Invitation Magazine - April 2019

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HOM E & GARD EN OUTDOOR OASIS SOUTHERN ST YLE IN NYC #GOBLUEMS



’ Mother s Day CAR GIVEAWAY B Y YO U R L O C A L N A PA A U T O C A R E C E N T E R S

GIVEN AWAY ON MAY 11TH NOMINATE A DESERVING MOTHER

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SheCOULD WIN A CAR T H I S M O T H E R ’ S D AY

Nominations close on May 5th, 2019 at 11:59pm CST.

McCord’s Auto Service, LLC 551 Endville Rd Belden, MS 38826 662-680-5286

Estes Garage 5315 Purnell Road Belden, MS 38826 662-842-2696

Cliffs Car Care INC. 205 North Veterans Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38804 662-844-0507

Covington Service Center 5464 Cliff Gookin Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 840-4408

Kizer Automotive 1199 N. Frontage Rd. Baldwyn, MS 38824 662-365-8585

East Main Tire 1426 East Main St Tupelo, MS 38804 662-844-4222

Bragan Wholesale Auto, LLC 1026 Gardner Blvd Columbus, MS 39702 662-329-5200

East Side Tire 501 Hare Rd. Booneville, MS 38829 (662) 728-8356

Enter at any of the following locations or online @ www.napaautocarenems.com

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FE ATURES 22 Southern Style in the City

For this New York-based interior decorator, Southern roots run deep.

24 Corinth Courtyard

A historic home gets a 21st-century upgrade with a pool and courtyard entertaining space.

28 Go Blue for Autism

This month, blue-themed fundraisers benefit the Autism Center of North Mississippi, which has expanded its services to treat more children.

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30 Crazy About Caladiums

34 Motoring Into History

DEPA RTMENT S

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New Albany master gardener Sherra Owen shares tips for growing colorful, heat- and shade-loving caladiums, and offers a glimpse into her garden.

The Tupelo Automobile Museum will open its doors one last time as hundreds of classic cars are auctioned off to benefit Frank Spain’s educational foundation.

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Letter From the Publisher

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Wake Up Tupelo

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Calendar

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Empty Bowls

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InstaLove: Mississippi Houses

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High School Golf Match

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Shoutouts

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Tupelo Garden Club

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In Season: Container Gardens

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Spring Into Literacy

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What’s In

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Barbecue Competition

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Out & About

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Run for Your Buns

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Recipes: Hot Cross Buns

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Zombie Fun Run


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ON THE COVER

The pool behind Ann and Bobby Woods’ historic home in Corinth sparkles on a sunny day. In addition to the inviting pool, shady porches and a covered outdoor kitchen allow for entertaining outside all summer long. Read more on pages 24-26. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

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L E T T E R from the P U B L I S H E R I enjoy all the magazines we publish each month. Each is different in its own way, but I think year in and year out, our home and garden issue is my favorite. Lush gardens, gorgeous homes and inviting outdoor living spaces make me forget about the gray days and look forward to the easy-living days of summer. This year’s issue is no different. In it, you’ll find breathtaking homes, spectacular landscapes, unique garden projects and even a delicious recipe. The cover features a beautiful courtyard and pool from the story on page 24

FOLLOW US

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about Ann and Bobby Woods’ home in Corinth. Choosing this cover was a tough task, since there were so many great images to select from in each of our feature stories, from carefully designed interiors to stunning outdoor environments. To experience the natural beauty of north Mississippi, read about Sherra Owen’s garden. This master gardener has a plethora of caladiums in all shapes, sizes and colors in her huge backyard garden, which is designed to engage all five senses. Read more on page 30. This month, we also offer an ode to the

@INVITATIONM AG A ZINE

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Tupelo Automobile Museum, on page 34. This Tupelo icon is a real treasure that has been shared with so many people over the years. It will soon be gone, but it will never be forgotten. We hope you enjoy this issue as much as we have enjoyed putting it together and that something in it inspires you this season. Happy spring!

RACHEL M. WEST, PUBLISHER

@INVMAGA ZINE


PUBLISHERS

Phil and Rachel West

EDITORIAL

EXECUTIVE EDITORS Allison Estes Emily Welly EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Mary Moreton CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rachel Burchfield Jennifer Collins Rachel A. Ishee Alexis Lee Sarah McCullen SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Sarah McCullen COPY EDITOR Ashley Arthur INTERN Alexis Lee

OFFICE

BUSINESS MANAGER Hollie Hilliard DISTRIBUTION Donald Courtney Brian Hilliard MAIN OFFICE 662-234-4008

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Holly Vollor STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Joe Worthem CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Paul Gandy Lisa Roberts Whitney Worsham CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Sarah McCullen

ADVERTISING

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Timeka Davis Alise M. Emerson Leigh Lowery Lynn McElreath Stacey Raper Moni Simpson Whitney Worsham Anna Zemek ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Paul Gandy Becca Pepper Hallie Thomas ADVERTISING INFORMATION invitationmag.com

Serving Alcorn, Chickasaw, Itawamba, Lee, Monroe, Pontotoc, Prentiss, Tippah, Tishomingo and Union counties. To subscribe to one year (10 issues) of Invitation or to buy an announcement, visit invitationmag.com. To request a photographer at your event, email Mary at mary.invitation@gmail.com. Invitation respects the many diverse individuals and organizations that make up north Mississippi and strives to be inclusive and representative of all members of our community.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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C O M M U N I T Y A PR IL 15-M AY 15 , 2019

County Line Music Festival A P R I L 20

Baldwyn’s fifth annual music festival takes place in the town’s historic district with music, art and family-friendly activities. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. baldwynliving.com

Easter Sunday APRIL 21

“The Addams Family”

Water Lantern Festival

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M AY 4

Tupelo Community Theatre stages a musical about love, family, honesty and growing up, featuring America’s darkest and quirkiest family. Adult tickets $25, student tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Lyric Theatre, Tupelo.

