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D OT E MAG AZINE . a well-styled and meaningful life issue six

spring/summer 2017


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GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Michelle Radomski

A Styled Home - pages 34-70

Ashley Hamilton

Market Collective: Fo' Drizzle - page 80 Nesting With Intention - page 116 Man With a Passion: Live Better, Not Bigger - page 124

Anastacia Jido

Beauty + Blooms: Coming Up Tulips - page 20

COPY EDITORS Heather Wensrich Cheryl Manness Heidi Brown Krystle Pederson Stacey Sitter Roda Michael Maggie Toth

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S IN THIS ISSUE

NATURALLY: BRINGING HOLISTIC LIVING HOME

73

HOW TO GROW A SALAD GARDEN

76

FROM THE FARM

88

TO THE TABLE

92

YES WAY ROSÉ

108

NESTING WITH INTENTION: SLOW LIVING IN THE HOME

116

HOME ON THE HEARTLAND

128

I N E V E RY I S S U E

D AY S A R E N O T T H O S E O N W H I C H ANYTHING VERY SPLENDID OR

WONDERFUL OR EXCITING HAPPENS

HELLO FRIENDS

19

BEAUTY + BLOOMS: COMING UP TULIPS

20

ENTERTAIN: A KIDDO BASH TO WOW

26

LITTLES SAY PLEASE: EMBRACING URBAN LIFE WITH A BABE IN TOW

32

A STYLED HOME: WHEN A HOUSE BECOMES A HOME

34

VIBRANT . VINTAGE . QUIRKY

36

STYLISH . CREATIVE . RELAXED

42

CHARMING . FRESH . EARTHY

48

ECLECTIC . CONTEMPORARY . HISTORIC

54

INDUSTRIAL . CHIC . MINIMALIST

60

URBAN . ARCHITECTURAL . ARTISAN

I BELIEVE THE NICEST AND SWEETEST

BUT JUST THOSE THAT BRING SIMPLE LITTLE PLEASURES, FOLLOWING

O N E A N O T H E R S O F T L Y, L I K E P E A R L S SLIPPING OFF A STRING.

L . M . M O N T G O M E R Y, A N N E O F A V O N L E A

66

MARKET COLLECTIVE: FO' DRIZZLE

80

BAKED: THE QUINTESSENTIAL SUMMER COBBLER

103

MAN WITH A PASSION: LIVE BETTER, NOT BIGGER

125

GIVING BACK: GIRLS WHO GIVE

137

EMMA’S DOTEABLES

145


PHOTOGRAPHY

I N S T A G R A M : @_J A M I E H Y A T T

WWW.JAMIEHYATT.COM


Welcome to our first ever Home and Outdoor Living issue. Home is where the heart is. It's perhaps the oldest cliché in the book, but upon reflection, maybe one of the most truthful. That moment when your house becomes your home, like when friends become family or when like becomes love ̶ that teensy little spark that transforms the ordinary into something just a little more special. Home has the power to comfort and console, energize and excite ̶ in this issue, we are exploring the seemingly supernatural powers of the home and how to make it your own. We visit six homes, each with a different take on an artsy, eclectic vibe. We learn how to invite bees into our yards, grow a salad garden with any amount of space, and take some time to slow things down. We chat with four ladies who are helping to improve the lives of others in this city we call home, and discover how one passionate man is transforming the idea of home for many. As we throw open our doors and invite the fresh spring air inside, be reminded that these moments are fleeting, and we have a limited number of days we can spend on the bike path and evenings out on the patio. So grab a glass of rosé and cheers to enjoying every last drop of the long, warm, summer days.

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B E AUTY + BLO O MS

COMING UP TULIPS W R I T T E N BY REBEC C A RAG AN PH OTOG R APHED BY S ARAH VAUG H AN

Spring is finally here, and although each season has its perks, for me, spring is near perfection. It’s the time of year when nature celebrates new beginnings with flowers, warm breezes, and sunny days. There is nothing more soothing than opening up your window and enjoying the fresh air. Tulips are one of the quintessential flowers for spring and one of my absolute favourites. They come in the most gorgeous shades and have such a joyful shape. They can bring cheer to any room. In honour of spring, let's talk about all things tulips. Their vibrancy, simplicity, and accessibility make tulips very approachable for anyone to arrange.

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STANDARD TULIPS

PARROT TULIPS

FRINGE TULIPS

DOUBLE TULIPS

LILY FLOWERED TULIPS

Our Tulip Favourites

Standard tulips

This variety is the type you’ll see in the tulip section at your local florist or grocery store and spread throughout local gardens in spring. Most standard tulips have a consistently pure colour, with the exception of bi-colour blooms, which are found in gorgeous, complementary combinations. Best of all, standard tulips are very inexpensive for such a beautiful bloom!

Lily flowered tulips

These elegant blooms have long, pointed petals that arch at the tips, much like a lily. From above, they look like six-pointed stars. These tulips aren’t available in many colours, but their shape makes up for it.

Fringe tulips

“Fringed” neatly describes the look of this tulip variety. While very similar to standard tulips in shape, fringed tulips have frilly petal edges and a soft, ragged appearance. The fringed effect creates a stunning visual complexity, enhancing the eye-catching ability of the flower in every diverse colour they are found.

Double tulips

Instead of the single petal layer seen in standard tulips, this variety displays multiple layers of petals. These are also referred to as double bloom or peony tulips. These beauties add a lush, voluptuous look to any arrangement.

Parrot tulips

These are the largest variety of them all and often grow more quickly. Their feathered petals look like the colourful, flamboyant bird they were named after. This beautiful variety is valued for its ruffled edges, big blooms, and tall stems, making superb cut flowers.

Do you ever wonder why tulips may bend more than other types of flowers? 1. Cut tulips are geotropic, which means that they will start to bend with gravity. 2. Tulips are also phototropic, so they will bend and grow towards any light source. 3. Even after being cut, tulips will continue to grow up to 2 inches. 22

Tu l i p C a re a n d H a n d l i n g Ti p s • Buy blooms that have the colour developed, but are still tightly closed. They should have bright green stems that feel crisp to the touch.

three days, and change the water to keep bacteria from contaminating the stems. • Keep tulips away from heat and direct sunlight. It’s best to keep them in a room with diffused light or the stems will start growing in one direction, towards the light.

• Once you get them home, keep the wrapping on the bunch, cut at least one inch off each stem on the diagonal, and place in clean, cool water immediately.

• Regular flower food can be used; however, the sugar in the mixture can often cause yellowing of the leaves. Keeping the water fresh, cleaning the vase, and recutting the stems regularly will be the best for vase life.

• Choose a vase that is taller to help the tulips stand up. Throughout the week, the stems will become shorter because of re-cutting, and you can downsize the vase. • Let the tulips sit in the water for two to three hours before you arrange them.

• If you want to include other flowers in your arrangement, be mindful that tulips are very sensitive. Daffodils or narcissus, for example, emit a substance that makes tulips wilt faster.

• To maximize a tulip’s life, re-cut the stem every two to

~ T u l i p s d r i n k a l o t o f w a t e r, s o b e sure to top up regularly~ 23


Your Next Evening Out

Party Ready For a springtime celebration, tulips are the perfect bloom to bring colour and texture to the table. This sweet centrepiece is fitting for a spring time birthday, and it is surprisingly simple to create.

Photo credit: Tara Whittaker, Brittany Back.

Working with just one type of flower keeps things simple. I tend to gravitate towards a more monochromatic or analogous colour scheme, which I often find is easier on the eye, as opposed to a mix of contrasting blooms. However, spring tulips always tend to inspire me to step out of my comfort zone and play with a more vibrant palette. For this arrangement, I chose a variety of pink hues, darling peaches, smooth creams, and crisp whites. The tulips’ graceful, arching stems, alongside the whimsical feel of the baby blue eucalyptus and genista, make this arrangement a perfect addition to any festivity.

Bedside Beauties There’s something positively cheery about waking up to fresh flowers. That doesn’t mean you have to invest in weekly bouquets — even a single, delicate stem in a bud vase will make your space feel special.

c il a nt ro

THR EE SET TIN GS, O N E PHILOSO PH Y F OL LOW R EB EC C A @REBEC C ADAWN DES IG N 24

crmr.com


EN TERTAIN

A KIDDO BASH TO WOW W R I T T EN A N D S TY LED BY ALEXAN DRA J OY WIG PH OTOG R A PHED BY H EIMA PHOTO G RAPHY

THOUGHTFULLY CURATING A WELL-DESIGNED PA R T Y F O R L I T T L E G U E S T S

The best parties are always the most thoughtful ones. The best parties are also the ones with the happiest guest of honour, and you can’t top the excitement of a child at their birthday party. A child's birthday is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate your beautiful little love and create something truly magical. Kids’ parties seem to get a bad reputation: cheesy themes, sugar highs, cheap goodie bag swag. But with some extra attention to detail and creative planning, you can pull off a well-designed, kid-approved celebration that’s sure to please the eye and your mini guests.

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Be creative when deciding on a location. Borrow a friend’s scenic backyard, seek out a lush green space or park, book a room at a library, church, or community hall – whatever fits your budget and theme. If you choose to host in your own home, get inventive and transform the space to create some spark for your birthday boy or girl. Clear out or rearrange furniture, take down art – do whatever it takes to make their everyday space feel magical. Borrowing furniture or rugs to mix with your own pieces is a smart and practical way to introduce newness and function to an at-home party. When compiling a guest list, remember to consider any adult friends or family who might be attending. Even if it’s as simple as including a charcuterie spread and wine, don’t forget to think of your parent party guests. When it comes to menu planning for the kids, take cues from your theme, design, and of course, your child. Party food options are endless, but decide if this is an element you want to focus time and budget on. If an elaborate homemade taco bar has everyone excited, then go for it. If playing chef is overwhelming, opt to have the party catered, “hire” your mom, or play it cool with veggies and dip, chips, and ice cream cones. There are many ways to make food beautiful and fun. Similar to menu planning, the options for party activities are also endless. However, this is a pretty great place to bring your theme and inspiration to life. Start by searching Pinterest for ideas, make a list, check in with your kiddo, and narrow your ideas. Always bring it back to your theme and the ages and kinds of personalities you’ll be expecting at the party, and don’t get hung up on things being too structured. Be flexible because they might love the amazing cookie decorating station you had planned, or they might just want to run around the backyard with a ball.

