran Saturday afternoon. Vol. 115, No.109

A thunderstorm that blasted eastern Allen and western Bourbon counties deposited a thick layer of hail Saturday. The hail, coupled with temperatures still in the 60s, created an eerie blanket of fog over a short stretch of U.S. 54. 75 Cents

Iola, KS


A2 Monday, April 1, 2013

The Iola Register

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Obituaries

Ruth Ann Hangen, 78, Iola, died Sunday, March 24, 2013, at Harry Hynes Hospice in Wichita. Memorial services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Waugh-Yokum & Friskel Chapel in Iola. Visitation will be at 1 p.m. Saturday. Interment will be in Highland Cemetery in Iola. Ruth was born Sept. 17, 1934, in Herington to Alec and Renata (Leitz) Weber. She married Floyd Erlan Hangen on Aug. 6, 1952. They were married 58 years before Floyd died April 3, 2010. Ruth is survived by her daughter, Kathleen Monfort and her husband Darrell, Iola, her son Floyd Wayne Hangen, and his wife Susan of El Cajon, Calif.; six grandchildren, Roy Monfort, Herndon, Va., Nicole Linder and her husband Travis, Las Vegas, Nev., AnneLouise Monfort and her significant other, Brian Dolny, Kansas City, Mo., Andrew Monfort of Lubbock, Texas, Erin

Gary Smith

Gary Duane Smith, 53, Chanute, passed away Tuesday, March 26, 2013, at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita.

Monfort-Nelson and her h u s band, Elijah Nelson, M a n hattan, a n d Stepha n i e H a n Ruth Hangen g e n of El Cajon, Calif.; and two g reat-g randchildren, Rylan and Mason Linder; and her beloved pets Frosty and Kitty. A homemaker in the truest sense of the word for her entire life, Ruth was an asset to her family and community, a baker of cookies and pies, the author and publisher of a family cookbook and a prolific creator of cards for family and friends. She will be greatly missed. A lover of her pets, Ruth requested donations in her memory be made to Allen County Animal Rescue Facility. Online condolences may be left at www.iolafuneral.com.

A full obituary will follow later this week. Arrangements are under the direction of Penwell-Gabel Johnson Chapel.

Calendar Deadline: Notify the Register about calendar announcements by 7 a.m. Monday in order to have your event listed in that week’s schedule. The calendar is published every Monday. Email event news to news@iolaregister.com

Today

Moran Public Library meeting, 5 p.m., at the Moran Public Library. Moran City Council meeting, 7 p.m., Moran City Hall. Kappa Alpha Sorority business meeting, 7 p.m., at Community National Bank. Hostesses are Mary LaCrone and Betty Skidmore. Iola Community Theatre meeting, 7:30 p.m., 203 S. Jefferson.

Tuesday

Allen County Commissioners meeting, 8:30 a.m., Allen County Courthouse. Iola Kiwanis Club, noon, meeting room at Allen Community College student center. Knights of Columbus meeting, 7 p.m., Knights of Columbus room in the St. John’s Parish Center. Allen County Historical Society board meeting, 7 p.m., Allen County Historical Museum 20 S. Washington Ave.

Thursday

Rotary Club, noon, The New Greenery. Take Off Pounds Sensibly No. KS 880, Iola, 5 p.m. weighin, 5:30 meeting, Calvary United Methodist Church, 118 W. Jackson. Iola Public Library board meeting, 6 p.m., in the library.

Friday

Allen County Hospital Auxiliary, 1:30 p.m., hospital conference room. Senior Citizens and Card Club potluck dinner, 5:30 p.m., senior citizens center, 204 N. Jefferson.

Saturday

First Annual Stroll and Roll, 10 a.m., Riverside Park. The Cleverlys, 7:30 p.m., Bowlus Fine Arts Center. “Greece and the Hands of Time,” by Mike Roach. Mary Martin Art Gallery in the Bowlus Fine Arts Center. Artist reception 6 p.m. Exhibit is open from April 6 to May 16.

April 8

Unity Club luncheon at Norma Stahl’s, 612 E. Neosho St.

Economic index jumps in Midwest OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A monthly economic survey index for nine Midwest and Plains states jumped last month, suggesting improving economic growth for the region over the next three to six months. The Mid-America Business Conditions index hit 58.2 in March, compared with 53.1 in February and 53.2 in January. Creighton University

economist Ernie Goss oversees the survey, and he credits the index jump to “the strongest neworders growth in two years.” The survey of business leaders and supply managers uses a collection of indexes ranging from zero to 100. Survey organizers say any score above 50 suggests growth while a score below 50 suggests decline for that factor.

Velma Webber

Velma Mary Webber, 92, Iola, formerly of Burlington, went home to be with her Lord late Friday night, March 29, 2013, at Allen County Hospital. Velma was born July 12, 1920, 10 miles southwest of Yates Center in Woodson County. She was the youngest daughter and child of Sidney and Mary (Knoll) Clugston. She married John Webber on June 16, 1946. They made their home and livelihood on a farm four miles east of Burlington. John passed away Oct. 7, 1977. Velma is survived by her four children, two daughters, Eileen Franklin and Elaine Redfern and spouse David, Iola; two sons, Dennis Webber and Steven Webber and companion Linda Peterson, Burlington; five granddaughters, Angela Redfern and friend Kelly Cook, Manhattan, Kandra McCullough, Iola, Jessica Webber, Burlington, Alicia Webber and friend Bill Kirksey, Topeka, and Callie Craft and husband Jeremy, Moran; five grandsons, John Nelson, Iola, Jason Franklin and wife Lhen, Iola, Jerod Franklin

and friend Anna Nelson, Iola, Corey Webber and wife Michelle, Burlington, and Quinten Webber and wife Ashli, Emporia; 12 great-grandchildren, Brittney Froelich, St. Louis, Mo., Johnathon and Justin Shepard, Bolivar, Mo., Heaven Wagner, Isaac and Kandrella McCullough, Iola, Chaelynn Webber and Brayleigh Harden, Burlington, Trowt Webber, Emporia, and Sierra and Jada Cunningham and Axtin Christenson, Topeka. She was preceded in death by a grandson, Derek Redfern, Iola. Velma was also preceded in death by her parents; two sisters, Elsie Peyton and Marie Young; and one brother, Martin Clugston. Age-wise she outlived her siblings. Velma was cremated. A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at Jones Funeral Home in Burlington. Inurnment will follow in Pleasant Hill Cemetery southeast of Burlington. The family will meet with friends from noon until service time Thursday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the Velma Webber Memorial Fund which will be designated at a later date.

