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Letter From the Staff

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Thacker Mountain Radio

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Saltillo Career Day

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Calendar

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Harvest Supper

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Celebration Village

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Holiday Happenings

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The Great 38 Race

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Humane Society Opening

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Shoutouts

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Ducks Unlimited

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Tupelo Maker’s Market

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InstaLove: The Mississippi Gift Company

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Southside Artist Reception

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The Marshall Tucker Band

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Drink Pink

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Pigskins All-America BBQ

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JROTC Marine Corps Ball

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Corinth Open House

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Delta Waterfowl

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Taste of Tupelo

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Ole Miss vs. MS State Soccer

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Tanglefoot Trot

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One Night Stand Art Show

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In Season: Citrus

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What’s In

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Out & About: Oxford

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Out & About: Northeast

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Recipes: Winter Mocktails to Cocktails

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62 Finding Florence

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Burkes & Smith

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Kellum & Eickmeier

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Cockrell & Woodhouse

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Null & Smith

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Csorba & Stanley

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Riley & Rozier

When the weather outside is frightful, these north Mississippi-area attractions offer plenty of ways to stay warm and combat cabin fever.

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Devlin & Worsham

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Wilbanks & Hood

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Dotson & Fairley

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Wilburn & Kim

78 Here We Come A-wassailing

ON THE COVER

Hop in the car and drive a couple hours east to Florence, the northwest Alabama city that offers something for everyone.

68 The Great Indoors

Carolers and revelers celebrate Christmas the old-fashioned way in Oxford and downtown Iuka.

82 Ringing in a Brand-New Year We all know how to celebrate New Year’s in the South, but we’re not the only ones with interesting traditions for ringing in the holiday.

93 Keeping the Dream Alive

Citrus fruit brings a fresh and unexpected twist to classic holiday decor. From frontdoor wreaths to table centerpieces, it’s fun to make unique decorations by pairing clippings from your yard with lemons, oranges or limes. Friends Steve Taranto and Stephanie Young shared their tips for making this mandarin tree and a cheerful winter wreath from seasonal greenery and citrus fruit. Learn how on page 54. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

In Oxford and Tupelo, MLK holiday traditions for all ages honor King’s legacy.

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L E T T E R from the S T A F F Advertising consultants Alise Emerson of Booneville and Moni Simpson of Clinton met at Invitation Magazines seven years ago. Now neighbors and best friends, they share parenting and life advice, help each other with child care, and undertake a Christmas decoration extravaganza that’s a wonder to behold. Here they discuss their friendship and shared love of all things Christmas. What’s it like living next to your best friend? Moni: Alise and I always joked about how great it would be to live next door to each other, so when my neighbor decided to sell, I knew I had to act fast and the stars would have to align perfectly. In the end, it all worked out, and it has been so wonderful having their family right beside us. (Our husbands may disagree!) Alise: Living next door to Moni and Stuart has been the biggest blessing for my family. We don’t have family here in town, and now that fills the void for us. We joke that it is basically one big house. And you also share a love of Christmas?

FOLLOW US

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Moni: My father was Clark Griswold before there was a “Christmas Vacation” movie — seriously. He even fell through our ceiling while putting Christmas lights up. He loved to do it up big, and having a farmhouse out in the country means you can do what you want however you want. That did not translate to me when I moved into a neighborhood. Thankfully we live around good people who enjoy our eccentric style. I am very fortunate that I married a man who loves Christmas as much as I do — we are terrible influences on each other when it comes to decorating. Alise: My father-in-law used to deck his house out with all these lights and offered all of his decor to me. Moni had challenged me to decorate the yard, which I had never done before, so when he made the offer I told her, “Challenge accepted.” My husband loves Christmas, but he believes it comes after Thanksgiving, and I believe it begins Nov. 1. We waited until Joseph went on a hunting trip the weekend before Thanksgiving, and that Sunday my inlaws came to town to help us get started. We

@IN V ITATI O N OXFO R D @IN V ITATI O NM AG A ZINE |

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

were all outside both of our houses running back and forth, borrowing from each other’s boxes, holding ladders, asking for opinions. The kids loved it when we turned on the lights. My husband was surprised when he got home, but he secretly loved it. This year he was on board to help us decorate. What can your neighbors expect this year? Moni: This year we decided to make it a team effort and go all out. We want our kids to remember Christmas as that time of year their parents made their homes as magical and exciting as possible for them to enjoy. Having a 2-year-old now and seeing her excitement for the season and her complete wonderment as she stands in our yard and just takes it all in is really what we do it for. I remember that feeling as a child, and it’s one of the greatest memories and gifts I have. Alise: This new tradition is so much fun and one of my favorite Christmas memories we have made. Moni and I have been discussing what we would do since we took last year’s Christmas decorations down. I’m sure each year will be bigger and better.

@INVOXFORD @INVM AGA ZINE


PUBLISHERS Phil and Rachel West

EDITORIAL

EXECUTIVE EDITORS Allison Estes Emily Welly EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Mary Moreton CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Shanna Flaschka Kimme Hargrove Rachel Ishee Sarah McCullen Lena Mitchell Stephanie Young SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Sarah McCullen COPY EDITOR Kate Johnson

OFFICE

BUSINESS MANAGER Hollie Hilliard DISTRIBUTION Donald Courtney Brian Hilliard MAIN OFFICE 662-234-4008

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Holly Vollor STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Joe Worthem CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Alise McCreary Alice McCullen Sarah McCullen Elizabeth Roberts Lisa Roberts Megan Wolfe Whitney Worsham CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS Sarah McCullen Holly Vollor

ADVERTISING

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Alise M. Emerson Leigh Lowery Lynn McElreath Stacey Raper Moni Simpson Whitney Worsham ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Zach Fields Becca Pepper ADVERTISING INFORMATION ads@invitationoxford.com

To subscribe to one year (10 issues) of Invitation Oxford or to buy an announcement, visit invitationoxford.com. To subscribe to one year (10 issues) of Invitation or to buy an announcement, visit invitationmag.com. To request a photographer at your event, email Mary at mary.invitation@gmail.com. Invitation Magazines respects the many diverse individuals and organizations that make up north Mississippi and strives to be inclusive and representative of all members of our community.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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Back to Bethlehem DECEMBER 8

Annual Toy Exhibit

Ozark Baptist Church presents its first drive-through Nativity with nine tableaux of the first Christmas, lit by luminaries. The self-guided tour includes hot chocolate and a CD with music and a description of each scene. Free. 6:30-8 p.m., 926 Ozark Baptist Church Road, Marietta.

THROUGH DECEMBER 28

This year’s annual display at Tupelo’s Oren Dunn City Museum features the museum’s own collection made by Rich Toys Inc., a toy manufacturer based in Tupelo from 1953 to 1962. The company is known for its iconic wooden toys with mechanical action. Tickets $2-$4, veterans free with a military ID. Open weekdays 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Wreaths Across America Ceremony DECEMBER 15

Participants lay wreaths on hundreds of Corinth National Cemetery’s nearly 8,000 veterans’ graves on National Wreaths Across America Day. More than 1,400 ceremonies take place all over America and are synchronized with the wreathlaying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. Free. Help lay wreaths anytime the day of the event; a ceremony takes place at 11 a.m. facebook.com/corinthhonorsveterans

facebook.com/orendunnmuseum

Oxford Charity Ball and Ugly Holiday Sweater 5K DECEMBER 8

Tupelo Community Theatre presents its holiday production of C.S. Lewis’ classic tale at the Lyric Theatre in Tupelo. Tickets $10-$20. Showtimes vary.

Junior Auxiliary of Oxford, a women’s organization that benefits Oxford children, hosts its annual Charity Ball at Castle Hill. The “Bid for the Kids” ball includes dinner, a silent auction, a wine pull, a date-night drawdown and dancing. Don a hideous holiday sweater and join the morning 5K or Fun Run. All proceeds benefit JA’s programs in Oxford and Lafayette County. Charity ball tickets $50. 7:30 p.m. 5K and Fun Run registration $35 for adults, $15 for kids 12 and under. 8 a.m.

tct.ms

facebook.com/jaofoxford

“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” D E C E M B E R 6 -8

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Corinth Charity Ball DECEMBER 29

Junior Auxiliary of Corinth hosts its 57th annual Charity Ball this year. The “Rhythm of the Night” event includes the presentation of the 2019 Citizen of the Year award, a buffet-style dinner catered by Vicari’s owner John Mabry, a piano duel and live music from the Directors and the Spunk Monkeys. Proceeds benefit JA’s local service projects. Tickets $75. 6 p.m., Hillandale Golf Course. facebook.com/jacorinth


Third Annual Pop Up Oxford J A N U A R Y 1 9 -2 6

PHOTO PROVIDED BY BANCORPSOUTH ARENA

This weeklong celebration of art, food, music and culture features a diverse list of events including a songwriters competition, a cocktail class, the Fiber Arts Festival, a day of service and much more. For a complete list of events and information, visit popupoxfordms.com.

Bitters & Bites JANUARY 22

Learn the roots of classic speakeasy cocktails with two of Oxford’s best bartenders, Joseph Stinchcomb of Saint Leo and Ivy McLellan of Snackbar, and enjoy hors d’oeuvres from Saint Leo and the City Grocery Restaurant Group. Proceeds support the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council’s endowment fund. Tickets $50 for YAC members, $60 for nonmembers. 6-8 p.m., the Small Hall.

Cirque du Soleil “Crystal” J A N U A R Y 1 0 -1 3

Cirque du Soleil stops in Tupelo for seven shows. “Crystal” combines world-class skating and gravity-defying acrobatics as performers leap, tumble, glide and fly over and across the ice. Tickets $44-$110. Showtimes vary, BancorpSouth Arena.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY NATALIE TROUTT

bcsarena.com

MLK Day

National Pie Day

JANUARY 21

The Miracles J A N U A R Y 1 3- F E B R U A R Y 3

The Senatobia-based Baddour Center’s nationally recognized choir performs in various north Mississippi venues this winter. Read more on page 25. Jan. 13, 6 p.m., Calvary Baptist Church, 305 Keating Road, Batesville Jan. 20, 10 a.m., United Methodist Church, 11067 Hwy. 336, Thaxton Feb. 3, 6 p.m., Solid Rock Assembly of God, 16938 Hwy. 4 E., Senatobia

Always observed on the third Monday in January, this federal holiday commemorates the life and service of Martin Luther King Jr., one of America’s greatest champions for racial equality and social justice. Most schools and many businesses are closed in observance. Turn to page 93 for details on a few local events.

Harlem Globetrotters

JANUARY 23

Show off your baking skills or just indulge in a slice of your favorite pie today. Share your photos with the hashtag #NationalPieDay, and tag us for a chance to be featured on Invitation’s social media.

Tupelo Charity Ball FEBRUARY 1

The world-renowned exhibition basketball team combines astonishing skill and fun theatrics for a family-friendly night of entertainment perfect for any age. Tickets $26-$69. 2 p.m., BancorpSouth Arena.

Junior Auxiliary of Tupelo hosts its 56th annual Charity Ball to support the organization’s projects in the Tupelo area. The “Great Gatsby” event includes dinner, music, dancing and the presentation of the Citizen of the Year award. Tickets $50. 7 p.m., BancorpSouth Arena.

bcsarena.com

facebook.com/jaoftupelo

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holiday

HAPPENINGS Christmas in Cotton Plant

Doors of Hope Holiday House Tour

ONGOING

DECEMBER 1

Featured on TLC’s “My Crazy Obsession,” this 12-acre Christmas display of lights and inflatables is open Thursday-Saturday, with a few additional days throughout December. Free. 6-9 p.m.

Walk through six holiday-decorated homes in Oxford’s North Lamar Historic District, including the L.Q.C. Lamar House. Proceeds benefit Doors of Hope Transitional Ministries, an organization that helps the homeless and those threatened by homelessness find permanent housing and employment. Pre-sale tickets $20, day-of-event tickets $25. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

christmasincottonplant.com

doorsofhopeoxford.org

Rudolph Run DECEMBER 8

Hosted by the Pontotoc Woman’s Club, the ninth annual 5K and 10K runs traverse Pontotoc’s festively decorated downtown and residential areas. $30 online registration until Dec. 5, $5 race-day registration fee. racesonline.com

Memphis Zoo Lights ONGOING

Rated one of the best zoo light displays by USA Today readers two years in a row, the park offers Christmas lights, live reindeer, a 90-foot-tall Ferris wheel and ice-skating after dark. Open select nights throughout December, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Cookie Palooza

memphiszoo.org

DECEMBER 2

Train to Christmas Town

The Cedar Oaks Guild invites families to the historic home in Oxford for cookies, crafts and a visit with Santa. Free. 2-4 p.m.