GET PLANNING First and foremost, start with a strong theme that will direct all design decisions. The best source of inspiration for a party concept is the guest of honour. If they’re old enough, involve your child in brainstorming to help develop a theme. What are some of your weekend family traditions? What kind of books do they read? What are their current favourite colours? Explore questions that get them thinking about what they love, what they’re thankful for, and what gets them excited. Pull party ideas from the amazing list you’ve created together. A strong colour palette is also key to great event design. Browse your favourite sources of inspiration and pay close attention to colour combos you’re drawn to and that remind you of your child. Think pastels, jewel tones, metallic, monochromatic, or neon. Get imaginative! 28

No matter what, consider involving your little one in the party planning and prep. Take a trip to your favourite supply shops and then go for a coffee/steamer date, or pick up crafting materials and work on DIY decorations or invitations together. Search online or go shopping for a special birthday outfit to match the theme of the celebration. Whatever their age, involve them in the fun details leading up to their party. You’ll be creating memories well beyond cake and presents. The more prep you do in advance, the more smoothly party day will roll out. If you’re hosting at home, go as far as setting your table the night before, doing as much food prep as possible, and hang decorations in advance so you’re not rushed. If you’re hosting elsewhere, pack all of your supplies in plastic bins with labels, so you’re extra organized for setup once you arrive at your party location. Ensure you have paper towels and baby wipes on hand for messes and sticky hands. 29


The sweetest thing about events with little guests is that all they really want is some fun, colourful magic with their friends and family. All of these design and planning tips can be applied to even the simplest of affairs within the smartest of budgets. Keep it creative but straightforward, and embrace the happy mess your perfectly-styled party will quickly become. As they say, let them be little.

T H I S PA R T I C U L A R PA R T Y Inspired by a playful colour palette and traditional party materials like balloons and paper chains, this theme was simply meant to be lively and whimsical. It was also created on a small budget. Here are a few quick tips for how we created this party. • The inspiration was based around a playful colour palette in shades of pink, with hints of mint and shimmers of gold. • The design elements, like tiny crowns and happy cloud napkins, added a spirited and whimsical touch. • The furniture and rugs were collected and borrowed from friends. • The paper chains were a simple DIY project made from sheets of wrapping paper in bold patterns. • The menu was simple and child friendly: popcorn, candy, and cake. • The cake was a classic vanilla sheet cake topped with gummy candies. So easy! • The little guests were all sent home with bunches of helium balloons as party favours. Always be on the lookout for places to gather and curate supplies. Think beyond your local party supply store and get creative when out and about. Party supplies for this bash were found at Reid's Stationers, Urban Outfitters, Michaels, the dollar store, HomeSense, and Party City.

K I D S PA R T Y T H E M E S W E C A N ’ T W A I T T O T R Y N E X T Modern Fiesta Farmers' Market Knights and Princesses Bookworm Nautical Pastel Gone Fishing Mini Foodie Metallic Galaxy

Neon Pool Party Ice Cream Social Golden Safari Royal Tea Party Bright Bohemian PJs and Pancakes Summer Camp

FOLLOW ALEXANDR A @ALEXANDR AJOYWIG 30

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L I T TL E S SAY PLEASE

As a mama to a three-and-half-year-old, I find myself having a lot of pep talks prior to visiting someone’s home, eating at a restaurant, or prepping for a playdate. Parents can all agree that we wish for nothing more than our kids to display lovely, kind behaviour inside and outside the home.

“Make learning fun by looking out for opportunities on a daily basis,” she says. “Encourage and engage in role playing games such as playing house, setting up a tea party, or shopping for groceries. There are so many social interactions that require manners.”

W R I T T EN BY ALEXAN DRA J OY WIG I L LU S T RATED BY K ATE K LAS S EN

Now, we all tire of hearing ourselves repeat the classic, “Say please.” So who isn’t looking for some fresh insight and reminders on how we, as parents, can instill these important values in our children? I welcome all tips and tricks to help raise well-behaved and kind little ones.

At a young age, kids begin to attend events and birthday parties. This is a great opportunity to explore the concept of manners when attending functions and to have some important discussions in advance. Role playing this type of situation can also go a long way with little ones.

I spoke with Calgary-based interior designer, creative planner, retail consultant, and manners advocate, Arminé Tatosian about her business, Modern Manners. Her approach to being well-mannered is practical, simple, and centred around kindness, respect, and bringing out the best in one another.

“When arriving at a birthday party, for example, a child could be so excited that when the door opens they might run in without saying hello or being asked to enter.” Arminé suggests, “Ask your child to be patient while waiting at the door. Gently put your hand on their shoulder as a signal to wait to be asked in, and remind them to say ‘hello’.”

“I believe manners are an important standard of behaviour in our interactions with society,” says Arminé. “Modern manners are about simply showing kindness and consideration for others.” A concept in which she believes is never too early to teach young children.

Teaching kiddos to be respectful in other people’s homes will serve them well beyond their young years. The same goes for table manners and food. Arminé recommends encouraging your child to try a little of each dish served, take small bites, and refrain from making comments if he or she doesn’t like something. This, of course, can be easier said than done, but a commitment to beginning this practice at home will make dining out and attending gatherings a much more welcomed experience for everyone.

e mbrac i ng urban life with a b ab e in to w

Arminé believes that as technology changes the way we communicate, it can also make it easier to live out modern manners. With our many methods of communication, it’s important we teach this generation of children to use those tools to develop healthy relationships and demonstrate kindness. Of course, modern manners also includes teaching polite and poised face-to-face social skills.

We absolutely agree with Arminé when she says that there is nothing more adorable than a child asking a host or hostess if they can help. “Encourage your child to help set the table or clean up,” she says. “And at the end of an event, your child should thank the host or hostess for having them and say ‘goodbye’.”

“Manners should be introduced in the home at an early age, and the best way for children to adopt good habits is by emulating their own parents,” explains Arminé.

In our home, we try and make a point of debriefing following a social gathering and making sure to praise our little one for good manners and behaviour. Positive reinforcement will teach your child to take pride in their actions and recognize when they’ve behaved well.

This is a great reminder for parents to think twice about the kind of table manners we practice, the language we use, and the way we speak to one another. Of course, it’s easy to critique children’s manners, or lack of, but take a moment to reflect on the kind of behaviour being demonstrated in the home.

Our Littles column is all about embracing urban life with a babe in tow, so this issue, we are exploring something a bit different than a favourite excursion or great kid-friendly restaurant. Instead, let’s chat about something that might help those outings and events with your wee ones go a bit more smoothly… manners. Since becoming parents, my husband and I make it a priority to do our best to continue to visit places we love and enjoy – a lot of the time that means cafés, restaurants, events, and other people’s homes. All places where you hope and pray your child is on their best behaviour. 32

So many of these are simple acts, and reminders will go a long way in instilling values in kids that will continue to benefit them as they attend school, extra-curricular activities, and so on.

Arminé advises that in order to ensure children are learning proper habits, parents must remind, encourage, and practice with them. It’s our job to reinforce this by practicing saying “please” and “thank you,” not interrupting when others are speaking, and saying “excuse me” – not just correcting children when they fail to do so. All very simple rules, but all important things to see a young one practice.

Lastly, be kind to yourself as a parent. Some children grasp these behaviours easier than others, but, with effort and commitment, your littles will get there, and you’ll be so proud that you took the time to help shape their lovely manners. I know because I’ll be the beaming proud parent of the little blonde girl who just used her napkin or asked to be excused.

Arminé provides practical ways to help with the development of good behaviours.

FOLLOW AR MINÉ @ATAR MINE 33


WHEN A HOUSE BECOMES HOME WRIT T EN BY EMILY T HWAI T ES PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMIE H YAT T

Where we love is home – home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts. – O l i v e r We n d e l l H o l m e s

As I sat snuggled under a cozy blanket and sipping on a warm cup of tea, I wondered to myself: what makes a house a home? While a house is structural, providing shelter from the elements, it occured to me that a home has far deeper meaning. A treasury of sentimental items, a home welcomes us with familiar aromas, textures, and tastes. It is a sanctuary, a place to make and share memories, and to love boundlessly. I met with a selection of local homeowners, all who, similarily, began with a blank canvas and over time added their ecelctic and personal styles. I learned about their design philosophies and discovered how they've turned their houses into homes.

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V I BR A NT. VIN TAGE . Q UIR K Y. Rea ga n M c L ea n , 2 9 , M u s i c i a n/ Di spl ay Coordi nator at Ant hropol og i e Ca l ga r y Fo l l ow Rea ga n @ borea l sons

“ F o r m e , i t ’s a l l a b o u t i n s p i r a t i o n and the contrast between items.” An offbeat, open-concept 1950s bungalow in Britannia was the perfect choice for musician and Anthropologie display coordinator, Reagan McLean, and his three friends, to rent. Along with two of his roommates, Reagan plays in local art rock band, Boreal Sons, and the property’s large basement offers an ideal rehearsal and jam space for the boys. The house boasts countless quirks, such as the silk-screened bathroom wallpaper. “It’s bizarre and kind of amazing,” Reagan says, of the mirrored, reflective design, which dates back to 1956.   Upon moving in, owning just a couch and coffee table, Reagan assumed sole responsibility for sourcing pieces to outfit the 2300-square-foot space. He prefers to purchase secondhand or clearance items, appreciating their age, and their more reasonable price points. Seven months later, the house is far from empty, occupied by a wonderful, eclectic mix of décor. “Some people find it cluttered, but I find it warm and cozy,” he says of the heavy texture and layering.  The space draws inspiration from organic palettes and the interaction between different elements, such as wood and fur. An abundance of luscious greenery in the south-facing sunroom at the back of the house makes this Reagan’s favourite space to unwind. The room is anchored by a sumptuous blue velvet couch in one corner – an accent of vibrant colour amongst the surrounding earthy brown and green hues. A plentiful selection of textured pillows on the couches makes this room a popular relaxation space, while intentionally layered rugs highlight its feeling of connectedness.  The aspect of shared communal space is precious to Reagan, and his strategic design choice to incorporate diverse seating areas throughout the living room and sunroom reflects this. A variety of cozy corners allows for separate conversations to be enjoyed with visitors without sacrificing a sense of connection within the space.  36

