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AUGUST 2018

THE CHILDREN’S ISSUE


AUGUS T 2018 | INVITATION

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I N

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FE ATURES 24 Kicking It

28 Smart Art

DEPA RTMENT S

ON THE COVER

Pontotoc High School senior Taylor Hughes has made a name for herself on and off the football field.

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Letter From the Publisher

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Calendar

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Shoutouts

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Cover Kid Q&A

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Community Corner

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Restaurant Guide

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In Season: Creative Collage

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What’s In

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Out & About

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Recipe: French Macarons

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INVITATION | AUGUS T 2018

Artists step in when funding for music and art at Tupelo’s Early Childhood Education Center falls short.

We are thrilled to introduce Kori Grace, the winner of this year’s Invitation children’s cover contest. She’s a spunky, confident seventh-grader at Pontotoc Junior High School. Read more about her on page 13. Our cover contest reached more than 90,000 people on social media, and more than 2,000 adorable children entered the contest. You, our readers, chose the winner from four worthy semifinalists. Thank you all for your support and participation. Please continue to follow us on Facebook and Instagram @invitationmagazine. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

30 Custom Living

A tailor-made home and its surrounding acreage, located just outside the city, is utopia for the Malone family.


AUGUST 2018

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EVENTS 34

Friday at Fairpark

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Talbot House Dinner

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Music and Movie

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Paw Patrol Live!

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All-Star Football Camp

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Father Daughter Ball

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Pappi’s Cruise-In

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Corinth Follies

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L E T T E R from the P U B L I S H E R Over the summer, some exciting things have been brewing at Invitation. You’ll see it reflected in some changes we’ve made throughout the magazine, and we couldn’t be more proud of our new look. The vision behind the redesign is our talented new creative director, Holly Vollor. You can read more about her on page 27. I had always admired her art and design skills whenever I saw them on social media and in person, so when it was time to look for a new creative director, I called her, thinking she might know someone who would be interested. Never in a million years did I

FOLLOW US

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think she would be willing to come on board herself. To say we are grateful to have her here is an understatement. This summer we also engaged over 90,000 social media followers and readers with our children’s cover contest. More than 2,000 children entered the contest. You’ll meet the winner, Kori Grace, on page 13. She’s an ambitious, enthusiastic seventhgrader with big dreams and a smile as bright as her personality. Also, with summer winding down and high school football getting started, be sure to read the inspiring story of Taylor Hughes.

@INVITATIONM AG A ZINE

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Hughes is a talented kicker for the Pontotoc High School football team who just so happens to be female. We hope you enjoy Invitation’s brandnew look. Please let us hear from you: Send us some feedback on what you like about it. If you have any great stories you’d like to see featured in upcoming magazines, feel free to email me at philandrachelm@gmail.com.

RACHEL M. WEST, PUBLISHER

@INVMAGA ZINE


PUBLISHERS Phil and Rachel West

EDITORIAL

EDITOR IN CHIEF Emily Welly EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Mary Moreton CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Allison Estes STAFF WRITER Melanie Crownover SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Sarah McCullen

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Holly Vollor STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Joe Worthem CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Amanda Cody Sarah McCullen Elizabeth Roberts Lisa Roberts Whitney Worsham CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Sarah McCullen

COPY EDITOR Kate Johnson

ADVERTISING OFFICE

BUSINESS MANAGER Hollie Hilliard DISTRIBUTION Donald Courtney Brian Hilliard MAIN OFFICE 662-234-4008

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Alise M. Emerson Leigh Lowery Lynn McElreath Stacey Raper Moni Simpson Whitney Worsham ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Zach Fields Becca Pepper ADVERTISING INFORMATION invitationmag.com

To subscribe to one year (10 issues) of Invitation or to buy an announcement, visit invitationmag.com. To request a photographer at your event, email Mary at mary.invitation@gmail.com. Invitation respects the many diverse individuals and organizations that make up north Mississippi and strives to be inclusive and representative of all members of our community.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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C O M M U N I T Y AUGUST 2018

Tupelo Summer Movie Series AUGUST 25

FOOTBALL LO C A L H I G H S C H O O L FO OT B A L L K I CKO FF

facebook.com/tupeloparkrec

AU G U S T 1 7 AT 7 P. M .

“The Marvelous Wonderettes”

Tupelo High School at Meridian Shannon High School at Corinth Saltillo High School at North Pontotoc Mooreville High School vs. Booneville Baldwyn High School vs. New Albany

Pedaling for Hope on the Tanglefoot Trail AUGUST 18

In a cycling event benefiting the New Albany Main Street Association and Regional Rehab Center, participants can bike 25 or 50 miles or 100 kilometers. After the ride, there will be food, music and door prizes. Registration $35. 8 a.m., Tanglefoot Trailhead, New Albany. racesonline.com/events/pedal-for-hope

Rebel/Bulldog Tailgate Cook-Off AUGUST 18

Pontotoc County Chamber Main Street hosts its annual cooking competition with categories such as chicken, chef’s choice, ribs, veggies and desserts. Call the chamber at 662-489-5042 to reserve a tent spot and enter your favorite tailgating dish. Noon-3 p.m., Pontotoc County Courthouse Square, Pontotoc. pontotocchamber.com

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Family-friendly movie “Because of WinnDixie” will be shown at Ballard Park. Bring chairs or blankets. The concession stand will be open. Free. 8:30 p.m., Ballard Park, Tupelo.