Continued from A1

there are tax incentives, abatements but if they didn’t know that then how would they know to look at Iola.” What Myrick would like to see is what southeast Kansas is known for, agriculture businesses. Also on Myrick’s agenda is solving the ambulance issue between the county and city. “I want to help the citizens of Iola and Allen County save on taxes,” he said. Myrick said he’d like to the city and county cooperate in “all aspects of government.” Most importantly,

H Becker Continued from A1

Kincaid voters have choices KINCAID — Voters here will pick five council members from among seven candidates Tuesday. Vying for council seats are Carolyn Whitcomb, Marjorie

Stephens, Judith Lenon, Brandon Gates, Darlene Stewart, William Starr Sr. and Tammie Neudeck. Incumbent Leonard Leadstrom is the only mayoral candidate.

Death penalty up in air for shooter CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — After a week of legal twists and turns, James Holmes will find out today if he could face execution if convicted in the Colorado theater attack that killed 12 people. Behind-the-scenes maneuvering erupted into a public quarrel between prosecutors and the defense over Holmes’ public offer to plead guilty, but the two sides could still come to an agreement that would spare Holmes’s life in exchange for spending the rest of his life in prison. “Even if they give

Myrick said he wants citizens to know that voicing their opinions won’t “fall on deaf ears.” Myrick, 48, is former military and is semiretired. He spends his afternoons working with SAFE BASE kids and is a part-time carrier for the Iola Register. He and his family have been in Iola for 14 years and he said he is involved in teaching and spending time with his grandchildren. Myrick said he practices the same lessons he teaches his SAFE BASE students, to always have “respect, discipline and honor.”

notice today that they are seeking the death penalty, they can come off that and enter into a plea bargain any time,” said attorney Dan Recht, a past president of the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar. As the tangled and bloody case returns to court, survivors and families of the victims are uncertain about what happens next. Holmes is accused of a meticulously planning and brutally executing a plan to attack a Colorado movie theater at midnight during a showing of the latest Batman movie, killing 12 people and injuring 70.

members would bring a different aspect to the council. “There is more to city council than there seems,” Becker said. If elected, Becker will try to get the city/ county ambulance issue resolved. “It needs to be resolved. It’s unnecessary,” Becker said of the current setup of two services. Another aspect Becker would like the city of Iola improve is its look. “I would like to see the city improve its appearance, not just Ward Three, but the whole city,” Becker said. The way to do that is for the city to give additional support to city services, such as housing and roads. Becker worked in the

oil industry for 35 years. He moved to Iola in 1994 where he ran his own consulting firm. He retired in 2010.

I would like to see the city improve its appearance, not just Ward Three, but the whole city. — Donald Becker, Councilman

Ruth Hangen

H Myrick

Being in Iola almost 20 years, Becker said he considers himself still a newcomer to Iola, but has a lot of pride in the city he now calls home. Becker said he intends to make educated decisions that will help the citizens of Iola.

Voters to decide on new hospital GARNETT — Anderson County voters will decide Tuesday whether to build a new hospital and long-term care unit for about $25 million. Supporters said a new facility is needed to replace an outdated 1949 building that no longer meets hospital building codes and needs significant structural upgrades, the Anderson

County Review reported. St. Luke’s Hospital, Kansas City, leases the current hospital and has agreed to increase yearly lease payments from $440,000 to $1 million with a new structure. Advocates say St. Luke’s will pay more than two-thirds of construction costs.

Mostly cloudy Tonight, mostly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of rain. Lows 30 to 35. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph. Tuesday, mostly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of rain. Highs in the mid 40s. East winds 5 to 10 mph. Tuesday night, mostly cloudy. Lows 30 to 35. East winds 5 to 10 mph. Wednesday, mostly cloudy. Temperature High yesterday Low last night High Saturday Low Saturday High Friday Low Friday

68 40 71 46 66 50

Sunrise 7:06 a.m.

High a year ago Low a year ago Precipitation 24 hours ending 7 a.m This month to date Total year to date Def. since Jan. 1 Sunset 7:45 p.m.

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The Iola Register



Monday, April 1, 2013

~ Journalism that makes a difference

Construction site workers deserve prevailing wages Due before the Kansas Senate today is discussion on a bill to deny communities the right to set prevailing wage rates. Senators should resist the urge to play Big Brother.

municipalities to insist a company pay prevailing wages. Joe Reardon, mayor of the Unified Government of Wyandotte and Kansas City, Kan., credits the pay scale rule as to how it secured $600 million in commercial FOR A LONG time, Kan- development over the last sas was a leader in workers’ several years, including rights. In 1891, it became the the Kansas Speedway, Holfirst state to set a base rate lywood Casino and Village of pay to local workers for West. Wyandotte County public works projects. The ranked first in the metrowage laws prevented large politan area for job growth companies from under- during the past year, acbidding local contractors. cording to a recent story in They also included mini- the Topeka Capital-Jourmum labor standards such nal. as eight-hour workdays Paying good wages enand benefits. The think- courages economic growth, ing behind establishing Reardon said. the threshold was not only The Kansas League of to attract highly skilled la- Municipalities, the AFLborers but also to prevent CIO, and the City of Topeka workers from being abused side with the pro-growth by industrialists who be- thinking of Wyandotte gan lowering wages and County, as well as J.E. demanding longer work- Dunn, a large construcing days. While tion company they were at it, that uses union Re publicans labor and has of the day also Paying good done many pubwrote child lalic service conbor laws and wages encourages tracts. made getting an economic growth. Leading the education comfight against the pulsory. measure are SuAlmost 100 san Wagle, presyears later, Kansas lawmak- ident of the Kansas Senate, ers repealed the law in 1987, the Kansas Chamber of saying it would save on Commerce and Crossland construction costs — much Construction, which typithe same argument made cally does not use union latoday. A result was Kansas bor, and has realized more construction workers saw than $200 million in govan average 11 percent drop ernment contracts over the in their wages over several past 10 years, according to years’ time; employer con- Kansas Working Alliance, tributions to benefit plans an advocacy group for Kandeclined and apprentice- sas workers. What muddies the waship training declined by ter on the legislation, or almost 40 percent. The expected savings in perhaps clears it, is the construction costs were not connection between those against the legislation and realized because, a) Lawmakers thought those who make the laws. The Crossland family they could expect a 50 percent savings on total tree has deep roots in the construction costs. Na- Kansas Legislature. The chairman of the Kantionwide, labor costs are typically 25 to 30 percent of sas Chamber of Commerce total production costs. In Board of Directors is Ivan Kansas, they average closer Crossland, also president of Crossland Construction. to 20 percent; and, b) Productivity was re- Among Crossland’s lobbyduced due to a less-skilled ists working the Kansas workforce because of the Legislature is Riley Scott, cut in apprenticeship pro- son-in-law to Wagle, Senate grams. Typically, union president. These familial conneccontractors pay for training through a collective bar- tions only serve to put a gaining agreement. With- greater burden on Wagle out that coverage, workers that the legislation is deare less likely to seek train- signed to serve all Kansans, ing if they have to pay for it and not just those around her dinner table. Let’s hope themselves. she feels the weight. CURRENT LAW allows — Susan Lynn