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With the sunroom as the home’s main source of light, ample light fixtures are a must for evenings. Originally belonging to Reagan’s grandfather, two unique mid-century tension pole lamps frame the living room window. “The nostalgia is very heartwarming to me. It’s nice to keep them in the family.” One boasts retro glass tulip shades, while the other has spherical glass shades, their combined mellow glow creating a relaxed ambiance. When it comes to décor, Reagan doesn’t like to commit to just one era. “For me, it’s all about inspiration and the contrast between items,” he shares. A silk tapestry rug lies underneath the dining room table and is one of Reagan’s many budget Kijiji finds. “There’s a bit of wear in it, but that’s my favourite thing about it, and I thought the colours were beautiful.” Reagan values the history behind this pre-loved piece, its torn fringe adding personality and richness.  “I’m not necessarily interested in pieces I’m going to have for my entire life. I’m interested in pieces I find unique, that one day I’m sure I’ll fall out of love with,” notes Reagan. For him, the benefit of purchasing second-hand is the flexibility to swap items in and out of his home frequently and inexpensively.  Reagan credits the thoughtful design choices in his home to his background in fine arts and visual sales, which gave him an appreciation for colour theory and how certain materials interact. “I think it’s really easy to see a modern aesthetic and copy it exactly. That’s the furthest thing from my design aesthetic,” he laughs. 38

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S T YLI S H . C R E AT IVE . R E L A XE D . L i d y D i p er t, 3 3 , Desi g n Bl og ger/ Stay-at-H om e M om Fol l ow L i dy @ he l l ol i dy

“ S u d d e n l y , i t ’s n o t j u s t m y h o m e , i t ’s s o m e t h i n g with a much deeper meaning to me.”

Three years ago, when Lidy Dipert and her husband, Joel, moved back to Canada from California, the couple was looking for the perfect home to raise their three young children. “In California, we lived in a really beautiful, historic neighbourhood,” says Lidy, “but in Canada, a lot of the homes aren’t that old, and it’s really hard to get an old home that’s not way out of budget.” They decided Airdrie was the perfect choice to raise their family, and found an 1100-square-foot house in one of the city’s older communities. “Airdrie is a very young town, but the neighbourhood had cute paths, and the house had potential for us to make it a home,” Lidy shares. As a design blogger and stay-at-home mom, it was important for Lidy to find a well-lit house where she wouldn’t feel confined. “Natural light is really important to me, especially in Canada, when you’re inside most of the year because it’s freezing outside,” she laughs.   A key design aspect for Lidy is to be true to yourself and not worry what other people may think about your choices. “I feel it’s a lot like clothing yourself and accessorizing. Your house is part of you and should reflect who you are,” she notes. Lidy tries to be mindful about buying pieces she still sees herself loving in years to come. “Sometimes I think the temptation is to go mainstream with whatever is trending. But the thing with trends is they come and go, and with homes, you can’t afford to constantly be changing things.” The couple draws influence from Scandinavian design, but also leans towards a 70s Bohemian vibe. “We love a home that has a lot of our own creations. My husband is really creative and handy,” says Lidy. The living room is her favourite space, and like much of the home, focuses on earthy colours and textures. Minimalist wooden shelves, built by Joel, hold a selection of quirky antique store finds, black and white graphic prints, and luscious, trailing plants.

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THE GRAND FINALE The couple is grateful to have a separate family room in the basement, where the children can play freely, creating the opportunity for a quieter, more formal, relaxation space in the upstairs living room. “Sometimes I’ll just sit here and sip coffee and look outside to clear my mind,” Lidy says, pointing to the brown leather couch, layered with textured cushions and a sheepskin throw to create contrast. A shabby-chic sideboard from an old Californian farmhouse displays wedding China and small trinkets the couple has collected on their travels.

it’s not just my home, it’s something with a much deeper meaning to me,” she smiles. Making the compact master bedroom feel more spacious was a fun design challenge for the couple. Floating side tables, built by Joel, offer a personal touch and increase available floor space. In contrast to the black and white walls, an eye-catching mix of framed paintings hangs above the bed, each with a unique story to tell. This bright and airy room is another favourite for Lidy, who considers it a peaceful haven for relaxation. 

In the dining room, geometric, monochrome wallpaper creates an impressive feature wall. While there are many exposed-bulb light fixtures throughout the home, Lidy and Joel opted for more intimate lighting in this space. “We wanted something a little bit different, and in the evening, it creates a moodier dining area,” Lidy says, of the solid brass chandelier. Charming saloon doors leading into the kitchen are a nostalgic addition, and they once belonged to Lidy’s grandmother. “Every time you open them, they creak, and that sound takes me right back to my childhood. Suddenly,

The basement family room is a wonderful space for Lidy and Joel to connect with their family and friends. “When we have company over, we tend to come down here because it feels so comfy and cozy,” says Lidy. A playful floral wallpaper, leather butterfly chair, and coffee table hand-made by Joel add whimsical touches to the room. Although Lidy says the house is still a work in progress, their design adventure has already produced a stylish and welcoming family home.

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C H A R M I N G. F R E S H . E A RT H Y. Ka i h l a To n a i , 2 6 , Weddi ng Photog ra pher Fo l l ow Ka i hl a @ ka i hl atona i

“I really like having the living outdoors theme brought in.”

Just over a year ago, a cozy 1914 heritage house in the historic neighbourhood of Ramsay captured the attention of local wedding photographer Kaihla Tonai and her husband, Mark. Seeking a quieter neighbourhood with a mature yard, Kaihla stumbled upon this single-level, 700-square-foot property. The couple attended an open house the following day, and within two weeks they had moved in, wasting no time in adding their own personal touches. They painted the majority of the interior white, which not only created cohesion throughout the house, but also helped to brighten and open up the rooms. Typical of older neighbourhoods, the houses in Ramsay are very close together, meaning it can get relatively dark indoors. For this reason, Kaihla is particularly fond of the south-facing sunroom at the front of the house, where she often enjoys nestling with a book and a cup of coffee, meditating, or simply people watching. Ample light, plants, and comfy cushions make the space one of her favourite retreats.  The couple shares a blended design philosophy, and although Kaihla loves a more freespirited, Bohemian, aesthetic, Mark favours Scandinavian décor, which is typically more minimalist. The main challenge, says Kaihla, is incorporating both aesthetics while trying to keep it simple. They enjoy integrating items from local businesses, including Plant and Needle and Pine, as well as visiting thrift stores and IKEA to source items.   “I really like having the living outdoors theme brought in,” Kaihla notes, adding that the pair often go camping and hiking. This passion for nature is reinforced by plenty of earthy tones, seen in plants and wood. Mark is a woodworker, so, naturally, this material is often incorporated throughout their home. A light wooden table in the front entrance is a treasured furnishing for both Kaihla and Mark, and it is the first piece of furniture he built. “It’s been in three of our apartments and now this house, but it’s always found a really stable place in each of our homes,” shares Kaihla.  48

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Kaihla and Mark enjoy starting each day together with a cup of coffee in the living room, and they consider this the most loved space in their home. Here, we find another of Kaihla’s favourite pieces: a custom flag made by the couple’s friend, Brett Colvin. A buffalo with the words “wander forever” is hand-painted on the coffeedyed cotton flag, which is suspended above the couch. Amber-scented candles and incense fill the home with wonderful, earthy aromas, creating a positive energy that helps the couple stay grounded. The absence of a television in the home reinforces Kaihla and Mark’s desire for connectedness. “We’ve discovered, in our own lives growing up, that it’s easy to waste so much time watching TV,” says Kaihla, adding that not having one forces them to be more intentional with how they spend their time.   A thoughtful office design makes this relatively small room incredibly functional. The couple wanted a practical space, where they could both work without the need for two desks, so a long, narrow IKEA countertop was the perfect solution. A simple black and white colour palette makes the room feel open and orderly – a necessity for a workspace. Stylish hexagonal shelves adorn the walls of their bedroom, displaying small personal objects. Kaihla cherishes the shelves, built as a birthday gift from Mark. “I always have a hard time filling plain shelves, so it’s a little bit easier and different to put things on these ones,” she notes, pointing to little hooks underneath one shelf where her necklaces hang. The bedroom is unique in that its only window doesn’t look outdoors; instead, the frosted glass separates it from the front sunroom. “It would be nice if it had another window to let in some outside light, but it does the trick,” says Kaihla. A single, hanging bulb is a fun solution to brighten the space. Crafted by Mark, a sweet wooden bird mobile hangs above an apartment crib, eagerly awaiting the arrival of the couple’s first child. “I feel like the energy will change in the home,” says Kaihla, smiling, “but I think it’s important to blend them into the life we have already established.”

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E C LE C T I C . CON T E MPO R A RY. H IS TO R IC. C a rey Jo n e s , 4 0 , Owne r of G ui l dha l l Hom e Fo l l ow Ca rey @ g ui l dha l l . hom e

“Part of the fun of it is the process for us: t a k i n g o u r t i m e , m a k i n g s u r e i t ’s w h a t w e w a n t , and then seeing it come to fruition.”