AU G U S T 2 1 AT 7 P. M .

Amory High School at Houston AU G U S T 2 4 AT 7 P. M .

Ripley High School at Kossuth Itawamba Agricultural vs. New Albany Pontotoc High School vs. Senatobia Aberdeen High School vs. Caledonia

A U G U S T 2 3-2 6

Tupelo Community Theatre performs the story of four high school friends in this fun, 1950s-themed musical. Tickets $25 adults; $10 students. Thursday-Sunday, 7:30 p.m., with an additional showing on Sunday at 2 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 201 N. Broadway, Tupelo. tct.ms

CO L L EG E FO OT B A L L K I CKO FF AU G U S T 3 0

Itawamba Community College at Pearl River at 6 p.m. Northeast Mississippi Community College at Southwest Mississippi Community College at 7 p.m. SEPTEMBER 1

Ole Miss at Texas Tech at 11 a.m. SEPTEMBER 1

Mississippi State vs. Stephen F. Austin at 6:30 p.m.

Full Moon Trail Ride A U G U S T 24-2 5

Altitude Trail Rides hosts its fourth annual moonlit horse ride on Friday night and continues through Saturday with music, food, a poker run and donkey penning. Friday, 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m., Altitude Trail Rides, Booneville. facebook.com/altitudetrailrides


Join Junior Cotillions REGISTER NOW

The National League of Junior Cotillions Lee County Chapter teaches table manners, introductions, phone and social media etiquette, interview skills, dance instruction and more. Monthly classes for students in grades 5-8 are held at Tupelo Country Club beginning in September. For registration information, contact Elizabeth Gable at elizabeth.gable@nljc.com or 662-322-5687.

“Peter Pan” Auditions A U G U S T 2 6 -2 7

Pied Piper Players hosts auditions for “Peter Pan.” Open to children in grades 3 and above. Production dates October 19-21. Sunday, 2:30 p.m., and Monday, 6 p.m., Church Street School, Tupelo. facebook.com/piedpipertupelo

Alabama Concert SEPTEMBER 7

Country rock band Alabama brings its Grammy Award-winning hits to Tupelo. Tickets $36-$76. 7:30 p.m., BancorpSouth Arena, Tupelo. bcsarena.com

Touch-A-Truck SEPTEMBER 8

Tupelo Parks and Recreation invites children to touch, climb, and explore trucks and heavy machinery and learn about the purposes they serve in the community. Free. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ballard Park, Tupelo. facebook.com/tupeloparkrec AUGUS T 2018 | INVITATION

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S H O U T O U T S S t . Jud e D re a m Ho me

Hu m m i n g b i rd Fe s t iva l

S C I P: S e r v i n g C h i ld re n of I nc a rc e rat e d Pa re nt s

Tiny ruby-throated hummingbirds will stage their annual takeover of northeast Mississippi the weekend of Sept. 7-9, when Strawberry Plains Audubon Center in Holly Springs hosts its 19th Hummingbird Migration and Nature Celebration. Each fall, the small birds, propelled by wings that can beat more than 50 times per second, migrate from North America to spend the winter in Mexico, Costa Rica or Panama. In addition to a hummingbird banding and release, there are children’s activities, live animal presentations, guided hikes, a native plant sale and more. The festival takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Admission is $15; $10 for seniors 65 and up; $5 for children ages 5-12; free for children 4 and under. For more details, visit strawberry.audubon.org/hummingbird.

According to a report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, over 5 million children have had a parent in jail or prison at some point during their lives. The financial and emotional toll on these kids can be devastating and can have lasting impact. Few programs exist to help kids through the experience, but those that do have been shown to be beneficial. One such program is SCIP, founded by Miss Mississippi Asya Branch. SCIP is a mentorship program staffed by University of Mississippi student and faculty volunteers, who serve as mentors for kids with incarcerated parents. SCIP connects with kids through schools, churches and other community groups and can be an encouraging, stable presence in their lives. Branch’s own father was imprisoned when she was a child. Separated from her father, she struggled with low self-esteem. From that experience grew her desire to help children in similar situations, leading to the formation of SCIP. To learn more, email scip@olemiss.edu.

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PHOTO BY MATT BOYD PHOTOGRAPHY

All summer, Tupelo has been abuzz with the St. Jude Dream Home Giveaway. Built by Legacy Construction, the 3,500-square-foot, four-bedroom, four-bathroom house is located at 1251 Dunbarton Oaks Circle in Tupelo. In June, St. Jude sold out of the $100 raffle tickets that give each purchaser a chance to win the house and benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The drawing for the house and a slew of other substantial prizes takes place Aug. 30. Open house tours are being held on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. through Aug. 26. One lucky open house visitor will win a $10,000 furniture-shopping spree courtesy of Room to Room. Learn more at stjude .org/give/dream-home/tupelo.html.


