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I N

T H I S

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OCTOBER 2019

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DEPA RTMENT S

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EVENTS

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Letter From the Publisher

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2nd Chance Fall Gala

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Calendar

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Bowl for Breath

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Oxford Thinks Pink

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Heather McMahan Comedy

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Shoutouts

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United Way Flashback Bash

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InstaLove: The Magnolia Dietitian

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Veterans Appreciation Day

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In Season: Pecans

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Square Books Celebration

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Out & About

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Recipes: Lettuce Wraps & Veggie Bowls

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Second Baptist Church

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UM Museum Celebration

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Kappa Delta Ceremony

ON THE COVER

Asya Branch is one of the models featured in this fall’s fashion guide. See this season’s favorite styles on pages 29-42. Necklace on cover provided by Delta Belle. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM I L L U S T R AT E D B Y F R A N K E S T R A D A


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F E AT U R E S

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FE ATURES 29 Fall Fashion Lookbook

56 Driven by Design

46 Daredevil Designer

60 Little “q” Ranch

From timeless and traditional to new and trendy, Oxford retailers share some of their favorite looks for this fall.

Determination and a spirit of adventure inspire custom jumpsuits by Julia Ray, who has taken up skydiving as a hobby.

50 Ronzo: Gateway to Cool

A tribute to Ron Shapiro. He was part of the landscape for over 40 years, and because of him our lives and our town will be forever changed.

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For Oxford native Beaty McKnight, a fascination with fashion led to a dream job in New York City.

From as far away as Alaska and as close as neighboring states, people come to try continental-style pheasant and quail hunting at Little “q” Ranch in Thaxton.

66 Captivated by Cuba

Milly West has traveled to Cuba nearly three dozen times, gathering a vast and varied collection of art from that country.

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L E T T E R from the P U B L I S H E R I vividly remember a fall homecoming football game in the late ’90s. Not because of who the Rebels played or the score of the game, but because of the outfit I wore. It was a navy wool suit with a dark mustard silk shirt, navy hose and navy heels. That was 20 years ago, and to say fashions have changed since then would be an understatement. Styles today are much more fun and casual, with vivid prints and interesting textures. Flip to our special style section on pages 29-42 to see some of this season’s trends and staples for all wardrobes. For some unique specialty garments, Julia Ray’s skydiving jumpsuits (page 46) are sure to inspire, along with a glimpse into Beaty McKnight’s fashion design job in New York (page 56). The weekend after I wore my navy wool suit, I traveled with a group of my sorority sisters to Memphis to participate in my firstever Race for the Cure. I remember the crisp, cool morning we arrived and the sea of pink

FOLLOW US

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that awaited us. It was a sight to behold and a moment of awe and reflection for me. Hundreds of men and women celebrating loved ones, coworkers, friends and others had gathered to support or honor those who were battling or had battled breast cancer. I’d never been so proud to wear pink in my life. That was a different encounter with fashion. It was a T-shirt I had on, after all. But wearing that color united me with complete strangers, which is something I’ll never forget. As we prepared to mix fashion and wellness in this issue, I kept returning to those two memories. They represent very different moments but are somehow tied together — I think because of the feeling of community I experienced in both situations. Fast-forward 10 years from that time, and another story began: the story of Invitation Oxford. In October of 2006, we began this magazine. I remember when we started covering local events, we sometimes

@INVITATIONOXFORD

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had to hunt to find them. Rarely was there any kind of charitable 5K race for us to photograph, and events that benefited health and wellness organizations seemed to be limited. Now, local charity and service events are so frequent, we are sometimes pressed to fit them all in. We have been honored to be your community magazine for the past 13 years. In today’s world, that is a long time to be in business. We are thankful to every single advertiser and reader who has supported us through all these years. We look forward to serving you for years to come and continuing to share in our growing community. With much thanks for your ongoing loyal support,

RACHEL M. WEST, PUBLISHER

@INVOXFORD


PUBLISHERS Phil and Rachel West

EDITORIAL

EXECUTIVE EDITORS Allison Estes Emily Welly EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Mary Moreton CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erin Austen Abbott Susan Baldani Aleka Battista Andi Sherrill Bedsworth Ginny McCarley EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Meredith Hull COPY EDITOR Ashley Arthur

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Holly Vollor STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Joe Worthem CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Paul Gandy Alex Sage Megan Wolfe Jeffrey Taylor CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Frank Estrada SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR & ART ASSISTANT Alexis Lee

INTERN Abbey Edmonson

ADVERTISING OFFICE

BUSINESS MANAGER Hollie Hilliard DISTRIBUTION Donald Courtney Brian Hilliard MAIN OFFICE 662-234-4008

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Alise M. Emerson Leigh Lowery Lynn McElreath Moni Simpson Whitney Worsham Anna Zemek ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Paul Gandy Becca Pepper Hallie Thomas ADVERTISING INFORMATION ads@invitationoxford.com

To subscribe to one year (10 issues) of Invitation Oxford or to buy an announcement, visit invitationoxford.com. To request a photographer at your event, email Mary at mary.invitation@gmail.com. Invitation Oxford respects the many diverse individuals and organizations that make up north Mississippi and strives to be inclusive and representative of all members of our community.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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C A L E N DA R OCTOBER 2019

Kudzu Kings 25th Anniversary Show

Halloween Magic Show

OC TOBER 4

The public library hosts Buffalo Bill for a magic show featuring an array of spooky tricks and treats. The show includes live animals, audience participation and large illusions. Free. No registration required. 6:30 p.m., Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library.

The kings of Oxford celebrate 25 years of their alternative, country rock music. Tickets $15, $5 underage fee charged at the door. Doors open at 8 p.m., show starts at 9 p.m., The Lyric Oxford.

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FOOTBALL

thelyricoxford.com

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Ole Miss vs. Vanderbilt (Homecoming) Time 6:30 p.m.

miopl.com

LE BONHEUR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

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Ole Miss at Missouri Time TBD

Fall Break Art Camp OC TOBER 4 AND 7

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Ole Miss vs. Texas A&M Time TBD

The Yoknapatawpha Arts Council offers autumn-themed art projects, movies and games to children ages 3-12. Half-day session 8 a.m.-noon, $30; full-day session 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $45. The Powerhouse.

Judy Schachner Reading

Monster’s Ball

oxfordarts.com

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Author of the “Skippyjon Jones” series Judy Schachner reads from her new picture book, “Stretchy McHandsome,” about a rakish street cat who takes up with a young girl and eventually discovers the benefits of a warm lap. Free. 4 p.m., Square Books Jr.

Le Bonheur Kids of North Mississippi hosts a spooky adult costume party to benefit Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Tickets and ticket packages range from $50 to $10,000. For more information, search “Monster’s Ball Oxford” on Facebook. 7-10 p.m., Swayze Field.

squarebooks.com

Skuna River Art Festival O C T O B E R 12

The Skuna River Art Festival features art and food vendors, live gospel music, children’s art activities, free painting demonstrations and more. Free. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., the Square, Bruce. facebook.com/SkunaRiverArtandMusicFestival

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Still Standing Conference OC TOBER 19

Venomous Vixens Social Club presents Still Standing 2019, a conference to educate both men and women on domestic violence. Resources, music, vendors and food will be available. Tickets $7. 2-6 p.m., Pontotoc Second Baptist Church. For more information, call 731-313-6479.