ONGOING

Board the train at the Depot in Batesville, and enjoy a magical night of cookies, cocoa and Christmas carols provided by Santa’s elves. Christmas pajamas, festive costumes and holiday sweaters are encouraged. Tickets $25-$110. Times and dates vary. Call 877-334-4783 or book tickets online. grenadarail.com

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Christmas with the NMSO DECEMBER 8

Participating stores in downtown Pontotoc welcome the Christmas shopping season by keeping their doors open late. Ellen Russell, Pontotoc’s Main Street director, says attendees will be delighted by carriage rides and a surprise snowfall. 5-8 p.m.

The choruses of Itawamba Community College and Northeast Mississippi Community College, along with the NMSO Children’s Chorus, join the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra to perform many holiday favorites, as well as some new versions of old classics. Tickets $10-$30. 7:30 p.m., Tupelo High School Performing Arts Center.

memphiszoo.org

nmsymphony.com

Marion Street Market DECEMBER 6

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019


Handel’s “Messiah” DECEMBER 9

Oxford Civic Chorus performs Handel’s “Messiah” with artistic director W. Thomas Ardrey. Run time is one hour, with a cookie reception following. Tickets ($10 for adults, $5 for kids and students) are available through the Ole Miss Box Office or at the door. 3 p.m., David H. Nutt Auditorium.

Gaither Homecoming Celebration DECEMBER 15

Mark Lowry, Lynda Randle and others join the Grammy Award-winning Gaither Vocal Band for a special evening of Christmas music at BancorpSouth Arena in Tupelo. Tickets $23-$69. 6 0p.m. bcsarena.com

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” DECEMBER 15

The beloved Claymation classic comes to life as a musical on the Orpheum stage in Memphis. Join Rudolph, Hermey the Elf, Bumble the Abominable Snowman and the rest of the cast for a fun sing-a-long show. Tickets $25-$40. 3 p.m. orpheum-memphis.org

Drew & Ellie Holcomb’s Neighborly Christmas DECEMBER 21

The Tennessee natives and their band, the Neighbors, perform in Memphis for one of three Christmas shows this season. Tickets start at $34.50. 8 p.m., the Orpheum. orpheum-memphis.org DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KAREN STOCKTON

Luc iu s L a m a r at S out h s id e G a l le r y “County,” a new collection of paintings by Lucius Lamar, is on display this month at Southside Gallery in Oxford. Lamar’s latest collection of oils and acrylics depicts the rural landscape surrounding Taylor, where Lamar lives for part of the year. “My paintings in ‘County’ are an extension of ‘Power Lines,’ the show hosted at Southside a few years ago,” Lamar said. “Our rural landscape inspires me … I am always slackjawed at the mundane beauty, and I am still exploring how connected we all are by nature.” Born in Memphis and raised in Oxford, Lamar earned a BFA in fine art painting from the University of Mississippi. He continued his studies at Parsons School of Design in New York City and Paris, later receiving a second bachelor’s degree in environmental design at UCLA. His work has appeared in the Third Street Promenade Gallery in Santa Monica, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the New Wright Gallery in Los Angeles. “County” is available for viewing at Southside Gallery Dec. 4-Jan. 5. An artist reception for Lamar takes place 5-8 p.m. Dec. 13 at the gallery.

After spending 10 years as a single mother, Deanna Thompson founded the I Am Brave Foundation to support women in Lafayette County who are raising children alone. At its first event in July, the foundation provided childcare so that women could connect with each other — something Thompson said she lacked for so long. “Community is key,” Thompson said. “I felt like I carried a load others didn’t want to share, but once I connected with people, I received a lot of healing. It’s important to know you’re not alone.” While I Am Brave primarily benefits single mothers, it also sponsors Santa’s Workshop 38655, a fundraising event for local families facing expensive medical treatments. This year Santa’s Workshop 38655 hosts its third annual event on Dec. 1 and 2. All proceeds will go toward medical expenses for Jack Morton of Oxford. Jack, who turns 2 in January, has CLOVES Syndrome and will need several facial reconstruction surgeries. “We want to begin by supporting single moms, but we want to be able to benefit families too,” Thompson said. For more information regarding the I Am Brave Foundation or Santa’s Workshop 38655, email deanna@iambravefoundation.org.

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INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CASTILLO PHOTOGRAPHY

I A m Brave Fou nd at io n


SHOUTOUTS

continued

The Baddour Center in Senatobia opened its doors in December 1978. Celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, the organization continues its mission to provide intellectual, spiritual, physical, social, emotional and vocational growth for people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities. The model facility serves more than 150 adults. Residents have the opportunity to seek employment through programs like Baddour Custom Packaging, a corporate packaging facility, or the Garden Center where they grow and sell flowers. Residents can also audition to perform with The Miracles, The Baddour Center’s nationally recognized choir. The choir tours the country to raise awareness of The Baddour Center’s mission while bridging attitudinal barriers that may exist toward adults with intellectual disabilities. The Miracles will perform in several north Mississippi locations throughout December and January, and into the spring. For a list of upcoming shows nearby, flip to the calendar on page 19 or visit baddour.org.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY NATALIE TROUTT

T he Ba d d ou r C e nt e r M i ra c le s

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instaL O V E PHOTOGRAPHED BY ABBEY GOODMAN

T he M i s s i s s i p p i G i f t C o m pa ny

More than 25 years ago, Cindy and Tim Tyler of Greenwood decided that there should be a store strictly dedicated to goods made in the Magnolia State. More than two decades later, that business, The Mississippi Gift Company, offers nearly 2,000 exclusively Mississippimade products. Scroll through the Instagram feed @themississippigiftcompany and you’ll be inspired by hundreds of unique, delicious and beautiful handcrafted Mississippi products. The account is a great place to find seasonal or year-round gift items for all ages

and genders, including food, home decor, skin care products, apparel and pet products. “The company started off by selling a few gourmet foods, with the idea that Mississippians are known for being excellent chefs,” marketing director Abbey Goodman said. “[Since] Mississippi natives are also known for their art and creativity, The Mississippi Gift Company started to branch out and offer more products.” Shop at themississippigiftcompany.com or in the Greenwood store location, knowing that your purchases are benefiting Mississippi artisans and helping to fuel the local economy. You don’t have to be from Mississippi to love The Mississippi Gift Company. Goodman said the business has fans from all over the United States and the world. It has even attracted some well-known celebrity clients over the years, including Emma Stone, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Dr. Phil and Viola Davis. FOLLOW ON INSTAGR A M @ t h e m i s s i s s i p p i g i f t c o m p a ny

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RENAISSANCE COMMUNITY LOAN FUND


THE FORD CENTER

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THE FORD CENTER

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY MICHAEL KUHN PHOTOGRAPHY

L i nd say E l i z a b e t h Bu rke s & R a nd a l l “S m it t y ” S m it h

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indsay Elizabeth Burkes of Batesville and Randall “Smitty” Smith of Oxford were united in marriage on Oct. 26, 2018, in a beachfront ceremony at The Henderson Beach Resort and Spa in Destin, Florida. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Burkes of Batesville. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Burkes Jr. of Batesville and the late Mr. and Mrs. Claude F. Gray of Sardis. The groom is the son of Ms. Julia D. Watt of Oxford. He is the grandson of Mrs. Martha P. Watt and the late Mr. William L. Watt of Batesville. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Ashley Sayle. Her bridesmaids were Gail Arrington, Kellen Burkes, Meredith Fleming, Bao Holly, Leigh Beth Hudson, Ginger Kizer, Kate Porter, Stefanie Snider and Corley Wicker. Her flower girls were Fowler and Mills Burkes, nieces of the bride;

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Lillian Kizer; Olivia Porter; Stella Sayle; and Addy Grace Smith, daughter of the groom. The program attendants were Allie and Avery Holly and Lesley Snider. Helen Rousseau assisted the bride as her proxy and read a scripture during the ceremony. The best man was Rob Jolly. Groomsmen were Lance Burkes, brother of the bride; Spencer Hill; Matt Insell; and Ryan Wilson. Ryan also served as the officiant for the ceremony. The ring bearers were Winston Jolly and Walker Sayle. The wedding was held beachfront at

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

sunset with family and friends. Following the ceremony, the celebration continued with a cocktail hour on the lawn before guests moved inside to the ballroom for dinner and a night of dancing to music from a local band, Mr. Big and the Rhythm Sisters. Along with the staff at The Henderson, the couple worked with wedding coordinator Sherri Kuhn of Destin to Wed Event Planning, Michael Kuhn Photography, Bella Flora and Holy Cakes — all vendors in the Destin area. The couple resides in Oxford, and they plan to honeymoon at a later date.


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PHOTOGRAPHED BY TAYLOR SQUARE PHOTOGRAPHY

Mol l ie S u z a n ne C o c k re l l & B e n T ho m a s Wo o d hou s e

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ollie Suzanne Cockrell and Ben Thomas Woodhouse were united in marriage July 14, 2018, in an evening ceremony at Paris-Yates Chapel in Oxford. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Dennis Smith of Corinth. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Barry Cockrell of Ridgeland. She is the granddaughter of Mr. Harry Cockrell of Vicksburg and the late Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Rose Sr. of Biloxi and the late Mrs. Marie Cecile Cockrell of Vicksburg. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Woodhouse of Corinth. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. John Burgess Darnell Jr. and Mr. George Allen Woodhouse Sr., all of Corinth, and the late Mrs. Peggy Allen Woodhouse. Escorted by her father, the bride wore a designer Martina Liana A-line gown with an ivory fitted bodice and a chapel-length

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train. She carried a hand-tied bouquet of hydrangeas, garden roses and peonies. The maid of honor was Katie Alexander, and the matron of honor was Megan Calvi. The bridesmaids were sister of the groom Betsy Mathis, Kaitlyn True, Brooke Paris, Kayla Dunlap, Erin Adams, Arma de la Cruz, Madison Ford, Regan Reardon, Olivia Mahaffey and Mike Jones. The bride’s cousin, Avery Held, was the flower girl. The bridesmaids wore Hayley Paige dresses in classic black. The groom’s father, Jeff Woodhouse, was the best man. The groomsmen were Carson Butler, Nick Carr, Parks Frazier, Kyle Holcombe, John Mathis, Kendall Murphy, Davis Pearce, Jeremy Richey, Dustin Smith, Joe Sparacino and Andy Timmons. The ushers were Evan Bauer and Reece McCollum. The ring bearer was Luke Mathis, nephew of the groom.

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

McKenzie and Katie Darnell greeted guests as they arrived. The Wedding Festival String Quartet provided ceremony music, and the groom’s uncle, Allen Woodhouse, sang “The Lord’s Prayer” a cappella. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at the Oxford Country Club. The seven-tiered bride’s cake was adorned with sugar peony flowers, gold leaves and gold beaded trim. The Party Jammers provided entertainment. An arch of glittering sparklers provided the perfect exit as the couple departed in an antique white Rolls-Royce. Taylor Square Photography and Frameblender Films captured lasting memories. On the eve of the wedding, the groom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Big Truck Theater in Taylor. Following the wedding, the couple took a trip to Antigua. They now reside in Oxford.


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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KRISTEN KILPATRICK

K at he r i ne Ave r y C s o r ba & W i l l i a m Fra nc i s S t a n le y

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atherine Avery Csorba of Nashville, Tennessee (formerly of Houston, Texas), and William Francis Stanley of Nashville (formerly of Corinth) were united in marriage at 5 p.m. Sept. 22, 2018, at the Roaring Fork Club in Basalt, Colorado. The service was officiated by the Rev. Elliott Cherry of Nashville. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Laszlo Thomas III of Houston, Texas. She is the granddaughter of Judge and

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Mrs. Herman Paul Pressler III of Houston, Texas, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Laszlo Thomas Csorba. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael K. Stanley of Corinth. He is the grandson of Mrs. John C Stanley and the late John C Stanley, and the late Dr. and Mrs. George C. Welch of Columbus. Music for the ceremony was provided by Gabe Scott, with vocals by Matt Wertz and Jill Chapman, all of Nashville.