Over 1,000 wood and rice paper lanterns reflect upon the water as families, friends and strangers come together to celebrate life. Tickets $35 adults, $12 youth 8-14 include lantern, marker and wristband. Gates open at 5 p.m., Ballard Park, Tupelo. waterlanternfestival.com

tct.ms

“Shrek The Musical” A P R I L 2 6 -2 8 , M AY 3-5

An ogre sets out to help a crew of misfit fairy-tale characters rescue a young princess and reclaim his secluded swamp in this musical re-creation of the 2001 movie based on the book by cartoonist William Steig. Adult tickets $20, student tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Crossroads Playhouse, Corinth. corinththeatrearts.com

Kentucky Derby Party M AY 4

Regional Rehab’s 21st annual Kentucky Derby fundraiser takes place at the home of Tom Evans. Watch the horse race live with friends and neighbors and celebrate with a hat contest, live and silent auctions, door prizes, food, mint juleps and more. For tickets, $50, call 662-842-1891. 3-8 p.m., 419 Robins St., Tupelo. regionalrehabcenter.com

Tupelo Automobile Museum Auction

Autism Color Run

Ride for the Light

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M AY 4

The Tupelo Automobile Museum will hold a no-reserve auction of the antique signs and rare automobiles in its collection. Proceeds benefit Frank Spain’s educational foundation. $10 entry fee for non-bidders. Tupelo. Read more on page 34.

The fifth annual Reconnect 4 Autism Color Run promotes autism awareness. Sponsored by Austin’s Shoes; proceeds help fund sensory-friendly events for those on the autism spectrum and their families. Registration includes T-shirt and colored powder. $20 adults, $10 kids through April 26; those with autism free. Corinth.

A 50-mile round-trip, family-friendly bike ride on the Tanglefoot Trail promotes health and wellness. Participants may complete as much of the ride as they wish. Benefits “Speed the Light,” which supports missionary evangelism. Registration $35. Check-in at 7 a.m., ride starts at 8 a.m. First Choice Bank Gateway, Pontotoc.

bonhams.com

reconnect4autism.com

racesonline.com/events/ride-for-the-light

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Coca-Cola Classic 10K M AY 4

Thousands take part in Corinth’s annual 10K race. The run is organized by and named for Corinth’s Coca-Cola Bottling Works, a privately owned plant that’s been in business for more than 100 years. Registration $30. 8:30 a.m. start time, downtown Corinth. runsignup.com/Race/MS/Corinth/Coke10k

Gumtree Festival M AY 1 0 -1 1

The 48th annual juried fine arts festival features artists from around the Southeast, live music, youth art activities, local food vendors and more. Preview party and live music 5-7 p.m. Friday; festival takes place 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, downtown Tupelo. gumtreefestival.com

Third Annual Springtime Social M AY 1 1

Ironclad Tattoo Gallery hosts a day of crawfish eating and socializing with friends. 4 p.m., The Hall at Rogues and Rebels, 380 Mobile Street, Saltillo. facebook.com/RoguesandRebelsMS

Celebration of Gardens M AY 1 1

Lee County Master Gardeners annual Celebration of Gardens takes place in conjunction with opening day of the Tupelo Farmers’ Depot. 9-11 a.m., Spring Street, south of the Farmers’ Depot. leecountymastergardeners.com APRIL 2019 | INVITATION

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instaL O V E

PHOTOS BY ANDEE HINTON

M i s s i s s i p p i Hou s e s

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isters Andee Hinton and Holly Deken always slowed down when they drove past old houses, taking time to consider the beauty and history of the storied structures that captured their attention. The two live in Madison, but they started their Instagram account, @mississippihouses, in an effort to showcase noteworthy homes scattered throughout the state. Hinton, who maintains the account, posts mainly original photos that she

snaps while out and about, but she also reposts photos submitted using the hashtag #mississippihouses. The majority of photos featured on the feed are of old — often historic — houses, but sometimes new ones make the cut. “When reposting a picture, it has to be something that speaks to us,” Hinton said. “We like to share photos [of houses] in different areas, different architectural styles and different seasons, as seen through the FOLLOW ON INSTAGR A M @mississippihouses

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eyes of our followers. This Instagram has caused us to slow down and explore our beloved home state of Mississippi.” Hinton hopes that the account helps others to recognize the beauty in historical structures and inspires people to save and restore more of them. Submit your unique home photos using the hashtag #mississippihouses, and follow @mississippihouses to give your timeline a dose of Southern antiquity.


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S H O U T O U T S This growing season, the Park Hill neighborhood in Tupelo will harvest vegetables and cut flowers from a newly transformed community garden. The Park Hill Community Garden is the result of a Fiskars Project Orange Thumb garden grant awarded last spring to Keep Tupelo Beautiful, an organization dedicated to improving the city’s scenic beauty and quality of life by inspiring and educating residents. The funds allowed several groups to collaborate on the project. Public Works tilled the land; Parks and Recreation leveled the dirt and placed cinder blocks. Real Men Stand Up, a mentoring and leadership program for young men, built raised beds and lined them with a pea gravel walkway. This spring, volunteers will work to clear out underbrush and plant okra, zucchini, squash, cabbage and peppers. There are plans to add benches around the garden and to grow zinnias to show the benefits of growing flowers for cutting and to attract bees, butterflies and other pollinators. “We hope the garden creates a com-

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RMSU AND KATHRYN RHEA

Pa rk H i l l C o m mu n it y G a rd e n

munity centerpiece that is much more than a set of vegetable beds,” said Kathryn Rhea, director of Keep Tupelo Beautiful. “The vision is for it to be an open and welcoming space that encourages citizens to not just sow the seeds of herbs and vegetables, but to sow the seeds of community and creativity.