Great 38 Race Weekend O C T O B E R 2 5 -2 7

Run Oxford, UM Athletics and Palmer Home for Children put on a race weekend benefiting the Chucky Mullins Foundation, which assists Ole Miss students with physical disabilities or financial needs. The 5K, 8- and 13.1-mile runs finish at VaughtHemingway’s 38-yard line. 7:30 a.m. runoxford.com/G38


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HALLIE THOMAS DESIGN

TH E

ONE NIGHT STAND ART S HOW AT TH E OLE M I SS MOTEL 1517 U N IVE R S IT Y AVE N U E , OX FO R D, M S

ARTISTS MICHAEL FOSTER OXFORD, MS ADRIENNE BROWN DAVID WATER VALLEY, MS HOLLIE CHASTAIN CHATTANOOGA, TN CHAMPNEYS TAYLOR WASHINGTON, DC NADIA ALEXIS OXFORD, MS HEATHER SUNDQUIST HALL AUSTIN, TX MICHAEL DOYLE SEATTLE, WA ZET GOLD DES MOINES, IA BILL WARREN AND PATI D'AMICO WATER VALLEY, MS NICCI HINKLEY WATER VALLEY, MS THOMAS GROSSKOPH OXFORD, MS KAYLAN BUTEYN NASHVILLE, TN CHURCH GOIN' MULE NEW ORLEANS, LA EMILY WALLACE DURHAM, NC

One Night Stand O C TO B ER 26

For one night only, 12 artists take over 12 rooms at the Ole Miss Motel, transforming each into a gallery. A paid preview hour LIVE TAPING from 5-6 p.m. includes food and drinks; 5:00-6:00 the rest of the eveningPMis free to the public. For details, search “The 6:00-9:00 PM One Night Stand at The Ole Miss Motel Art Show” on BEVERAGES Facebook. 6-9 p.m., the Ole Miss Motel. OF THE PODCAST IN WHICH I TALK TO ARTISTS WITH ERIN WILLIAMS

WASHINGTON, DC

$20 | FOOD INCLUDED FROM OXFORD SMOKE SHOP

FREE | FOOD AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE FROM OXFORD SMOKE SHOP

FOR PURCHASE FROM JACKSON BEER CO.

Tailgate for Palmer O C TO B ER 26

Celebrate all things SEC football during the ultimate tailgating experience, while benefiting the Palmer Home for Children. Football games will be shown on the big screens, and tailgate treats will be provided by Oxford restaurants and caterers. Tickets start at $75. 7-10 p.m., Olivia and Archie Manning Athletics Performance Center. palmerhome.org

Halloween OC TOBER 31

Creep it real and share your costume ideas and spooktacular Halloween traditions with us by posting pictures on social media with the hashtag #invitationoxford. OC TOBER 2019 | INVITATION OXFORD

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O X F O R D thinks P I N K OCTOBER IS NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH. HERE’S HOW SEVERAL LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS ARE COMMEMORATING IT. SHARE YOUR PL ANS FOR RAISING AWARENESS ON SOCIAL MEDIA WITH THE HASHTAG #INVITATIONOXFORD SO WE CAN HELP YOU SPREAD THE NEWS.

OHS Cancer Walk OC TOBER 15

Oxford High School puts on its fifth annual breast cancer awareness walk. T-shirts will be sold with proceeds benefiting a local breast cancer survivor. 7:30 a.m., Charger Loop at OHS.

SurviveMiss Through its website and blog, SurviveMiss provides advice, resources and support to young breast cancer survivors in the state. The organization is part of the Gulf States Young Breast Cancer Survivor Network, of which the University of Mississippi Medical Center is a member. Learn more at survivemiss.org.

Pink Out Day OC TOBER 1

Baptist Cancer Center celebrates breast cancer awareness month with a “Get Pinked” costume contest. First and second place awards will be given to the bestdressed individuals and groups. Includes refreshments and a photo booth. 1-3 p.m., Baptist Cancer Center Conference Room.

Oxford Dental T-shirt Purchase a special pink ribbon-themed “fight cancer” T-shirt from Oxford Dental (2155 S. Lamar Blvd.) for $10 this month to benefit the Oxford Cancer Center.

Wednesday, November 6 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall 800 Van Buren Avenue ~ Oxford, MS

with special guest

Dr. Ethel Young Scurlock Join us for an afternoon dedicated to inspiring women who give of themselves and their time and talents to make the Lafayette-Oxford-University Area a better place!

Tickets are $30/each. For more information, please contact Jenny Jones at 662-350-6041 or jenny.jones@girlscoutshs.org. Visit us online at www.girlscoutshs.org/lou-womenofdistinction 20

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S H O U T O U T S The 25th annual Mississippi Walk for Diabetes takes place Nov. 3 on the University of Mississippi campus. Proceeds fund the programs and services of the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi, including Camp Kandu, Mississippi’s only camp for children with diabetes and their families, “Sweet Subject” school diabetes education and patient assistance for Mississippians in need. Irena McClain, associate director of the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi, said the Oxford walk is one of the foundation’s favorite events. “We always say we saved the best for last with our Oxford walk,” McClain said. “It is 2½ miles of the prettiest scenery, and we have strong connections with the families involved.” Registration begins at 1 p.m., with the 5K walk beginning at 2 p.m. in front of the Lyceum. Teams and individuals are welcome to join at the starting line.

HANNAH BYRD

Wa l k fo r D i a b e t e s

“We want people to know that you can still do and think whatever you want with diabetes,” McClain said. “The foundation is here to bridge the gap of doubt and help you live your fullest life with the disease. Our motto is, ‘When you’re friends with the Mississippi foundation, we’re there for life.’” This year’s walk will be in memory of Anne Marie Liles and Dr. Andrew Martin

“Mart” Chandler. Liles was director of experiential affairs and clinical associate professor of practice at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, and an avid volunteer for the foundation. Chandler was an endocrinologist and a member of the foundation’s advisory board. He was both a patient with insulin-dependent diabetes and a caregiver to those with the disease.

LAFAYETTE COUNTY LITERACY COUNCIL

L C L C a nd D ol ly Pa r to n’s I m a g i n at io n L i b ra r y Bi r t hd ay Pa r t y

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For nearly 25 years, the Lafayette County Literacy Council has been fostering a love of reading through programs such as the Children’s Book Festival, L.O.U. Reads Coalition and Adult Basic Literacy Education. In 2009, LCLC became a Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library affiliate. With the help of funding from the United Way of Oxford-Lafayette County, the program provides free books monthly to more than 700 children ages 0-5. To celebrate its 10th anniversary with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, LCLC invites children ages 0-5 and their caregivers to attend a costume birthday party from 2-4 p.m. Oct. 27 at the plaza next door to Square Books Jr. “We hope our Imagination Library children will attend this fun event and help us celebrate 10 years,” Sarah McClellan, LCLC’s executive director, said. “We will have pumpkins to decorate and books as giveaways. It is an exciting time, and we want to celebrate with everyone.” Learn more about LCLC at lafayetteliteracy.org.