U.S. debt clock

As of April 1, 2013, the U.S. debt is $16,780,995,794,012. The estimated population of the U.S. is 314,698,243. So each citizen’s share of the debt is $53,324.

www.brillig.com

The Iola Register

Published Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings except New Year’s day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas, by The Iola Register Inc., 302 S. Washington, P.O. Box 767, Iola, Kansas 66749. (620) 365-2111. Periodicals postage paid at Iola, Kansas. Member Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for publication all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches. Subscription rates by carrier in Iola: One year, $107.46; six months, $58.25; three months, $33.65; one month, $11.67. By motor: One year, $129.17; six months, $73.81; three months, $41.66; one month, $17.26. By mail in Kansas: One year, $131.35; six months, $74.90; three months, $44.02; one month, $17.91. By mail out of state: One year, $141.35; six months, $76.02; three months, $44.97; one month, $17.91. Internet: One year, $100; six months, $55; one month, $10 All prices include 8.55% sales taxes. Postal regulations require subscriptions to be paid in advance. USPS 268-460 Postmaster; Send address changes to The Iola Register, P.O. Box 767, Iola, KS 66749.

Medicaid dollars for private insurance The Obama administration and Republican officials in several states are exploring ways to redirect federal money intended to expand Medicaid, the main public insurance program for the poor, and use it instead to buy private health insurance for Medicaid recipients. The approach could have important benefits for beneficiaries and for the future of health care reform. But the idea also carries big risks. Federal officials will need to enforce strict conditions before agreeing to any redirection of Medicaid dollars that were originally intended to enlarge the Medicaid rolls. The Supreme Court ruled last year that the states could decide whether they want to expand their Medicaid programs to cover more of the uninsured; they can’t be required to do so, as the health reform law intended. The law provides hugely attractive financial incentives for states to add more people. The federal government will pay 100 percent of the cost of caring for newly eligible enrollees for the first three years, tapering to 90 percent in later years. Even so, some state officials, mostly Republicans, are proposing that the very generous federal financing for expansion be used instead to pay the premiums of poor people on new electronic health care exchanges, created by the reform law, where people can shop for subsidized

private insurance. Private insurance obtained on the exchanges could help poor beneficiaries in several ways. They would be less vulnerable to disruptions every time their incomes fluctuated above or below the boundary line that determines whether they are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid, where they

out the law and reduce the appetite among Congressional Republicans to gut the law. There are at least two big caveats. The switch would be likely to increase costs for the federal government, and ultimately state governments, because private insurance is almost always more costly than Medicaid. That could

Private insurance could help poor beneficiaries because they would be less vulnerable to disruptions every time their incomes fluctuated above or below the boundary line that determines whether they are poor enough to qualify for Medicaid.

would see one array of doctors, or slightly better off and eligible for subsidized insurance on the exchanges, where they might see a completely different group of doctors. Providers would be paid the same amount whether treating a Medicaid recipient or a privately insured patient, potentially creating a wider network of doctors for Medicaid patients. And some poor residents of states resistant to expansion, who would otherwise be frozen out by a glitch in the reform law, could gain coverage through the exchanges. BUT THE MAIN benefit would be political in that it could engage Republicans in the whole health reform effort, make it easier to carry

force a cutback in the number of people covered because the money won’t go as far. There is also a risk that poor people will end up with fewer benefits and higher cost-sharing on the exchanges despite regulations that should prohibit that. Federal officials must be vigilant in ensuring that recipients on the exchanges receive the same services and same cost-sharing limits that they would under an expanded Medicaid program. State officials who don’t want to play by those rules would be better off using the generous federal dollars as originally intended — to expand their Medicaid programs to cover many more of their uninsured residents. — The New York Times

Environmental inaction costly By CLAIRE PROVOST The Guardian

The number of people living in extreme poverty could increase by up to 3 billion by 2050 unless urgent action is taken to tackle environmental challenges, a major UN report warned on Thursday. The 2013 Human Development Report hails better than expected progress on health, wealth and education in dozens of developing countries but says inaction on climate change, deforestation, and air and water pollution could end gains in the world’s poorest countries and communities. “Environmental threats are among the most grave impediments to lifting human development … The longer action is delayed, the higher the cost will be,” warns the report, which builds on the 2011 edition looking at sustainable development. “Environmental inaction, especially regarding climate change, has the potential to halt or even reverse human development progress. The number of people in extreme poverty could increase by

up to 3 billion by 2050 unless environmental disasters are averted by coordinated global action,” said the UN. The British prime minister, David Cameron, and U.S. President Barack Obama have both made eradicating extreme poverty a key plank in their respective development agendas. THE PROPORTION of people living under $1.25 a day is estimated to have fallen from 43 percent in 1990 to 22 percent in 2008, driven in part by significant progress in China. As a result, the World Bank last year said the millennium development goal to halve the proportion of people living in extreme poverty by 2015 had been met ahead of schedule. Thursday’s report says more than 40 countries have done better than previously expected on the UN’s human development index (HDI), which combines measures of health, wealth and education, with gains accelerating over the past decade. Introduced in 1990, the index aims to challenge gross domestic product

and other purely economic assessments of national wellbeing. Norway and Australia are highest in this year’s HDI, while the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Niger are ranked lowest. Some of the largest countries – including Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, South Africa and Turkey – have made the most rapid advances, it says, but there also has been substantial progress in smaller economies, such as Bangladesh, Chile, Ghana, Mauritius, Rwanda and Tunisia. This has prompted significant rethinking on routes to progress, says the report: “The south as a whole is driving global economic growth and societal change for the first time in centuries.” The report points to cashtransfer programs in Brazil, India and Mexico as examples of where developing countries have pioneered policies for advancing human development, noting how these efforts have helped narrow income gaps and improve the health and education prospects of poor communities.