We encourage anyone to join us on this project, and we welcome more help, ideas and advice.” For more on improving and beautifying your environment and to stay up-to-date on Keep Tupelo Beautiful projects, visit facebook.com/KeepTupeloBeautiful.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY DAVID NEILSEN

C h a d Pay ne Me mo r i a l W he e lc h a i r R a c e s

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Held in conjunction with the 10K Gumtree Run in Tupelo, the Chad Payne Memorial Wheelchair Races pair mobility-impaired children with runners to push their wheelchairs. The push/ride division of the Gumtree race started in May 1984 when runner Gary Steiner pushed Chad Payne, a man with muscular dystrophy, in the 10K Gumtree race. Since then, the push-ride division of the race has grown in popularity. “We are always looking for mobility-impaired kids who want to join,” said David Neilsen, head of the event committee. “Last Gumtree, we had 16 kids and we hope to work up to over 20 in the next year or two. We have some ‘kids’ well up into their 40s who race with us, and they still enjoy it.” The Gumtree race takes place May 11. To register, visit gumtree10kand2k.racesonline.com. This year’s event benefits the Tupelo-Lee Humane Society. To participate in the wheelchair race, contact David Neilsen at dlneilsen@att.net.


SHOUTOUTS

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4 0 t h A n nu a l C a ndy C l a s s ic

This tournament for players ages 12 and up takes place the first two weekends in May at the Corinth High School Tennis Complex. Dubbed the Candy Classic in memory of two local children, Candy Hammond and Amber Peeks, it benefits St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and is the longest running charity tennis tournament in the state. Last year the Candy Classic raised $16,000; this year the goal is $20,000. Families of patients at St. Jude never receive a bill. And while children from all over the world receive treatment from St. Jude and its national and global affiliate programs, the hospital is helping those close to home as well. “We currently have a 5-year-old boy from Kossuth and a 3-year-old boy from Booneville being helped by St. Jude,” event co-director Becky Nelms said. “We are so thankful for [St. Jude] and are happy to be a part of their success.” Adults ages 18 and up play May 3-5, while juniors ages 12-18 play May 10-12. Lunch is provided on Saturday, and pictures of the winners will be featured on the Candy Classic Facebook page. Registration is $53 and includes a singles and a doubles event. Players can register for the tournament at tennislink.usta.com. For more information about the event or to make a donation, email candyclassictennis@gmail.com. APRIL 2019 | INVITATION

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WRIT TEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY SAR AH McCULLEN

Zinnias Fountain Grass

Coleus Potato Vine

Mexican Heather Petunias

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olorful container gardens signify the start of spring. Hobbyist gardener Lizzette Van Osten of Tupelo, who is in the process of becoming a Lee County Master Gardener, offers these tips for creating stunning seasonal planters. Learn more about the master gardeners at leecountymastergardeners.com.

1 Choose a container

Clay, fiberglass, metal and wood containers work great, but make sure that the container has holes in the bottom to allow proper drainage. Size, shape and color are up to you.

2 Choose a location

Decide if you want an indoor or outdoor planter, and observe the location for a few days to see how much sunlight the area receives. This will determine which plants are best suited for the spot you have in mind.

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3 Prepare the soil

To keep the drainage holes from getting clogged, layer rocks on the bottom of the container, add a layer of sand, then fill with soil. Equal parts topsoil, compost and manure work best. For flowering plants, consider adding a high-phosphate, water-soluble fertilizer like MiracleGro Bloom Booster or a slow-release fertilizer like Osmocote. Additionally, a moisture manager will help the soil retain water.

4 Choose the plants

Light, location and the size of the container should be considered, but the rest is personal preference. Mix flowers and greenery of varying heights, sizes, colors and textures to create interest. Try fountain grasses, coleus, Mexican heather, potato vines and English ivy. Flowers like snapdragons, petunias and zinnias also work well.

5 Organize the plants

Van Osten suggests using “the three T’s” — a tall plant, a thick plant and a trailing plant. The plants that grow the tallest should be placed in the center of the container with shorter plants radiating outward. Place running plants near the edges to create a cascading effect. Loosen the roots before planting, and don’t crowd; the container may look puny at first, but the extra space allows the plants to flourish and fill the container.

6 Maintain your masterpiece

Finish your planter with hardwood mulch, and add more as needed to protect plants’ roots. Water every one to two days, and mix in a fertilizer every two weeks or according to directions. Prune shriveled leaves and blooms and remove dead plants to create more room for growth.


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W H AT ’ S CORINTH

COKE MUSEUM PILLOW $38 ROWAN HOUSE

B A B Y CLOT H I N G $ 32 .9 9-$ 42 .9 9 LOVE & A PUPPY

MUSEUM BEES $55 K ATES AND CO.