COVER KID Q&A Me e t Ko r i G ra c e A ge 12 , 7t h G ra d e Po ntoto c Ju n io r H i g h

Here are a few things we learned about our children’s cover contest winner, Kori Grace: - She is a leader. She was president of Junior Beta Club, has been involved in drama club since fourth grade, and was a member of Sweet Treats baking club. - She is excited to try some new things in junior high this year but also plans to stay focused on her grades. - She is a chef. She likes to wake up early to cook breakfast for her family. - She is an athlete. She plays basketball and swims, which she hopes to do someday in the Olympics. - She is adventurous and loves to travel with her family, including on recent road trips to Chicago and Washington, D.C. - She is an artist, and her favorite things to create are drawings of flowers and people that she uses to decorate her room. - She has big dreams. When she grows up, she hopes to train kids to play basketball, start her own cooking show or open a restaurant, and pursue engineering. We wish you all the best, Kori Grace! AUGUS T 2018 | INVITATION

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C O M M U N I T Y corner Jud a h’s S up e r K id s WRITTEN BY MEL ANIE CROWNOVER

PHOTOS BY LAUREN ZUELZKE PHOTOGRAPHY

Left: Judah Powell is the inspiration for Judah's Super Kids. Right: Judah with his sisters, Ashlyn, Addelyn Kate and Ainsley.

Judah Powell was a real-life superhero. From the time doctors closed his chest with steel wire after open-heart surgery at 4 days old, his parents called him their little man of steel. The Tupelo native had always been enamored with the animated good deeds of comic book legends such as Superman and Batman. By the time he was 3 years old, he was insisting that people should “hero up” to help when things got difficult. It was a mantra Judah’s parents, Matt and Andrea Powell, saw in action the day he died after his heart stopped at their home on Jan. 26, 2018. “The care my son and our family received on that worst day of our lives was overwhelming,” Matt said. “The staff at the ER worked for an hour to try to resuscitate him and did everything they could to comfort us through it. Healing and caring is their superpower, and they use it every day to help families just like us.” The Powells buried Judah in his Superman suit and included a cast of his most beloved superheroes on his headstone. But

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they knew this wasn’t the end of his story. In his honor, the pair decided to make it easier for pediatric patients and their families to endure tough ER visits. They joined forces with the CREATE Foundation, North Mississippi Medical Center and Relias Healthcare to form Judah’s Super Kids. The nonprofit organization seeks to meet young patients’ needs in multiple ways, starting with a heap of toys. “When Matt came in with $100 a couple of days after his son passed and said they wanted to help, we tried to think of ways to make it tangible,” Relias CEO Luke West said. “Keeping a stock of toys to give out in the emergency room when there’s a procedure or transport to another hospital gives that child something to hold onto for strength and courage. That’s our hero Judah’s legacy.” Since the Powells and their team began fundraising for the organization in early 2018, donations have reached $20,000, including a $5,000 donation from Relias Healthcare. More than $4,500 was raised at the first Hero Up 5K benefit run, held July 21.

Judah’s Super Kids plans to buy its first batch of toys for the ER by early fall. The goal is to fully establish an endowment fund with $50,000 over the next two years and to make the fund self-sustaining so that interest from initial donations could support toy purchases and increased services in the future. Additionally, Matt has offered his talents as a former art major to create free portraits for the families of children who die in the ER. “Our hope is to eventually provide support resources for families, especially if they have to travel to another hospital for care, and to have scholarships for students who are going to college to study healthcare,” Matt said. “While we seek to remember Judah, we want this to help the staff at the ER use their gifts to meet the needs of people walking through those doors every day, physically and emotionally. It’s a tool to let them love on those who need it even more.” For more information on donating funds or new toys to Judah’s Super Kids, call the CREATE Foundation at 662-844-8989.


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R E S T A U R A N T guide

FI N E D I N I N G D O N E C A S UA L LY

ITALIAN GRILL

O L D FA S H I O N E D S O DA F O U N TA I N

s mi t h c o r i nt h . c o m

T E X-M E X

v icar igr ill.co m

604 E. WA L DRON S T.

603 N. FIL L MO R E S T., CO R IN T H

512 CRUISE S T. CORIN T H

514 CRUISE S T., CORIN T H

6 6 2 -5 9 4 -1 9 2 5

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6 6 2 -2 8 7 -4 76 0

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6 6 2 -2 8 6 -3 3 6 1

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SoCo Grind BAR-B-Q

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BAR

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BURGERS

112 N. FIL L MORE S T. CORINTH 662-97 7-7104

COFFEE

L ATIN A MERICAN FUSION

616 WICK S T.

div in e latin ame r ican.com

p iz z agro c er y. c o m

2307B W. M A IN S T., T UPELO

800 CRUISE S T., CORIN T H

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6 6 2 -6 6 4 -3 2 9 1

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6 6 2 -2 6 0 -4 5 3 8

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PA STA

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6 6 2 -2 8 7 -3 2 0 0

$$

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J UJ U & C R I S TA’ S SHRIMPBOAT C AFE