SHOUTOUTS

continued

TATUM BOYETTE

Ve lve t M a g a z i ne

A new student-run fashion magazine launches just in time for fall. Velvet Magazine, appropriately named after the “Velvet Ditch,” is the brainchild of University of Mississippi student Alexi Alonso. “I have seen the talent and creativity of my fellow classmates,” Alonso said. “I wanted to start something that could bring the IMC department to its full potential and showcase that talent.” Velvet Magazine focuses on high fashion, lifestyle, beauty and culture from the perspective of modern, trendy college students. Alonso, with help from the integrated marketing communications journalism department, aims to make the magazine an outlet for creative students who want hands-on magazine publishing experience. Currently, 30 students are on the magazine’s staff. Alonso created the magazine after taking professor Joe Sherman’s fashion merchandising class, which focuses on fashion history, targeting and positioning, as well as how to compete in the changing retail environment brought about by online shopping and social media. As part of the class, students are assigned a retailer in Oxford to analyze. “Alexi took this class and wants to create a fashion publication for the university much like SMU’s publication, The Look,” Sherman said. OC TOBER 2019 | INVITATION OXFORD

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instaL O V E T he M a g nol i a D ie t it i a n

FOLLOW ON INSTAGR A M @the _ magnolia _dietitia n

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OLIVIA DELEON

Y

ou can have your cake and eat it too. Eating smart doesn’t mean cutting out foods and ditching carbs, according to Olivia DeLeon, a local dietitian and lifestyle coach. On her Instagram, The Magnolia Dietitian, DeLeon is debunking myths of the diet culture and encouraging her followers to consider overall wellness. “Nutrition is not about the latest fad diets and excluding foods from our food choices,” DeLeon said. “I aim to promote (maintaining) a healthful lifestyle while enjoying all foods.” DeLeon, a North Dakota native, moved to Mississippi in 2013 to pursue a master’s degree in nutrition and a dietetic internship at the University of Mississippi. She consults with rehabilitation centers in north Mississippi and provides medical nutrition therapy, but is working toward a new goal. “I am also working on starting up my own consulting business, with the goal of enhancing quality of life through improved nutrition and lifestyle habits,” DeLeon said.

The Magnolia Dietitian aims to educate followers on real, simple and evidencebased nutrition. Her Instagram reflects the beauty of eating well, while sprinkling in some healthy truths. The feed features images of orange-sesame shrimp bowls, cauliflower gnocchi, Thai lettuce wraps and bright veggies, plus indulgences like ice cream. To try DeLeon’s Thai lettuce wraps and a Greek couscous bowl, turn to page 96. For more delicious recipes plus sound eating advice, follow @the_magnolia_dietitian.


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P E C A N S RECIPE BY SARAH McCULLEN

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

PECAN PIE energy B I T E S ¾ cup chopped pecans ¼ cup unsweetened shredded coconut 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 20-25 pitted Deglet Noor dates Place pecans and coconut in food processor, and pulse for about 20 seconds or until finely chopped. Add vanilla, salt and cinnamon, pulsing until just combined. Add dates in batches, about 5 at a time, processing until the mixture begins to stick together. Using your hands, scoop and roll the mixture into 11/2-inch balls. Place on a cookie sheet lined with waxed paper, and chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to a week. Each pecan pie energy bite contains approximately 93 calories, 2 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat and 9 grams of sugar.

D

espite their tiny, shelled packages, pecans pack a mighty healthy punch, according to experts from the Mississippi State University Extension Service. And, lucky for us, they are indigenous to Mississippi. “Pecans are native in a small part of Mississippi, the North Delta region, but have been planted throughout the state,” said Eric Stafne, a fruit crops specialist at the extension service. “Many varieties of pecan originated in Mississippi, especially from the coastal counties.” Abundant throughout north Mississippi from September to December, pecans are loaded with fiber, antioxidants and

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nutritious fats that defend against cancer, degenerative diseases and heart disease. “Pecans are a very healthy product with more than 19 vitamins and minerals,” Stafne said. “They are low in saturated fat as well. Of course, like anything else, they should be eaten in moderation.” Pecans make scrumptious additions to salads, desserts and other dishes. And they are an ideal ingredient for homemade energy bites — these simple, no-bake snacks are great for fueling a workout or an on-thego breakfast. This recipe uses Deglet Noor dates, which are lower in calories and sugar than Medjool dates, and captures the flavor of a sweet slice of your favorite pecan pie.


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LO O KB O O K

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM ILLUSTRATED BY FR ANK ESTR ADA ST YLED BY JESSIC A M ATHIA S MODELED BY A S YA B R A N CH JENNIFER GROSS FORREST HINTON L I L LY M cEL R E AT H

DELTA BELLE

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A LOOK AHEAD

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HINTON AND HINTON

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JANE

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KALEIDOSCOPE

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MY FAVO R I T E S H O E S

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THANKS TO OXFORD L AFAYE T TE COUNT Y ARENA FOR PROVIDING THE PHOTO SHOOT LOCATION.

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CUTE MEETS SOPHISTICATED WHEN ANIMAL PRINT MIXES WITH PINK.

DELTA BELLE

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L I TT L E B L AC K DRES S A FUR JACKET MAKES A STATEMENT A N D A D D S A L AY E R OF WARMTH ON COOL FALL NIGHTS.

DELTA BELLE

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FA L L TEXTU R ES A TRENDY TWIST ON CORDUROY AND KNIT IS PERFECT FOR AUTUMN AFTERNOONS.

FROCK

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G O R G EO U S G LAS S ES FROM SPORT Y TO DISTINGUISHED, THE RIGHT EYEWEAR CAN MAKE A STATEMENT.

A LOOK AHEAD

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STA N D

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EYE-CATCHING PAT TERNS AND ACCESSORIES TAKE JEANS AND A TANK TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

HINTON AND HINTON

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BAC K TO BA S I C S A CL ASSIC BL AZER AND KHAKI PANTS NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE. ADD A POCKET SQUARE FOR A FINISHING TOUCH.

HINTON AND HINTON

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DRESS UP BL ACK PANTS WITH A VIBRANT COLORED SHIRT AND SWANKY HEELS.

JANE

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S H I M M ER &SHINE MAKE ANY EVENING OUT SPECIAL WITH A SEQUINED TOP AND SLEEK PANTS.

KALEIDOSCOPE

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AC C E S S O R I Z E FINISH ANY LOOK WITH HEELED BOOTIES AND A CLASSIC HANDBAG.

MY FAVORITE SHOES

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Daredevil Designer DETERMINATION AND A SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE INSPIRE CUSTOM JUMPSUITS B Y J U L I A R AY. WRITTEN BY GINNY MCCARLEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

J

ulia Ray had been talking about going skydiving with friends for years, but they’d never actually gone through with it. A few days before her 40th birthday, she decided to take the leap alone. “I thought, ‘I’m not gonna wait. I’m just going to go ahead and do it,’” Ray said. On a crisp, clear day in February, Ray drove herself to West Tennessee Skydiving in Whiteville, Tennessee. She had stopped her daily jog halfway through, to shower, dress, jump in the car and head to the place before she lost her nerve. The closer she got to the airfield, the more she began to doubt whether she could do it. “Honestly, it’s so nerve-wracking because it’s so unknown,” Ray said. “If you haven’t skydived before, then you’ve never really done anything like it. You just don’t have a clue as to what to feel or what to think. Looking back, I can remember driving, using my GPS, into the middle of nowhere. And when I got close, I looked into the sky and could see people coming down in front of me. I remember almost getting sick. I thought, ‘I can’t do this.’” Despite her nerves, Ray drove on. The rest of the process was so quick there wasn’t time to back out: In less than an hour, she was free-falling at about 120 miles per hour. First-time jumpers are fitted with a parachute harness that attaches to the harness of an experienced instructor, all