The first time Carey Jones and his partner, Jeffrey, set foot in the historic house they now share in Ramsay, the couple instantly felt a sense for its potential. “We both really loved a lot of the character features of the home: the height of the ceiling, the moldings, the French doors,” says Carey. Built in 1912, the two-level, 1600-square-foot house had been home to a Japanese immigrant family since the 1940s. Carey and Jeffrey smile as they remember a discovery during their kitchen renovation in 2011; one family member had signed the inside of a kitchen cupboard in 1949. The couple loves that their home offers a real connection to the past.  Both designers, Carey and Jeffrey are fond of applying their creative passions to the domestic environment. “Part of the fun of it is the process for us: taking our time, making sure it’s what we want, and then seeing it come to fruition,” says Carey. In March 2016, Carey opened Guildhall Home, a furniture and home décor store in Inglewood. He is proud to represent local talent, as well as offer pieces from Northern Europe, a region that he and Jeffrey gravitate towards for design inspiration. “The light there is very similar, there’s strong seasonal change, and they spend a lot of time indoors. In this climate, there’s a connection to that,” says Jeffrey. By sourcing inventory that reflects their own design philosophy, Guildhall has naturally become one of the couple’s favourite places to shop for their home.  A few years spent living in the U.K. in the early 2000s has also heavily influenced their design perspective. Here, they loved seeing the juxtaposition of modern and traditional living, while still paying homage to the age of a house, and they have adopted this approach in their Ramsay home. “When there’s a sensitive piece of modern architecture next to an old piece of architecture, both those things really shine,” Carey notes.  54

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With Carey’s fondness for cooking, it made sense for the couple to renovate the kitchen from three small rooms into one larger space. Cool white cabinets, an iconic subway tile backsplash, and grey Caesarstone countertops are balanced by the warmth of the breakfast nook, with it's wooden shelves and vibrantly coloured cookbooks. The living room, with an eclectic blend of contemporary and antique items, is the space where Carey and Jeffrey spend most of their time. A charming, colourful Persian rug once belonging to Jeffrey’s great grandparents fills most of the floor space. One of the couple’s favourite pieces, a cool blue womb chair with a matching ottoman, made from silk mohair, is paired next to a polished marble side table in one corner. “Texture is a big motivator for us. We try to add textures and materials that are opposite, but complementary,” Carey shares. In an otherwise open room, intentional design choices punctuate the living and dining areas into separate spaces. Above the dining table hangs a large, black pendant drum light. Crafted from solid sheets of brass with a hammered gold inside, the piece creates a dramatic statement while helping define the space. The area flows into the more snug, private, and cozy retreat, where Carey often enjoys taking a nap. Craftsman details on the mantelpiece and two hanging green glass lanterns are a reminder of the history of the house, while a collection of nostalgic items from the couple’s family members makes the space more personal.  In the master bedroom, a special personal touch includes a beautiful patchwork quilt made by Carey. With their keen eye for design, the couple has embraced the traditional character of the house, while introducing their own customizations. 58


I ND U S T R I AL . C H IC. MIN IMA L IS T. Al ex i s F r i es e n, 2 3 , Ma rket i ng Sci ence Ana l yst Fo l l ow Al ex i s @ a l ex i sjust i na

“I try to pick things with some meaning. I l o v e s u p p o r t i n g w h a t ’s l o c a l a n d p l a c e s that are special to me.”

Fascinated by interior design from a young age, Alexis Friesen had long yearned for a home with unique structural features. “I always think you should have a really interesting ceiling, wall, or floor, if not all three,” she laughs. It’s no surprise, therefore, that a 750-squarefoot 1980s loft conversion in the neighbourhood of Glamorgan sparked an instant love affair. Originally a recreation centre, the place was renovated as an apartment building and is now home to her chic, minimalist space. An avid reader of interior design blogs, Alexis enjoys drawing inspiration from images she sees online. “I knew I wanted all the walls white to make it feel big and airy, and also because I love decorating and knew it would be a great blank canvas. I wanted to have the freedom to change up accessories and furniture and not be married to one particular palette,” she says. Earthy, rustic tones and textures, including the wooden floors and dining table, balance warmth with the cooler industrial materials, like the stainless steel kitchen countertops and the 13-foot exposed steel ceiling.   The respectably proportioned dining space is a rare find in an apartment of this size. “I love cooking for other people, and this is such a wonderful space to entertain in,” Alexis shares. Her eight-person, custom-made dining table is one of her favourite pieces in the home. “It absolutely anchors the whole apartment. It’s where the big, open space is, under the lights, right in front of the window.” A lucky find, eight round-back wooden chairs – which were once in the dining room of the Prince of Wales Hotel in Waterton, Alberta – surround the table. “I try to pick things with some meaning. I love supporting what’s local and places that are special to me,” she adds. A simple, yet chic, vibe is achieved by 36 lightbulbs suspended from the ceiling in a square formation. In the evenings, Alexis often dims these lights to create a warm and relaxing ambiance. One of her favourite features in the apartment is the large, west-facing, dining room window, which lets in plenty of natural light.  60

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Decorating the loft was a big undertaking for Alexis, and she is especially pleased with the split-level bedroom. Half walls take advantage of light coming in from the rest of the apartment. Alexis takes pride in the giant DIY headboard that adds both comfort and a sense of luxury to the otherwise modest-sized bedroom. Open-concept white wire grid closets were a strategic design choice, making the space appear larger and brighter. A handsome antique dresser from Montreal adds additional storage and has an amazing oak smell, she says. In addition to her culinary passion, the kitchen is Alexis’ favourite area of the home, because she was able to tailor so much of the design to her personal style. “It was bright red before, so I painted it white. I had a different backsplash put in because I love the texture of wavy subway tile, and I had all the cabinets resurfaced,” she shares. Stainless steel countertops compliment the bluebrown stain of the cabinets, while reinforcing the apartment’s industrial feel. Laboratory glass beakers provide a fun way to store cleaning brushes beside the sink, and a stainless steel pot rack suspended above the island is a stylish solution to minimal storage space. Alexis particularly treasures the three shelves made from reclaimed barn wood, a DIY project she tackled with her boyfriend. “They add a lot of warmth and bring focus to textures. I love that they have a beautiful colour as well,” she notes of the dark wood. The shelves display everything from flour canisters to cherished items from family members, including old canning jars that once belonged to her grandmother. While the apartment reflects her excitement for interior design, being able to integrate sentimental items into her home, like her grandmother’s old canning jars, is something Alexis finds extremely important. “It’s a really nice memory of the time that we had,” she reminisces.

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bakeshop

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U R BA N . A RC H IT E CT UR A L . A RT ISA N . Ja m i e Hyatt , 2 8 , Photog ra phe r Fo l l ow J a m i e @ _ ja m i e hyatt

“ We h a v e m e r g e d t o g e t h e r i n a s p a c e , a n d t h a t ’s r e a l l y c o o l b e c a u s e I f e e l l i k e w e have created something.”

Built in 2013, and located just off 17th Avenue, a sophisticated townhouse in Bankview offers contemporary downtown living to professional photographer Jamie and her interior designer fiancé, Landon. The 1400-square-foot space is also home to their energetic boxer, Ella. After learning the space was designed by one of Calgary’s top architects, Landon knew the home would be unique. The couple loves that their home caters to their active, urban lifestyle. “Downtown’s your living room. You can ride a bike, pick up a baguette and wine, have some people over, and then go out,” Landon notes. They originally anticipated upsizing after getting married, but the couple have really learned to appreciate the space. “In New York, you see apartments that house a whole family of five, and I think it’s amazing and something we should really value. You don’t see enough of that in our city, using a space to its full potential,” says Jamie. Landon’s initial design vision for the home was a minimal, masculine aesthetic, but after meeting Jamie, the couple faced the task of blending their unique styles into one space. “It was a challenge in the beginning, especially as we are two visual creatives,” says Jamie. “We were coming from two different perspectives, but it still had to be a home that reflected both of us.” Jamie introduced a more eclectic style, and the couple now considers their home to be the perfect balance of traditionally masculine and feminine elements. Featuring a beautiful mid-century record player that once belonged to Landon’s grandfather and was gifted to the couple by his grandmother, the living room is the most-loved area of Jamie and Landon’s home. A large marble-topped coffee table occupies the central space. Underneath, stacks of blankets, books, and photo albums are easily accessible and add to the intimate and cozy atmosphere. The room is filled with contemporary eclectic pieces, including an African wildebeest taxidermy mount, gemstones, and a renowned 66

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Wassily chair, inspired by the frame of a bicycle. “I really like things that wear well, and that usually comes with a textured leather that already has a bit of grit to it,” says Landon, of their brown leather couch. Here, a selection of tuxedo and nautical woolen cushions create contrast, and demonstrate his enthusiasm for texture and form. Jamie draws a parallel between her love of pattern and her time spent at fashion design school in Vancouver. “I really like colour blocking and bold, contemporary pieces.” A black and white geometric cushion sits on Jamie’s reading chair, where she loves to curl up with a book each morning. A custom-designed walnut cabinet with deep drawers, in the dining area, is one of Landon’s strategic design choices to maximize storage space. All-black Herman Miller molded chairs and a modern banquette offer stylish seating around the mid-century oval tulip table, where the couple often enjoy playing board games with friends. One of Landon’s many artisan projects is an IKEA lamp that he dismantled and crafted into a unique new fixture, incorporating hand-blown glass from Vancouver. “We’re constantly destroying things and making them our own, but in a smart way,” says Jamie. The couple gravitates towards a more neutral palette, adding flairs of colour through vibrant artwork. An informal arrangement of colourful prints, paintings, and drawings on the office gallery wall makes this a fun workspace, reflecting the personalities of both Jamie and Landon. The couple also enjoy creating their own art, a selection of which is on display throughout their home. In contrast to the rest of their home, the master bedroom features a dark colour palette. A decorative painted datum line uses colour blocking to emphasize the dark gray ceiling and walls. “It’s very architectural and super compressing. It really pushes down and creates this little cave,” says Landon. His and hers side tables are an interesting addition to the space. “We didn’t want it to look like a show home with the exact same piece on each side. We wanted something a little more cheeky,” laughs Jamie. A full-wall bookshelf built by Landon is home to the couple’s book collection, and also holds treasured items including an old film camera and Brazilian leopard sculpture.

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Jamie and Landon have created a contemporary home that reflects their unique design differences, while establishing a strong sense of cohesion throughout. “We have merged together in a space, and that’s really cool because I feel like we have created something. I’m glad that we found this happy medium,” Jamie smiles.

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N AT U R A L L Y WR ITTEN BY LARY NDA MC K AY PHOTOGR APHED BY T H E JAR P H OTOGR AP H Y STYLED BY ALEXANDR A JOY W IG

BRINGING HOLISTIC LIVING HOME

Holistic living embraces the interconnectivity between what we consume and how we relate to our external environment. A joyful aspect of holistic living is finding ways to define all facets of our lives, and, step-by-step, finding new ways to live life in a healthy, whole way – including with our cleaning products.

CLEANING

Mia Shettler of The Wellth is a holistic living coach. Believing we can all re-write our wellness story, she coaches people on connecting mind and body. This means she places a focus on food, health, self-care, and how we can interact with our environment, such as the surfaces we touch and the air we breathe. I talked with her about her wellness journey and the benefits of using wholesome cleaning products.

L M : What ignited your personal passion for holistic, wholesome living? M S : I’ve always had an interest in health and wellness, but what ignited me to live and breathe this life was a personal curiosity to see how much better I would feel when I immersed myself in it. I’m an all-or-nothing kind of girl, so I made some drastic changes. It started with food: eating whole, nourishing, and unrefined ingredients from the earth, and then it naturally expanded into other areas of my life. It started as more of an experiment but quickly morphed into a lifestyle that I’m healthily obsessed with.