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BILA $54 ANN’S OF CORINTH

OTBT

| NEW MOON $138.95 AUSTIN’S SHOES

SPRING DRESS $ 36 .9 9 LOVE & A DOG

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JON HART MINT GRANDE $34 GINGER’S

BB LU V TERMO THERMOME TER $ 42.9 9 SHILOH APOTHECARY

BIRKENS TOCK | ARIZONA $13 4.95 AUSTIN’S SHOES


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PHOTOS BY WILLIAM WALDRON

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F O R T H I S N E W YO R K-B A S E D I N T E R I O R D E C O R AT O R , S O U T H E R N R O O T S R U N D E E P. WRITTEN BY RACHEL BURCHFIELD

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s a little girl growing up amidst the antebellum homes of Corinth, Courtney Coleman knew she wanted to be an interior decorator. In fact, decorating is in her blood. Her great aunt was an interior decorator in the Delta in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, and would travel to New York City and Dallas to go shopping for clients. By the time Coleman landed at Mississippi State University, she knew she wanted to follow in her great aunt’s footsteps. It was this aunt, Mary Jane Lyle, who encouraged Coleman to pursue a degree in architecture in order to study and understand the bones of a home. “It was good advice,” Coleman said. “In architecture school, I learned a lot about history, I learned about building systems and structure, and I learned a lot about possibilities. Growing up in Mississippi definitely gave me an appreciation for old houses — when we were in architecture school, a bunch of friends and I would ride around and look at houses on weekends. That was a good part of my education.” After she graduated from Mississippi State, Coleman followed close friends from architecture school to New York City. They

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had, in Coleman’s view, cool jobs and cool apartments, and soon Coleman was working at an architecture firm she loved and living in a loft apartment in TriBeCa. When she arrived in New York City in the 1990s, Coleman became a fellow at the Institute of Classical Architecture, where, in that role, she was an advocate for the study and practice of classical architecture. It was there that she met her future business partner, Bill Brockschmidt, who hails from Virginia. As two Southerners living in the Big Apple, they were naturally drawn to one another. “In New York, all of the Southerners hang out together,” Coleman said. “I don’t know if we have the best food or have the best culture. There’s a lot of glitz here [in New York City], but being Southern shows you that’s not all there is. There is nature and a porch with a rocking chair — in so many ways, I’d rather have a porch on Main Street as a place to hang with my friends than a space on Park Avenue.” Coleman and Brockschmidt first crossed paths at the Institute, where Brockschmidt was taking classes after he relocated to New York City from Chicago. Both trained as architects, the two hit it off


PHOTO BY PETER MURDOCK PHOTO BY WILLIAM WALDRON

PHOTO BY MELANIE ACEVEDO

because of their shared love of architectural and decor detail; both Southern, their styles complemented one another. “Southerners in general have a great sense of houses, and houses are really important to them,” Coleman said. “Southerners like to live in pretty surroundings and have a place where they can entertain well.” In 2001, the duo founded Brockschmidt & Coleman LLC, a firm focused on decoration and design. Eighteen years into their journey together, they’re set to open a second office in the Garden District of New Orleans in the first half of 2019, a throwback to both Coleman and Brockschmidt’s Southern roots. The team works all over the United States and even internationally. They are currently working on interior decorating projects in Washington, D.C., Palm Beach, Texas and, of course, New York City, and have decorated spaces in Bermuda, Croatia, France and Italy in the past. But Coleman is excited to continually rediscover the South, where her family and many of her friends still live, through the opening of her firm’s second office in New Orleans. “I am looking forward to spending more time in the South,” Coleman said. “There is so much construction and a renaissance going on in a way [in New Orleans].”

Coleman has brought her style to homes all across the Southeast, from Louisiana to South Carolina and everywhere in between. She is currently working on a project in the Mississippi Delta for acclaimed author, journalist and columnist Julia Reed, whom she met when Reed interviewed Coleman and Brockschmidt for a piece in Elle Decor. The firm typically takes on between 15 and 20 clients at a time, with the size of work ranging from one room to an entire home. “What is really fun is to get to keep learning,” Coleman said. “We get to do different kinds of projects. Sometimes they are projects for clients that we immediately understand, and we are immediately sympathetic with the client’s wishes. Sometimes we don’t understand the style, colors or floor plan [a client wants], and it’s interesting to get into somebody’s mind and really fun to start to understand their taste.” Coleman always knew that interior decorating was her passion. What would she tell another aspiring young designer in north Mississippi? “Travel as much as you can and look at as much as you can,” she said. “Be exposed to as much as you can — read everything from novels to design books. And never miss an opportunity to take a class or go to a lecture.” APRIL 2019 | INVITATION

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COURT YARD

A H I S T O R I C H O M E G E T S A 2 1 S T- C E N T U R Y U P G R A D E W I T H A P O O L A N D C O U R T YA R D E N T E R TA I N I N G S PA C E . WRITTEN BY JENNIFER COLLINS

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

nn and Bobby Wood bought the historic Heyer house in 1993. Originally built in 1903, the home features a welcoming front porch and neoclassical architecture popular at the turn of the 20th century. The Woods have renovated both the interior and exterior over the years, always planning improvements that kept the charm of the older home intact. When they decided to upgrade the backyard area, the Woods engaged decorators Judy Smelser and Marcia Hora along with contractor Jerry Garner of Garner Construction Co. Inc. to handle the transformation. The result is a courtyard living and dining area where the Woods can host gatherings and where family and guests can relax, swim, play, mingle and enjoy dining al fresco. “We had my oldest granddaughter’s wedding reception and several functions in the courtyard,” Ann said. “It’s the perfect place for parties, but we enjoy it the most for family gatherings. To say it is used and enjoyed is an understatement.”

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The centerpiece of the courtyard is the free-form pool with an adjoining hot tub cascading into it. Both were installed by Memphis Pool, with landscaping by Corinth Nursery and Garden Center. The mix of formal topiary boxwood and flowering plants in pots and planters offers privacy as well as splashes of color, while chairs and recliners with turquoise and terra-cotta cushions reflect the colors of the pool and the planters and invite lounging. The nearby pool house accommodates dripping grandchildren and guests with a convenient place for towel storage and changing. Some years ago, the Woods renovated the kitchen inside the house, and it became the place where everyone gathers. So, they re-created a similar kitchen and dining area outdoors. The covered space is equipped to provide drinks, snacks or a whole meal. Pillars of stacked stone veneer climb from the polished concrete floor to support the countertops. A wood ceiling offers rustic warmth, while the lighting is located among the exposed beams. The work area includes two refrigerators under the counter as well as a grill, a deep fryer and a smoker mounted in the stone chimney. Guests and family can relax in front of the gas fireplace, gather at the table or chat with the chef at the bar — Bobby does all the cooking. Front and back porches reflect each other with a palette of cool shades to create tranquil spots to relax and unwind. Strategically placed shutters can be opened to give plants or people some sun or closed to deflect it. Potted ferns sway in the breeze, and a porch swing on the front and a ceiling fan on the back provide classic Southern porch ambiance. “I love all of the courtyard, but my favorite [space] is the back porch,” Ann said. “It’s great to enjoy morning coffee and watch the hummingbirds and listen to the waterfall from the pool. Bobby and I have had many wonderful conversations during our coffee time there.”