A4 Monday, April 1, 2013

The Iola Register

www.iolaregister.com

H Polio cold. In addition to supplying vaccine, another challenge is “identifying where you have been,” Potter said. “There are no street addresses and homes made out of cardboard.” Though eradication seems to be right around the corner, Potter said it is in the home stretch where it’s the hardest. “Rotary has raised over $1 billion to the effort,” Potter said. Rotarians are looking for more donations to help complete eradication of the disease. POLIO seems so far in

the past to most Americans, but people such as Potter still remember

the 1950s and ’60s, when being diagnosed with polio was a national and

ful.” Polio is spread through fecal-oral trans-

Tinn’s Pins

“It is interesting that this disease has

been eliminated from the Western world for a long time. I can remember not being able to go to the pool or to the movie theater because my mom was too fearful. — Ellis Potter, Rotarian

worldwide fear. “It is interesting that this disease has been eliminated from the Western world for a long time,” Potter said. “I can remember not being able to go to the pool or to the movie theater because my mom was too fear-

Tutu

Continued from A1

mission and was highly contagious during the outbreak. One of the most famous cases known to Americans was President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was paralyzed from the waist down from the disease.

Girls broaden horizons

Photo courtesy of Pinterest

Allison Tinn

I can attest for little girls who are growing up in a dance studio that they would love this, because I know I would have as a young ballerina. Paint a wall a lighter color such as a lighter pink or purple. Then paint a ballerina that looks similar to the little ballerina in your life. Get some colorful tulle, scrunch it up and staple it to the wall. Staples can always be pulled out and filled in when that little ballerina turns into a big girl.

Lettuce tacos I am always looking for that recipe that cuts a ton of calories but will still be really good. Lettuce wraps are a good way to cut the majority of calories and carbs out of tacos, since one flour tortilla, on average, has 150 calories. You can fill it with your favorite taco filling or substitute it with ground turkey. Basically get creative and fill it with whatever you like. Photo courtesy of Pinterest

By ALLISON TINN allison@iolaregister.com

Email pins (or other ideas) to allison@iolaregister.com and a description of why you like that pin. You can also follow me on Pinterest at http://pinterest.com/tinnspins/

H Wicoff “ When

Continued from A1

Register/Allison Tinn

Girls who attended the Expanding Your Horizons conference at Emporia State University were, front row from left, Madison Carlin, Katie Weide, Ashley Crane and Camryn Freimiller; second row from left, Jennifer Tidd, Makyala Simmons, Victoria Smith and Mercedes Maple; third row from left, Colbi Riley, Allie Peres, Jaden Channel and Abigail Allen. being a pharmacist also sounded like fun. For Makyala Simmons the conference didn’t change her mind about what career she wants to go into, but did change her mind about the school she would like to attend. “I originally wanted to go to K-State but I really liked Emporia State University,” she said. Some of the experiments they tried were wacky. Some of the girls had to make a cast

around a soda bottle and then put it on a pig’s leg. The girls were served an Italian lunch that made them wish their cafeteria could serve similar food. “It made some of us sad because we really wanted more of that food,” Katie Weide said. Although it meant an early wake-up call on a Saturday, the girls all agreed it was well worth it and would encourage their classmates to go in the future.

you are shopping communities old school buildings are not tempting. A new school would be a big draw.

Wicoff said the bulk of the construction seen in Iola is for lower income homes. “There are nice homes on the north side of town but I would like to see more medium income housing being built,” he said. But Wicoff understands the difficulty behind that wish and that nothing can be accomplished overnight, or even one week at a time. “We are stuck with taking it one step at a time,” Wicoff said. “In today’s economy we are limited on the funding side. We have to concentrate on what doesn’t cost as much.” Also necessary to improve the city of Iola is making it a contender with surrounding areas such as Chanute and Garnett.

— Joel Wicoff, councilman

Being exposed to new things at a young age can open your eyes to new horizons. A group of 12 Iola Middle School girls attended the Expanding Your Horizons Conference at Emporia State University, where they were immersed in a variety of math and science careers and activities. At the daylong conference the girls attended three career discussions, which featured female speakers from a variety of different careers, including a research mathematician for the National Security Agency. “I had never heard of that job before,” Ashley Crane said. IMS counselor Stacey Crusinbery has taken girls to this conference for 10 years. There were hands-on science projects that included exploding balloons, ketchup bubbles and glow-in-the-dark liquids. “It’s always fun to see things blow up,” Madison Carlin said. Crusinbery usually targets girls who are interested in math and science already. The conference was an eye-opener for the girls because they got to see how many different careers are open to them within those subject areas. Mercedes Maple said she still wants to be a veterinarian, but thought

One way to make Iola more appealing to the outsider would be having new buildings such as the hospital and schools. “When you are shopping communities old school buildings are not tempting. A new school

would be a big draw,” Wicoff said. One aspect of the city that is already moving along is the EMS merger, but it will still take some time. “I am confident it will and can happen,” he said. “It would offer a better service for everyone in the county, save money for the tax payers in the county. The quality of the service won’t go down, it will go up.” Wicoff said a committee is working on the details and thinks the merger can be seen in one to two months. Wicoff owns and operates his own engineering company and has four children, all still in school.