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of whom have made more than 1,000 jumps and have completed special training programs. Following the minute-long, exhilarating tandem free fall, the instructor opens the main parachute at 4,000 feet for a canopy ride to the ground. After her first jump, Ray was hooked. The exhilarating feeling of flying through the air with total concentration was addicting. Her tandem jump instructor, Christian Young, casually suggested that she should consider becoming a solo skydiver, a remark that Ray couldn’t get out of her head for the next few days. “I came back home, and I just started thinking about it,” Ray said. “I thought, ‘I work all the time, and I don’t really have an outlet. I’m just going to do it.’” A week and a half later, Ray was in the Accelerated Free Fall program, learning how to skydive solo. Throughout the process, Ray has been a standout student. Most people come with a group or a friend for their first jump. Very few people immediately join the Accelerated Free Fall program after only one skydiving experience. And almost no one sews their own jumpsuits. Ray, who runs a successful studio in Oxford, has been designing and altering clothes for years for a wide range of clients, including Oxford Bridal and World Championship Wrestling. Almost immediately after her first jump, Ray decided to combine her work and her newfound hobby. “I really put myself through bootcamp on learning to design skydiving outfits,” Ray said. “After I taught myself the process of it, I designed my first outfit and so many people saw it and loved it that I’ve had a huge request for more.” The colorful jumpsuits were so popular, she has tentatively begun making more. Though Ray has years of experience as a seamstress, she is still learning the complicated process of creating clothes suitable for skydiving. Since skydivers fly at more than 100 miles an hour, normal cotton fabric can tear in the air — a lesson Ray learned the hard OC TOBER 2019 | INVITATION OXFORD

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way when one of her suits ripped. Instead, she sources a spandex polyester that is water-resistant, similar to the material used for sails on boats, with reinforced seams. Physics plays a role in her designs as well: Different fabrics and styles create different fall rates. If you want a slower fall, the suit can be looser, while tighter designs create a faster fall. Elizabeth Young, an instructor on most of Ray’s jumps, was the lucky first recipient of a custom-made Julia Ray jumpsuit. Her suit is a deep purple with pops of turquoise, hot pink and navy paisley, and her name stitched on the front. “(Ray) is very creative and has supercute patterns for her jumpsuits,” Young said. “She is amazing. Before she had even finished the Accelerated Free Fall program, she had already made her own jumpsuit.” For Ray, one of the best parts of skydiving is the community she’s become a part of and the people she gets to meet. On Memorial Day, Ray happened to be on the plane before a jump with a group of veterans. One of them, a World War II POW, was 95 years old and jumping for the first time since an emergency evacuation from his B-24 in Austria. Meeting the men, who ranged in age from about 70 to 95, Ray felt her own journey mirrored. “It was amazing (meeting the veterans),” Ray said. “It really is just the fear of the unknown that keeps us stuck in life.” Ray still remembers that day in February, when she was so afraid she almost didn’t go through with it. But she pushed through the fear and hasn’t looked back. Now, after 55 jumps and a lifetime to go, Ray looks forward to traveling the world, visiting different skydiving drop zones and showcasing her work. “Throughout this process, I’ve learned that I’m a lot stronger mentally than I thought,” Ray said. “There are so many factors in our lives that (hold us back), but I’m learning to really live. I was a workaholic and I still am, but I’m learning to close my door at home and just take some time out for myself.”

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The Gateway to Cool

W H O C OULD IN SPIRE HUN DRE D S O F P E O P L E T O t a k e t o t he st r e e t s the TO CELEB R ATE H IS LIF E, MA R C H ING D OWN N O RT H L A M A R I N OX F O R D' S F I R S T-E VE R S ECO N D L I NE PARADE? WH O ELS E B UT RO N "R O NZO" S H A PIR O ? H E WAS PA RT O F T HE L A N D S CA P E HE R E F O R OVE R 4 0 YE A R S, A ND BECAUSE O F H IM O U R LIV E S A N D O U R TOWN WI L L F O R E VE R B E C HA N GE D.

J-MAN

WRIT TEN BY ERIN AUSTEN ABBOT T

“I WO U LD N’ T BE WH E R E I AM WI T HO U T T HE HE L P A N D S U P P O RT O F R O N S HA P I R O.

HE WAS AN AMB A S S A D O R O F T H E A RT S I N O X FO R D AN D W IL L B E D E E P L Y MI S S E D . ” — A RT I S T J -M A N

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PAUL GANDY

“It 's never t oo l a t e t o b e mo re l i k e Ro n z o .” — JIM DE E S, H O S T O F TH AC KE R MO UN TA I N R A D I O, LO N GT I M E HO KA PA RT N E R A N D F R I E N D O F SH AP IRO

NOAH SATERSTROM

W

e all met Ronzo at different times. For some, it was during that awkward time in adolescence when you are figuring out who you are and growing your first set of armor in the process. For others, it was as an adult, having just moved to Oxford. For many, it was at The Hoka Theatre, the first and last of its kind. Through the vast differences of when we met Ronzo, we all share the common thread of how he made us feel. He could light up a room as he entered, with a smile that was warm, and it was kind, and it was sincere. Ronzo was a beacon that many of us just needed. I first met Ronzo when I was about 3 years old. It was the late ’70s, and my mom, Dorothy Abbott, had taken a job at the Center for Southern Culture, moved us to Oxford and discovered The Hoka. Ronzo and my mom became fast friends. She was a single mom, and The Hoka was a spot that wasn’t too precious to bring two kids to. She didn’t have to cook, and my brother and I would be occupied by the jukebox for a long time. She could read or visit with friends while we entertained ourselves. Ronzo would greet us with big hugs and warm smiles every time we stopped in, and he would join us at the table while we ate a “Love at First Bite” (basically a club sandwich, Hoka-style). Ronzo was the gateway to everything cool for me in those early years. He introduced me to so much good

“R O N D I D N’ T J U S T CR E AT E A G AT HE R I N G P L ACE F O R T H E LO CAL CO U N T E R CU LT U R E, HE HE L P E D TO CR E AT E A N D NURT URE T H AT CU LT U R E … HE WA S R O N ZO, L I VI N G HI S O P T IM IST IC A N D P O S I T I VE P HI LO S O P HY T HAT

BEING Y YOU O U R O WN WE I RD S E L F M A K E S T H E WO RL D A B E T T E R PL PLA AC C E .” — A RT I S T N OA H S AT E R S T R O M


“RO N WAS AN ELEC TR IC H U M A N BE ING.