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ALL-PURPOSE CLEANER

L M : Do you feel there is a change in how people view

RE C I P E BY M I A S H ET T L ER O F T H E W EL LT H

their homes in terms of cleanliness? Do you think we are more germ-aware and conscious of the dangers of synthetic chemicals so close to our daily lives?

M S : I am hyper germ-aware. I think a lot of people are

these days. I used to think the only way to kill bad bacteria was to use harsh chemicals that carry a potent smell. We all want to decrease our exposure to harmful viruses, and there is a growing awareness on the benefits of alternative cleaning methods.

L M : It’s easy to feel that unless a cleaner is a chemical, it won’t kill germs effectively. How do homemade cleaning products stack up against the chemical-based products we can buy commercially?

To o l s a n d i n g r e d i e n t s :

Benefits of essential oils:

16 ounce glass bottle 1 cup water 1 cup white vinegar 10-20 drops essential oil (drops required will vary depending on the brand)

L a v e n d e r (natural antibacterial)

Directions:

M S : Chemical-free cleaning products are, in many circumstances, just as powerful as the toxic alternative, and many star players already line your pantry. Think baking soda, vinegar, olive oil, essential oils, and lemon. These nonconventional agents are multi-purpose and definitely get the job done, removing dirt, disinfecting household surfaces, degreasing, removing stains, and naturally freshening your space.

• In a glass spray bottle, combine equal parts water and vinegar. • Add essential oil of choice. Shake well. • Use this non-toxic all-purpose cleaner on wood, glass, stainless steel, and porcelain. • Wipe clean with a microfibre cloth. • It’s always a good idea to spot test new products on a particular surface prior to using. • Store in labelled glass spray bottles (certain essential oils can break down plastic over time). • Can be stored for up to a few months away from direct sunlight.

L M : Is there a cost benefit to making your own cleaners

at home?

M S : The homemade version is absolutely more cost effective. Your average store-bought, all-purpose cleaner can run upwards of four to five dollars, whereas the homemade variety is less than a dollar. I suggest making an all-purpose cleaner to start, then customize small batches with different essential oils.

Notes about essential oils:

L M : By creating a healthier environment it moves us closer to a holistic lifestyle. Can we bring all parts together for an overall healthy approach to every aspect of our lives?

• Make sure you buy pure, undiluted essential oil. • The oils are highly concentrated, and adding more won’t strengthen the formula. • Do not use on natural stone surfaces like granite or marble, as it will cause etching. • To keep kids and pets safe, storing essential oils and homemade cleaning products out of the reach of children and pets is as important as it is with their chemical counterparts.

M S : As much as we try to keep these parts of our lives separate, they inevitably blend into one another. I believe the biggest thing to remember is that YOUR wellness is at the centre of it all. Only you know if you need to make changes. Bringing awareness to the self in the present moment and reflecting on what the body, mind, and spirit need is the first step towards living a more holistic life. Living your best, most whole life with vitality is worth it!

Not only does lavender have a fresh, floral scent, it can be used to disinfect many surfaces in your home.

L e m o n (antiviral and antibacterial) Admired for its light, clean citrus scent, it is an effective natural degreaser that can be used to lift stovetop film and stubborn stains, and deodorize your refrigerator.

T e a t r e e (fights germs and bacteria) Has a medicinal scent that helps alleviate the smell and appearance of mould, mildew, and other bad bacteria.

O r a n g e (cleansing) Known for its bright and uplifting aroma, this versatile essential oil pairs well with seasonal scents to cleanse and purify surfaces.

E u c a l y p t u s (purifying) Its soothing aroma makes for a beautiful addition to household cleaners, killing bacteria and germs in the air and on surfaces.

P e p p e r m i n t (antibacterial) Has an invigorating scent along with powerful antibacterial properties, perfect for high traffic areas like the kitchen and bathrooms.

FOLLOW MI A @THE _WE LLTH 74

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HOW TO GROW A SALAD GARDEN W R I T T EN BY AMAN DA MAG N O LO I L LU S T R ATED BY FLO RA ELIS E C O.

C U L T I VAT I N G A G A R D E N W H E R E V E R Y O U L I V E Kyle Chow, of Plant, recalls a childhood of running through the huge rows of his grandparents’ garden, inspecting insects and planting seeds that would grow into fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs, ripe for picking and eating. The smell of dirt and the spring green of a newly sprouted shoot are memories evocative of childhood, bare feet, dirty hands, and full bellies: peas fresh and tender from their pod; tomatoes candy apple red, bursting on the tongue; and basil, waxy to the touch, with a hint of mint and musky earthiness.

seed, such as lettuce, you would simply push it into the top of the soil. The best time to plant your seeds is in the late winter to early spring, so that come late spring and summer, your garden is yielding edible vegetables. If, however, your patience wanes, you can pick up a seedling as late as May to have the same results in less time. While this may be a more convenient option, Kyle says that starting from a seed allows for a greater variety of plants.

For those of us living in the highrises and infills of a metropolitan city, a vast expanse of land to plant and maintain a garden seems beyond reach. The thought of nurturing the weary plots of our apartment balconies and dim patios into anything that grows sufficiently enough to be consumed is a daunting undertaking.

MAINTENANCE

At this point, the final steps are to water your plant evenly so it is moist, but never soggy, before moving it to a sunny, warm location and giving it patient, consistent care. Most vegetable plants require four to six hours of sunlight a day, and if you do not have a south facing window or direct sunlight, Kyle suggests using a grow light to supplement this need. Germination times vary, but you will start to see sprouting in as little as three to seven days, and once the frosts have completely gone, you can move your plants outside to the patio or transplant them to your backyard.

With the following questions running through my mind ‒ How do you grow something? How do you grow something you can eat and nurture it to keep it producing food for your family’s table throughout the year – I took time to chat with Kyle about the best practices and his tips and tricks for planting, nurturing, and maintaining a kitchen garden in an urban setting.

The time when vegetables will be hardy enough to consume depends on the seed or seedling you have planted. Pea pods and beans show up around mid-summer, while lettuces and radishes take only two to three weeks. Container tomato plants may have fruit from the moment they are purchased.

S O , H O W D O Y O U S TA R T ?

With a container, time, a little bit of patience, and, as Kyle notes, “experimentation.” The size of your container will differ depending on the seed or seedling you are planting, and this can be determined from its packaging. However, Kyle suggests a container with an 8-inch depth as preferable. “Anything smaller will dry out the seeds, or keep the roots from taking.” Your container should also have some way to drain, either through holes or rocks placed in the bottom.

Regardless of where you plant your seeds or seedlings, ensure each one has enough room to grow; a small seed sprouts large. Avoid overcrowding to yield more viable results and fuller, healthier vegetables. Kyle makes a final suggestion to care for your plants: aerate them throughout the growing season using a rake or a kitchen fork, turning up the soil every one or two weeks to ensure enough oxygen is getting to the roots. You should also use compost or fertilizer to promote better, faster growth. There are many natural and chemical fertilizers on the market, and it is entirely a personal preference as to which you choose to use, noting, however, that most chemical fertilizers are food safe and will quicken the growing process so you can enjoy the fruits of your labours sooner.

Lettuce, small leaf spinach, spring onions, certain edible flowers, and perennial herbs do well in smaller containers, while plants such as tomatoes, radishes, zucchinis, and peas require more space. PLANTING THE SEEDS

Once you’ve acquired your containers and ensured they have effective drainage, you will want to fill them with a seed-starting soil mix appropriate for indoor and outdoor planting. Kyle says you should fill the container up, leaving 1/2 to 1 inch at the top, and review your seed package to determine the depth at which you should begin planting. Generally, “Seeds should be planted below the soil at a depth of two to three times the size of the seed.” For a bulb, like an onion, this would be quite deep; whereas, for a small

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WHAT TO GROW AND WHERE

Some plants will not fare well in our unpredictable weather, and Kyle notes that melons, gourds, and brussels sprouts require more space and take longer to grow. If you have a backyard with room, you can plant bush-growing vegetables, such as peas, winding them upwards to grow around a trellis, or experiment with crop varieties of vegetables, such as corn,

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carrots, and potatoes. Zucchinis will also fare well in larger pots or on plots of land.

ODD AS I AM SURE IT WILL APPEAR TO SOME, I CAN THINK OF NO BETTER FORM OF PERSONAL INVOLVEMENT IN THE CURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT THAN THAT OF GARDENING. A PERSON WHO IS GROWING A GARDEN IS IMPROVING A PIECE OF THE WORLD. HE IS PRODUCING S O M E T H I N G T O E AT, W H I C H M A K E S HIM SOMEWHAT INDEPENDENT OF THE GROCERY BUSINESS, BUT HE IS A L S O E N L A R G I N G , F O R H I M S E L F, T H E MEANING OF FOOD AND THE PLEASURE OF EATING.

For smaller gardens around the kitchen sink or on the balcony, focus on smaller vegetables like lettuces; perennial herbs, like mint, oregano, thyme, and chives; or container tomatoes and strawberries. Edible flowers also make delightful additions to kitchen, patio, and backyard gardens, and they are often easy to grow. Try pansies, nasturtium, or calendula ‒ added to a salad, they make a colourful and flavourful punch. Marigolds, Kyle adds, although inedible, are an excellent flower to plant next to your garden, since they act as a natural deterrent to pests, especially with softer vegetables. Once the weather shifts to autumn, and the frosts return, most plants will fall, and while some, such as herbs, may last a little longer after being brought in, revel in your harvest and replant again come next year. There is no special formula to growing your own produce, and Kyle insists that trial and error are key to planting and maintaining your own kitchen garden. If you lose one plant, he recommends buying a more mature plant and trying again. Growing any plant is an experiment. “See what works for you, and don’t give up,” he says. Keep to tender vegetables, appropriately sized for your growing area. Delight in the moments of time you take to water and care for each seed and shoot, and reap the rewards in salads, soups, meals, and drinks embellished with your homegrown vegetables shared around the table with family and friends.