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Letters to the editor must be signed and must include the writer’s address & telephone number. Names will be omitted on request only if there might be danger of retribution to the writer. Letters can be either emailed or sent by traditional means. E-mail: editorial@iolaregister.com

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SportsB Red Devil softball squad drops doubhleaders — B4 Allen baseball drops pair to Independence — B4

The Iola Register

Monday, April 1, 2013

GUSTIN HOLDS OFF CROWD AT KING OF AMERICA III By RICHARD LUKEN

a spot in the “A” main feature — before his engine went kaput midway through the 20-lap qualifier. Chanute’s John Allen had an eventful weekend. He took second in a last chance race to make, then 10th in a “C” main feature to secure a spot at the rear of the “B” feature. He worked his way into the top 12 — which also would have qualified him for the main event — before exiting a few laps from the finish.

richard@iolaregister.com

HUMBOLDT — It took Ryan Gustin about 25 laps to take the lead for good Saturday night at Humboldt Speedway. For the next 75 laps, the Marshalltown, Iowa, product held off all charges — including a thrilling pass attempt by runner-up Chris Brown with three laps remaining — to claim the third annual USMTS King of America trophy in front of a packed speedway crowd. The win capped a scintillating weekend that frequently was threatened by nasty weather — storms were reported north and east of the speedway all day Saturday — but still came off without a hitch. Coming through unscathed was Gustin, who started on the outside of the second row of the 100-lap feature, and kept pole sitter Terry Phillips within range throughout. Phillips led the first 25 laps before encountering lapped traffic, allowing Gustin an opening. Gustin powered inside down the final turn to take the lead for the first time. Phillips stayed virtually even over the next six laps before Gustin secured the lead for good. Phillips stayed within a car length or two for an extended period, occasionally darting inside or outside to challenge Gustin. It wasn’t until the race’s first caution flag in lap 73 that bunched up the field for a dazzling conclusion. Brown and Jeremy Payne used the restart to slide in front of Phillips. The duo nipped at Gustin’s wheels over the ensuing 25 laps, including

Photos by Dayton Sutterby

Ryan Gustin, above, led the last 75 laps Saturday to win the third annual USMTS King of America feature at Humboldt Speedway. Below, Ryan Golin takes the checkered flag, one of two USRA B-Modified feature races over the weekend. two more cautions and restarts. Brown’s last best chance came on lap 97, when he pulled alongside Gustin from the inside of the fourth and final turn. The pair raced side by side before Gustin crossed the line by a nose. He kept the momentum to regain a car length lead that he kept for the balance of the race. Gustin’s victory garnered him $10,000. Brown, of Spring, Texas, was second. Payne and Phillips, both of Springfield, Mo., rounded up the top four. Zack VanderBeek of New Sharon, Iowa, took fifth. Joey Jensen had one of the most exhilarating rides of the night. He finished fifth in one qualifying race and 11th in another to sneak into the “A” main feature in the 23rd spot. He snaked his way up into the top five before finishing in sixth. Several drivers of local note made their mark on the evening.

Iola’s Justin Folk took advantage of a pair of impressive qualifying races to start

at the front of Saturday’s “B” main feature. He was leading the pack — virtually ensuring

THE WEEKEND’S festivities included a pair of impressive showings by Fort Scott’s Brian Bolin in the USRA BMod feature series. Bolin led nearly from start to finish in feature race victories on both Friday and Saturday, earning $3,000 in the process. He led all 25 laps in Friday’s feature, then took the lead from defending B-Mod national champion Scott Drake of Joplin in lap 6 on Saturday. Drake held on for second, followed by Corey Crapser of Wisconsin. Dan Wheeler and Jacob Bleess, both of Minnesota, rounded out the top five. Thursday’s opening night winner, Kris Jackson, took home sixth. Jake Timm was seventh, Trevor Drake was eighth, Tim Van Gotten took ninth and Jason Schlangen took 10th. Olathe’s Terry Bruner gave the crowd a scare in the C main feature Saturday. He collided with another car and flipped onto his side in the front straightaway. Emergency crews pushed the car back onto its wheels, where Bruner emerged unscathed — shaken but not stirred.

Blowouts — and a Shocker — set Final 4 field By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — After a season of uncertainty, there’s a clear favorite heading to the Final Four. The Louisville Cardinals. While the other No. 1s have fallen by the wayside, the top overall seed romped to the Georgia Dome with four dominant wins in the NCAA tournament. And, if the Cardinals need any extra motivation, they’ve got it. Sophomore guard Kevin Ware, who played his high school ball in the Atlanta suburbs, sustained a gruesome injury in Sunday’s regional final against Duke. Before he headed off to surgery, he courageously urged his teammates to finish the job. Now, they would like nothing more than to win it all for Ware. “We talked about it every timeout, ‘Get Kevin home,’” coach Rick Pitino said. Next stop, the A-T-L, where three rather unlikely teams will be looking to knock off the mighty Cardinals. First up, the surprising Shockers from Wichita State in the semifinals Saturday. The No. 9 seed has already pulled off two major upsets, but this would be the biggest stunner yet. If Louisville makes it through to next Monday night’s title game, the opponent would be either Michigan, sporting a new group of Fab Wolverines, or Syracuse, which comes at you with the stingiest zone defense in college basketball. The two No. 4 seeds will meet in the other semifinal game. All are underdogs to the Cardinals, who are winning by an average of nearly 22 points a game in the tournament. “I thought we had a chance

Jaime Green/Wichita Eagle/MCT

Wichita State’s Carl Hall (22) and Fred Van Vleet (23) celebrate as the clock expires on a 70-66 win against Ohio Sate in the West Region Final of the NCAA Tournament Saturday at Staples Center in Los Angeles. there, and then boom,” said Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, who watched Louisville pull away for an 85-63 victory in the Midwest Regional final. “That’s what they do to teams. They can boom you.” In the other game Sunday, Michigan captured the South Regional with a 79-59 rout of Florida, leading from the opening tip. A day earlier, Syracuse shut down Marquette 55-39 to win the East Regional, while Wichita State punched its Final Four ticket with a 70-66 upset of Ohio State out