HE HAD A CERTAIN KIN D OF ENERG Y T HAT EX C ITED T HE W HOLE C OM M UNITY.” — MARY ANN REE D BOWE N, F R IE ND O F S H A PI R O

V IS IT

JOE WORTHEM

M O R D .C O IO N O X F T A IT V IN D MORE TO REA

ES M E M O R ID T O

AN OF RON WN. YOUR O SHARE

ERIN AUSTEN ABBOTT

music and film, all before I turned 8. I had my 5th birthday party at The Hoka, Ronzo standing over me, watching as I opened my presents. We wore almost-matching plaid shirts, which I’m sure was no accident — I wanted to be just like him as a child. I heard teenagers hanging out at The Hoka describe it as the time when they learned it was OK to be weird. The Hoka was always the place you could retreat to and feel a sense of belonging, when nowhere else in town allowed you to be different. We moved to Florida when I was 9, but I wasn’t done with Oxford. In my 20s, I moved all over the country searching for a place that made me feel like Oxford did in those years — searching for a place like what Ronzo had helped cultivate here. I couldn’t find it anywhere. No place compared to Ronzo’s Oxford. Upon my return in 2005, Ronzo and I picked right back up like no time had passed. The Hoka was gone by then, but I made frequent stops at his next venture, the Main Squeeze, for the only vegan meal I could find in town at the time. Ronzo will always be so dear to me, and my memories of him will continue to be as the father figure that he was to me. I hope that we can honor Ronzo by carrying on in his spirit. Smile at strangers; make small talk while waiting in lines; support the arts; read the books by the writers passing through Square Books; sit and stay awhile. Most of all, welcome everyone. The city of Oxford has planned a memorial for Ron “Ronzo” Shapiro the evening of Nov. 1, at the Powerhouse. The community is invited to join in sharing stories of Ronzo over cocktails, while also taking more memories of Ronzo home with you. Continued on page 54

Writer Erin Austen Abbott at The Hoka with Shapiro, in a matching shirt, looking on. “A S S O M EO N E D R AWN TO T HE C I VI L R I G H T S M OV EM ENT A N D A M O R E B O HE M I A N, U N CO N VE N T IO NAL LIF EST YLE,

MO V I N G T O O X FO RD I N T HE ’70 S A N D FI N D I N G T H E H O K A W A S L I K E CO MI N G H O M E . O N O U R WE E KLY HO KA P I LG R I M AGE S, MY CH ILDREN AND I WE R E I N T HE CO M PA N Y O F P EO P L E WH O LOV ED M USIC, A RT, F I L M , L I T E R AT U R E, A N D JUST ICE.” — WR I T E R A N D E D I TO R D O R OT H Y ABBOT T


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“I N E VE R F E LT BAD AT T H E H O KA.

Continued from page 52

A N D I F I E V ER F ELT BAD,

I WE N T T O T HE HO K A A N D FE L T BE T T E R .” — S PA R K Y REARDO N I N “ S O R R Y, WE’ RE O P EN”

DEREK MORETON

OCTOBER 2015

“PL ACES, LIKE DO G S, H AV E A WAY O N TA KING O N T HE P E R S O N A L I T Y O F T HE I R OWNERS UNTIL T H E TWO BEG IN TO M IR R O R E ACH OT HE R I N U N C A N N Y A N D WONDERFUL WAYS. TH AT WA S C E RTA INLY TR U E O F T HE HO KA . L I KE R O N ZO, I T WAS FUNK Y AND FU N, O PE N A ND WA R M, A PL AC E WHE R E WE I R D O S CO U L D GO AND B ELONG, A ND S TIF FS CO U LD G O TO LO O S E N U P. A N D BY E X T E N S I O N, OXFORD TOOK ON TH AT PE R S O NA LIT Y. S O, IF YO U T HI N K OX F O R D I S CO O L A N D YO U WONDER HOW IT G OT TH AT WAY, IT WA S R O N ZO. P L A I N A N D S I M P L E. HE MADE US COOLE R TH A N WE D E S E R V E D TO BE A N D T HA N K G O D F O R T HAT. ” — FILMMA KE R JO E YO R K , PR O D U C E R O F “ S O R R Y, WE ’ R E O P E N, ”

“I M I S S HI S L AU GH A N D HI S WO R D S O F WISDO M , AND

T H E WAY H E E N J OY E D A L L T HE MO ME N TS O F L IF E .” — M O L LY F E R G U S S O N S T UA RT, F R I END O F SH AP IRO

“MANY PEOPLE WE R E INTR O D U C E D TO F ILMS THAT CO U L D N OT B E ACQUIRED IN OXFO R D WITH O U T (H IS ) S E R VI C E.

WIT HOUT HIM, W E WOULD HAVE B EEN W IT H OU T. I T WAS A GIFT.” — FA R A S H O O K , F R IE ND O F S HA P I R O R O N A L A N “R O NZO” S HA P I R O, AU G U S T 2 7 , 19 4 3 -AU G U S T 19 , 2 0 19

MOLLY FERGUSSON STUART

ARTWORK BY MARTY VINOGRAD. PHOTO BY JOE WORTHEM

A D O C U M E NTA R Y FILM A BO U T T HE HO KA

Invitation Oxford’s October 2015 cover depicted Ron Shapiro as Doc Brown from “Back to the Future” in an illustration by artist Bryan Nigh. The issue explored Oxford’s past, present and future.


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FOR OXFORD NATIVE BEAT Y MCKNIGHT, A FASCINATION WITH FASHION LED TO A DREAM JOB IN NEW YORK CIT Y. INTERVIEWED BY ALEK A BAT TISTA

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eet Beaty McKnight, a 25-year-old Oxford native who landed a fashion career in New York working for some of the most esteemed designers and coveted brands in the industry. She spends her days primarily behind the scenes at a high fashion house, promoting fashion shows and project-managing campaigns — and she loves every second of it. McKnight says fashion was always a part of her life. Although she holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia, she credits her hometown and her family with introducing her to sewing and working with textiles, and springboarding her career. Before attending SCAD, she spent a year as a student at the University of Mississippi, where her interest in the industry grew, through art classes and a job at Village Tailor. Here’s how she went from the velvet ditch to behind the velvet ropes.

Q: Were you always interested in studying fashion? A: I’ve always had a passion for fashion design, but it was always a

hobby: I’ve been drawing fashion sketches ever since I can remember. It was not until I went to the University of Mississippi that I was really starting to take art classes. I was taking color theory and art history. I realized that I was excelling in those classes; meanwhile, other ones were a little hard to get through.

Q: Who were your fashion inspirations growing up? A: I’ve been most inspired by my family. My father

bought me my first sewing machine. My mother let me explore my creativity at an early age by allowing me to dress myself. My Aunt Amy has always been someone I admire watching pursue her creative talents. Growing up she would make these exquisite ice-skating costumes for my cousins. She’s now a professional quilter in Oregon. Also, my Aunt Cindy. I would visit her store, Boston’s of Memphis, and play dress-up when I was little. I look up to my grandmother, Barbara Blakenship, of Oxford, who used to make dresses for my mom and aunt. I would say my inspiration comes from my heritage. Continued on page 58

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at a luxury clothing store. I worked mainly with menswear. That was when I started playing with swatches and seeing the whole process of a custom garment being made — from a client coming in and working with them, and then working with the company to create custom pieces for the client. They also had an in-house tailoring studio. I would hang out with them all the time. My second internship in college, between my junior and senior year, was with a tailoring and bespoke design studio in Manhattan, which is when I recall solidifying what I found joy being a part of — working alongside designers to bring a client’s vision to life.

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garment and the extensive preliminary steps involved. I ended up keeping fashion design as my minor but decided to pursue fashion marketing and management because I didn’t want to just do fashion design. I cared about how you make a garment, but I also cared about how you market it. What’s the story behind it? Why are you making it? And why should someone else buy this?

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McKnight explores textiles in New York’s famous garment district.