- THE

ART OF THE COMMONPLACE: THE

A G R A R I A N E S S AY S O F W E N D E L L B E R RY

FO L LO W KYLE @PLANT S HO P Y YC

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M A RK ET CO L L ECT I V E

FO' DRIZZLE W R I T TEN BY AN G EL G UERRA PH OTOG R A PH ED BY BLAIR MARIE PH OTO G RAPH Y

“The core reason for Drizzle is to support local beekeepers, implement sustainable business practices, and bring consumers the most indulgent honey possible.�

F

ounded by Aja Horsely, Drizzle dripped gracefully through the doors of Market Collective back in 2015, when we were working to create an additional space within Market Collective for artisanal food. Drizzle creates boutique, sustainable products inspired by natural honey and local beekeepers. Fusing traditional beekeeping and honey production with relevant design and marketing, Drizzle is a local food champion and an exceptional example of collaboration. Drizzle keeps the environment and local farmers in mind through sustainable business practices, packaging, and charitable donations. But most importantly, Drizzle is delicious.

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M C : How and why did you get started in beekeeping? A H : In my former position as an environmental scientist, I managed urban agriculture projects in SAIT’s Applied

Research department. I started beekeeping in 2013, when I had the opportunity to manage a rooftop beekeeping project. I worked with chefs from SAIT's culinary school, and together we installed hives on one of the campus building's rooftops. We had students from the culinary school and children from day camps learn about hives, honey, and local food production. It was very rewarding.

M C : Last year, you had a bit of a scare. Can you tell us about it and where your resilience to keep going despite this came from? A H : Last summer, I was beekeeping in my backyard hives early one morning and got stung in the face. In the

past, I had little to no reaction to stings, but this one caused a serious reaction, and I ended up in the hospital. I was prescribed an Epipen and told to stop beekeeping. This threw a bit of a wrench in my plans for Drizzle, but I had to look at it in a positive light. The core reason for Drizzle is to support local beekeepers, implement sustainable business practices, and bring consumers the most indulgent honey possible. I realized I could still meet these objectives, and with more focus, by stepping out of my beekeeping role and focusing instead on running the company. That’s exactly what happened, and now I run Drizzle’s day-to-day operations and have beekeepers on the farm handling honey production.

M C : What are the benefits of honey consumption? A H : Because raw honey hasn’t been heated or micro filtered, it contains

healthy enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. When honey is heated, the enzymatic properties can be destroyed, and when honey is heavily filtered, the pollen and beeswax are removed, and so are many of the vitamins and minerals. Pollen is rich in proteins, free amino acids, vitamins, and folic acid. Honey is also lower on the glycemic index than sugar, so it is superior in maintaining steady glycogen levels.

M C : Why is it important for Canadians to seek and consume Canadian-made honey? A H : There is a fairly urgent need for Canadians to consume Canadian-made honey. There are current issues

with major honey brands purchasing cheap honey, which is often adulterated, from abroad. Our local beekeepers cannot compete with the foreign prices to produce their honey on Canadian fields, and this is leading to an imminent bankruptcy situation. In other words, they have to sell their honey below the cost it takes to produce, or are holding on to their honey stock and waiting for a reasonable offer to come in – both situations lead to little or no income. To make matters worse, some major brands are blending foreign honey with Canadian honey and labeling their products as Canadian-made honey. As a result, consumers often do not know exactly what they are buying. Drizzle is 100 percent Canadian honey.

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M C : As the founder of Drizzle, you wear many hats. Can you tell us about all the ways in which you contribute to your company? A H : My days with Drizzle are very full, with everything from packing orders for my retailers to taking photos for social media, reviewing accounting and financials, meeting with bloggers, working on branding material, and drafting emails. As the company has grown, I’ve had to spend a lot of time on regulatory work, like labelling, trademarks, barcodes, drafting contracts, and insurance. M C : What are some of your favourite ways to use honey in regard to cooking and culinary creations? AH:

I eat wayyy too much honey, and most of it is just on a spoon by itself! I’ve started using honey for many DIY natural health and beauty items, like facemasks, scrubs, hair conditioner, and under my bandaids when I get a cut. My favourite recipes with honey include honey whipped with butter, honey yogurt frosting, honey turmeric lattes, spicy honey with sriracha, and any salad dressing with a honey and apple cider combo.

M C : Aside from honey, what is your favourite bee-inspired product? A H : I’ve collaborated with a number of local businesses to create

bee-inspired products, including honey dog biscuits with BARK, a honey facial mask with Wild Prairie Botanticals, honey lip balm with Mint and Daisy, and honey soap with Lamb’s Soapworks. These are my favourites, and for obvious reasons!

M C : Lastly, what is your favourite bee joke? MC:

How does Drizzle directly support local farmers and beekeepers in Alberta?

AH:

When I started Drizzle, I was doing much of the beekeeping myself, but I also wanted to showcase honey from other beekeepers and locations because I thought the natural colour and flavour differences were so pretty. I also recognized there was an urgent need to support beekeepers in Canada to ensure they were getting a fair price for their honey and were able to grow their businesses. As part of Drizzle’s business model, we have worked with over 25 beekeepers and sold 3000 kgs of Alberta honey. By doing so, we have put capital back into our local economy and farms. This is just the beginning of Drizzle, and I personally can’t wait to see us make a bigger impact as more households purchase Drizzle.

A H : I like telling people to bee-hive themselves. And this one gets me every time: Why does Snoop Dogg carry an umbrella? Fo' drizzle.

*According to the Government of Canada, giving honey in any form to an infant under one year old could cause infant botulism.

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JOIN US

AUGUST 26, 2017 FLINT ROCK R ANCH • PINCHER CREEK AB

D R I Z Z L E ' S T I P S T O S AV E T H E B E E S 1  . W h y a r e b e e s i m p o r t a n t ? Bees = food + honey! Bees are important because they contribute to pollinating plants. During pollination, plant fertilization occurs, which allows for fruit, nuts, and seeds to develop. Essentially, we need bees and other pollinators to help produce food. Not all bees produce honey, but honey bees are important in providing the sweet treat of natural honey.

in support of Food Water Wellness Foundation

A FIELD TO TABLE EXPERIENCE

featuring

2  . T i p s f o r c r e a t i n g a b e e - f r i e n d l y b a c k y a r d

CHEF DAVID COUSINEAU OF THE BISON, BANFF

Generally speaking, a bee-friendly yard is one that provides a broad variety of blossoms that bloom over the course of the warm seasons, provides a source of water for when bees get thirsty, and provides lots of natural, non-toxic areas for foraging and nesting. It’s important to consider that there are many different types of bees and pollinators in our yards, and they each thrive in different conditions. For example, solitary bees make nests in small crevices or little tunnels in rotten wood and would love if you kept an area of your yard messy with compost and dry, hollow sticks or stems. Honey bees, on the other hand, are not native to Canada and usually live in man-made hives; therefore, they are happy when they have big clusters of bee-friendly flowers to feed from.

3. People don’t usually want bees in their yards ̶ how can people live in harmony with b  e e s ? First, I want to mention that most people don’t realize there is a difference between wasps and bees. Not only are they quite different in appearance, but wasps are generally more aggressive and mainly hunt other insect larvae and adults or feed on fallen fruit and dead insects. Bees, on the other hand, feed on nectar and pollen from flowers. This may sound cheesy, but we have to consider that we, as humans, are not the only species that rely on a safe, healthy environment to thrive in. We need biodiversity, including bees, in order to survive. If you see a bee in your yard, take a deep breath and remember it will only act aggressively towards you if you act aggressively towards it – so no swatting!

F O L LO W A J A @ D RI Z Z L E_ H O N EY

performances by

WINTERSLEEP JP HOE

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FOLK ROAD SHOW

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PRETTY FACES

T I C K E T S $ 1 6 5 » F O O D WAT E R W E L L N E S S . O R G

CELEBRATE ALL SUMMER LONG AT FLINT ROCK RANCH WITH MITCHELL BROS RANCH DINNERS

M ITC H E LLB R OS B E E F.CO M JULY 1

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F R O M T H E FA R M W R I T T EN BY AN IS E THO RO G O O D PH OTOG R A PH ED BY G EN EVIEVE REN EE PH OTO G RAPH IE

I grew up in the southern United States in the 1980s, where convenience and cost were key, as they still are in most places. The boom of frozen food in the 1950s started a wave of ways to have a “quick and easy” dinner on the table for the family. But this also brought about a disconnect in the way we viewed food. I remember growing up thinking green beans came from a can and cheese was naturally orange – is milk orange? I thought corn only existed as little niblets in plastic bags found in the frozen food section. Butter was no longer created from the neighbour’s cow’s milk, and carrots weren’t pulled from the earth with a big bite enjoyed right there in the garden. Now, as a nutritionist, I have come to value food, how it is created, and how it is prepared.

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I recently visited Hoven Farms, a family-run farm for over 115 years, located in central Alberta. We chatted with Tim Hoven, the owner, a farmer, and a father. As I walked the farm with him and watched the cows frolic in the field and happily scratch their bums on the trees, I asked him all sorts of questions. It was refreshing to hear someone speak passionately about his focus not only on healthy food, but also healthy people!

the last sliver of sun is seen over the horizon. They watch with admiration as their chickens roam free in the yard. They cherish the land that grows our food. “We are so dependent on the soil. Healthy soil makes healthy food, and that makes healthy people,” says Tim. Shopping local also has its own benefits. Taking it into your own hands guarantees you are feeding your family the quality your health demands. Let’s take the tomato, for example: my quality standards have gone up for tomatoes since I tasted a fresh, farm-grown one. It was ripe, juicy, tender, and amazing with just a sprinkle of sea salt.

“Health is the primary motivator for what we do,” says Tim. “More-so than healthy food, but healthy people. All you have is your health.” Now, more than ever, it has become imperative to know where our food comes from. Tim says he is a big believer in educating people about their food. “I think it’s really sad how disconnected people are from the food supply.”

By grocery shopping with our local farmers, we are creating a smaller carbon footprint, and we’re building the local economy.

Respect and appreciation for food has definitely dwindled as years have gone by, as fewer people are farming and big corporations are taking over. When we take back control of knowledge, we are taking control of our health.

If this is all a bit overwhelming for you, start by walking around your local farmers’ market and chatting with the farmers! Get involved; join a co-op. To learn a bit more about what they do and how they do it, and to ensure you’re eating the types of food you want, feel free to ask them questions about their farming practices.