SEAFOOD SPORTS BAR AND GRILL

SOURDOUGH PIZZA | BURGERS

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C R E AT I V E A PARTNERSHIP WITH TUPELO BLOGGERS

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C O L L AG E |

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

Art projects aren’t only for the classroom. For a fun, entertaining and affordable athome activity, Tupelo art teacher Amanda Koonlaba suggests this step-by-step collage that features a local landmark: the TVA Tupelo sign at Crosstown. “I have found this to be great subject matter for kids because of the local significance,” Koonlaba said. “Plus, drawing an arrow is pretty easy.” Koonlaba is a blogger and educator who specializes in using the arts to help students access their creativity through processes with real-world connections. She works with schools to implement arts integration and STEAM. “I am a big believer in creative processes,” Koonlaba said. “That’s where the choices come in for children. They have to think through their process before doing things. It may sound simple, but this is a real-world skill all kids need to develop.”

1

With a pencil, draw the arrow on white paper. Paint or color it blue, as pictured. After allowing it to dry, cut it out with scissors. Set aside.

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2

On white paper, draw “Tupelo,” then decorate and cut out the letters (or, for very small children, print letters from the computer and cut them out).

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Create a background with the child’s choice of paint, marker or crayon colors. Add texture to the background with paper, paint rollers and/or stamps.


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Assemble the arrow and Tupelo letters on the background. Glue everything together.

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If desired, add more details with paint, markers, crayons and/or paper.

Follow Amanda Koonlaba’s blog, partyinartroom.com, or follow her on Twitter @AKoonlaba to learn much more about arts integration, creative processes and art-making opportunities for kids. AUGUS T 2018 | INVITATION

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FJ A L L R AV EN K A N K EN B AG S REED’S $80

PERSONALIZED BABY APPLIQUÉ SET SOUTHERN GRACE BOUTIQUE $50

TORTOISE SHELL E ARRINGS HOOCHIES BOUTIQUE $8

PA JA M A S BY L ACIE COT TON GINGER'S $68

VERSACE SUNGL ASSES GARRET T E YE CLINIC $245

COT TON C ARDIG AN SWE ATER LIPCHIC BOUTIQUE $55

SOUTHERN TIDE PULLOVER SHIRLEY DAWG'S $95

BARRINGTON BAG K ATES AND CO. $190

THE ALIDA BY M ARC FISHER LTD AUSTIN'S SHOES $160

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KI C KI N G I T

THIS

PONTOTOC

HIGH

SCHOOL

KICKER HAS MADE A NAME FOR HERSELF ON AND OFF THE FIELD.

WRITTEN BY MEL ANIE CROWNOVER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

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The reception Pontotoc High School senior Taylor Hughes gets on the football field isn’t always heartwarming, but she never thought being the only female on the gridiron would be easy. Other players, coaches and fans had varying opinions on whether the 6-foot-3 kicker should play when Pontotoc High School revealed their team roster last year. At her first football camp off campus, one of the hosting coaches shouted “Hey! The softball field is over there!” before he realized she was in the right place. During her first game, the opposing team targeted her with a heavy tackle that silenced people in the bleachers until she jumped to her feet to kick the rest of a winning game. “That’s just part of it,” she said. “My team doesn’t care that I’m a girl, but some of the others guys have definitely let me know that they don’t think I should be out there. That’s okay, though. We have an amazing offensive line that protects me like family.” Taylor has worked overtime to prove she belongs on the football field since Coach Jeff Carter invited her to try out for the spot that was left open when his son, the former kicker, graduated. “She was worth the risk,” he said. “I know there aren’t a lot of females on the football teams around here. I had to pull a couple of guys to the side at first and say, ‘When she puts on those pads, you support her like any other teammate,’ but it was a nonissue when they saw what she can do. “I’ve never babied her or pulled any punches. The courage meter she has to play — in a man’s world on that field competitively in that position under all that pressure — is off the charts.” Taylor’s confidence in stepping into a new sport as a high school junior comes

partly from having competed in sports most of her life. She has played soccer since she was 3, including with championship-winning travel teams in the area, such as the Brilla Juniors out of Jackson and the Mississippi Flood Futbol Club out of Oxford, until her football schedule pulled her off the circuit last year. She began playing volleyball in eighth grade and has been on the high school varsity team since 10th grade.

Last football season Taylor scored three out of four field goals, made 33 of 36 attempted extra points, had 15 kickoffs and made two tackles with the Warriors. Her longest kick at practice reached 50 yards; her longest in a game was 37 yards. Taylor sat out three games due to injury, but the team finished the year 10-2. Thanks to those numbers, she was invited to multiple high-profile camps this summer: Manning Camp for Girls in New Orleans; Brian Jackson Pro Kicking Camp in Pensacola, Florida; Chris Sailer Kicking Camps in South Carolina and Los Angeles; and the Southern Elite Top 150 in Brookhaven. Taylor opted to attend only one camp — the Ole Miss Specialist Camp — because her off-field talents were also demanding her attention. In addition to her impressive athletic resume, Taylor maintains a 3.56 grade point average. She’s also a talented vocalist.