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Monday for a company in New York, where I was doing a lot of visual merchandising. I was merchandising their showroom for the

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market week, doing public relations and communications, and I was styling models to do press presentations.

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Being a project manager, my goal is to make their process as seamless as possible. I think coming from a design background helps me to better understand their way of thinking and then figuring out the best way to nurture that process in hopes that it facilitates new ways of thinking that lead to innovative ideas and being able to bring those ideas to fruition.

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me to be involved in many different aspects of a company. I have a lot of interests and hobbies, so I felt that it was a career path I could take and keep growing. There is still so much to learn.

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of like a way of life. I’ve evolved with my style and become more consistent, just because I know what I like on me. For work, my goto is jeans and a T-shirt, but I throw on a blazer.

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McKnight’s friend and colleague, Jeffrey Taylor, of Atlanta, photographed her for this article. Taylor is a 2016 Supima Award Winner who has shown in New York and Paris Fashion Week. He has been featured in Women’s Wear Daily, Teen Vogue and Essence magazines. “Jeffrey and I met studying abroad at SCAD Hong Kong during the first-day tour,” McKnight said. “We grabbed the same fabric at the same time and quickly developed both a friendship and business partnership. We still collaborate on special projects today.” Learn more about him at jeffrey-taylor.com.

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Q: Do you have any advice for someone interested in getting into the fashion industry? A: Having good mentors is important. Also, exploring the type of fashion career you want. People don’t realize there are so many different careers in fashion. Communications skills are essential, too. Public relations and communications can be a great place to start. My best advice would just to be to pursue what you want and don’t think twice about it. I think that if you set your mind to something, you can accomplish it. It’s just a matter of really pursuing it and putting that energy out there for it to come back to you.

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F R O M A S FA R AWAY A S A L A S K A A N D A S C L O S E A S N E I G H B O R I N G S TAT E S , PEOPLE COME TO TRY CONTINENTAL-ST YLE PHEASANT AND QUAIL HUNTING AT LIT TLE “Q” RANCH IN THAXTON. WRITTEN BY SUSAN BALDANI

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oshua Quong enjoyed growing up in the Mississippi Delta. So after living in the city for a number of years, he was ready to get back to his country roots. When he found some property in Thaxton, less than 20 miles from Oxford, where he could build a home and business, he asked his good friend and mentor, Orville Robertson, for advice about starting a bird hunting ranch on the land. Robertson, a retired colonel in the United States Air Force, was also an avid hunter and fisherman, so Josh trusted Robertson to steer him in the right direction. “Quail hunting is a dying sport in the south,” Josh said. “People usually have to drive to Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma before they can find wild birds.” This fall, Little “q” Ranch, offering quail and pheasant hunts, is celebrating its 10th anniversary. Of its 126 acres, 86 are used for the hunts. Robertson, better known as “the Colonel,” is the main guide, along with avid outdoorsman, hunter, fisherman and former bronc rider Marshall Merchant. “It gets better every year,” Josh said. “We started with 13 hunts a year. Last year we did 107.” How did the ranch get its name? When Josh’s wife was pregnant with their first child, they didn’t want to know the gender beforehand. So, people would always ask how “little q” was doing. Josh was used to country life, but for Sally, who grew up in a Chicago suburb, being so far away from town was a whole new experience. She appreciates that it’s much quieter and more peaceful. “It’s the best of both worlds for me because even though I go into town every day, and I have a career, I make a home out here,” Sally said. “It’s also nice because we live in the middle of nowhere, and my kids can run wild and free. There’s lots of space.” Hunts run from April through October, and the rest of the year is spent raising birds for the hunts, along with breeding, training and caring for German shorthaired pointer puppies. OC TOBER 2019 | INVITATION OXFORD

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Little “q” Ranch partners with Wildrose Kennels tp provide dogs for pheasant hunts.

Tom Bates, a neighbor, helped start the dog business. Early on, the ranch had only one English pointer belonging to Robertson. Josh acquired a second dog, and when Bates came along the third year and gave Robertson another pointer, it really snowballed. Josh gives credit to both Robertson and Bates for making the hunts possible. “These two men have selflessly shared their time, knowledge, and love with my little family in immeasurable amounts,” Josh said. “There would be no Little ‘q’ without them.” Ralph White, of Oxford, has been going to the ranch for the last few years and hunts there at least seven times a year. He always goes with his son Joey, who is currently finishing up his doctorate in economics at the University of Mississippi. “We’ve been to the pheasant shoots, but I go for the quail more often,” White said. “It’s very traditional and something I grew up doing. Josh’s birds fly well and the dogs are well-trained. It’s a good, safe hunting experience.” Clients gather for each hunt at the “Tin Can Lodge,” where Josh and his family lived before they built their current home. The ranch provides dogs, though some clients prefer to bring their own. Most

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clients bring their own guns and ammunition, but the ranch can provide them as well. Hunters go out in groups of two to four, and they take home the birds they harvest. A half-day quail hunt, which is the most common, is usually 2½ to 3 hours and the distance about 3½ to 5½ miles. “We’ve tried to keep it as simple as the old-time hunts where you can go out the back door and walk in the field with your dog and hunt,” Josh said. “Then, you walk back with a few birds for supper, just like folks did when they were kids.” The pheasant hunts at the ranch are done in the style of “continental shooting” or tower shooting. Hunters rotate from station to station, while the birds are released in waves. Since Josh’s bird dogs are not trained to retrieve pheasants, Little “q” teams up with nearby Wildrose Kennels to provide Labrador retrievers for the pheasant hunts. The Labs get more training, and the kennel gets more exposure. “It’s a coordinated event; a community event,” Josh said. “We got two (local) businesses involved, and there’s a really good synergy between us.” Once the hunting is finished, everyone meets back at the lodge for


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lunch. Sally and her father, John Booth, otherwise known as “Papa,” prepare and serve the lunches. Josh does most of the dressing and packaging of the pheasants and divides them up among the group. “It’s a definite team effort,” Josh said. The ranch attracts patrons from all over, with most traveling from Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas. One regular client comes all the way from Alaska to hunt at Little “q.” Another came from as far away as Warsaw, Poland. “The connecting fiber among all is coming out and being with one another,” Josh said. “It doesn’t matter where anybody’s from; folks come out and really enjoy it.” Frank Harwood and his wife, Terri, of Coldwater, have been going to the ranch since 2013 and visit at least four or five times a year, including on Terri’s birthday. Frank prefers to hunt quail, while Terri likes to take part in the pheasant hunts, but they always accompany each other. “It gives us more family time together,” Terri said. “I have a hard job, and I work a lot, but my family time comes first; it’s a very relaxing, enjoyable bonding experience that we have together.” About five years ago, Frank decided he wanted his own bird dog. He ended up buying a German shorthaired pointer named Pearl Ann from Josh. “Josh runs a good operation, and his birds fly nice,” Frank said. “We really enjoy being part of the community,” Josh said. “It’s home. We’re a regular family here. We teach here. We’re folks who decided to put down roots, and we try to water them every day.” For more information or to schedule a hunt, call 662-801-5764 or visit littleqranch.com. Joshua Quong

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Captivated by Cuba M I L LY W E S T H A S T R AV E L E D TO C U B A N E A R LY T H R E E D OZ E N T I M E S , G AT H E R I N G A VA S T A N D VA R I E D COLLECTION OF ART FROM THAT COUNTRY. STORY BY ANDI SHERRILL BEDSWORTH C A P TI O N S BY M I L LY WES T PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