As we learn more about the food chain, local farmers, and their processes, an appreciation for food develops, which, in turn, can slow us down as we sit for a meal. We become more grateful for the process of growing and harvesting food. I can’t stand wasting food, and I feel once you know how long it takes to grow that one pumpkin, you definitely won’t be throwing the seeds away. Being informed about where your food comes from can create an appreciation for the process of  raising animals and growing food.  Farmers have this appreciation. This is their livelihood, their passion. They wake up with the sun and tend to their crops and livestock until

Despite its short growing season, Alberta has an abundance of local produce. Hoven Farms, for example, grows everything from beets, carrots, zucchinis, and turnips to pumpkins, squashes, and radishes. They also raise their own cattle, pigs, and chickens. “We believe in biodiversity here at the farm. It’s a little more work, but it makes a huge difference,” says Tim. Visit hovenfarms.com for more information.

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T O T H E TA B L E PH OTOG R A PH ED BY G EN EVIEVE REN EE PH OTO G RAPH IE S T Y L ED BY ALEXAN DRA J OY WIG

PEOPLE WHO LOVE TO EAT A R E A LWAY S T H E B E S T P E O P L E – JULIA CHILD

The beauty of eating freshly grown food is that it is easy to pull together for a fancy meal. We brought the Hoven's farm fresh produce to our table and created a lovely summer meal we believe was best enjoyed outside. It’s a beautiful thing knowing exactly where our ingredients came from and that we were feeding ourselves not only nutritious food, but food straight from the ground, tended to by a passionate farmer.   

TAB LE WARE AVAI LAB LE AT CRATE + B ARRE L P LAN TS AN D P I LLOWS AVAI LAB LE AT P LAN T 92

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SPRING HERB CHICKEN RECIPE BY ANIS E TH O R O GO O D O F LOV E A ND GARN I S H

Ingredients: 1 small fresh chicken, about 4 to 5 pounds 4 tablespoons grass-fed butter, divided 1 tablespoon chopped parsley 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 tablespoon chopped thyme

Directions: 1 tablespoon chopped sage 1 lemon, cut into chunks ½ cup chopped fennel bulb 1 small onion, cut into chunks 3 garlic cloves, smashed

1. Preheat oven to 450o F. 2. In a small bowl, mix together the butter with parsley, rosemary, thyme, and sage. Set mixture aside. 3. Remove giblets and liver from chicken’s cavity and discard. Let chicken rest for 1 hour at room temperature. Rinse chicken thoroughly under cold water, inside and out, and pat dry, ensuring the cavity is completely dried. 4. Sprinkle cavity with salt and pepper, then stuff with lemon, fennel, onion, and garlic. Truss chicken or tie legs together with kitchen string. 5. Loosen skin, and, working from the neck end, slide your fingers under the skin until you reach the tip of the breast, being careful not to tear the skin. Rub half the herb butter under the skin. Rub the other half of the herb butter over the chicken, and season the entire outside generously with salt and pepper. 6. Place the chicken in a small roasting pan with a rack, legs facing towards the rear of the oven. Bake at 450o F for 15 minutes, and then lower the temperature to 350o F. Continue cooking until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh reads 165o F, or about 20 minutes per pound. 7. Remove string and transfer chicken to a platter. Let rest for 10 minutes.

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Directions:

ZUCCHINI AND SWISS CHARD SALAD WITH SORREL AND M I N T P E S T O , P I S TA C H I O S , A N D RADISH

1. In a food processor, combine pine nuts and garlic. Pulse a few times. Add the parmesan, and pulse a few more times. Add sorrel, mint, and spinach. Pulse until combined and leaves are completely chopped into little pieces. Transfer the pesto to a bowl and stir in oil and salt, then set mixture aside.

RECIPE BY ANISE TH O R O GO O D O F LOV E A ND GARN I S H

2. With a mandolin, carefully slice the zucchini lengthwise to create long, thin strips. Toss with a bit of the pesto, and set aside.

Ingredients: Pesto: ¼ cup pine nuts 1 ½ small garlic cloves ¼ cup shredded parmesan ½ cup tightly packed sorrel ½ cup tightly packed mint ¼ cup tightly packed spinach ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil ¼ teaspoon salt

Salad: 2 large zucchinis 1 bunch of swiss chard 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon lemon juice Salt and pepper

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Garnish: Crushed pistachios Sliced radish Extra mint

3. Remove the swiss chard leaves from the rib. Chop both leaves and stems, keeping them separate. In a skillet, heat the coconut oil and add the swiss chard stems. Sauté over medium-low heat for 2 minutes. Add the leaves and continue to sauté for another minute. Remove from heat, add lemon juice, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss with a bit of the pesto and add to the zucchini. 4. Place zucchini mixture in a bowl and top with crushed pistachios, sliced radish, and more mint. You can also add more oil to the pesto and drizzle over as extra dressing. 99


HONEY ROASTED CARROTS AND BEETS O V E R L E N T I L S W I T H P E C A N TA H I N I S A U C E RECIPE BY ANIS E T HO R O GO O D O F LOV E A ND G A RN I S H

Directions:

Ingredients: Salad: 6 small beets, various colours ½ cup dry black or puy lentils 1 pound carrots, sliced in half length ways 2 tablespoons coconut oil 2 tablespoons honey 1 garlic clove, smashed

Pecan Tahini Sauce: 4 tablespoons tahini ½ cup pecans 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic ½ tablespoon honey 3 tablespoons fresh orange juice 2 tablespoons water Pinch of salt Dill to garnish

1. Preheat the oven to 375o F. 2. Place beets in a large saucepan and fill with enough water to cover them 1 inch. Simmer over low heat until a fork can be inserted easily; cook time will depend on the size of the beets. When they are finished, cut off the end and peel the skin. Cut beets in quarters and set aside. This step can be done the night before. 3. In a small saucepan, combine lentils with enough water to cover them by 1 inch and a large pinch of salt. Simmer over low heat for 20 to 30 minutes, until lentils are cooked through, then set them aside. This step can also be done the night before. 4. While the beets are cooking, prepare the carrots. On

a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, add the coconut oil. Place in the oven to allow the coconut oil to melt. Remove the pan with coconut oil from the oven. Add the carrots, honey, and crushed garlic and toss to combine. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and bake for 25 minutes (depending on the size of your carrots) until soft, but not mushy. 5. While the carrots are baking, prepare the tahini sauce. In a food processor, puree tahini with oil, garlic, honey, orange juice, water, and salt. Puree until smooth and set aside. 6. Assemble the salad: place the lentils in the centre of a bowl or large platter. Place the carrots and beets over the lentils and drizzle with tahini sauce.

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BAKED

THE QUINTESSENTIAL SUMMER COBBLER WR ITTE N BY V IC K I MANNE SS PHOTOGR APHED BY GENEVIEVE RE NE E P H OTOGR AP H IE STYLED BY AL E X ANDR A JOY W IG

My go-to dessert in the summer has always been a cobbler. It’s one of the quickest desserts in my recipe book, it’s easy to whip up, you can use whatever fresh fruit you have on hand, and there is minimal prep and oven time. Heck, try and make it on the barbeque! And the best part? It’s delicious! A cobbler, in my (and my Uncle Stuart’s) opinion, is one of the most perfect endings to any outdoor summer meal. We used fresh blueberries, and rhubarb picked from my parents’ yard, in this recipe, but feel free to mix it up and use any fruit you find inspirational.

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B L U E B E R RY A N D R H U B A R B C O B B L E R RE CI P E BY V I CKI MAN N E SS OF P RE TTY SWE E T

Ingredients: Fruit Mixture: 2 cups fresh blueberries 2 cups fresh rhubarb – chopped into rough, ½ inch-thick pieces 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons honey (softened if solid) 3 tablespoons lemon juice

Cobbler Dough: ½ cup salted butter, softened ½ cup honey (softened if solid) 1 egg Seeds from 1 vanilla bean pod 2/3 cup all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon baking powder

Directions: 1. Toss together berries, rhubarb, sugar, honey, and lemon juice in a bowl and let sit for 15 minutes to create juices from the fruit. If using solid honey, be sure to warm it up before mixing in – you’ll want the honey to be a liquid consistency when mixing it into the fruit. 2. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375o F. Grease a pie plate, cake pan, or skillet (about 1 ½ - 2 inches in depth). 3. In a medium bowl, stir together flour, cinnamon, and baking powder and set aside. 4. In a mixing bowl, beat butter and honey until light and fluffy. Add in the eggs and vanilla. Mix in the flour mixture until just combined. 5. Pour fruit and juices into your pan. Next, add the cobbler batter in spoonfuls over the fruit mixture. Cover as much of the fruit as you can, but don’t worry if some spots are showing. 6. Bake for 35 minutes or until the top is a glorious golden brown and the fruit is bubbly. 7. Let cool before serving, or make earlier in the day and heat up on the barbeque for a few minutes in front of your guests. Serve with fresh cream, ice cream, or eat it on its own! Cobbler is also perfect for breakfast the next day!

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THE SHARED MEAL E L E VAT E S E AT I N G F R O M A MECHANICAL PROCESS OF FUELING THE BODY T O A R I T U A L O F FA M I L Y A N D C O M M U N I T Y, F R O M THE MERE ANIMAL BIOLOGY TO AN ACT OF CULTURE. -MICHAEL POLLAN

RETURNING TO #YYC FALL 2017 next-big-thing.ca


Y E S WA Y R O S É W R I T TEN BY J EN N Y BO O K PH OTOG R A PH ED BY THE J AR PH OTO G RAPH Y S T Y L ED BY ALEXAN DRA J OY WIG

Every outdoor summer soirée needs a light, elegant, refreshing beverage t o p a i r w i t h t h e f r e s h a i r a n d f r e s h f o o d . We c h o s e s o m e b e a u t i f u l r o s é s for our outdoor meal, and we have delightfully learned that there is more to rosé than meets the eye. W i t h i n s i g h t s f r o m B i n 9 0 5 ’s J e n n y B o o k , c e r t i f i e d s o m m e l i e r, w e h a v e gathered a taste of the world of rosé, including some carefully selected rosé options that you can pair with your own summer meals.