West. In the final year of the Big East before it splits into two new conferences, Louisville and Syracuse provided a fitting send-off to a league that quickly became a basketball powerhouse after it was founded in 1979. Before it goes, this version of the Big East has a shot at one more national title. With two teams, no less. The Cardinals — who, like Syracuse, are moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference — shook off the incredible

shock of Ware’s injury with about 6½ minutes to go before halftime and blew out the second-seeded Blue Devils. The sophomore snapped his lower right leg after coming down awkwardly while defending a 3-point shot. The injury occurred right in front of the Louisville bench, where the players gasped and turned away quickly at the sight of Ware’s dangling leg, which was broken in two places. Russ Smith collapsed onto the floor, along with several players, and was crying as

doctors attended to Ware. While Ware was loaded onto a stretcher, the Cardinals gathered at midcourt until Pitino called them over, saying the injured player wanted to talk to them before he left. “All he kept saying — and remember, the bone is 6 inches out of his leg — all he’s yelling is, ‘Win the game! Win the game!’” Pitino said. “I’ve never seen that in my life. We’re all distraught and all he’s saying is, ‘Win the game.’ Kevin is See FINAL FOUR | Page B4


www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Public notices (First published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS In the Matter of the Estate Of VELVA J. BURCHE, Deceased Case No. 2012 PR 44 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR FINAL SETTLEMENT THE STATE OF KANSAS TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that a Petition has been filed on March 15, 2013, in this Court by William H. Burche, Executor of the Estate of Velva J. Burche, Deceased, praying for a final settlement of the Estate, approval of his acts, proceedings and accounts as Executor, allowance for attorney’s fees and expenses, determination of the heirs, devisees and legatees entitled to the Estate and assignment to them in accordance with the Will of Velva J. Burche, Deceased. You are hereby required to file your written defenses thereto on or before April 9, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. on such day, in the District Courtroom, Allen County Courthouse, One North Washington, Iola, Allen County, Kansas, at which time and place such cause will be heard. Should you fail therein, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon said Petition. William H. Burche, Petitioner R. KENT PRINGLE, S.C. #10458 221 W. Main, P.O. Box 748 Chanute, KS 66720 Telephone (620) 431-2202 (3) 18,25 (4) 1

Freeze kills flea circus BERLIN (AP) — An entire troupe of performing fleas has fallen victim to the freezing temperatures currently gripping Germany. Flea circus director Robert Birk says he was shocked to find all of his 300 fleas dead inside their transport box Wednesday morning. The circus immediately scrambled to find and train a new batch so it could fulfill its engagements at an open-air fair in the western town of Mechernich-Kommern. Michael Faber, who organizes the fair, told The Associated Press that an insect expert at a nearby university was able to provide 50 fleas in time for the first show Sunday.

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofThe Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 3652111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

ZITS

(First published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS Henry R. Donaldson and G. Ann Donaldson, husband and wife,

Defendants No. 2013 CV 13 NOTICE OF SUIT The State of Kansas to: Enos Wright; and the unknown devisees, trustees, creditors, assigns or successors in interest of such defendant; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of such defendant as are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of such of the defendants as are or were partners or in partnership; and the unknown

guardians, conservators and trustees of such of the defendants as are minors or are in any wise under legal disability; and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any person alleged to be deceased and made defendant as such and all other persons who are or may be concerned: You are hereby notified that a Petition has been filed in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas, by the above named Plaintiffs praying that title be quieted to the following described real estate located in Allen County, Kansas, to-wit: That part of the Southeast Quarter (SE/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Twenty-four (24) South, Range Twenty-one (21) East of the Sixth Principal Meridian, Allen County, Kansas, lying North of the right-of-way of U.S. Highway 54; LESS: a tract beginning at the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW/4 SE/4) in said Section Thirty-

two (32), thence West 35 1/2 rods (585.75’); thence South to center of the roadbed of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, thence along the center of the roadbed Eastward to the West line of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE/4 SE/4) of said Section, thence North on said line to place of beginning. and you and each of you be forever barred, restrained and enjoined from setting up or claiming any right, title, interest, estate, equity, lien or claim in and to the real estate, and you are hereby required to plead to such Petition on or before April 29, 2013, in such Court at Iola, Kansas. Should you fail therein judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon such Petition. Henry R. Donaldson and G. Ann Donaldson Plaintiffs IMMEL, WORKS & HEIM, P.A. Four East Jackson Iola, Kansas 66749 (620) 365-2222 Attorneys for Plaintiffs (3) 18, 25 (4) 1

(First Published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS In the Matter of the Estate of Thomas R. Thomas II, Deceased No. 2013 PR 12 NOTICE OF HEARING AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE STATE OF KANSAS TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that on March 15, 2013, a Petition was filed in this Court

by Thomas R. Thomas and Rhonda L. Thomas, praying that Petitioners be appointed as Co-Administrators; and Petitioners be granted Letters of Co-Administration. You are required to file your written defenses thereto on or before April 9, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. in the District Court, Iola, Allen County, Kansas, at which time and place the cause will be heard. Should you fail, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon the Petition. All creditors are notified to exhibit their demands against the Estate within the latter of four months from the date of first publication of

notice under K.S.A. 59-2236 and amendments thereto, or if the identity of the creditor is known or reasonably ascertainable, 30 days after actual notice was given as provided by law, and if their demands are not thus exhibited, they shall be forever barred. Thomas R. Thomas and Rhonda L. Thomas, Petitioners IMMEL, WORKS & HEIM, P.A. Four East Jackson Iola, Kansas 66749 (620) 365-2222 Attorneys for Petitioners (3) 18, 25 (4) 1

Plaintiffs vs. Enos Wright; et al.

Monday, April 1, 2013

B3

DAILY CRYPTOQUOTES - Here’s how to work it:

Sudoku is like a crossword puzzle, but uses numbers instead of words. The puzzle is a box of 81 squares, subdivided into 3x3 cubes of 9 squares each. Some squares are filled in with numbers. The rest should be filled in by the puzzler. Fill in the blank squares allowing the numbers 1-9 to appear only once in every row, once in every column and once in every 3x3 box. One-star puzzles are for beginners, and the difficulty gradually increases through the week to a very challenging fivestar puzzle.