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THIS MONTH, BLUE-THEMED FUNDRAISERS BENEFIT THE AUTISM CENTER OF NORTH MISSISSIPPI, WHICH HAS EXPANDED ITS SERVICES TO TREAT MORE CHILDREN. WRITTEN BY SARAH MCCULLEN

April is World Autism Month, and statewide, events and fundraisers are being held as part of #GoBlueMS, a concept developed in Tupelo three years ago to increase awareness and acceptance for children with autism across the state. “Autism Speaks has a campaign called ‘Light It Up Blue,’ where famous buildings around the world go blue to generate awareness [about autism],” said Brittany Cuevas, executive director of the Autism Center of North Mississippi. “We came up with #GoBlueMS to grow statewide awareness, and it just grows every year.” Locally on World Autism Day, Tupelo’s City Hall, the Lee County Library and others show support by lighting up blue, while Tupelo Parks and Recreation hosts a burger bash benefit at Fairpark. Other individuals and businesses sponsor other fundraising events including the “Blue for Boo” walk, run or motorcycle ride April 13 in Holly Springs and the ACNM Annual 5K April 27 at Ballard Park in Tupelo. “When I came up with the hashtag, I didn’t want it to be just in Tupelo because I realized that really no one in Mississippi was pushing this ‘go blue during the month of April for autism awareness,’” Cuevas

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

said. “We also sell T-shirts and encourage businesses to post selfies in support, and the first time we did it, we sold them all over the state. The secretary of state’s office employees bought T-shirts and put a selfie on Facebook.” ACNM held a T-shirt design contest on Facebook in February, and this year’s winning designer is 12-year-old John Herring of Pontotoc County, who receives treatment at the center. Proceeds from the sale of the T-shirts benefit the Autism Center and can be ordered online at autismcenternms.com. “We just want affected families to know they’re not alone,” Cuevas said. “I think a lot of times, when families are living with [autism], they end up isolating themselves because they’re afraid of what might happen when they go into a restaurant. My hope is that these families feel like we can come alongside them and support them, and through the Autism Center, offer more services in any way we can.” Autism affects one in 59 children according to the CDC. Since 2009, ACNM has provided treatment for children ages 2-8 with autism spectrum disorders. In the past year, the facility has undergone renovation and added a new clinical director, allowing

the center to expand its services. Dr. Sheila Williamson, a licensed behavior analyst and clinical psychologist, is heading up a new program that allows ACNM to serve a wider age range across the spectrum. For the last 10 years, ACNM offered limited treatment. “Because of Sheila’s experience and level of expertise, she has really created a new vision for [the Autism Center],” Cuevas said. “She can see the full potential, and she can see where we can take this place. She’s the captain of advancing the program.” Having trained at Rutgers University, the University of Mississippi and Johns Hopkins University, Williamson has over 30 years of experience in treating people with autism spectrum disorders. She has treated individuals with autism ages 0-72 in schools, private practice and now at ACNM. “I’m so excited to get to train others and facilitate growth here,” Williamson said. “Previously, we were treating young kids with language issues, but now we’re going to get to serve [children and young adults up to age 21] throughout the entire autism spectrum so that those kids can meet their full potential, learning the skills and having the support they need to do that.”


SHIRT GRAPHICS PROVIDED BY MASTER GRAFIX, LLC

The facility expansion includes a 3,000-square-foot space for a new treatment program known as BLAST, an acronym for Building Life and Social Skills Training. Previously the center had no group therapy and very little social skills training. The BLAST program offers therapy in a communal setting, teaching participants to focus on particular skills in an environment where distraction is common. The addition of the BLAST program in the new space will allow more children to receive treatment. “The groups will be based on what level on the autism spectrum they fall, and the programming will be adapted to the level,” Williamson said. “We want to look at the whole person, so we’ll be teaching exercise, self-care, self-advocacy, safety awareness, social skills, leisure and more.” The center is also working to develop programming for children with more severe behavioral problems, and it is expanding its school-based services as well as parent support, education and training. “Before [Williamson arrived], we had a cookie-cutter type of treatment, but what we’re expanding is the ability to tailor treatment to the specific needs of those who come to us,” Cuevas said. ACNM has a grant-funded scholarship account that allows families without the ability to pay to receive services, but the center still relies on grants, donations and fundraisers to supplement the cost of their treatment programs. To show your support for autism awareness, consider buying a T-shirt or attending a fundraising event, and post photos on social media using the hashtag #GoBlueMS. Learn more about the Autism Center of North Mississippi and this month’s events at autismcenternms.com.

Opposite page, far left: Brittany Cuevas and Sheila Williamson. Cuevas is executive director of the Autism Center of North Mississippi, and Williamson is the center’s clinical director. Top and right: ACNM’s #GoBlueMS T-shirt was designed by 12-year-old John Herring of Pontotoc County for this month’s autism awareness campaign.