In June, she attended invitational tryouts for NBC’s hit show “The Voice” after recruiters found video of her singing on Instagram. She didn’t make it to the televised rounds, but she was asked to return to audition again in the future. “She’s made it into choir at school; there’s just been no time for it because of all her sports activities,” her mother, Alisha Hughes, said. “If it’s something she wants to pursue, I have no doubt she can because she has a real dedication for what she loves. The way she’s adapted to football is proof.” This summer Taylor became part of the Kick It Campaign, created by Alex’s Lemonade Stand, a nationwide philanthropy that funds children’s cancer research. The campaign lets an athlete’s fans pledge a specific monetary donation for each point the athlete scores during a season. Taylor is participating in honor of her mother, who is a breast cancer survivor, and became the first Mississippi athlete to join. She set her fundraising goal for the 2018-19 season at $2,000. She plans to play both football and volleyball in high school again this fall, as well as participate in travel soccer in the spring. Taylor says she would like to major in education when she graduates and has already committed to Itawamba Community College to play soccer. Her football career beyond high school is still unknown. “I honestly would like to play in college now because I feel like it’s one of my main sports. That’s why I was willing to pass on travel soccer last year for it,” Taylor said. “I have all these little girls come up to take pictures with me after the games, and it makes me want to keep going — maybe go on to be the first girl kicker in the SEC. I want them to see that you can do anything you want if you work for it.” AUGUS T 2018 | INVITATION

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WHO’S NEW AT INVITATION

Hol ly Vol lo r C re at ive D i re c to r After gradu­at­ ing from Ole Miss in 2007 with a B.A., Holly dove into the world of graphic design, spe­ cial­ izing in branding design, market­ ing materials and digital illus­tration. In 2015, she launched her own full-service graphic design studio, Whisper Design Co. For the last 11 years, Holly has balanced her freelance career with being a wife to her husband, Matt, and raising their three children, Kate, Luke and Gabe. While she may love a relaxing trip to the beach, she lives and breathes design.

S a ra h Mc C u l le n S o c i a l Me d i a C o o rd i n ato r & E d ito r i a l A s s i s t a nt Sarah grad­u­ ated in May 2018 with a B.A.J. from Ole Miss. She has managed social media for local busi­ nesses and for na­ tional or­gani­za­tions such as Operation Christmas Child. Growing up, Sarah flipped through Invitation Magazines’ publications, fueling her interest in lifestyle writing and photography at an early age. Sarah enjoys baking, painting and spending time at Pinelake Church, where she leads a high-school girls group.

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WHEN FUNDING FOR MUSIC AND ART AT TUPELO’S E A R LY C H I L D H O O D E D U C AT I O N C E N T E R FA L L S S H O R T.

WRITTEN BY MEL ANIE CROWNOVER

The almost 300 preschool students at Tupelo’s Early Childhood Education Center learn an impressive amount in their one year of attendance. Colors, shapes, numbers, letters, and basic writing and fundamental reading skills are just a sampling of the daily curriculum. Since last year, however, one particular day of weekly instruction outshines the rest. The school calls it Arts Friday. “Our kids look forward to Friday all week,” teacher Cheryl Dexter said. “They love it because every week it’s something new and exciting. The students know they will participate in activities that are actionpacked and integrate what they have learned in the classroom.” The program started in response to funding cuts that resulted in the school not having a music teacher on campus last year. In previous years, the music teacher saw classes twice a week for regular music class and about once a month for an integrated arts lesson. A decrease in Title 1 funds changed that. In response, Dexter, the school’s arts integration coordinator, began plotting ways to work more creativity into ECEC’s classroom offerings. She teamed up with local dance teacher and musician Mary

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ILLUSTRATED BY SAR AH McCULLEN

Frances Massey to find candidates willing to serve as volunteer guest art teachers. “I had gotten involved the year before when my daughter was at school there and knew we had to do something to fill that gap when the funding fell through,” Massey said. “Arts programs seem to be the first thing to go in that situation. Luckily, there are a lot of [generous] artists around here.” Massey had been visiting ECEC as an occasional guest artist since 2015. She became an artist in residency there after receiving a teaching artist certification from the Mississippi Arts Commission in July 2017. She also served in the Pontotoc School District last school year, and she took her musical storytelling and dance instruction to 12 other state schools that were similarly looking for ways to bring more arts instruction to their students. Other guest teachers that Dexter and Massey recruited enriched the curriculum with a variety of art forms, from moretraditional visual art to physical expression. Students did spoon painting with William Heard and made Christmas ornaments with Jennifer Hankins from Midnite Pottery; they heard tales from storytellers Asia Rainey and Maddie Presley; they danced with Roxie Clayton and Jan Dijkwel; and they

tried yoga with Lauren McElwain. Each lesson was customized to fit the students’ curriculum. For example, ABC yoga helped teach the shape of letters of the alphabet; a recycling project helped children learn about Earth Day; and students discussed how ballet dancers from Civic Ballet could translate the story of “The Firebird” through body movement after watching a video of the performance. “When we lost funding for our music position, we wanted to ensure our children continued to have exposure to a variety of arts,” ECEC Principal Haley Stewart said. “We believe in this approach to teaching; therefore, we knew as a school and a community that we had to find a way to go above and beyond for our children.” This year, ECEC has secured funding that will ensure the return of a full-time music instructor. But even with the music program in place, ECEC will continue Arts Friday in the school. “The program was too successful to even consider having it end,” Dexter said. “They encounter so many new ideas and people and art forms to drive their curiosity, and we teachers get to take the things they’ve learned back to class to expand on them even more.”