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

BLONDIE

by Young and Drake

BABY BLUES

by Kirkman & Scott

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

by Tom Batiuk

HI AND LOIS

by Chance Browne

BEETLE BAILEY

by Mort Walker


www.iolaregister.com

The Iola Register

Public notices (First published in The Iola Register, March 25, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Charlotte O Pope, Mark W Cleaver, Jane Doe, John Doe, and Housing Resources Corporation, et al., Defendants Case No. 13CV14 Court No. Title to Real Estate Involve Pursuant to K.S.A. §60 NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF KANSAS to the above named Defendants and The Unknown Heirs, executors, devisees, trustees, creditors, and assigns of any deceased defendants; the unknown spouses of any defendants; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of any defendants that are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of any defendants that are or were partners or in partnership; and the unknown guardians, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any legal disability and all other person who are or may be concerned: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Mortgage Foreclosure has been filed in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas by CitiMortgage, Inc., praying for foreclosure of certain real property legally described as follows: LOT SIX (6), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THREE (103), CITY OF IOLA, ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS.  Tax ID No. IA00917 for a judgment against defendants and any other interested parties and, unless otherwise served by personal or mail service of summons, the time in which you have to plead to the Petition for Foreclosure in the District Court of Allen County Kansas will expire on May 6, 2013.  If you fail to plead, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon the request of plaintiff. MILLSAP & SINGER, LL C                                                 By: Jennifer L. Michaels, #24256    jmichaels@msfirm.com Chad R. Doornink, #23536        cdoornink@msfirm.com Jeremy M. Hart, #20886           jhart@msfirm.com 11460 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 300 Leawood, KS 66211   (913) 339-9132 (913) 339-9045  (fax) ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF MILLSAP & SINGER, LLC AS ATTORNEYS FOR CITIMORTGAGE, INC. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. (3) 25 (4) 1, 8

• NOTICE •

O ur carriers’ (under contract) deadline for hom e delivery ofThe Iola R egister is 5:30 p.m . in Iola and 6:30 p.m . outside ofIola w eekdays and 9:30 a.m . Saturdays. Ifyou have not received your paper by this tim e, please callyour carrier. Ifyou cannot reach your carrier callthe R egister office at (620) 3652111 betw een 5:30 and 6 p.m . R uralC arriers 6:30 p.m . w eekdays – 10:30 Saturdays

ZITS

Defendants No. 2013 CV 13 NOTICE OF SUIT The State of Kansas to: Enos Wright; and the unknown devisees, trustees, creditors, assigns or successors in interest of such defendant; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of such defendant as are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of such of the defendants as are or were partners or in partnership; and the unknown

guardians, conservators and trustees of such of the defendants as are minors or are in any wise under legal disability; and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any person alleged to be deceased and made defendant as such and all other persons who are or may be concerned: You are hereby notified that a Petition has been filed in the District Court of Allen County, Kansas, by the above named Plaintiffs praying that title be quieted to the following described real estate located in Allen County, Kansas, to-wit: That part of the Southeast Quarter (SE/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Twenty-four (24) South, Range Twenty-one (21) East of the Sixth Principal Meridian, Allen County, Kansas, lying North of the right-of-way of U.S. Highway 54; LESS: a tract beginning at the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW/4 SE/4) in said Section Thirty-

two (32), thence West 35 1/2 rods (585.75’); thence South to center of the roadbed of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, thence along the center of the roadbed Eastward to the West line of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE/4 SE/4) of said Section, thence North on said line to place of beginning. and you and each of you be forever barred, restrained and enjoined from setting up or claiming any right, title, interest, estate, equity, lien or claim in and to the real estate, and you are hereby required to plead to such Petition on or before April 29, 2013, in such Court at Iola, Kansas. Should you fail therein judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon such Petition. Henry R. Donaldson and G. Ann Donaldson Plaintiffs IMMEL, WORKS & HEIM, P.A. Four East Jackson Iola, Kansas 66749 (620) 365-2222 Attorneys for Plaintiffs (3) 18, 25 (4) 1

(First Published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS In the Matter of the Estate of Thomas R. Thomas II, Deceased No. 2013 PR 12 NOTICE OF HEARING AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE STATE OF KANSAS TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that on March 15, 2013, a Petition was filed in this Court

by Thomas R. Thomas and Rhonda L. Thomas, praying that Petitioners be appointed as Co-Administrators; and Petitioners be granted Letters of Co-Administration. You are required to file your written defenses thereto on or before April 9, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. in the District Court, Iola, Allen County, Kansas, at which time and place the cause will be heard. Should you fail, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon the Petition. All creditors are notified to exhibit their demands against the Estate within the latter of four months from the date of first publication of

notice under K.S.A. 59-2236 and amendments thereto, or if the identity of the creditor is known or reasonably ascertainable, 30 days after actual notice was given as provided by law, and if their demands are not thus exhibited, they shall be forever barred. Thomas R. Thomas and Rhonda L. Thomas, Petitioners IMMEL, WORKS & HEIM, P.A. Four East Jackson Iola, Kansas 66749 (620) 365-2222 Attorneys for Petitioners (3) 18, 25 (4) 1

(First published in The Iola Register, March 18, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS Henry R. Donaldson and G. Ann Donaldson, husband and wife, Plaintiffs vs. Enos Wright; et al.

Monday, April 1, 2013

B3

DAILY CRYPTOQUOTES - Here’s how to work it:

Sudoku is like a crossword puzzle, but uses numbers instead of words. The puzzle is a box of 81 squares, subdivided into 3x3 cubes of 9 squares each. Some squares are filled in with numbers. The rest should be filled in by the puzzler. Fill in the blank squares allowing the numbers 1-9 to appear only once in every row, once in every column and once in every 3x3 box. One-star puzzles are for beginners, and the difficulty gradually increases through the week to a very challenging fivestar puzzle.

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

BLONDIE

by Young and Drake

BABY BLUES

by Kirkman & Scott

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

by Tom Batiuk

HI AND LOIS

by Chance Browne

BEETLE BAILEY

by Mort Walker


B4 Monday, April 1, 2013

The Iola Register

www.iolaregister.com

ACC softball squad falls short Red Devils Allen Community College’s softball team was able to dodge the raindrops over the weekend, playing doubleheaders Friday in Hutchinson and Saturday in Hesston. The Red Devils were unable to come up with a victory, however, dropping 5-1 and 4-2 decisions to Hutchinson, and 9-1 and 5-4 losses to Hesston. The losses drop Allen to 1-18 on the season. Allen recorded hits in five of their seven innings in Friday’s opener, but mustered only a single run when Maecy Charleston led off the fifth with a double. She scored on a two-out single by Taylor Easum. By then, Hutchinson led 4-0, including a three-run second. Charleston added a

Sports calendar Iola High School Baseball/Softball Today, JV vs. OSAWATOMIE, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, at Osawatomie, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, JV at Independence High School Track Friday, at Parsons, 2 p.m. High School Tennis Thursday, at Pittsburg, 3 p.m. High School Golf Tuesday, Iola Invitational at Allen County Country Club, 3 p.m. Middle School Golf Today, at Pittsburg, 3 p.m. Thursday, at Allen County Country Club, 3 p.m. Middle School Track Tuesday, Iola Invitational, 3:30 p.m.