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The bride was given away by her father. The bride’s sister, Molly Csorba, served as the maid of honor. The groom’s brother, Michael K. Stanley Jr., served as the best man. Flower girls were the groom’s nieces, Imogene Stanley and Claire Kerr. The reception was also at the Roaring Fork Club, with music provided by Georgia Bridgewater. Following the wedding, the couple honeymooned in Mexico. They now reside in Nashville.


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WEDDING Jo rd a n E l i z a b e t h D e vl i n & Ro b e r t H ayd e n Wo r sh a m I I I

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as bridesmaids were Karley Boagni, Grace Britsch, Ainsley Fischer, Alexandra Gasser, Alyssa Henke, Louise Summitt and Haleigh Wells. The attendants wore soft-rose-colored dresses of crepe de chine fabric with a soft draped ruffle across the front. Carley Guillot served as the bride’s proxy, and the flower girls were Mollie McAmis Worsham and Ann Frances Worsham, cousins of the groom. The groom’s father served as best man. Groomsmen included the bride’s brothers, Clay Sutton Devlin Jr. and John Joseph “Jack” Devlin. Also serving as groomsmen were Bryson Avent, Chris Brantley, Ben Long, Jim Matthews, David Palmer, Wes Perry, Francis Stanley, Pat Steelman and Charles Woods. Ushers were Byron Burkhalter, William Carpenter, Alex Hood and Mitchell Lowe. Readers for the ceremony were Emily Grace Jordan and Alyssa Steelman. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at the Audubon Tea Room, where guests danced to music by G.O.T. Groove. On the eve of the wedding, the groom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner in honor of Jordan and Hayden at Antoine’s. The couple now resides in Atlanta.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY BOB BRADFORD

ordan Elizabeth Devlin and Robert Hayden Worsham III were united in marriage at 6 p.m. June 29, 2018, at Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church in New Orleans. The Rev. William Bradford of Tupelo officiated the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Sutton Devlin of Atlanta. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Gene Jordan of Baton Rouge and the late Mr. and Mrs. John Joseph Devlin of New Orleans. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayden Worsham Jr. of Corinth. He is the grandson of Mrs. James Prentiss Hodges and the late Mr. James Prentiss Hodges, Mrs. Carl Wilson Wood, and the late Robert Hayden “Bobby” Worsham Sr., all of Corinth. Given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father, the bride wore an ivory, A-line, French lace gown featuring a V-neckline with a scalloped trim. The bride and bridesmaids carried classic bouquets of white hydrangeas and white roses designed by Kathleen Thaller of New Orleans. Attending the bride was maid of honor Paige Browning of Baton Rouge. Bridesmaids included sisters of the groom Priestley Worsham, Prentiss Worsham and Katherine Madden Worsham. Also serving

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY SONJA REVELLS PHOTOGRAPHY

A l a n a Taylo r D ot s o n & C h r i s to phe r Rya n Fa i rle y

A

lana Taylor Dotson and Christopher Ryan Fairley were united in marriage at Seascape Golf Resort in Miramar Beach, Florida, at 6:30 p.m. on June 30, 2018. The ceremony was performed on the beach by local officiant Stoney Bilbo. The couple was attended by the bride’s brother, Drew Dotson; the groom’s friends Drew Barnett and Morgan Weatherford; and matrons of honor Jane Claire Biggers, cousin of the bride, and friends Whitney Chrestman, Hallie Chisolm and Heather Outlaw. The flower girl was Ava Nemesek, and her brother, Jackson Nemesek, served as ring bearer. The bride wore a lace-bodiced dress with a flowing tulle skirt by Watters of BHLDN, and the bride’s attendants wore lavender tulle from Revelry. The groom and groom’s attendants wore gray linen.

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The bouquets and floral arrangements, provided by It’s a Perfect Day Wedding Florist LLC, were made of lavender roses, hydrangeas, peonies and fresh eucalyptus. Photography was provided by Sonja Revells Photography, with videography services by 30A Videography of Santa Rosa Beach. A cocktail reception was held for 120 guests at the resort conference center in the Oak Room, with entertainment provided by GTE Entertainment and Music. Toasting, dancing and merriment continued until midnight. An Ole Miss-themed chocolate cake adorned with chocolate-dipped strawberries was offered for dessert, along with a threetiered ivory bridal confection decorated with lavender roses. Chris and Alana now reside in Oxford with their two dogs, Abby and Moncrief, and Kitty, the cat.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JANNAH ALEXANDER

S t a c i M ic he l le Ke l lu m & Lu ke A a ro n E ic k me ie r

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taci Michelle Kellum of Oxford and Luke Aaron Eickmeier of Rome, New York, were united in marriage at 11:30 a.m. on May 26, 2018, at North Oxford Baptist Church in Oxford. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Ward Kellum of Oxford. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lee Eickmeier of Rome, New York. Staci and Luke met through friends at Community Church Oxford and began dating soon after. The couple was engaged on Dec. 17, 2017, on the Oxford Square. The wedding weekend began with a rehearsal dinner at Taylor Grocery given by the groom’s parents. The wedding ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Fish Robinson, pastor of Community Church Oxford. The music for the ceremony was provided by vocalists Emma Leader and Isaac Eickmeier; guitarists and vocalists Eddie Willis and Katie Heckel; and pianist Linda Taylor. The

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flowers for the wedding and reception were designed by Emily Roberts Forman from MODA Designs of New Albany. In memory of her maternal grand­ parents, Staci’s “something old” was an antique locket that belonged to her maternal grandmother. It held photos of her grand­ parents inside and was pinned to her bridal bouquet. Staci’s “something new” was her wedding gown from Low’s Bridal & Formal. Her “something borrowed” was the necklace that had been given to her mother by Staci’s father on their wedding day. Each pearl on the necklace represents a year the bride’s parents dated before they married. In memory of Staci’s paternal grandmother, a handkerchief wrapped around the bridal

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

bouquet was made from her grandmother’s blue-and-white floral apron. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the North Oxford Baptist Church atrium. It was catered by Party Waitin’ to Happen, and the bride’s cake was designed by Laurie Lackey. The photographer was Jannah Alexander of Nashville, Tennessee, and Revival House of Jackson provided the videography. Shortly after returning from their honeymoon in Saint Lucia, the couple relocated from Oxford to Collierville, Tennessee. Luke is a franchise owner of The Exercise Coach in Germantown, Tennessee, and Staci is a speech pathologist with Lafayette County Schools in Oxford.


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WEDDING A b i g a i l Ja ne Nu l l & Taylo r C h r i s t i a n S m it h

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRIAN FLINT

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bigail Jane Null and Taylor Christian Smith, both of Corinth, were united in marriage at 6 p.m. on June 23, 2018, at First Baptist Church in Corinth. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Dennis Smith. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Anthony Null of Corinth. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. Donald Thomas Cooper and Mrs. Sharon Sue Cooper of Leland, and Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Lee Null of Corinth. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Charles Smith. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Hugh Burcham, and the late Mr. Charles Robert Smith and Mrs. Shirley Jean Smith, all of Corinth. Nuptial music was provided by Mrs. Sara Mallory Ellington and Mr. Michael Chadwick Dickerson. Attending the bride as maid of honor was her sister, Lilian Jean Null. Bridesmaids were Holly Lee Howell, Jenna Eden

Huggins, Bailee Ruth Kramer, Elizabeth Anne McPheters, Catherine Grace Cheek Pratt, Alison Katlyn Burns Reece and Kathryn Gatewood Timmons. Honorary bridesmaids were Margaret Lanier Coker, Sydney Isabella Gonzalez, Brittany Nicole Lott Pinter and Sara Elizabeth Williston. Junior bridesmaids were the bride’s godsisters, Swayze Greer Razzano and Isabella Grace Razzano. The flower girl was Katherine Rayne Gurley. The groom’s father served as best man. Groomsmen were Douglas Hayden Camp; Samuel Jackson Cornelius; Nicholas Cole

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

Fuqua; Estevan Garcia; Andrew Lincoln Kerby; the bride’s brother, Thomas Elijah Null; Joseph Brooks Pratt; the groom’s brother, Tyler Gregory Smith; and Christian Hunter Stone. The bride’s cousin, Ryan Holden Trippe, was the ring bearer. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at The Franklin Courtyard with music provided by The Blind Eye DJ. Elizabeth Spencer Designs provided the floral arrangements. The couple honeymooned at Walt Disney World and Saint Lucia. They now reside in Corinth.


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organ Lynn Riley and David Earl Rozier III were united in marriage at 6:30 p.m. June 9, 2018, while surrounded by family and friends at The Chapel at Plein Air in Taylor. The Rev. Dr. Eric Hankins officiated the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Allan Riley of Oxford. She is the granddaughter of the late Thomas Riley of Lexington, Mississippi, and the late Mrs. Adelaide Riley Fisher of Oxford, and Mr. and Mrs. John Beard Neville of Ridgeland. The groom is the son of Dave and Jackie Rozier of Oxford. He is the grandson of Mrs. Janie Rozier and the late David Rozier Sr. of Oxford, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Walters of Philadelphia, Mississippi. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a Rita Vinieris fit-and-flare matte satin gown with a sweetheart neckline and satin-belted waistline, paired with a removable, cap-sleeve Chantilly lace bolero and a cathedral-length lace veil. Bridesmaids

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY PATRICK REMINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Mo r g a n Ly n n R i le y & D av id E a rl Ro z ie r I I I

wore chiffon halter-style slate-colored gowns tied at the waist, with flowing skirts and princess seams. The bride carried a white free-form bouquet with a variety of garden roses, peonies and ranunculus designed by Oxford Floral. Attending the bride was her sister and maid of honor, Brooke Ramsey Riley. Bridesmaids were dear friends Jamie Nicole Douglas, Elizabeth Laurel Hathorne, Mary Sybil Hodge, Mollie Beth Ott, Emily Paige Rucker and Mary Amelia Williamson. The groom’s father, Dave Rozier Jr., served as the best man. Groomsmen were Hunt Seabrook IV, Vic Bishop, Darby Turman, Taylor Sandroni, Cody Jones and Peyton Moss. The flower girl was Millner Locke Herrington, and the ring bearer was Riley Allan Ramsey. Nuptial music was provided by vocalist Kara Young. The chapel was decorated with a single large cross made up of a variety of garden roses, ranunculus, peonies and

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

hydrangeas, designed by the bride and Oxford Floral. Following the ceremony a reception was held at The Mill at Plein Air, where guests enjoyed Southern cuisine by A&N Catering. Guests were treated to cakes prepared by Alice Chow of Clarksdale and were entertained with dancing and music by The Dantones of Memphis. The day’s memories were captured by Patrick Remington Photography of Jackson. The wedding coordinator was Katie Naron. On the eve of the wedding, the groom’s family hosted a rehearsal dinner at Oxford Country Club, with assistance from event coordinator Connie Braseth. At the groom’s request, Chef Jon created a special outdoor fire pit and s’mores bar, one of the bride’s favorite treats. After the wedding, the couple enjoyed a honeymoon in Saint Lucia. They now reside in Clinton, where Morgan is an elementary education teacher and David works as an engineer at International Paper Company.