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C USTOM L IVIN G A TAILOR-MADE HOME JUST OUTSIDE THE CIT Y I S U TO P I A F O R T H E M A LO N E FA M I LY. WRITTEN BY MEL ANIE CROWNOVER

The land surrounding Scott and Missy Malone’s newly built home in Ravenwood Cove was the selling point for them. The 17 acres of wooded hillside was conveniently close enough to town to have a Tupelo address and just far enough away to feel like the country. “When we want the city, it’s only minutes away, but we still get the privacy and peace of the country right here,” Missy said. “It was like getting the best of both worlds in one place, which is good because we’re a pretty outdoorsy family.” When it came to building a house on their newly

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

acquired land, the couple had a shared vision. They headed to architect Scott Emison with a list of core requirements and amenities for the blueprints, and a photograph of how they wanted it to look on the outside. The photo was of the Shooting Star resort in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, a favorite stop for the Malones on summer vacations. The building is an unusual combination of larger-than-life Texas Hill Country charm and the rustic swagger of a Western lodge. Homebuilder Tony Miles spent a year bringing the plans for the Malones’ dream home to life.


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The exterior mimics the style of the resort, with a timber-framed, open-air gable entranceway and natural stone facade. Within the 5,000-square-foot space, Emison created a four bedroom, four-anda-half bath layout that includes a reading room for Missy, a masculine study where Scott can relax and a second den for their children to entertain, as well as a pantry that doubles as a regulation storm shelter. The picturesque views of Yonabba Creek and its tree-lined banks are central to the home’s character. A solid wall of uncovered floor-to-ceiling windows dominates the open-concept living area, making the bucolic backyard landscape integral. Whether the family is gathered for supper in the dining room, entertaining guests while they cook in the spacious kitchen or lounging together on the sectional sofa, the view almost counts as another presence in the room. Decorator Robin Waldrip used grays and whites, along with touches of aqua, throughout the interior to complement the natural scenery outside. A refurbished barnwood dining table, sliding barn doors in several of the entryways and 100-year-old reclaimed wood beams on the vaulted living room ceiling reinforce the rustic feel of the home.

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All the rooms except two of the smaller bedrooms look out onto the backyard woods. The rooms with front-yard views overlook the circular driveway, which is surrounded by trees and greenery that provide privacy and hide the road from view. The living area opens onto a screened porch with cedar-plank walls and a panoramic view of the lush, shaded woods and open fields. A gas fireplace encircled with ample plush seating makes the space a year-round option. The Malones added an informal dining area to the porch, where they enjoy meals together outdoors without dealing with pests. “There’s nothing better than sitting back there and watching the seasons, even when it’s cooler,” Missy said. “We can see the trees change color and the farmers in the fields nearby come harvest their crops in the fall, and the first snow here was like being in a mountain cabin with all the evergreens.” In the warmer months, the patio area provides extra living space, including a pool, a hot tub and an impressive outdoor kitchen. After 30 years in the food industry, working as a caterer and at his family’s Malone’s Fish and Steak, it was important to Scott to have a space capable of feeding a crowd. A pavilion houses the outdoor kitchen,

complete with running water and electricity, two grills and a commercial-grade fryer that Scott added to prepare the family’s famous catfish and hushpuppies outside. The structure’s wood beams, plank siding, stone bar and sloped roof continue the aesthetic of the house, and the chef’s view of the landscape from behind the counters is unimpeded. A storage area, a changing room for swimmers and a bathroom are also located beneath the pavilion. The woods that first attracted the Malones to the property have been a perk of ownership for the whole family. Watching local wildlife, including foxes, coyotes, geese and owls, is a favorite pastime. Scott created trails in the growth for their son, Tate, to explore by four-wheeler or golf cart with friends, and Tate frequently spends time charting the countryside from above with his video drone. Scott also takes both Tate and daughter Mia out to hunt white-tailed deer or turkeys on their land when the season is right. “For the first year we’ve been here, I seriously kept thinking it was about time to go home because it feels so much like vacation,” Scott said. “We don’t have to go anywhere to get back to nature. We have it all right here.”