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t all started in the mid-1990s when Oxford resident Milly West was co-owner of Southside Gallery. A chance conversation led her to the Center for Cuban Studies in New York, which was offering its first dedicated art trip to Cuba. “We went in January of 1996,” West said. “I found a lot of art and real joy!” Back then, gallery owners could travel to Cuba by securing a specific license to visit artists’ studios. Those visits led West to begin forging relationships with prominent Cuban photographers, sculptors and painters. “That first trip with Sandra Levinson, director of the Center for Cuban Studies, opened doors wide for me,” West said. “The Oxford community responded very positively to the work I showed, so I returned for more.” With every trip, West’s collection has grown, along with her love for Cuba. After more than 35 trips, she has well over 100 works of art, including photos of the revolution. Many are for sale, though some she says she wouldn’t part with. “I will always hold on to some works because of my relationship with the artists and the quality,” West said. Work for sale is on display in Tres Puertas Gallery adjacent to West’s house and at The Edison where owner Lindsey Baquie allows her to show it. Learn more about West’s journeys to Cuba and view her photos in her book, “Cuba for Keeps,” available online at issuu.com/krowswork/docs/cubaforkeeps_krowsworkbooks. If a travel photography trip is on your bucket list, West teams up annually with photographer Danny Klimetz to lead photography workshops in Cuba. For more about the next trip, scheduled for January 2020, visit thecollectivewander.com/jan2020-cuba.

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Above: West with artist José Rodríguez Fuster’s self-portrait, painted on side A of a 33 RPM record with Havana’s Areito label. Over her shoulder is a painting by Roberto Torres Lameda (Mella), and paintings by Julio Barbón Davis hang on the wall.


Wooden Sculptures by Blanca Rosa Chacon Santiago de Cuba Holguin | 20 inches tall “The work of wood sculptor Blanca Rosa Chacon, deceased, deals mostly with the AfroCuban heritage of Cuba and often the relationship between the slave and the master.”

DOBLE SESION by Suitberto Goire Santiago de Cuba 32- by 20-inch limited edition serigraph “Goire’s amazing posters often promoted an event or propaganda for a national cause like education or conservation of energy. This one commemorates a longer school day for all Cuban students.” OC TOBER 2019 | INVITATION OXFORD

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JIMAGUITAS EN EL VALLE DE LAS MARIPOSAS (little twins in the valley of the butterflies]

by Julio Barbón Davis Cienfuegos | 29- by 24-inch oil on linen “When I saw this painting of these twins in Galería Diágo in Havana in 2014, I knew I was looking at the work of someone special.”

HOMENAJE A EGIPTO or “EGYPTIAN LADY WITH CAT”

by Jorge Luis Sanfiel Cárdenas Santa Clara | 16- by 10-inch acrylic on linen “Sanfiel believes that cats can teach us how to live; that is, when to rest, how to ask for affection, and how to be playful.”

Left: from the cover of West’s book, “Cuba for Keeps.”

“(This photo) represents that sophistication as well as the character and ease with which guests are accepted in Cuba. This lovely young woman in Matanzas allowed me to take her photo with just me gesturing to ask, ‘Is this ok?’ I looked for her on the last of my trips to give her a copy of the book, but have had no luck in finding her.”

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JA JA JA by Carlos César Román Pérez Trinidad | 10.5- by 12-inch acrylic on heavy paper “César’s work is creative, often with a universal theme, and this piece shows that no matter where you are, sometimes, nothing makes sense.”

ANA MARÍA by Julio Barbón Davis Cienfuegos | 21- by 18-inch acrylic on linen “This piece is one of my favorites. It’s strong, and it shows both the innocence and dignity of a young Cuban school girl.”

FIRE FLOWER by Roman Pérez López “Chicho” Santiago de Cuba 8.5- by 14-inch ink and paint on poster board from his series UNA MANERA MAJOR (A BETTER WAY)

“This is one of many from Chicho’s series about how to address conflict, and I love the sentiments he expresses. There is a better way.”

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DIRECTOR by Roberto Domingo Gil Esteban Cienfuegos 15- by 19-inch acrylic on linen “This piece makes me smile because of my gallery experience!”

PEDRO Y MARIA by Luis Rodriguez Arias Mella | 16- by 20-inch acrylic on heavy paper “I met Luis Arias and many other naive-style painters on my first trip to Cuba in 1996. He is known for his paintings of the serene life around Mella, a small village near Santiago de Cuba.”

BELLA BARCO (BEAUTIFUL SHIP)

by Roberto Domingo Gil Esteban Cienfuegos | 15- by 19-inch acrylic on linen “This ship represents the hope that all Cubans have of normalizing relations with the United States. For me and all my Cuban friends, this would be wonderful.”

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2ND CHANCE FALL GAL A PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

2ndChanceMS held its second annual Fall Gala Sept. 5 at Saint Leo Lounge. Proceeds from the ticket sales, silent auction and raffle will help the organization raise funds to further adult education and for work skills training for adults in Mississippi. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Liz Woodward and Pat Nelson with Sally Doty 2. Terri Clark, Laurie Kesler and Angela Bass 3. Albine Bennett, Lewis Whitfield and Kristy Luse 4. Alan Beales, Woody Sample and John McCullouch 5. Diane Scruggs, Kristina Carlson and Doug Alexander 6. Jesse Mitchell and Latisha Latiker 7. Ian Tailyour and Richard Barrett 8. Mary Haskell, Teresa Hubbard and Allyson Duckworth 9. Billy and Rebecca Long

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BOWL FOR BREATH PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALEX SAGE

Oxford Bowl for Breath took place Sept. 10 at Premier Lanes. Many participating teams wore superhero-themed costumes. Proceeds from the bowling tournament benefit the Mississippi Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Libby Zoghby and Jenny Stubblefield with Baker and Brynnen Quick, Lindsey Meisenheimer, Jenna Lovelace and Carlyle Thomas 2. Kristen and Jonathan Palmer with Lindsey and Jay Shipp and Heather and Daniel Lenard 3. Ron Rychlak, Tim Wilkinson, Ricky Berry, George Read and Matthew Farrell 4. Doug Odom, Emily Rikard, Joey Odom, James Rowe, Kim Byler and Brian Mullins 5. Micki and Catherine Berry 6. Melissa Jones and Douglas Vance 7. Ashley Clark, Whitney McGraw, Lauren Cleary and Carter Griffin

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Committed to Excellence Dan Finan, Realtor Ole Miss’15 MBA

CELL: 601.917.5429 wdfinan@hotmail.com www.resideoxford.com OFFICE: 662.234.5621

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HEATHER MCMAHAN COMEDY PHOTOGRAPHED BY ABBEY EDMONSON

University of Mississippi alumna Heather McMahan performed a sold-out comedy show Sept. 5 at The Lyric Oxford. The performance was the second stop on “The Farewell Tour.” Read more about McMahan and upcoming shows at heatherontour.com. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Kara Parham, Cobie Watkins, Catherine Yates, Anna Kathryn Colbert, Megan Miller and Leslie McCormick 2. Kristen Palmer, Carrie Stephens, Lindsey Roberson, Haley Murphy, Melissa Grayson and Heather Moffatt 3. Chelsea Walters, Alden Low, Rollie Carson, Chelsea Sheridan, Griffin Stroupe and Sarah Siebert 4. Channing McPherson, Anne Grace Kennon and Katherine Boggs with Liz and Molly Edwards 5. Ashlea Depriest, Jamie Cousin, Cecile Lonjaret, Neely Meadors and Claire Ganey 6. Hannah Dye, Ashley Folk and Kayla Diskin 7. Ellen Duncan, Hunter Smith, Ellen Gleason and Anna Harris 8. Rosebud and Will Skudder 9. Alyssa Dowell, Marilyn Hessler and Cookie White