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WEDDING Me re d it h Bro oke W i l ba n k s & E l ija h C a d e Ho o d

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALEX AND KATE MADDEN SELLERS

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eredith Brooke Wilbanks of Corinth and Elijah Cade Hood of Flowood were united in marriage at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 13, 2018, at First Baptist Church in Corinth. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Dennis Smith. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kerry Michael Wilbanks of Corinth. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Sue Williams and the late Mr. Donald Williams of Corinth, and Mrs. Shirley Wilbanks and the late Mr. Charles Wilbanks of Corinth. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Kendall Hood of Flowood. He is the grandson of Mrs. Betty Herrington and the late Mr. Mims Herrington of Pearl, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Robin Hood of Utica. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore an Anne Barge princess ball gown of silk Mikado. The gown featured a sweetheart neckline and spaghetti straps embellished with chiffon floral embroidery and a chapel train. With her gown, the bride wore an ivory cathedral-length veil by Martina Liana. She carried a bouquet of burgundy and pink peonies, peach ranunculus, cream garden roses, silver dollar, seeded eucalyptus and pepperberry. Flowers were provided by the talented Jessica Dean and her mother, Amber Rinehart. Attending the bride as maid of honor was her sister, Olivia Danielle Wilbanks of Corinth. Meredith was also blessed to have as bridesmaids Camille Hood, sister of the groom; Meghan Barlow; Kate Cleary; Shelby Davis; Haley Gilbreath; Brooke James; and Sydney Pittman. Serving as honorary bridesmaids were Meredith’s close friends from physical therapy school, Shelby Brown, Natalie Hall, Caroline McDaniel, Emily McDermott, Mackenzie Ortlepp and Rachel Tyrone. Flower girls were Ella and Charli Little, cousins of the bride.

The groom’s father served as best man, and the groom’s brothers, Kendall and Kyle Hood, served as groomsmen. Groomsmen also included Bryce Dahl, Brandon Hood, Lance Martin, Tyler Sumrall and Austin Wilson. The ring bearer was Counce Little, cousin of the bride. Following a beautiful ceremony at First Baptist Church in Corinth, the celebration

INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

continued at The Franklin Courtyard, where wedding guests were entertained with music and dancing provided by The Dantones of Memphis. The night’s memories were captured by photographers Alex and Kate Madden Sellers. The couple has made plans to travel to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, in December for a delayed honeymoon.


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PHOTOGRAPHED BY HELENA KAYE PHOTOGRAPHY

C h a s it y N ic ole W i l bu r n & S a mue l K i m

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KPS PHOTOGRAPHY

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hasity Nicole Wilburn and Samuel Kim were united in marriage at 6 p.m. Oct. 11, 2018, at Chapel in the Pines in Senatobia, with the Rev. Fish Robinson officiating the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of John H. and Rebecca Smith of Oxford. The groom is the son of Juho and Moon Kim of Greenwood. Attending the bride as maid of honor was Phyllis Tatum Smith. The bridesmaids were the bride’s daughters, Taylor House and Courtney Pruitt. The groom’s son, Landis Kim, served as best man. Groomsmen were Brandon House and Barron Pruitt. The bride’s hair and makeup were done by Kay Lee Gore of Southern Chic Salon in Oxford. Miranda Maples and Rachel Delashmit, also from Southern Chic Salon, assisted the maid of honor and bridesmaids. Tabitha Phillips from The Parlor assisted the groom and best man with fresh cuts. The bride’s bouquet was made by

Amy Knotts of Bette’s Flowers Inc. The bridesmaids’ bouquets and groomsmen’s boutonnieres were made by the maid of honor, Phyllis Smith. The photographers were Helena Kaye McCullough of Helena Kaye Photography and Kelly Presley of KPS Photography.

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The couple resides in their new home in Oxford, where he is the director of quality care investigations with North Mississippi Regional Center,and she works with the Ole Miss Alumni Association as a special events assistant. The couple also owns and operates CNS Security LLC.


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C I T RU S WRIT TEN BY STEPHANIE YOUNG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

Winter is here, and that means citrus is in peak season. Oranges, limes, lemons and kumquats abound, and their vivid colors guarantee your holiday decor will pop. Grab a friend and a few supplies, and create a striking lemon wreath or mandarin tree. Work them into garlands, or simply display them in a pretty container with greenery for a bright, fragrant and elegant twist on traditional decorations. These arrangements were created by good friends Stephanie Young and Steve Taranto of Oxford.

CITRUS WREATH Seasonal greenery: We used Jackson vine, gardenia, boxwood, bells of Ireland, rosemary, green mini chrysanthemums and hypericum. 7-9 medium-size fresh, firm lemons 12-inch wreath form (or preferred size) Floral tape Floral wire Dish soap Wash lemons and any greenery clipped from your yard in cool soapy water, rinse well and dry. Tuck three or four 12-inch trimmings of Jackson vine into the wreath form, and secure with floral wire. Clip several pieces of varying greenery into different lengths, leaving 4 to 6 inches of stem. Starting with two longer pieces, wrap stems together with floral tape, and continue adding one stem at a time, wrapping each time to create a small bouquet. (Seven to nine of these should offer sufficient coverage for a 12-inch wreath.) Space them around the wreath facing outward. Wire each one onto the wreath form over the Jackson vine, tucking stems toward the inside the wreath under the vine base. Thread a piece of floral wire about 8 inches long through the flesh of each lemon on one side, lengthwise. Twist the ends of the wire together nearer one end of each lemon to form a snug loop. Use more wire to attach the lemons to the wreath form, nestling them in the greenery. Additional wiring may be needed to keep lemons from falling forward. (If so, don’t pierce the lemons again, just use more wire through the same loop.) Tuck in additional greenery to fill in bare spots as needed.

Stephanie Young lives on the family farm with her husband and their four sons. She devotes her time to simple yet beautiful tasks like cooking, writing poetry, prayer and caring for others. Steven Taranto is an assistant director of financial aid at the University of Mississippi and the organist and choirmaster at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. He enjoys projects with friends and all things creative.

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CITRUS

continued

CITRUS TREE Flat green leaves, such as ‘Little Gem’ magnolia 2 bags of mandarins or other small citrus fruit of choice Rosemary sprigs Gardenia or other greenery Williamsburg apple tree form (available online) Rinse citrus and any greenery clipped from your yard in soapy water and dry. Cover the tree form in green leaves such as ‘Little Gem’ magnolia by attaching to nails until wooden base is covered. Attach fruit with the pedicle (flower stalk) facing outward. Once the oranges are firmly attached, tuck greenery such as rosemary and gardenia between the fruit. Tips: Pick up the tree from the base when moving. Store in the refrigerator at night to extend the life of the arrangement. Freshen by replacing dried greenery. DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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SALTILLO

R A Y- B A N T H E B L A Z E C O L L E C T I O N $ 1 8 8 A LOOK AHEAD

MISSISSIPPI MADE DONUT PET BEDS 100% M ADE IN THE US A $ 79.9 9-$149.9 9 H O L LY WO O D F E E D

LIQUID M AT TE $24 AMY HEAD

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CHRIS TM A S S TAR $ 4 TAB BOREN POT TERY

TE A TOWEL $18 OLIVE JUICE

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E T TA B P OT TERY S ANTA PL ATE $ 48 OLIVE JUICE

SOREL

HOBO MERRIN $258 EMILOU’S BOUTIQUE

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M ADSON CHUKK A $169.95 AUSTIN’S SHOES


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HAPPY EVERY THING NUTCR ACKER PL ATE $36 GINGER’S

LOVE TREE HOODED VEST $32.00 BAILEY DIANE

S TRIPE GEO PAT TERN P ONCHO $36 T.FEA ZELL

SOU T HERN P OIN T MEN ’ S PUL LOV ER $10 4 .9 9 SHIRLEY DAWG’S

BLUE AND WHITE ORNA MENT $28 K ATE’S AND CO.

ON RUNNING | CLOUD $12 9.95 AUSTIN’S SHOES

TOWN AND COUNTRY PL ANTER WITH IV Y WRE ATH $ 45-$65 MOSS CREEK PLANTS

FAUX CHINCHILL A FUR HOODED VES T $12 9 ANN’S OF CORINTH

JEFF LIEB NECKL ACE $110 PEACOCKS AND PEARLS

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HOP IN THE CAR AND DRIVE A COUPLE HOURS EAST TO FLORENCE, THE NORTHWEST AL ABAMA CIT Y THAT OFFERS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. WRITTEN BY SARAH McCULLEN

Wilson Lake

Florence is the largest of “The Shoals,” a group of Alabama towns, including Tuscumbia, Sheffield and Muscle Shoals, located near the Tennessee River in the northwest corner of the state. Just like its Tuscan namesake, “Alabama’s Renaissance City” is a treasure trove of history, music, art, food and natural beauty.

| PHOTO BY JAMES RAPER

NATURE

Those who love spending time outdoors should visit Cane Creek Canyon, just south of Florence. The 700-acre nature preserve with cascading waterfalls and scenic trails is ideal for hikers. For a more laid-back outdoor activity, hang your hammock and relax on the banks of the Tennessee River in Joe Wheeler State Park, east of Florence. Wilson Dam, built in 1918 to create hydroelectric energy for nitrite plants in Muscle Shoals, offers breathtaking views of Wilson Lake. The lake, actually a section of the Tennessee River between Wilson and Wheeler dams, is about 15 miles long and is filled with bass and catfish for anglers.

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Wilson Lake

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| PHOTO PROVIDED BY FLORENCE-LAUDERDALE TOURISM


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M U S I C & F E S T I VA L S

Florence Wine Fest

| PHOTO BY ABRAHAM ROWE PHOTOGRAPHY

Music fanatics, The Shoals are home to some of America’s greatest music, and it all started in Florence at Rick Hall’s FAME Studio, Alabama’s first successful music studio. FAME’s in-house rhythm band, the Swampers, eventually moved across the river to establish Muscle Shoals Sound Studio, also known as 3614 Jackson Highway. The Swampers hosted and played for artists like The Rolling Stones, Aretha Franklin, Willie Nelson and Lynyrd Skynrd. Both studios are open for tours.

Alabama’s Music Hall of Fame celebrates all forms of music and talent hailing from Alabama, regardless of genre or era. Noteworthy artists are honored in fascinating exhibits, including the We Believe in Music Walkway. The W.C. Handy Birthplace, Museum and Library houses a collection dedicated to Handy, the Florence native considered to be the father of the blues. The city holds the W.C. Handy Music Festival in his honor for 10 days every July. Festivals are familiar happenings in Florence. In March, more than 200 wines from around the world are paired with bites prepared by local chefs at the Florence Wine Fest. A four-day festival in June commemorates Helen Keller, with live music, food vendors and a parade near her birthplace, Ivy Green, about 6 miles south of Florence. The Alabama Renaissance Faire in October draws nearly 40,000 visitors. While not required, all are invited to wear Renaissance garb while enjoying period-style arts and crafts, music and food.

FAME Studio

| PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHRIS GRANGER

FOOD

Florence has a flourishing food scene, with abundant options sure to suit any visitor’s taste buds at any time of day. For breakfast, drop into Staggs Grocery for their signature chocolate gravy, or munch on Tabasco brown sugar bacon at Big Bad Breakfast, one of the Oxford original’s sister locations. For your morning joe, try Rivertown Coffee Company, a cozy Florence cafe. While at The Factory, refuel at The Factory Cafe. The locally sourced, organic menu includes sandwiches and salads, the popular Factory Burger, and plenty of desserts to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Alabama Music Hall of Fame

| PHOTO BY ALABAMA MUSIC HALL OF FAME

Round out your day with dinner at 360 Grille, a rotating restaurant in the Renaissance Tower at the top of the Marriott Shoals Hotel and Spa, where you can enjoy American cuisine crafted with regional ingredients while taking in panoramic views of the Shoals. Or stay downtown for dinner at farm-to-table eatery Odette. No food tour of Florence would be complete without a stop at 100-year-old Trowbridge’s Ice Cream Parlor and Sandwich Shop. The menu includes hot dogs, sandwiches and old-time sodashop fare, but the orange-pineapple ice cream has been a fan favorite since 1918.