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FAIRPARK

PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M ANDA CODY

Friday Night at Fairpark was held June 9 in downtown Fairpark in Tupelo. The event celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Tupelo Elvis Festival with a free concert featuring Muscadine Bloodline, Bishop Gunn, Memphis Jones and Spunk Monkees. 1

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1. Taylor Mckinney, Riley Estes, Faith Holmes and Josh Estes 2. Casey Waller and Sharmayne Douglas 3. Dexter Cleveland with Summer and Brailey Fugitt and Georgia Ryan 4. Carlie Carwile, Tyler Nash, Chance Whitt and Ashley Vickers 5. C.J. Walker and Brandi Thornton 6. Colton and Alice Griggs 7. Angela, Dylan, Dallas and Wesley Brown 8. Adrian Coburn and Lauren Lucas

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M ANDA CODY

Talbot House, a sober living facility for women, hosted a community steak dinner June 30. Around 100 dinner guests attended the fundraiser on the grounds in Belden, and entertainment was provided by local musicians Will Taylor and Clint Crawford. 1

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1. C.J. Holt with Roxanna and Clint Crawford and Nikki Gardner 2. Kiara Suggs, Matt Perryman and Lauren Barber 3. Karen Morgan, Becky Weatherford and Tom Morgan 4. Say Smith, Holly O’Callaghary, Kristen Blake, Connor Hyle and Samantha Lewis 5. Angela and Joshua Ballard with Micheal Byles 6. Will and Robert Murphree with Gina Donna 7. Lisa and Jonathan Martin 8. Emily Ferrel and Hope Vick 9. Amanda Robertson and Walt Walton

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MUSIC

AND

MOVIE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH MCCULLEN

Music and Movie in the Market was held June 12 at Off the Square Market in Pontotoc. The event was hosted by Pontotoc County Chamber Main Street Association. It featured music from the PHS jazz band and a showing of “The Greatest Showman.” View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Ezra Bryant and Diane Warren with Mattox and Marley Wilbanks 2. Amiyah and Larissa Dastinot with Solomon Golden 3. Rowan, Kayla and Hunter Gray 4. Ashley, Kolby and Korbin Clowers 5. Paisley, Addy Kay and Danyel O’Callaghan 6. Whitney and Colton Killough 7. Emily Warren and Mabry Chamblee 8. Julie and Ivy Robbins

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LIVE!

PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M ANDA CODY

PAW Patrol Live! “The Great Pirate Adventure” took the stage June 26-27 at BancorpSouth Arena in Tupelo. The live performances featured a dynamic soundtrack, choreography, dazzling lights and special effects. 1

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1. Addison, Kareem, Kingston and Amelia Moore 2. Jordan and Baker Owens with Lauren and Finley Sanders and Leslie and Ryder Swords 3. Valerie, Remi and Kirk Donnell 4. Xorian Coggins and Constance Cunningham 5. Rylan Rogers and Morgan Moorman 6. Hailee Morris and Azriella Hall 7. Sheluv and Nouri Walton 8. Luzon Rivers III, Vanessa Young and Lahonestee Rivers 9. Channing, Shannon and Keely Clifton 10. Morgan and Kristin Hearnsburger

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ALL

STAR

FOOTBALL

C A MP

PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M ANDA CODY

Boys & Girls Clubs of North Mississippi hosted its second annual All Star Football Camp June 16 at Ballard Park Sportsplex in Tupelo. The event featured former professional and collegiate football players coaching the fundamentals of football. 1

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1. Giovonni Holloway, Tristen Jones, Tradarian Coleman and Ethan Cathey 2. Juan Long, John Brown, Doug Cuthburt and Cameron Floyd 3. Drew White and Lucia Randle 4. Kingston, Pete and Paxton Rodrigues 5. Milton and Russel Copeland 6. Kim Dill and Ashton Shumpert 7. Kylan Lindsey and Avery Cathey 8. Cody Crawford, Jake Hudson and Faith Wallace

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DAUGHTER

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ELIZABETH ROBERTS

The 16th annual Gumtree Twigs Father Daughter Ball was held June 23 at BancorpSouth Arena in Tupelo. The event included a candy bar, photo opportunities and a silent auction. More than $75,000 was raised for Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. 1

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1. Olivia and Sean Austin Williams 2. Neal and Nealee Turner 3. Coty and Linley Adam 4. Jessica Leslie, Courtney Holcomb, Pam Burns, Terri Hughes, Kim Harbin and Lynn Collier 5. Jordan and Mary Ryan Metcalfe 6. Emmalee, Calvin and Macie Mangum 7. Kevin and Marian Frances Abel 8. Ben and Mamie Galjour 9. Clifton and Adalyn James 10. Alison Kenney and Layla Murphy

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PAPPI ’ S

CRUISE-IN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M ANDA CODY

Pappi’s Garage classic car emporium in Tupelo held its monthly charity cruise-in June 29. The event featured an exhibit of 100 classic cars and raised $4,400 for the Tupelo Children’s Mansion. 1

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1. Eddie Bethany, Martha Matthews, Betty McDaniel and Hayden Chism 2. Danny and Teresa Cash with Eva Aldridge and Dave Morris 3. Bo Alexander and Lee Hartman with Steve and Rhonda Weaver 4. Cohen and Carter White 5. Rosa Lawson and Joel Burcham 6. Lily and Kurt Campbell 7. Donnie Davis, Larry McMahan and Ralph Henderson 8. Cam and Ben Harrison