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Caladiums

About

W H E N YO U R G A R D E N I S S W E LT E R I N G A N D B L O O M S B E G I N T O D R O O P, H E AT- L O V I N G C A L A D I U M S ADD A WELCOME BURST OF COLOR TO SHADY AREAS. NEW ALBANY MASTER GARDENER SHERRA OWEN SHARES HER TIPS FOR GROWING AND A GLIMPSE INTO HER GARDEN. WRITTEN BY RACHEL A. ISHEE

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ngel wings and elephant ears are not the first things that come to mind when picturing a summer garden, but that’s exactly what fills Sherra Owen’s New Albany property. Known for their distinctly heart-shaped appearance, caladiums are a tropical plant that rarely flower but have leaves that come in a variety of colors. Owen is a native plant educator and has been gardening for decades. Her garden is expansive and changes with the seasons so that there is always something blooming no matter when she has visitors show up at her door. From shaded patio seating and well-worn lawn chairs to a peaceful pond and hammock, her property features a little something for everyone to enjoy. Owen considers her garden to be a “people place,” and she works hard year-round to ensure that it is inviting. “I work to enhance the five senses,” Owen said. “I try to have something that smells good, something that you can taste and, of course, something that looks good.” Owen’s garden showcases about 300 caladium plants, and she adds more each year. Her interest in the plant started when she realized that she wanted her garden to yield more color during the summer months.

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Owen has three different types of caladiums that are displayed throughout her garden, separated by color. These tropical perennials flourish in the summer months, adding eye-catching splashes of white, red and pink wherever they are planted. All of Owen’s white caladiums are displayed in a large bed that is roughly the size of a small house, and her red and pink caladiums are also displayed in their own manicured beds. According to Owen, practically anyone can have beautiful caladiums in their own garden. The key is to buy big bulbs at the start of the season. Owen recommends going to your local nursery, but she said that bulbs can be found in pretty much any gardening store during the spring and summer. She frequents Philips Garden Center and Midsouth Nursery in Tupelo for her bulbs, or she purchases them online. Caladiums thrive in the heat. Plant in June, when the soil is above 60 degrees. If you plant before Mother’s Day, tender bulbs may fall victim to a late season temperature drop. And plant them in the shade — caladiums don’t like too much direct sunlight. “A lot of people make the mistake of planting them too soon, but it is a tropical flower and it will rot if planted when the ground is still too cold,” Owen said. Owen believes in taking care of the soil and uses only organic products in her garden. “Regular fertilizer produces salts that build up in your soil, and things don’t like to grow in salt,” Owen said. “Eventually it will harm your soil. Sprays kill the pollinators, and the pollinators are why we have anything.” Owen suggests using natural organic bonemeal, along with a mixture of leaf compost and soil. “You hear the word ‘sustainability’ — that goes along with being organic,” Owen said. “So we’re saving ourselves by saving our soils.” Owen recommends planting caladium bulbs about three at time in pots, so that they last longer into September and don’t have to compete with the roots of other plants. Once she displays the pots out in her garden, they blend in with other foliage, so visitors can’t even tell that the caladiums are actually in pots instead of being in the ground. MASTER GARDENER SHERRA OWEN As the temperatures slowly start to drop in September and the leaves start to fade, Owen collects all of her pots and pulls the bulbs out with the foliage still attached. After that she sorts them by color and sets them out to dry. Once the plants have dried, Owen pulls off the foliage and stores the bulbs in mesh bags, making sure that the temperature stays above 60 degrees throughout the year. This allows her to save and use her bulbs year after year, while adding an additional 50 to 100 bulbs each season. Owen suggests caladiums to anyone who is looking to add a bit of color and diversity to their summer garden. Because they are relatively simple to grow and can be brought back year after year, they are a great option for the novice gardener as well as the expert. “I really enjoy caladiums so much because they have a long color time,” Owen said. “They give off bright, strong color in the shade, which is hard to find in a plant.”

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THE TUPELO AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM WILL OPEN ITS DOORS ONE LAST TIME AS HUNDREDS OF CLASSIC CARS ARE AUCTIONED OFF TO BENEFIT FRANK SPAIN’S EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION. WRITTEN BY ALEXIS LEE

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When Frank Spain began his car collection in 1974, he started not just a hobby but a lifestyle. “Some people collect stamps, Frank collected cars,” Frank’s wife, Jane Spain, said. Frank spent the next several years hunting for collectible cars, with the help of his friend Max Berryhill. Jane remembers fondly how the couple’s travels to obtain cars were often full of adventure. “We were driving back from Alaska, and Frank was lying on the ground, working on the car, and a large dog kept coming over and taking Frank’s shoes right off his feet because he wanted to play,” Jane said. “There was never a dull moment.” Frank opened the Tupelo Automobile Museum in 2002 with 150 rare automobiles from all over Europe and North America. Frank, who grew up in Tupelo and graduated from Mississippi State University, set up an educational foundation funded by the museum. Frank died in 2006. Since then Jane has kept the Tupelo Automobile Museum running. But the number of visitors declined, and the museum was

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no longer earning enough money to remain in operation. In addition, Jane is considering relocating and wants to spend more time with her children and grandchildren. So, two years ago, Jane called upon Stephen Mancuso, an automotive consignment specialist, for guidance on what step to take next with the museum. She said she thought about the auction idea for about 20 seconds and said “OK, let’s do it.” “I have had great memories with many of these cars,” Jane said. “But now it is time for others to make memories with them.” The museum closed to the public at the end of March. The cars will be up for sale in a no-reserve auction April 25-27. The estimated value of the collection is $7 million to $25 million. Thursday will be a preview day; on Friday all the signs in the warehouse will be auctioned; the car auction is scheduled for Saturday. All proceeds from the auction will benefit Frank Spain’s educational foundation, which was always the goal of the museum. Mancuso said he expects bids from people all over the world — either in person or via internet and phone — including a few celebrities. For more information on the auction, visit bonhams.com.