Odette

| PHOTO PROVIDED BY ABRAHAM ROWE PHOTOGRAPHY

When it’s time to stop for lunch, no trip to a Southern state is complete without a taste of barbecue, so try the pulled pork or smoked chicken at Bunyan’s Bar-B-Q. If it’s Italian you’re craving, Ricatoni’s serves “old-country” style dishes and pizzas fired in a handmade brick oven. The Factory

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| PHOTO PROVIDED BY ALABAMA CHANIN

Trowbridge’s

| PHOTO PROVIDED BY FLORENCE-LAUDERDALE TOURISM


ART & FASHION

Billy Reid

| PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHRIS GRANGER

Rosembaum House

| PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHRIS GRANGER

Three historic homes serve as galleries at the Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts on East Tuscaloosa Street in the heart of Florence. The center rotates exhibits that showcase pieces from nearby artists, including Ke Francis from Tupelo and Eric Bagwell from Huntsville. The Rosenbaum House museum, south of downtown Florence on Riverview Drive, is the only Frank Lloyd Wright structure in Alabama. Built in the 1930s for Florence newlyweds Stanley and Mildred Rosenbaum, the low-cost, modern design offered middle-class Americans a chance to fulfill the American dream. Add Florentine flair to your wardrobe at several shopping destinations in the Shoals. Visit acclaimed designer Billy Reid’s headquarters for high-fashion finds for both men and women. Another shopping staple is The Factory, housed in Alabama Chanin’s design and production studio. The brand’s flagship store features organic cotton-based apparel as well as accessories, home goods and products from local artisans. DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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WHEN THE WEATHER OUTSIDE IS FRIGHTFUL, THESE NORTH MISSISSIPPI-AREA AT T R A C T I O N S O F F E R P L E N T Y O F WAY S TO S TAY WA R M A N D C O M B AT C A B I N F E V E R. WRITTEN BY RACHEL A. ISHEE

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We Southerners are accustomed to our balmy weather, but this time of year we may be forced to put away our shorts, get out our coats and endure temperatures that drop below freezing.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

When the days are short and the air is chilly, there are still loads of fun activities in the area — most of which can be enjoyed from the comfort of the warm indoors.

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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT

ESCAPE ROOMS Nothing gets your heart racing like being locked in a room and having only an hour to escape. Escape rooms like America’s Escape Game in Oxford offer a choice of themed escape rooms with different levels of difficulty — visitors never know what challenges they are going to face. “Guests should expect a unique, interactive experience that will challenge their puzzle-solving skills,” owner Dylan Detlefsen said. “Nothing is more satisfying than going in with your friends and family and working together to escape the room in time.” Other escape rooms in north Mississippi include Paradox Challenge and Deadbolt Escape Rooms in Tupelo, The Escape Room in Corinth and The Locked Door Escape Games in Aberdeen. For more information about America’s Escape Game visit americasescapegame.com/oxford.

BANCORPSOUTH ARENA

America’s Great Escape | Oxford

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Besides ice-skating, BancorpSouth Arena has a lineup of family favorite shows in December and January. Disney on Ice makes a stop in Tupelo Dec. 6-9. Guests can expect to see some of their favorite characters take to the ice, including Lightning McQueen from “Cars,” Buzz Lightyear and Woody from “Toy Story,” and Anna and Elsa from “Frozen.” At Cirque du Soleil’s “Crystal,” Jan. 10-13, world-class iceskaters and acrobats come together to challenge the laws of gravity. The Harlem Globetrotters take to the court Jan. 21. For more information, visit bcsarena.com.


LEARN SOMETHING NEW

BETH HUNT CALLIGRAPHY Get ready to address all those holiday and thank-you cards. Throughout December and January, Beth Hunt Calligraphy in Oxford offers classes in which Hunt teaches basic modern calligraphy skills and brush lettering. “Once you know how to do it, it’s so relaxing and makes for a wonderful creative outlet,” Hunt said. “The slow pace of calligraphy is a complete departure from how we live our fast-paced lives, and I believe that’s one reason it’s gained so much popularity in recent years.” Sign up for a workshop at bethhuntcalligraphy.com/workshops.

MIDNITE POTTERY Since 1997, this group of self-taught potters has been creating decorative and functional pieces in their Tupelo studio. The new studio is a great space to hold classes and creative workshops. If you’d like to have pottery but prefer to leave the actual craftsmanship to professionals, Midnight Pottery also sells a wide selection of gorgeous pieces that range from traditional to eclectic. Find out about classes at facebook.com/midnitepottery.

STELLA After a successful summer wine-tasting class that focused on a variety of different wines and pairings, Stella on the Square is bringing back the popular course this winter. Up to four different wines will be tasted each week, and each will be offered with an accompanying food pairing. Attendees can expect to learn which wines pair best with certain foods. Classes are limited to 18 people. “Hopefully people will not only enjoy a great meal but also increase their chance at successful [food and wine] pairings in the future,” said Cindy Kirk, one of the owners of Stella. Find a list of classes at facebook.com/StellaRestaurantOxford.

Beth Hunt Calligraphy

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Crossroads Museum

MUSEUMS

If you’ve lived in north Mississippi your entire life, or even just a couple of years, but feel like you know nothing about the place, consider visiting Crossroads Museum in the historic depot in Corinth. Here, you can find artifacts that are hundreds and even thousands of years old. Some of the most popular exhibits include fossils, Native American artifacts and Civil War relics. More information about the museum and its exhibits is available at crossroadsmuseum.com.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett Museum A collection of heirlooms, artifacts and art is housed in the historic Bolling-Gatewood house in Holly Springs. The museum and cultural center commemorate Ida B. Wells-Barnett and African-American contributions to history, art and culture. Wells-Barnett was born a slave and became a teacher, a journalist, an activist for women’s and civil rights, and a founder of the NAACP. Operating hours vary; call 662252-3232.

The Magnolias Built in 1850 by Dr. William Alfred Sykes, The Magnolias is a stunning antebellum home located in Aberdeen. With its columned front porch and period furnishings, this Greek Revival home allows visitors to take a step back in time. The museum is open for daily tours and holds artifacts from the Sykes family as well as the Aberdeen area from the past 200 years. For more information, visit magnoliasofaberdeen.com.

Marshall County Historical Museum The Marshall County Historical Museum in Holly Springs is known as one of the most interesting and unusual destinations in the city. The topics the museum covers are vast, and displays range from Civil War artifacts and Victorian children’s books to mounted animals and original 1920s flapper girl clothing. No matter what your interests include, there is truly something here for everyone. Learn more at marshallcountymuseum.com.

Tupelo Automobile Museum

Ida B. Wells-Barnett Museum

Wander through this 120,000-square-foot museum with over 100 historic, rare and collectible cars worth more than $6 million. The self-guided chronological tour begins with an 1886 Benz and ends with a 1994 Dodge Viper that has never been driven but can go up to 188 mph. Other noteworthy cars in the collection include celebrityowned vehicles and the world’s only Camarovette. Viewing bays allow visitors to watch restorations underway. For more information, visit tupeloautomuseum.com.


STAY ACTIVE

HealthWorks! While the kids are out of school, HealthWorks! in Tupelo is a great place to take the entire family for fun and to learn about healthy life choices. The interactive exhibits and inside entertainment make it a popular location on chilly days. Some of the topics that are addressed in innovative ways include the human body, food and nutrition, healthy habits, and germs. “Little ones enjoy crawling through tunnels, the broccoli slide and filling up their baskets at the pretend farmers’ market, while older children get competitive while playing physical challenges and interactive quiz games,” said Rebekah Wilson, HealthWorks! implementation coordinator. On Jan. 26, the facility celebrates its 10th anniversary with a free birthday party that everyone is welcome to attend. More information is available at healthworkskidsms.org.

Skating Rinks BancorpSouth Arena in Tupelo has hosted public ice-skating for over 20 years. Director of Marketing Kevan Kirkpatrick said he has seen every age and demographic on the ice, from toddlers to senior citizens. The Mid-South Ice House in Olive Branch offers classes in skating, hockey and curling. For those who prefer wheels to blades, try Fun Time Roll-A-Rena in Pontotoc or The Skate Place in Oxford. Check websites or Facebook for more information.

Tupelo Aquatic Center Don’t let the cold weather stop you from enjoying a day at the pool. The Tupelo Aquatic Center is a state-of-the-art facility that offers healthy and fun programs for people of all ages. For news and upcoming events, visit facebook.com/tupeloaquatics.

Leisure Lifestyles of Oxford OPC’s Leisure Lifestyles program offers free classes year-round for those 40 years old and up. Aerobics, Pilates, yoga, tai chi, dance and pickleball are just a few ways to keep fit and make new friends during the winter months. For a complete list of classes, visit oxfordparkcommission.com.

HealthWorks!


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IN OXFORD AND DOWNTOWN IUKA, CAROLERS AND REVELERS C E L E B R AT E C H R I S TM A S T H E O L D -FA S H I O N E D WAY. WRITTEN BY SHANNA FL ASCHKA

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It started with a bunch of wigs and a group of costume-loving friends. When one of them suggested they don traditional Victorian garb and go around town together singing Christmas carols, the women all loved the idea. “Deborah Pittman had the idea three years ago,” caroler Reed Toms said. “When she mentioned it to us, we hit the ground running. She loves a themed costume party as much as I do and had the brilliant idea to carry that through into spreading some Christmas joy.” “My mom had cancer about 32-33 years ago, and she held on to the eight or so wigs all those years,” Pittman said. “When one day I noticed them sitting on a shelf in storage, I asked her if I could put them to use. I knew that my girlfriends and I could have some fun with them and, boy, have we!” With candles and songbooks in hand and period-appropriate costumes augmented by Pittman’s collection of wigs, the 10 or so women get together for one night on a weekend in December and go caroling doorto-door. Some of the group grew up together in Oxford, while others are transplants, but all are now close friends. “[We love] to bring smiles to others’ faces and have a grand time making forever memories with some of our besties while doing it,” Toms said. Besides Pittman and Toms, the original group includes Angela Maloney, Kristin Kelly, Elizabeth Williams, Anne Turan, Kate Porter, Stacy Lamberson and Jennifer Portera. Others have come and gone. They each devise their own costumes, so they appear with an eclectic mix of styles. “We each piece together our costumes

the things she loves about the event is just wearing the costumes (she admitted the wigs are her favorite part), unexpected moments definitely add to their good times. “There are so many hilarious memories,” Toms said. “Trying to use the ladies room in those hoop skirts; losing a few of our wigs at the Library sports bar after caroling there; our candles blowing out each time we sang because we had them so close to our mouths like microphones ... the list and laughs go on and on.” Any mishaps come with the territory, as Toms admitted that none of them are singers. “We wing it and probably don’t sound the best, but people still love it,” Toms said. A large part of what makes the night special for the group is the fun of spending time together. Reed Toms, Anne Turan, Angela Maloney, Elizabeth Williams and Deb Pittman “Before we head out for the night, we share some fancy Christmas The carolers plan a route each year drinks and appetizers,” Pittman said. “We based on the most efficient way to get to hang out and enjoy one another first.” as many houses as possible. Most of their The best part of all though, the carolers visits are to family and friends, but they also agree, is seeing how their happiness spreads include other people who have contacted to others. them through someone they visited before. “The fun in it for me is the endless They typically reach 8-10 houses, and their memories with lifelong friends and the pure audience is growing. joy and laughter we bring to people’s faces “We pop in on unsuspecting houses when we show up at their door,” Toms said. as well,” Toms said. “That makes for some “It’s part of the true Christmas spirit, isn’t great fun. We rent a 19-passenger van each it? Getting together with those who mean year and pile in, hoop skirts and all, with a the most to you and spreading joy.” driver [wearing] a suit and top hat. We go all The Victorian carolers hit the town on around Oxford.” Dec. 15 this year. They are limited in the Just like in Victorian times, those number of houses they can reach, but they who open their doors to the “wassailers” try to get to everyone who would be uplifted sometimes share a little “cheer” of their by their visit. own — like Toms’ mother, who warms up If you are interested in having the the carolers with a now-traditional shot of carolers come to your door, contact Pittman Fireball cinnamon whiskey. at deborahpittman@yahoo.com. Although Toms divulged that one of from all over,” Toms said. “Some order, some have them made, some run to Walmart, some get in their mother’s attic.” “Some do more authentic outfits, and others go for a silly, ‘trashy’ style,” Pittman said. “We have a plethora of looks. I’ve had a different one each year, but I’ve found ‘the one’ and am not going to use anything else from now on.”