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FOLLIES

PHOTOGRAPHED BY WHITNEY WORSHAM

Corinth High School held its annual Follies May 29-June 2 at the school. More than 115 graduating Corinth High School seniors participated in the Class of 2018 edition, which featured a 1980s theme. 1

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1. Jacob Nunley, Baylee Cain, Zaquariya Patterson and Nico Crump 2. Ansley Wiggington, Kate Madden Worsham, Laikyn King and Lily Null 3. Sherika Guyton, T.J. Walker and Alondes Guyton 4. Cooper Frazier, Kelly Treadway, Baylor Frazier 5. Jon D. Warren, Chris Kelley and Tada Stricklen 6. Sarah Kate Burns and Weston Mitchell 7. Abby Greene and Emma Edwards 8. Ashley Clausel and Linde Avent 9. Amanda and Gina Dorsett

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VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONM AG.COM

M i s s M i s s i s s i p p i Ho me c o m i n g D i n ne r

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N E W M S G i rl s E m p owe r me nt

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C o m mu n it y Ba n k O p e n i n g

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1. Tanner Fant and Dana Wesley 2. Kristal Branch, Asya Branch, Caroline Mcphillips and Roger Wicker 3. Brooke Edwards and Mark Hinton 4. Cadi and Lillie Springer 5. Audjha and Andrea Wilson 6. Candice Martens and Nicole Trimble 7. Rod and Kenya Lesure

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1. Sims High School Alumni with Nettleton Primary Students 2. Tykerious Vance and Tre Harvey 3. Jordyn Akins, Kylia Wofford, Alecia Pulliam and Karis Autry 4. Angie Vanderford and Laney McAnally 5. John David Manahan, Cory Quinn and Caleb Byrd 6. Christin Hale, Lindsay Thompson and Hudson Hale 7. Philip Sanderson and Logan Arnold

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French M A C A R O N S WRITTEN BY MEL ANIE CROWNOVER

Seventh-grader Emmy Dean spent her summer doing something she loves: teaching others to cook. Inspired by her family, the Tupelo Christian Preparatory School student has been honing her culinary skills in her family kitchen since she was a preschooler. “I’m lucky because I get to learn from my dad on the grill, my mom does healthier meals, and my grandmother won a Betty Crocker award when she was my age,” Dean said. “Food brings people together. That’s something you have to share.” Spots for Emmy’s Cooking School sold out in just two weeks. The class of 10 students met daily for a week at her home to prepare some of her favorite recipes, including her signature French macarons. Although Dean found the original recipe online, the ingredient list and directions have evolved along with her expertise. She invented different varieties, including coconut, lemon and cream cheese by adding flavors she thought would complement the basic recipe. “If it doesn’t work out, I try something new and try to perfect it,” she said. “It’s a difficult recipe because you have to get just the right amount of air in them to get what they call ‘the feet’ on the bottom, but the trick is to whip the mix slowly so they won’t deflate.” Follow Emmy on Facebook by searching “Emmy’s Cooking School.”

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

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RECIPE BY EMMY DEAN

French Lemon Macarons COOKIES: 2 cups powdered sugar 1 cup almond flour 3 egg whites, at room temperature ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar Pinch of salt ¼ cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon lemon extract Food coloring of choice

- Heat oven to 275°F. Line 2 cookie pans with parchment paper. Prepare a piping bag and a No. 1A round piping tip. - Sift 2 cups powdered sugar and almond flour into a bowl, and set aside. - In a large mixing bowl, beat egg whites, cream of tartar and salt on high speed until foamy. Turn mixer to low, and slowly add granulated sugar. When the mixture forms soft peaks, add 1 teaspoon lemon extract and about 4 drops food coloring. Continue whipping until mixture forms stiff peaks. - Gently pour the dry mixture over the whipped egg whites, being careful the egg whites don’t deflate. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold the dry mixture into the egg whites until the mixture falls off the spatula in a ribbon pattern. - Transfer the batter into the prepared piping bag. Pipe 1-inch rounds of batter

FILLING: ½ stick of butter, at room temperature 4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature 1 cup powdered sugar 1 teaspoon lemon extract

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onto the parchment-lined pans, spacing at least 1 inch apart. Tap the pans hard on the counter to release air bubbles, and then let rest 20-30 minutes. Bake 18-20 minutes or until lightly browned. For the filling, beat together butter and cream cheese. Add 1 cup powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon lemon extract. Once cookies are completely cooled, fill cookies by using piping bag or plastic bag with corner cut off to pipe about a teaspoon of filling on half of the cookies. Top each with another cookie to make sandwiches. Serve immediately. One recipe makes about 10 filled lemonflavored macarons. Experiment with different colors, and try new flavors by replacing the lemon extract with another flavored extract, such as strawberry or vanilla.


Invitation Magazine - August 2018  
Invitation Magazine - August 2018  
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