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1963 Pontiac Bonneville The Bonneville was one of Pontiac’s most luxurious models. The distinctive protruding grille, available for an additional charge, was a sign of wealth and status.

1948 Tucker Only 51 were ever made, and each one is unique. The Tucker was designed for passenger safety, with seat belts, a roll bar, a padded dashboard and a rear engine. Luggage was stowed under the front hood, and every car came with a set of ladies’ luggage.


1905 Delauney Belleville The headlights on this car are gaslights, as were many other car lights during this time period. A unique feature of these lights was that people could unscrew them from their bases and use them as lanterns to light the way to their doors. APRIL 2019 | INVITATION

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1985 Triton aero car The Triton is classified as a three-wheel motorcycle and was built for pizza delivery, with an oven built into the back of the car. Pizzas would be half-baked at the store and finish cooking while being delivered.

1954 Buick Roadmaster This was the first edition of a Buick to have “Dagmar bumpers,” a fancy title for the chrome conical-shaped bumper guards also known as “bullet bumpers.”

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1899 Knox Porcupine The Knox had an air-cooled engine covered with steel bolts, making it less likely to overheat. Later Knox models had four wheels, but all were known for reliability. APRIL 2019 | INVITATION

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WAKE UP TUPELO PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

Wake Up Tupelo was held March 8 at the Elvis Presley Birthplace. The breakfast event featured a program by the Mississippi Economic Council focused on enhancing Mississippi’s opportunities in business and economic development. View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Judd Wilson and Brad Miller 2. Gina Black and Perry Whitaker 3. Sue Golmon and Keith Henley 4. Robin Robinson and Amy Speck 5. Emily Wooten and Doug Henley 6. Scott Waller and Beth Kitchings

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EMPTY BOWLS PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The 21st annual Empty Bowls luncheon was held March 6 at Tupelo Furniture Market. Attendees were treated to soup made by area restaurants that was served in a handmade pottery bowls. Proceeds from the event benefit the Salvation Army. 1

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1. Shelby Conley, Leslie Nabors and Ashley Roark 2. Sandra White, Shirly Rice and Gale Pinion 3. Robert Yeager and Jasmine Myles 4. Brad Kent and Renea Ethridge 5. Koron Jackson and Rhonda Holmes 6. Josefina Rayburn and Jason Shelton 7. Fred and Carol Pitts 8. Koos and Antoinette Badenhorst 9. Aubrie Jones and Darlene Richey

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HIGH SCHOOL GOLF MATCH PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

A golf match for high school students took place Feb. 28 at Natchez Trace Golf Club. Amory, Pontotoc and Saltillo high schools participated in the event, and the Amory girls and Pontotoc boys were the winners. 1

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1. Josh Fryery, Caden Cates and Jack Herring 2. Sam Parker, J.D. Baker, Everett Price, Brandon Bryant and Landon Koehm 3. A.J. Martin, Mitchell Cook, Crossland Malone, John Mark Mills, Mac Cook and Jolan Mills 4. Riley Carter, Emma Coggins, Riley Adams and Jydni Carter 5. Riley Grace, Colby Scott, Jackson Finch and Will Hamm 6. Jordan McDaniel and Addison Mask 7. Ayleen Garcia, Kylie Luker, Cooper Graves and Trey Joslin

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TUPELO GARDEN CLUB PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The Tupelo Garden Club held its annual spring luncheon March 26 at St. James Catholic Church. The event featured a program with special guest Laura Dowling, a former White House florist. 1

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1. Catherine Mize, Michelle Hutto, Mimi McGraw and Tricia Cockrell 2. Ann Monaghan, Belva Poland, Marian Hill and Judy Taylor 3. Wanda Todd, Lisa Reed and Stephanie West 4. Jala Caldwell, Laura Dowling and Tricia Cockrell 5. Carol Flowers, Rosalyn Hutchinson and Gayle Lindsey 6. Dale Simmons and Holly Walker 7. Sally Kate Ray and Kathryn Barrow 8. Ann Godwin and Peggy Carter

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SPRING INTO LITERACY PHOTOGRAPHED BY WHITNEY WORSHAM

The Corinth-Alcorn Literacy Council hosted its Spring Into Literacy Dessert Tasting fundraiser March 7 at The Franklin Courtyard in Corinth. The event featured 25 dessert-tasting stations, live music and door prizes. 1

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1. Darlene Watkins, Shirley Maddox, Marcia Wegmann and Trish Parks 2. Lisa Kirk, JaDarrien Atkins and Stephanie Patterson 3. Vicky Avery, Harriett Kemp and Denise DeBoer 4. Tina and Laura Jane McKee 5. Henry, Abby, and Mary Katherine Summers 6. Billy Hugh and Sandy Coleman Mitchell with Sandy Childs Jones 7. Morgan Aultman and Anna McCalla 8. Kim Bradley and Christy Tice Carter

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BARBECUE COMPETITION PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

Natchez Trace Golf Club hosted its first barbecue competition March 1-2. Teams competed for cash prizes for best chicken wings and best pork ribs. The event also included music, a food truck and barbecue plates made by the Ladies Golf Association. 1

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1. Adam Morgan and Miles Patton with Malcolm, Michael and Rachelle Reed and Jeremy Griffin 2. Tanner Grayson, Benjie Rigby, Bill Roberts, Chad Keenum and Barry Replogle 3. Meagan Gazaway, Tiffany May, Heather Franks, Misty Taylor and Patsy Polson 4. Scott Wood with Michael and Kim McCrory 5. Colin Russell and Drew England 6. Rick Nelms with Bradford and Jennifer Ridgway, Winky Weathers and Alex Wilcox 7. Eli and Scotty Bowman with Jeff and Daniel Huggins 8. Scott Wood and John Hamm