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Gail Lyles, Anne Marie Brown, Kathy Merder Vogler, Rebecca Gray, Mary Ellis Gray and Matt Vogler

Those in Iuka also have a chance to step back in time with the ghost of Christmas past. The Iuka Development and Economic Association hosts its fifth annual Dickens Christmas 6-9 p.m. Dec. 21 in the historic downtown. Local residents decked out in Victorian costumes put on the volunteer-led event. Some of the highlights include carriage rides, a crafting area for kids, and carolers in the Jay Bird Park gazebo. A Victorian Santa will be there for free photos. One notable performer is Autry Davis, who performs Dickens-era poetry. Davis runs the Corinth-based nonprofit arts organization called the Crossroads Poetry Project and is known throughout the area as “the Poetry Man.” He has had a rich career in theater, with performances onstage and

on television. In his work with the poetry project, Davis tells stories and recites poetry in schools and at community events such as the Dickens Christmas. Event manager Shana Hollon said a number of vendors attend, including skilled artisans selling items like handcrafted jewelry. According to Hollon, many of the stores in the area will stay open as well. “[The vendors] all sell handmade arts and crafts,” Hollon said. “Everything from candles and soap to pillows, woodwork and more.” Attendees will find plenty of places to eat. Nearby restaurants include a new cafe, Bread & Butter, that specializes in homestyle comfort food and baked desserts, as well as the Front Street Snack Bar, a historic eatery that dates back to the early

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PHOTOS PROVIDED BY IDEA

Autry Davis

1900s. The tiny shack, which is sandwiched between two younger buildings, is famous locally for its slugburgers and hamburgers. “Local churches and civic organizations will also be there, serving soups, cider and hot chocolate,” Hollon said. “It’s a real community celebration.” Another draw to the event is a truly un-Scrooge-like tradition: Every year, IDEA holds a giveaway of five $100 bills. Anyone who shops at selected stores in the downtown area in the weeks before and during the event gets tickets for the raffle. Along with all these reasons to make the trip to Tishomingo County, Hollon said there’s also always a surprise. Last year a snow machine delighted attendees with a snow machine. This year it’s still in the works, but Iuka might just have a skating rink for a day.


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We all know how to celebrate New Year’s in the South — eat hoppin’ John (rice and black-eyed peas with onion) for good luck. But did you also know you should eat pork, not chicken, because chickens scratch backward and pigs root forward? We’re not the only ones with interesting traditions for ringing in the holiday. Here are some fascinating ways that people say “Happy New Year” in other parts of the world — from friends and neighbors right here in our own little corner of the cotton patch. COMPILED BY ALLISON ESTES

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ILLUSTRATED BY SAR AH McCULLEN


Prosit Neujahr

Feliz Año Nuevo

G ERMANY

S PA IN

New Year’s Eve in Germany is called Silvester. It is the saint’s day of Pope Silvester, who died Dec. 31, 335. The holiday includes old traditions that have been passed along over the years. One of these traditions is the “Bleigiessen” or “lead pouring.” A small amount of lead is melted in a tablespoon held over a flame and then poured into a bowl of cold water. The ensuing shape is supposed to predict what will happen in the coming year. A ball is supposed to bring you luck, an anchor means help in a difficult situation, a fish means a great vacation, etc. At midnight, people welcome the new year with champagne, wishing everyone “Prosit Neujahr” (Happy New Year).

Spain has two very solid traditions to celebrate the new year: We eat 12 grapes during the last 12 seconds of Dec. 31, and we follow the countdown on television. For this occasion, a historic clock in La Puerta del Sol square in Madrid makes the last 12 bells of the year sound with special intensity, while Spaniards attempt to swallow one grape per ring of the bell. This is not an easy endeavor and only the very skilled can perform it with perfection. (Even though it is unacceptable, some prepare their grapes ahead of time by peeling them and removing the pits.) Apparently, this tradition was consolidated in 1909, a year when grape farmers had a production surplus that needed to be sold.

H A N N E G AYC K E N, OX F O R D

CARMEN SANCHIS-SINISTERRA, OXFORD

Akemashite Omedeto Gozaimasu J A PA N

In Japan, New Year’s is the most important holiday of the year. People celebrate by eating a special meal called osechi ryori and a lot of mochi (rice cake) with their family and relatives. The colorful dishes in osechi ryori are neatly put together in special boxes called jubako, and each dish has a special meaning. For example, ebi (skewered prawns), cooked with sake and soy sauce, symbolizes a wish for long life because of its shape like an old man with a long beard and bent waist. Tai (red snapper) is considered special because it is part of the Japanese word medetai, which means “auspicious.” Kazunoko (herring roe) is another common osechi dish. “Kazu” means “number” and “ko” means “children” in Japanese, so kazunoko symbolizes a wish to be gifted with many children in the new year. Many people visit local Shinto shrines to pray for good health and luck in the new year. During their visit, they often try their luck by drawing an omikuji paper. They can find their fortune for the year written on the paper. Another New Year’s tradition for Japanese children is otoshidama, which is cash offered by parents, grandparents, relatives or sometimes family friends. New bills are usually used for otoshidama and put in beautiful, small special envelopes. Some kids spend it for toys they’ve wanted to get, while others save for the future. RYOKO WATANABE, TUPELO


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Manigong Bagong Taon P H ILIP P IN E S

My mother is from the Philippines and my father is from Kerala in South India, but I was born in Chicago. My husband is from Kansas. One New Year’s Eve tradition that we’ve kept as we blended families is the “Media Noche” (Tagalog for “midnight”), a giant midnight feast on New Year’s Eve. It’s not uncommon to have a table full of pancit, lumpia (Filipino egg rolls), a curry of some sort, samosas and desserts like leche flan. In the Philippines we light fireworks, but here we’ve adapted that to sparklers in the driveway. Our kids are supposed to jump as high as they can at the stroke of midnight to help them grow tall in the future, and everyone jingles coins in their pockets or hands for prosperity. AIMEE NEZHUKUMATATHIL, OXFORD

Saehae Bok Mani Badeuseyo

S Novim Godom

KO REA

RU S S IA

Every Korean New Year, which is based on the lunar calendar, families gather together to celebrate. One of the common traditions is receiving money from the elders. We children would line up in front of them and bow down to the ground with the forehead touching the ground as a sign of respect. In return we would get an envelope filled with money from our grandparents, aunts and uncles. My family was fairly large, so it was a good payday for me and my sisters! JI HOON HEO, OXFORD

In Russia, New Year’s Eve is a big celebration everyone loves. It always smells like mandarins, like fruit trees, and it’s usually snowing. People do fireworks. We eat and drink together. Lots of salads — olivie, which is like a potato salad on steroids, and a salad with pickled herring called “herring under a fur coat” because it has layers of vegetables. We bake savory pies big or small, sweet pies, pickled herring. Children get bags of sweet treats. There is a sleigh pulled by three horses, with Grandfather Frost and Snow Girl. Grandfather Frost wears red and white and has a white beard; Snow Girl wears blue and white and has a long braid. (Actors go around and do that — then they get drunk!) There is a clock tower on the Red Square. Usually after the bell rings 12 o’clock we drink champagne, and the celebration keeps going on into the night. We don’t kiss. VERA PA, OXFORD

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Feliz Año Nuevo

Xinnian Gongxi

CO LO MBIA

TA IWA N

The Chinese New Year is celebrated in Taiwan as one of the major festivals. Just like Thanksgiving in the U.S., it is a time for people who work out of town or abroad to go home and enjoy delicious dinners with family. Sweeping and cleaning the house is a metaphor for welcoming a bright new year. Eating dumplings and fish means good fortune and prosperity. Of course, for children a New Year cannot be complete if they don’t get a hong bao, a red envelope with money their parents or relatives give to them so the children won’t grow too fast. CHENG-FU CHEN, OXFORD

The end of the old year and the beginning of the new one is a very exciting time for all Colombians. At the striking of the clock at midnight, the head of the household wishes God’s blessings on each family member. At this time, everybody gets a glass of champagne with 12 grapes in it. Each grape stands for a new resolution or a wish. People of all ages participate in this tradition, including little children who look forward to the event (they get nonalcoholic sangria instead of champagne). They start eating each grape as they wish one another a happy new year. Soon after, everybody goes outside to watch the burning of the Old-Year Man, which is dressed up in a suit and hat and is stuffed with fireworks. This is quite a spectacle to see. ELIANA CUMMINS, OXFORD

Hosa Varsada Subhasaya S O U TH

IN D IA

Ugadi, the Hindu New Year, is celebrated in spring and symbolizes leaving behind the past and starting afresh. On that day we usually wake up early, take an oil bath, and dress in new traditional clothing and jewelry. We do rangoli — beautiful designs on the floor, made with colored powder. We decorate with flowers and pray to the Indian god idols. We cook special dishes, in particular Bevu Bella — “bevu” means “bitterness” and “bella” means “sweetness.” This dish is made from a mixture of ingredients, each with a distinct taste symbolizing some aspect of life: bitter neem, tamarind, chili, unripe mango, salt, and jaggery (sugar). The meaning of it is that we accept both hard and easy times equally in life. KAVITHA SATHISH, OXFORD

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Bhlain Nua Sasta IRE L A N D

When I think of New Year’s Eve or Day I immediately think of two things. One is first-footing — the practice of visiting a neighbor or friend as a way to welcome in the new year. Anytime after midnight the first-footer comes through the door. The person who first-foots is usually someone who is dark-haired and relatively dark-complected. And traditionally they carry bread and coal: bread as a way to initiate having enough food for the new year, and coal to have warmth. Now it’s become more about the warmth of spirit, not just physical warmth, and a way to extend friendship to neighbors. And the other tradition, on New Year’s Day, is called hunting the wren. In the distant past, the bird was actually hunted and put in a cage, and children would take it around and ask for money to release the wren. But then it got to be perceived to be cruel to catch little birds, so in modern times it was just children going around, getting money. And there’s a song they sing, “Hunting the Wren”: “The wren, the wren, the king of all birds, New Year’s Day he’s caught in the furze (gorse bush), Although he is little his family is great, We pray you good people to give us a ‘trait’ (treat).” BILL MEARNS, OXFORD

Feliz Año Nuevo PARAGUAY

In Paraguay, New Year’s falls in the middle of summer and is one of the country’s most celebrated holidays. Family and friends gather on New Year’s Eve to bring in the new year, a festive time with food, music and togetherness. The house is decorated with lights, and fragrant coconut blooms are set around the house and the yard. Guests are welcomed with a refreshing glass of clericó: chopped fruit, such as grapes, apples, cantaloupe and peaches, covered in orange juice and sweet wine. People start eating around 10 p.m. and continue past midnight. Everyone brings their favorite dish to set on a long table. This might be a salad, fresh fruit, or sopa paraguaya, a corn-based casserole. Grilled steak, chicken and sausage, served with a side of boiled yucca, are the centerpiece. And lots of desserts. At midnight there are fireworks, and everyone celebrates with a toast and warm wishes for the new year. SANDRA, ROBERT, SARA AND ANNA MAGEE, OXFORD

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#I N VI TATI ON N EW YE AR Share your story with us! P o s t a b o u t y o u r N e w Ye a r ’ s traditions using the hashtag #invitationnewyear for a chance to be featured on our social media pages.