Humboldt High School Baseball/Softball Tuesday, at Burlington, 4:30 p.m. High School Track Today, at Central Heights, 3 p.m. High School Golf Tuesday, at Burlington

Marmaton Valley High School Golf Today, at Erie, 3 p.m. High School Track Tuesday, at Oswego, 1 p.m. High School Baseball/Softball Tuesday, at Yates Center, 4:30 p.m.

Crest

single for Allen. Paige Rothwell went 2-for-3, while Mary Reilly and Easum singled once. Audra Nelson took the loss, giving up six hits and three walks with two strikeouts. A late rally in the finale Friday came up short in the 4-2 loss. Hutchinson led 3-0 before the Red Devils scored single runs in the fifth and sixth frames. Easum singled in Lauren Poertner in the top of the fifth, and Kaitlyn Rash led off the sixth with a home run. But other scoring chances were held at bay. Poertner doubled to lead off the third, but was thrown out at home on a fielder’s choice by Hutchinson’s pitcher. Easum singled twice. Annie Gentry added a

single. Rash gave up nine hits with a strikeout to take the loss. ON

SATURDAY,

Hesston broke open a 3-1 lead with six runs in the bottom of the fifth in a 9-1 victory. Allen’s only run came on an RBI double by Kaitlin Norris in the fourth, driving in Poertner, who led off the inning with a single. Poertner went 2-for2. Easum and Gentry singled. Nelson was saddled with the loss, giving up nine hits and a walk with three strikeouts. Hesston broke out of the gates early in the 5-4 nightcap, scoring four in the first. The Red Devils pulled to within 4-3 before Hesston scored its deci-

sive run in the bottom of the sixth. An error and wild pitch accounted for the Red Devils’ final run in the top of the seventh. Rothwell blasted a two-run home run in the fifth for Allen, one of only four hits. Allen put two runners on in both the first and second innings — Easum and Stormie Bush both singled. A double play ended the first-inning scoring threat. A pair of ground balls ended the Allen hopes in the second. Reilly also singled. Rash gave up eight hits and two walks in the loss. Allen travels to Neosho County Tuesday for a doubleheader before returning home this weekend for doubleheaders against Pratt

High School Baseball/Softball Today, at Neodesha High School Golf Wednesday, at Erie

Southern Coffey Co. High School Track Friday, at Lyndon

Allen Baseball Tuesday, at Coffeyville, 3 p.m. Wednesday, at Butler, 3 p.m. Softball Tuesday, at Neosho Co., 2 p.m.

INDEPENDENCE — Allen Community College’s baseball team saw its losing streak reach 17 Friday with a pair of losses to Independence. A doubleheader Saturday was rained out. Coincidentally, the games were played at Independence because of wet field conditions at the ACC field in Iola. The Red Devils mustered only four hits in Friday’s opener. Allen scored a run in the first. Cole Slusser’s RBI hit drove in Tim Lewis. Slusser went 3-for-3 in the loss. Nate Arnold had the only other hit for Allen. Seth Jones was the hard-luck loser for Allen, giving up just five hits in seven innings. Big innings propelled

Independence in the nightcap. The Pirates scored three in the first and fourth innings to lead 6-0. Allen scored its only run in the bottom of the fifth. Jerrik Sigg had two of the Red Devils’ three hits. Tim Lewis delivered the other. Gage Dickerson, Conor Burns and Chase Cunningham shared pitching duties, giving up eight hits and seven walks. Allen also was victimized by five errors. The Red Devils (320) travel to Coffeyville Tuesday and Butler County Wednesday before returning home Saturday and Sunday for doubleheaders against Labette.

H Final Four Continued from B1

a special young man.” This is a special team. Smith scored 23 points. Gorgui Dieng had 14 points, 11 rebounds and four blocks. The Cardinals (33-5) simply refused to lose, breaking open a game that was tied at 42. They dove on the floor for loose balls. They pounded the boards ferociously. They contested every shot and swarmed around the Blue Devils like they had an extra player on the court. In a sense, they did, as Pitino reminded them during every timeout. “This is a gritty bunch,” the coach said. “From the beginning of the year to now, they’ve not had a bad game. I’m really proud of these guys.” Wichita State was the most improbable team to advance. The Shockers lived up to their nickname in the West, knocking off top-seeded Gonzaga in the second round and No. 2 seed Ohio State in the regional final Saturday night. Wichita State (30-8) built a 20-point lead on the Buckeyes, then managed to hang on through

Sam Riche/MCT

Louisville teammates gather around Kevin Ware (5) after he broke his right leg in first half action in the NCAA regional final game on Sunday in Indianapolis. Louisville won the game 85-63. a nerve-racking final five minutes to pull off the latest upset in a tournament filled with them. That other team from Kansas isn’t content yet. “It feels very good,” said Cleanthony Early, a junior forward who, like most of his teammates, was passed over by higher-profile programs, “but we understand the fact that we’ve got to stay hungry and humble, because we’ve got two

more games left to really be excited about.” Old-timers might remember Louisville and Wichita State as former conference rivals. The Cardinals were a member of the Missouri Valley Conference in the 1960s and ‘70s, which meant annual games against the Shockers. Louisville holds a 19-5 edge in the series, but the teams haven’t played since 1976.

Michigan (30-7) is headed back to the Final Four for the first time since the Fab Five era of the early 1990s, when the Wolverines lost in backto-back national title games. This team has the same youthful feel, led by sophomore Trey Burke, the Big Ten player of the year, and three freshmen starters. They were downright fabulous against third-seeded

Florida, never seriously threatened after scoring the first 13 points. “A lot of guys said we were really young and that we couldn’t get here,” said Burke, who scored 15 points against Florida but really came through in an improbable comeback against top-seeded Kansas in the regional semifinals. “We’re here now and we still have unfinished business.”

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