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RUN FOR YOUR BUNS PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

North Mississippi Medical Center hosted its annual Run For Your Buns 5K race on March 2 at Fairpark to raise awareness of colon cancer. Proceeds benefit cancer patients in north Mississippi. View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Paul Bailey, Michelle Bridges and Katelyn Richardson 2. Marcia Smithey, Bobby Watts and Sonya Butler 3. Robert McAuley, Teri Spain, Kim Palmer, Lorie Bass, Julie Dickeron and Jules Cason 4. Lyndi Treadway, Jim Johnson and Carlee Morgan 5. Taylor Smith, Rebekah Childers, Rannah Carr and Lindsay Pounders 6. Heather Gann, Karen Hunt and Mindy Minga 7. Haley and Christy Jones 8. Misty and Jason Dodds

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ZOMBIE FUN RUN PHOTOGRAPHED BY WHITNEY WORSHAM

The Zombie Tobaccolypse Fun Run took place March 20 at Crossroads Regional Park in Corinth. The one-mile race was hosted by the Mississippi Tobacco Free Coalition of Alcorn and Tippah Counties. 1

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1. Dena and Molly Johnson with Oliver 2. Tess Lancaster, Olivia Knight and Lynleigh Crabb 3. Kathryn Jester, Hallie Beth Faulkner, Bella Winn, Callie Grace Bingham and Brantley Faulkner 4. Thomas and Kim Ratliff 5. Evonna Drewry, Antwon Guyton, Marqullis Vance and Iveyana Smith 6. Lizzie, Tanya and Maddie Carpenter 7. Patti and Steve Hill 8. Nellie and Trulie Hall 9. Kakie, Annie and Rob Jeter

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OUT & ABOUT VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONM AG.COM

G re g I le s B o ok S i g n i n g

M i a A . S i m s B o ok S i g n i n g

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Ju n io r Au x i l i a r y B o ok C lu b

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Me mo r y ’s M a g ic a l D re s s e s at Ba r ne s C ro s s i n g

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Toyot a C o rol l a Rol l - O f f C e re mo ny

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It awa m ba C ou nt y M a s t e r G a rd e ne r s S p r i n g F l i n g

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C a s t i n g C row n s C o nc e r t

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1. Scott Reed, Bennett Mize, Greg Iles, Susan Svenson and Jane Riley 2. Mia A. Sims and Reagan Huffman 3. Kathy Wallace, Lynn Mize, Mika Brown, Jamie Ramels, Amy Murphree, Allen Bradford and Jullie Gibens 4. Debra Carouthers with Skylar and Marlaina Partlow 5. Linda Hall, Renita Ware, Memory Carouthers, Tina Jamison and Aundra Kohlheim 6. Tommy Lee Ivy, Steve Watson, Evan Denton and Chad Coffey 7. Laura George and Emily Wilemon-Holland 8. Zach Hamm with Becky and Marty Walton and Luke Yarbrough 9. Connie Marion and Lura Schumpert 10. Linda Bennett, Nicole McGreger, Austin French and Kayla Clanton

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MISSISSIPPI’S BEST

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H O T cross B U N S BRING A CENTURIES-OLD BAKING TRADITION TO YOUR TABLE THIS EASTER. RECIPE BY CYNTHIA GERL ACH

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ot Cross Buns are an Eastertime tradition. The symbolic spiced sweet rolls, historically eaten on Good Friday to mark the end of Lent, have gained popularity throughout the season. Cynthia Gerlach, owner and operator of Bottletree Bakery in Oxford, plans to make several dozen of them a day during the two weeks leading up to Easter. “I love the flavor and the texture,” Gerlach said. “It’s like a spiced bread meeting a donut.”

BOTTLETREE'S

hot cross buns

12/3 cups dried currants ¾ cup warm apple juice 4½ tablespoons active dry yeast 1¼ cups warm whole milk ¼ cup sugar 51/3 cups plus 1/3 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg ¼ teaspoon ground allspice 1/3 cup melted butter 2 large eggs FLOUR PASTE 1 cup all-purpose flour 6 tablespoons water EGG WASH 1 egg 1 tablespoon whole milk SIMPLE SYRUP 1 cup sugar 1 cup water

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Heat oven to 375°F. In a bowl, soak currants in warm apple juice. Set aside. Using a stand mixer with a dough hook attachment, stir together yeast, warm milk and sugar on low speed for 2 minutes. Set aside. In a separate bowl, combine 51/3 cups flour and the salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice. Add half the flour mixture to the yeast mixture, mixing until just combined. Add melted butter and 2 eggs. Gradually add the remaining half of the flour mixture. Drain the currants, discarding the apple juice. Add currants to flour mixture, and beat on medium speed 4-5 minutes. Beat in the remaining 1/3 cup flour. The dough should not be sticky. Place dough in a greased bowl and cover for 1 hour or until dough has doubled in size. Once the dough has doubled, lightly punch down and let rest 5 minutes.

Gently place dough on a floured surface and divide into 24 evenly sized balls. Place dough balls in a lightly greased 13x9-inch pan and cover. Allow the dough to proof (rise) in a warm place. The balls should be touching each other. Meanwhile, stir together flour and water to create flour paste. (Mixture will be thick.) Whisk together the egg and milk to create the egg wash. Set aside. When the dough balls are finished proofing, brush each with the egg wash and pipe the flour paste over the top to form a cwross on each one. Bake 15-18 minutes or until golden brown. To make the simple syrup, while the buns are baking, bring water and sugar to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until sugar dissolves. Remove baked buns from oven, and brush with simple syrup while still warm.