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KEEPING THE DREAM ALIVE I N OX F O R D A N D T U P E L O, M L K H O L I D AY T R A D I T I O N S F O R A L L A G E S H O N O R K I N G ’ S L E G A C Y. WRIT TEN BY LENA MITCHELL

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I

t was 1986 when Martin Luther King Jr. Day was first observed as a federal holiday. Not long after, Tupelo city officials created a group charged with leading an annual celebration of King’s life and legacy. In 1987, city officials appointed human resources director Charles Penson to organize Tupelo’s Committee for King. Penson, now executive director, has been involved ever since. Over the holiday weekend, the committee sponsors four events celebrating the core principles of the iconic civil rights leader: racial harmony, equality and justice for all. In 2019, the Committee for King will be in its 32nd year. “We just want as much community involvement as possible, and everybody’s a winner,” Penson said. A Sunday afternoon sermon with performances by local church drill teams was the first event held by the Committee for King in 1987 and is a feature each year. That first commemoration service concluded with volunteers from local businesses and the city of Tupelo preparing and serving a meal at the close of the program. Since then the weekend has expanded to include Apollo Night on Friday, a blacktie banquet on Saturday evening, and a Monday morning motorcade followed by a worship service. “Continuing the legacy of Dr. King is almost a dream for me,” said Janette Kirk, this year’s chairwoman of the Committee for King weekend and a volunteer for more than 25 years. Each event throughout the weekend is a celebration of community unity. In that spirit the committee reaches out to area churches, announcing the events and inviting young people to participate in Apollo Night. “Helping with youth and Apollo Night is where I started as a volunteer,” Kirk said. Most of the Apollo Night participants are church praise teams, drama teams, singing groups and soloists. Though each group has its rooting section and supporters, it’s not really a competition where there is a single winner. Everyone gets a kick out of the fact that they all go home with a trophy. “Apollo Night is always college-age

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youths and younger,” Penson said. “And we have an adult group to perform an opening and during intermission, as well as an Apollo Night band for backup and any lulls in the program.” Saturday evening’s Black-Tie Affair is at Tupelo’s Summit Center. Tickets are $30. The keynote speaker is Dr. Beverly Hogan, president of Tougaloo College in Jackson, one of the nation’s historically black colleges and universities. The banquet honors Image Award winner Ollie Collins, owner of WSEL radio station 96.7, and Community Service Award winner Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi. The Image Award is for talent, and according to Penson is the committee’s version of an Emmy Award. Collins is being honored for numerous appearances singing

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in area church programs at no charge. The Community Service Award to Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi is in recognition of the company’s support for education in northeast Mississippi with grants, school and community service projects, and other initiatives. A service on Sunday afternoon commemorating King features keynote speaker Dr. Rob Picou, superintendent of the Tupelo Public School District. The Mississippi State University Black Voices will perform, along with area drill teams and the MLK Community Choir, among others. The service includes a presentation of the Drum Major Award to Plantersville Mayor Shelton Shannon. This award is given to someone who embodies the principles King stood for — equality, justice, compassion


and exemplifying a spirit of unity and harmony in the community. On the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday Monday, a motorcade begins at 11 a.m. at the VFW Mall on Eason Boulevard. The route through downtown Tupelo concludes at St. Paul Christian Life Center on North Front Street with a program by the Modern Beauticians Club and a message from the Rev. Randy Jones, pastor of St. Paul United Methodist Church. The club, along with the Committee for King, presents scholarships to deserving students at the event.

While the four-day Committee for King celebration in Tupelo is the largest celebration of King’s life and legacy in the state, many other communities have found ways to honor King. In Oxford, Square Books has observed the holiday in different ways over the years. In 2017, the staff organized a community reading of King’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail.” Store manager Lyn Roberts said they plan to continue the tradition. The first year, more than 30 readers, including community activists, members of various churches, people from the arts community, the University of Mississippi and local businesses each took turns reading from the letter. “We wanted to change it up a bit the next year, so we decided to target young people, teens and tweens and had them do the reading,” Roberts said. “They were excellent readers, very engaged, and did a great job. It was so great to hear how meaningful this very important document is and how much people appreciated being reminded.” The 2019 reading will be done by women, Roberts said. A sign-up sheet for those who would like to volunteer to read will be available in the store. “At the end of last year’s event, we discussed where to go with it this year and thought, it’s time to get women’s voices out there,” Roberts said. “We welcome anyone to sign up and take a slot. The parts are sectioned off for each reader. For me, it’s powerful to hear all the different voices.” DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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THACKER MOUNTAIN RADIO PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

Thacker Mountain Radio Hour hosted a University of Mississippi homecoming show Oct. 18 at the Lyric Oxford. The guests included Cary Hudson, Taylor Hunnicutt, Jeff Roberson and Jim Weatherly. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Hannah Kimborough, Kevin Ann Weatherly and Evelyn Claire Kimborough 2. Rowland, Margaret and Cynthia Herron 3. Wilson Webb and Rosie McDavid 4. Pam Malone and Cathy Herren 5. Ed and Lisa Gregory 6. Susan Hayman and Suzan DeLoach 7. Sally and John Williams 8. Katie and Dee Lovelace 9. Mary Alice and Donny White

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HARVEST SUPPER PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH McCULLEN

Friends of the University of Mississippi Museum hosted the sixth annual Harvest Supper Oct. 18 on the grounds of Rowan Oak in Oxford. The event included dinner, live music and an art auction. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Paul and Anna Koshenina with Tom Howorth 2. Lynn Wells with Dick and Claire Dickerson 3. Brett Richards, Lenwood Brooks and Robert Murray 4. Meg Sinervo and Matt Wallace 5. Mary Thompson and Donna Gotshall 6. Susan and Guy Mitchell 7. John and Katey Haltom 8. Doug and Terri Sanford 9. Jaquon Irby and Jessica Johnson 10. Brenda Catherine Schaffer and Alex Kiamie 11. Kirk Purdom and Hal Moore 12.Terry and Sharmana Lynn 13. Robert and Bobby McConnell

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THE GREAT 38 RACE PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALICE McCULLEN

The Great 38 Race Weekend was held Oct. 26-28 on the campus of the University of Mississippi. The event, presented by Ole Miss Athletics, included Visit Oxford’s Health & Race Expo along with 5K, 8-mile and half-marathon races. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Mary Grubbs, Emma Overstreet and Mary Margaret White 2. Cynthia Norsworthy and Leigh Puckett 3. Jennifer and Duane Froud 4. Teresa Johnston, Amber Cook, Shane Johnston 5. Mandy Roberts and Mark Pierce 6. Zach, Abigail, Michael and Laura Hipp 7. John and Terri Hurd

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DUCKS UNLIMITED PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH McCULLEN

The Oxford-Lafayette chapter of Ducks Unlimited held its annual banquet Nov. 16 at Castle Hill Resort in Oxford. The banquet is a fundraiser event to support DU’s mission of conserving, restoring and managing waterfowl habitats. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Russell Cook, Hayes Osborn and Hayden Hicks 2. Jake and Justin Bonds with Joey Dooley 3. Gabe and Joey Stuckey 4. James Carden and Michelle Mazza 5. Randy and Trina Bishop 6. Dodd Jones and Chancey Boutwell 7. Duvall Flautt, Alex Ossorio and James Jefferson 8. Jerry Rogers and Mary Aquino

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ARTIST RECEPTION PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

Southside Gallery in Oxford hosted an artist reception Oct. 19 for its “Unnatural History” exhibition. Featured artists included Blair Hobbs, Lee Harper, Adrienne Brown-David and Joe Barbera. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Katelynn Dillard, Adrienne Brown-David and Sunny Baker 2. Cindy Nichols and Debbie Wooldridge with Joli and Bessie Rose Nichols 3. Kurtis Bryant, Zion David and Tom Kirkpatrick 4. Jack Barbera and Ann Odell 5. Jonathan Kent Adams and Clay Jones 6. Greta Koshenina and Stephen Steenwyk 7. Natalie Bryant, Claire Mischker and Coulter Fussell 8. Isis Arantes and Kevin Felker

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DRINK PINK PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH McCULLEN

The University of Mississippi chapter of Colleges Against Cancer held Drink Pink, its third annual bar crawl fundraiser, Oct. 25 at various locations on the Oxford Square. Proceeds from the event benefit the American Cancer Society. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Jordan Healy, Kaylee Carlone and Lauren Peters 2. Maggie Weber, Madison Huffman and Lauren Stalcup 3. Allison Suter and Olivia Buquoi 4. Reed Keen, Gracie Watkins and Leo Marin 5. Ethan Robinson and Jenn Ventura 6. Mallory Long and Lindsey Duncan 7. Summer Jefferson and Micah Uline 8. Reece Crumpler and Andrew Ladner

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JROTC MARINE CORPS BALL PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALISE McCREARY

Oxford High School’s Marine Corps Junior ROTC program held its Marine Corps 243rd Birthday Ball Nov. 9 at the Powerhouse in Oxford. The event featured a formal dinnerdance. Retired Marine Corps Master Sgt. Gene Hayes was the guest speaker. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Drew and Kelley Clinton 2. Daryl Fogerty and Sam Jo 3. Lawson Brines and Mark Berger 4. Rick and Jennifer Hollander 5. Holly and Steven Jubera 6. Precious Malone, Kiana Burt, Jakayla McIntosh and Jazzmyne Malone 7. Seongbong Jo and Jeong Jolee

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DELTA WATERFOWL PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALISE McCREARY

The Oxford/Lafayette County chapter of Delta Waterfowl hosted its annual banquet Nov. 10 at The Farmstead on Woodson Ridge. The event included dinner, an auction, a general raffle and a goose band raffle. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Carter, Sara Bradley, Toni, Cooper and Brad Ewing 2. Austin and Sara Grace Wallace with Bubba and Regina Daniels 3. Blake Barnes with Jim and Drew Windham and Susan Tollar 4. Jackson, Mary and Taylor Mooney with Matthew Hill 5. James Lowstuter and Walker Huston 6. John and Erin Cromeans 7. Kevin and Luke Shankle with Eli Jones 8. Will Traylor and Tate Russell

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OLE MISS VS. MS STATE PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALICE McCULLEN

The Ole Miss women’s soccer team hosted Mississippi State Oct. 21 in front of the largest crowd in Ole Miss Soccer Stadium history. The Rebels beat the Bulldogs 2-0 to retain the Magnolia Cup for the fifth consecutive season. View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Haley Hooper, Bee Ritcher and Sarah Grace Lasso 2. Kara Krekorian and Brayden Carpenter 3. Molly Martin, Zharia Metcalf, Lonnie Mulligan and Alyssa Stanford 4. Chris, Emma Claire and Tammy Pierce 5. Aaron Sharp, Christian Moorehead, Atticus Dale and Larkin Dowling 6. V.O. and Sharon Little 7. Maddison Medina and Hannah Lochiatto 8. Jack Treadway, Jamarcus Brooks and Alahaje Bah

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ONE NIGHT STAND ART SHOW PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN WOLFE

The 12th annual One Night Stand Art Show took place Oct. 13 at the Ole Miss Motel in Oxford. The event featured 10 hotel rooms showcasing different artists, food, drinks and pop-up art lessons for children. 1

View more photos at invitationoxford.com.

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1. Katelyn Stevens, Marian Barksdale, Taariq David and Mary Bryan Barksdale 2. Mary Blessey, Shannon Curtis, Cynthia Joyce and Corbin Evans 3. Ashni Brown, Adrienne Brown-David and Beverly Brown 4. Olivia Whittington with Rebekah and Nathalie Flake 5. Timothy and Nicole Yenter 6. Stevi Self and Gretchen Williams 7. Robert Saarnio and Andi Bedsworth 8. Katy Vinroot and John Martin

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OUT & ABOUT VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONOXFORD.COM

O ut of t he D a rk ne s s Wa l k

C A SA Swe a r i n g- I n C e re mo ny

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Ju n io r Au x i l i a r y C a m p Bat s a nd Ba l l s

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1. Carey Neal, Erin Smith and Terry Alves-Hunter 2. Joe Shields and Lacy Morelock with Fiona, Cassie and Jennifer Shields 3. Stephen and Katherine Pannell 4. Margaret Neely, Whitney Reese and Beth Chamblee 5. Janet and Rickie Burnette 6. Waide Fortenberry and Carl Lafferty 7. Cori Johnson and Kaden Dukes

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OUT & ABOUT CONTINUED ON PAGE 120

O x ford O r t hopaed ic s Meet & Greet

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Discou nt Bu i ld i ng Mater ia ls O pen House

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Ja ke G i b b s’ Bi r t hd ay C e le b rat io n

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Ma ke Somet h i ng G ood Today Book Sig n i ng

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OH S Bre a s t C a nc e r Awa re ne s s Wa l k

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1. Steven and Sara Blackwood 2. Sabrina, Chad, Rachael and Wanda Lowry 3. Ben and Erin Napier 4. Jake Gibbs, Rory Terrell and Rick Ziblich 5. Leslie Purvis, Anne Ferrell and Jane Hubbard 6. Cameron Turnage and Michelle Boyd 7. Grace Logan, Brian Harvey and Lauren Sink

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OUT & ABOUT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 119

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Ba p t i s t C a nc e r C e nt e r P i n k O ut D ay

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Un ive r s it y of M i s s i s s i p p i Fo o d D ay Fe s t iva l

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Fa l l C u lt u ra l Rou nd Ta ble

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1. Kim Swanner, Tabitha Elam and Ginny Brown 2. Tiffany Moak, Tabitha Burk, Jamie Petty and Jennifer Harrell 3. David Lenard and Mike Magee 4. Santana Amaker, Annie Siebenaler and Victoria Inghram 5. Rachel Vanderford and Valerie Ewing 6. Damon Burks and Baldwin Chin 7. Gay and Steve Case

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SALTILLO C AREER DAY PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The 12th annual Saltillo Elementary School Career Fair took place Oct. 26 in Saltillo. The event exposed students to a wide variety of possible future careers with more than 30 participants and displays. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Hayden Long with Brady and Casey Bruce, Braxton Sandlin and Cameron Harris 2. Madison Padgett, Lexi Ray, Cadillac Aguilar, Addie Mar McCoy, Mary Pat Hancock, Anna May and Anthony Holguin 3. Kennedy Starks, Addie Moore, Louis Conley and Carson Evers 4. Malaki Pharr, Colton Griggs, Leah Bruce, Jesse Peacock and Melonnie Wilson 5. Taylor Hill, Allie Bean and Spencer Maddox 6. JaKinady Jennings and Walt Wilkins 7. Nathan Sheffield with Kelso Jackson, Peanut Graves and Evee Sheffield 8.Jesse Bandre with Kyrese Lucas, Michael Jenkins and Haydn Hood 9. Jovin Hamilton with Kenndy Neal, Caitlin Figge and Jacob Coggins

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CELEBRATION VILL AGE PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The 17th annual Celebration Village holiday market took place Oct. 25-27 at Tupelo Furniture Market. Proceeds from the event benefit Sanctuary Hospice House.