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UNITED WAY FL A SHBACK BA SH PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

United Way of Oxford held its Flashback Bash fundraiser Aug. 17 at the Oxford Conference Center. The 1980s-themed party included an Oxford PhotoBomb booth, live music by Almost Famous, and food from Taylor Grocery Catering and My Michelle’s. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Brian Whisenant with Kana and Eric Cromby 2. Chris and Charlotte Dicus with Pam Swain 3. Brady and Kasi Hoggard 4. Teasha Sanders and Marilyn Barnes 5. Jack and Sage Nichols 6. Jessica and Shaun Vaughn 7. Carole Hughes and Traci Hale 8. Nancy Stribling and Irwin Sperling 9. Ryan Upshaw and Kurt Brummett

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VE TER ANS APPRECIATION DAY PHOTOGRAPHED BY ABBEY EDMONSON

Veterans Appreciation Day was celebrated Sept. 13 at the Mississippi State Veterans Home. The tailgate-themed event included performances by the Ole Miss Pep Band and the Ole Miss Choir. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Sam Jones, Elly Purdon and Lawson Brines 2. Willie Price, Larry Dykes and Charlie Foote 3. Paul Gibbs and Leroy Mullins 4. Aubri Maroney, Cayden Owens, Shanitra Bowen and Marlin Clark 5. Tommy Eaton 6. Whitney Holmes and Redus Whisenant 7. Ernie Lowe with Gideon

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SQUARE BOOKS CELEBRATION PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALEXIS LEE

Square Books hosted its 40th anniversary party Aug. 24 at The Lyric Oxford to thank the store’s staff, friends and readers. Guests celebrated with food, a toast and live music by The Soultones. The event continued with a special storytime at Square Books Jr. 1

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View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Paul Phillips and Ann O’dell with Mack and Doroty Aldridge and Shirley Crawford 2. Barbie Cheatham and Pat Klein with Barbara and Bill Bailey 3. Cathy and Greg Blackburn 4. Lucien Cremaldie and Dale Abadie 5. Don and Linda Alexander 6. David and Betty Barkett 7. Jane Vorhies, Rene Pulliam and Priscilla McCoy 8. Marge and Jim McCauley

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9. Hugh and Olivia Morgan 10. Sarah Waddell and Virginia Pence-Wadell 11. Willow and Cricket Thompson 12. Carol Jane and Finley Grace Clayton 13. Walt and Kadiee Davis 14. Dell, Rebecca and Peter Crane 15. Harper and Carrie Stevens

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SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

Second Baptist Church celebrated its 150th anniversary Aug. 18. Mayor Robyn Tannehill presented a proclamation to commemorate the church’s anniversary and to honor Ulysses “Coach” Howell, former alderman and mayor pro tem, who died in May. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Benita and Andrew Robinson 2. Hugh and Darlene Ivy with Frances Carothers 3. Carol Boyd and Wanda Henshaw 4. Lola Pearson and Connie Armstrong 5. Wilma and Jacelyn Frierson 6. Belia and Elmer Shaw 7. Alisa and George Liggins 8. Adolph Williams and Felicia Porter

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UM MUSEUM CELEBRATION PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

The University of Mississippi Museum hosted its 80th birthday celebration Aug. 27 in conjunction with the Oxford Art Crawl. Guests helped celebrate with birthday cake and a toast to the museum. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Gale and Richard Gurner with Martha Kelley 2. Bill and Brenda West with Sarah Frances and John Hardy 3. Stephen Threlkeld, Buffy Choinski and Cora Brusevold 4. Taronce Pettis and Carol Turner 5. Tom Howorth, Billy Chadwick and Earl Dismuke 6. Marvin and Frances King 7. Don Fruge, Sherry Cooper, Polly Williams, Mary Ann Fruge and Robert Saarnio 8. Dick and Claire Dickerson

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K APPA DELTA CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPHED BY ABBEY EDMONSON

The Ole Miss chapter of Kappa Delta sorority held a groundbreaking ceremony Aug. 20 to celebrate construction of its new house. Members and friends gathered on the former house’s lot to dedicate the project. View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Alex Moorman, Morgan Atkins, Josie Parham, Lauren Taylor and Madeleine Zacks 2. Kelly Bates, Anna Daniels and Jordan Watts 3. Angie and Mary Reed 4. Katie Parker and Addison Riley 5. Brooke Hubbard, Anna Brocato and Matthew Boudreaux 6. Rebecca Donaldson and Allie Wilcox 7. Kappa Delta alumnae

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OUT & ABOUT VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONOXFORD.COM

Wa f f le Hou s e Nat io n a l Wa f f le We e k

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Mo o n Ta x i C o nc e r t

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1. Virginia Finney and Deidra Keaton 2. Donnasha Hubbard, Adam Stirgus, Ryne Riebock, Woody Sorenson and Jonathan Brown 3. Ben Brashear and Edward Puckett 4. Ann Leigh Robbins and Carina Easson 5. Hannah Lacy, Michael McMillan, Blaine Sinak and Peyton McKnight 6. Emily O’Hara and Marlene Alice Middleton

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MISSISSIPPI'S BEST

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L E T T U C E wraps & V E G G I E bowls RECIPES CONTRIBUTED & PHOTOGRAPHED BY OLIVIA DELEON

O

livia DeLeon, otherwise known as The Magnolia Dietitian, creates recipes like these that promote healthful eating habits without sacrificing taste. Read more about DeLeon on page 24.

THAI

lettuce

W R A P S

1 pound ground turkey 1½ tablespoons peanut butter  1 tablespoon lime juice  1 tablespoon garlic chili paste  1 tablespoon soy sauce  1 head butter lettuce (or iceberg lettuce)  1 cup broccoli slaw  Chopped cilantro for garnish In a medium saucepan, cook ground turkey over medium-high heat until browned. Add peanut butter, lime juice, garlic chili paste and soy sauce, and stir to combine. To build wraps, spoon ¼ cup turkey mixture onto a leaf of lettuce, and top with 1 tablespoon broccoli slaw. Garnish with cilantro.  

GREEK

vegetable

C O U S C O U S B O W L

DRESSING

¼ cup olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic, chopped ¼ teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoons black pepper

COUSCOUS BOWL

2¼ cups water 1½ cups pearled couscous, uncooked 2 cloves garlic, chopped   ½ cup sliced English cucumber  ½ cup quartered cherry tomatoes 1 cup chopped green, orange or yellow bell pepper

¼ cup finely diced red onion ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley Optional toppings: roasted chickpeas, shredded rotisserie chicken

Combine dressing ingredients in a small bowl, and set aside. Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan; add couscous and garlic. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer 8-10 minutes. Once the couscous is cooked, add the vegetables, feta cheese, parsley and dressing. Stir to combine, and serve with desired toppings. 


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Invitation Oxford - October 2019  

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