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1. Ashley Bowles, Donna Hussey and Summer Gorman 2. Glenda Reeder, Paige Holland and Amy Reeder 3. Sharon Young, Rosemary Wilson and Sheryl Blackburn 4. Raquel Hardin, Rosemary Reed, Rachel Morris and Jeannine Peters 5. Misty Bailey and Tanya Carr 6. Jennifer Locke and Ainsleigh Dunn 7. Betty Mayfield, Debbie Wiley and Sarah Jenkins 8. Searcy Swain and Shelby Bickes 9. Sandy Jackson and Rebecca Harrison 10. Amanda Dunaway and Dorothy Thompson

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HUMANE SOCIETY OPENING PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The Tupelo-Lee Humane Society held a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for its new shelter Oct. 30 in Tupelo. The new facility is 20,000 square feet, three times bigger than the old building, and can house up to 450 animals. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Michelle Turba, Jay Quimby, Kim Willis, Jason Shelton and Rachel Allred 2. Kim Willis, Cody Decker, William Davenport and Scott Davidson 3. Mike Bryan, Feather Burns and Kim Napier 4. Montana Moody, Brandy Blair, Hannah and Shan Mattox, and Gloria Easter 5. Kim Ketterman, Justin Posey and Lacey Williams 6. Emily Word, Martha Dale and Sheryl Blackburn 7. Jennifer and Jonathon Greer with Marleena Thrasher and Tara Christian 8. Lauren Scott, Madison Wilson and Hannah Michael 9. Judy Robbins and Jessica Hawkins 10. Kaitlyn Hester and Maddie Hillhouse DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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TUPELO MAKER’S MARKET PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The first Tupelo Maker’s Market took place Nov. 10 at the Tupelo Farmers’ Depot. The event featured vendors selling food, handcrafted goods, artwork, curated vintage finds and more. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Daphne and Tensley Taylor 2. Maddie Ludt, Ali Ballard and Christy Stewart 3. Jordan West, Melanie Cumming, Barbara Eaton and Glen Payne 4. Brian and Tennille Hubbard 5. Amy Kirby and Malorie Payne 6. Chuck and Sandy Shumaker 7. Wynn and Sallie Belle Howell

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THE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND PHOTOGRAPHED BY WHITNEY WORSHAM

The Marshall Tucker Band performed a live show Nov. 8 at Crossroads Arena in Corinth. Special guests included Prowler and Noah Richardson & The 60 Cycle Hum.

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6 1. Dianne and Jerry Beck 2. Jerome and Carol Baker

3. Breck and Charlotte Curtis with Lesley Graham and Guy Curtis 4. Tim and Brianna Scobey with Heather Kocurek 5. Gary Henson, Theresa Smith and Jackie Atkins 6. Brandy Isbell and Lori Horn 7. Virginia Smith with Pam and Steve Foster

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PIGSKINS ALL-AMERICA BBQ PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The Pigskins All-America City BBQ CookOff was held Nov. 10 at Fairpark in Tupelo. The tailgate-themed event included college football games on the big screen, a tailgating contest and a barbecue cookoff. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Lori Hoard, Tracye Nance and Janice Driskell 2. Mitch Beard, Randy Burchfield, Dianne Powell and Bobby Geno 3. Charlie Barber, Kim Dill, JD Wood, Rachel Wood and Jacob Bean 4. Christen Harville and Amanda Daniel 5. Patty Phillips and Catherine Baldwyn 6. Kasey Manly, Kristin Logan and Kenzie Pennington 7. Sajan Zaver and Felicia Patel 8. Bradley Michael with Maeve 9. Collin and Trish Bair 10. Louis and Jenea Britton

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CORINTH OPEN HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHED BY WHITNEY WORSHAM

Main Street Corinth hosted its annual Christmas Open House Nov. 10 at various shops downtown and in the SoCo District. Guests enjoyed refreshments and holiday music while they shopped. View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Jeffrey, Lindsey and Jack Williams 2. Hannah Avent and Jordan Brawner 3. Ella Davis and Kate Walker Williams 4. Abby Lyles, Madison McAnally, Alyson Roach and Carli Bullard 5. Hannah Avent and Jordan Brawner 6. Harlie Dover, Julianna Potts and Bayleigh Pounders with Fitz 7. Ashley Clausel and Todd Feazell 8. Lilly Kate and Molly Grace Morelock 9. Trudy Berryman and Leah Manus

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TASTE OF TUPELO PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The Community Development Foundation held the 12th annual Taste of Tupelo Nov. 8 at BancorpSouth Arena. The premier business networking expo was presented by Magnolia Business Center and included a range of vendors, from restaurants to banks. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Kaylan Faust, Ryan Roper and Nerissia Watkins 2. Josh and Lindsey Humber with Carrie Buse and B.J. Kent 3. Melissa Sutton, Tonya Hensley, Donnie Kisner, Libby Adams and Jonathan McCoy 4. Katie Buller, Misty Coleman and Jeb Bristow 5. Teranda Campbell, Dakota Wilson, Ariel Watkins, Lakyen Mathis, Luther Murphree and Nicholas Holland 6. Ken Williams, Jimmy Ward, Donna Aycock, Karen Jenkins, Leslie Pettey and Kristi Hillhouse 7. Chelsea Aycock and Shannon Fryery 8. Matthew Kimbrough, Leslie Sheffield, Will Foley and Lauren Bell 9. Juanita Floyn and Kalyen Gambrel

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TANGLEFOOT TROT PHOTOGRAPHED BY LISA ROBERTS

The 2018 CATCH Kids Tanglefoot Trot took place Nov. 10 in downtown Pontotoc. The annual event included a 5K, 10K and 1-mile fun run, and proceeds benefit the organization’s free health care clinics in Chickasaw, Lee and Pontotoc counties. 1

View more photos at invitationmag.com.

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1. Blair Rice, Amanda Stark and Murry Collum 2. Misty Dobbs, Nikki Lynn Sanchez and Kristi Hall 3. Brandi Embrey, Kathryn Cobb, Valerie Long and Renee Creely 4. Mackenzie Watkins, Chloe Buchanan and Addyson Pippin 5. Kelly Hill and Erica Martin 6. Jessica Rhodes, Ramona Buttrum and Mandie Payne 7. Bailey, Barbara and Alex Drennan with Caleia Leggan 8. Liz Dawson and Kristi Luse

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OUT & ABOUT VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONM AG.COM

Wa l k to E nd A l z he i me r ’s

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U M -Tu p e lo H a l lowe e n

O r t ho pae d ic I n s t it ut e of No r t h M S O p e n Hou s e

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1. Annie Williams and Shelia Neighbors 2. Niva Kitchens with Martha and Jake Nobles and Ann Musgrove 3. Coley Thompson, Anita Holley and Corey Crippen 4. Ronnie and Judy Steele 5. Jed Dixon and Mahogany Bell 6. Dawn and Kristen Kelly 7. Kali Clayton, Claire McNeese and Valerie Wigington 8. Nels Thorderson, Eric Lewis, Gabe Rulewicz, William Pillow, Barry Clark, Bryan Fagan and Stephen Southwort

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OUT & ABOUT VIEW MORE PHOTOS AT INVITATIONM AG.COM

Ba ldw y n H i s to r ic D i s t r ic t C h r i s t m a s O p e n Hou s e

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S a lt i l lo Ve t e ra n s D ay C e re mo ny

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1. Jenna Massengill, Paige Wood and Darbi Burns 2. Gracie Robbins, Ashleigh Flurry, Sara Beth Howell and Mallory Martin 3. Catelyn Eller, Kenzie Pennington and Haylee Smith 4. Jason Harrelson, Ben Jones and Pete Harrelson 5. Nichole Sanderson, Emma Cate Sparks and John Bryant Stanford 6. Saltillo High School Choir 7. McKenzie Jones, Benjamin Webb, Lily Hill and Gavin Gittleson

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MISSISSIPPI’S BEST

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MISSISSIPPI’S BEST

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Winter M O C K T A I L S to C O C K T A I L S CELEBRATE THE SEASON WITH THESE FESTIVE WINTER DRINKS. THE BASIC RECIPES ARE MADE WITHOUT ALCOHOL SO ALL AGES CAN PARTAKE. A D D A N O U N C E O R T W O O F L I Q U O R T O R E A L LY G E T I N T H E H O L I D AY S P I R I T. RECIPES BY KIMME HARGROVE

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE WORTHEM

QUICK CLASSIC EGGNOG 6 egg yolks ½ cup sugar 1 cup whipping cream 2 cups whole milk 2 teaspoons ground nutmeg Pinch of salt ½ teaspoon vanilla extract Whole nutmeg (for garnish) Whisk egg yolks and sugar until creamy. In a saucepan, heat cream, milk, nutmeg and salt on low until just about to boil. Turn heat off. Temper the eggs by slowly ladling the warm cream mixture into them, while quickly whisking to combine. Once all is combined, pour mixture back into saucepan, and cook on low heat, stirring constantly, for about 8 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Pour into a container, seal and chill in the refrigerator. Serve in small metal mugs or tumblers, or in punch cups. Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg. HOLIDAY SPIRIT:

Add 1-2 ounces rum, whiskey or brandy to each just before serving. DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 | INVITATION

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RECIPES

Winter M O C K T A I L S to C O C K T A I L S continued

CITRUS MOSCATO SANGRIA 2 grapefruit, thinly sliced into wheels 4 large oranges (2 blood oranges if available), thinly sliced into wheels 2 tablespoons honey 2 cups sparkling water, chilled Juice of 1 large lemon One 750-milliliter bottle sparkling white grape juice, chilled Place all fruit slices in a serving pitcher. Add honey, stir and let sit for at least 30 minutes. Add the chilled sparkling water and juices. Serve over ice in stemless wineglasses, with fruit from the pitcher as garnish.

SPICED APPLE CIDER 8 cups apple cider 2 cups orange juice 4 whole cinnamon sticks 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 orange, thinly sliced into wheels

HOLIDAY SPIRIT:

Combine all the ingredients in a slow cooker. Cook on low heat 3-4 hours or on high 1-2 hours at a minimum. The longer it cooks, the more spiced the drink will be, so add 1 cup water for each additional hour it cooks. Serve warm in large mugs or tumblers. Garnish each with a cinnamon stick and an orange wheel.

Add 1/4 cup Grand Marnier or your favorite orange liqueur, and replace sparkling white grape juice with one 750-milliliter bottle chilled Moscato wine.

Add 11/2 ounces brandy to each serving.


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INVITATION | DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019

HOLIDAY SPIRIT:


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Invitation Oxford - December 2018/January 2019  

Invitation Oxford - December 2018/January 2019  

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