There’s been something stirring in the wine world, and we’re getting on board. It’s the rise of rosé! This is not a new phenomenon – in fact, rosé has been on the rise, and significantly so, over the past ten years in Europe, and, more recently, in the U.S. Rosé has had some pretty big stereotypes to overcome before it was allowed back into the mainstream. It is often misunderstood as universally sweet and frivolous, and it is stereotyped as a drink to be swirled and sipped by cackling gaggles of women. The truth is, most of the rosés produced today are dry. Recent consumer trends in the consumption of rosé are driven by these dry wines and Provence, France has seen a dramatic 390 percent increase in exports over the past ten years.

In North America, it is these dry wines that are breaking down the stereotype barriers of the past and catapulting rosé into circles of sophistication. These days, any self-respecting foodie or aspiring wine aficionado should acknowledge the place and potential of rosé. It needs to be understood in the context of the world’s great and historic wines, produced with a focus on terroir and attention to detail, just like other great wines of the world. With some help from Rosé Wine Economic Observatory’s Vins de Provence and The Rosé Wine Market’s OIV Focus 2015, these are some great rosé options for any summer evening.

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Whispering Angel, Cave D’Esclans

D e C h a n c e n y, C re m a n t de Loire

PROVENCE, FRANCE

L O I R E VA L L E Y, F R A N C E

D e s c r i p t i o n : A distinctive blend of Grenache, Rolle, and Cinsault, the Whispering Angel typifies its name. It is subtle, ethereal, and sophisticated and pours classically pale pink in colour, perfectly clear in the glass. You have to listen carefully to hear her hush tones. Instead of volume, it offers a gorgeous, creamy texture, elegance, and perfect poise. Flavours of grapefruit, heavy cream, floral tones, and minerality coat the palate through a long and satisfying finish.

D e s c r i p t i o n : The colour is a most delicate pink pearl, with gorgeous bubbles persistent in the glass. The aromas are savoury and sophisticated, offering a subtle, peppery spice, yogurt dairy notes, and refined fruits, like rhubarb and white cranberry. The palate is dry and balanced by a nice, round acidity and fine, mouth-filling bubble. This is a great sparkling for any occasion, but a super wine for the dinner table.

D e s c r i p t i o n : The aromas of La Tordera leap from the glass. Honeysuckle, orange blossom, and elderflower, redolent of spring, burst on the nose. Peach and melon bring wonderfully juicy fruity notes, and a fabulous frothy mousse fills the mouth. The sugar is hardly perceptible, but it brings a nice softness and subtle richness to the palate. Truly, this is the perfect sparkling sipper for spring/summer patios.

D e s c r i p t i o n : La Crosse is predominantly a Grenache and Cinsault, but it uses the seasoning of several other grapes in its blend. The colour is a vibrant pink, and out of the glass the wine is expressive and forward. There’s beautiful, ripe fruit, such as raspberry and strawberry, with some great underlying spicy and floral tones. There’s plenty in the glass here to keep you interested and coming back for more – absolutely a classic Tavel.

F o o d p a i r i n g : This delicate style of rosé demands an equally delicate touch at the table. A bold flavoured food will overpower the finesse of the Whispering Angel, so think light. Baked salmon or grilled halibut with a grapefruit beurre blanc would be heavenly. Mediterranean vegetables on the grill with fresh herbs would make a gorgeous side dish. Close your eyes and you’ll feel like you’re dining at the Mediterranean seaside!

F o o d p a i r i n g : The savoury, peppery

spice of the De Chanceny would make it a perfect partner for barbeque fare. Kebabs are a sure thing here. Intermix herb marinated chicken or pork with peppers, zucchini, tomatoes, and onions, and watch the flavours pop. As an alternative, it would be fantastic with grilled trout or garlic marinated shrimp.

F o o d p a i r i n g : Here’s a wine that does

Food

P r i c e : $24

P r i c e : $28

L a To r d e r a , G a b r y V E N E T O , I TA LY

La Crosse, Prieuré de Montézargues

R o s a d o , Vi ñ a E g u í a R I O J A , S PA I N

MAULE, CHILE

T AV E L , F R A N C E

not need any food for maximum enjoyment. It is a perfect conversation wine, which means it is made for backyard and patio sipping while mingling around with your pals. It is not a wine that requires concentration to enjoy. This is the definition of easy rosé. It would be magic with appetizers, such as prosciutto and melon or a charcuterie board, and it would be versatile at the dinner table, particularly with summer salads and lighter proteins. It would even transition well to dessert, such as fresh berries and mascarpone cheese.

D e s c r i p t i o n : Viña Eguía’s Rosado pours a lovely pale salmon colour, and it looks very attractive in a glass. It pops with fresh strawberries, citrus pith, and some great melon and nectarine undertones that emerge in the finish. You’ll love the dry, fruity nature of this wine; it’s so nicely balanced and easy to sip that one bottle is hardly enough amongst friends!

fruity, but complex, wine, we want to really show off its moves at the patio table. Because it is relatively full bodied and complex, this wine can stand up to heavier proteins, like spice-rubbed grilled pork loin or barbeque ribs. You’d have a great partner in something like Nicoise salad, and, of course, it’s great for fish or grilled seafood.

F o o d p a i r i n g : This is a wine that’s easy to drink on its own, with loads of satisfying fruit flavour, a lovely balance, and a clean finish. But these characteristics also make it incredibly versatile in food and wine pairings. It would be quite happy with charcuterie, burgers, chicken, or salads. Save big proteins and complex dishes for bigger, fuller flavoured wines, and pair simple, truthful food with the Viña Eguía for pure pleasure.

P r i c e : $30

P r i c e : $17

p a i r i n g : With a forward and

P r i c e : $21

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L o t # 4 1 O l d - Vi n e P a l e , G a r a g e Wi n e C o . , D e s c r i p t i o n : True to its roots, the Lot #41 Old Vine Pale is farmed by hand and horse by traditional Maule farmers. Carignan, Grenache, and Mourvedre, from old vines, of course, are dry farmed to produce an intense and character-filled wine. The grapes are allowed a short maceration on the skins, and because Carignan and Mourvedre are thickskinned grapes, a luminous richness of colour is achieved. The wine spends a short period of maturation in old oak barrels, and emerges beautifully expressive and ready for bottling in spring. This is a bold flavoured rosé, bursting with fruit and subtle spices. It’s dry, with great food-friendly acidity and substance, feeling more like a light red than a delicate rosé. F o o d p a i r i n g : Barbequed food needs wine with a bit of substance to stand up to the smoky char of the grill. I can’t think of a better rosé than the Old Vine Pale for outdoor patio dining to pair with barbeque fare. Burgers and sausages would be instant success, but there would also be great versatility with chicken and grilled vegetables. P r i c e : $35

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GIVE ME BOOKS, FRENCH W I N E , F R U I T, F I N E WEATHER, AND A LITTLE M U S I C P L AY E D O U T O F DOORS BY SOMEONE I DO N O T K N O W. -JOHN KEATS


CONNECTING ALL PEOPLE WITH JESUS AND HIS MISSION

S A R A H VA U G H A N P H O T O G R A P H Y. C O M

PLANTS FOR THE PEOPLE I N I N G L E W O O D AT � � � � � T H AV E S E , C A L G A R Y P L A N T S H O P. C A

PaigeLeighReist STORYTELLER Once upon a time, a writer called Paige shared her thoughts at thewholesomehandbook.com. Sometimes, she wrote for others, and kept those pieces at thewholesomehandbook.com/portfolio.

it’s Simply Em emily thwaites writer + photographer itssimplyem.com @itssimplyem_ H EY S E C A L G A RY ! JOI N US S U N D AY S AT 1 0 : 3 0 AM AT C R A N S T O N S C H O O L 205 C R AN S T O N D R . S E TH E E X C H A N G E C H U R C H . C OM @E X C H A N G E Y Y C

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Calgary’s Handmade Market


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You’ve probably heard the term "slow living" before. It’s the notion du jour for bloggers, business owners, and Instagram icons everywhere, and for good reason. It’s the exact opposite of the intensely materialistic consumer culture of the last few decades – a philosophical balm for the over-stimulated soul. We owe the concept of slow living to the Italians – in the 1980s, the slow food movement emerged in Italy as a response to the rapidly growing fast food industry. Instead of just accepting their fate and moving toward massproduced, processed, and chemical-laden imitations, our dear Italian friends continued to champion the joys of home-grown, handmade food. They stood up for the real thing and, over the next twenty years, the concept would spread across the globe and seep through everything, from the way we drink our coffee to the clothes we put on our backs. The latest incarnation of the slow movement, appropriately, concerns our lifestyles. It’s no secret that we live in a fast-paced, chaotic world. We have access to more opportunities, information, and means of communication than ever before, and although it’s an exciting time in history to be alive, it’s also a stressful one. The ever-rising popularity of the slow movement indicates that we’re still trying to learn how to balance our ambitions with our mental, emotional, and physical health. Slow living is about recapturing that sense of balance, and it’s about creating a life that invigorates and empowers rather than drains you. It’s about mindfulness, intention, and authenticity. It’s about being true to yourself, and confidently living in whatever that truth happens to be – and one of the most effective places you can apply these principles is within your own home. Applying the concept of slow living in the home is all about creating a space that speaks to you. Home is where we begin and end every day. It’s the first hello and the last goodnight; it has the power to complicate or simplify your life. Very few of us live in our dream homes, but you don’t have to wait until you score that restored 1901 farmhouse or the luxe downtown apartment to make your home a dream to live in. Here’s how we’re giving our homes a slow living makeover this spring.

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SLOW LIVING IS ABOUT R E C A P T U R I N G T H AT S E N S E O F BALANCE, AND IT’S ABOUT C R E AT I N G A L I F E T H AT I N V I G O R AT E S A N D E M P O W E R S R AT H E R T H A N D R A I N S Y O U .

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What does your home mean to you, and what role does it play in your life? Some prefer their homes to be tranquil, spacious places to relax and unwind after a long day. Others might fill the walls with art and line the baseboards with stacks of books, creating a space to inspire creativity. The hostesses among us might love making their homes beautiful, cozy places to visit, with lots of seating and a killer wine cellar. Do you want your home to soothe or energize you? Do you want it to be a quiet retreat or a social hub? For true domestic bliss, focus on what you want your home to feel like rather than what you want your home to look like.

As artist, designer, and writer William Morris puts it in his 1880 lecture, The Beauty of Life, “If you want a golden rule that will fit everybody, this is it: have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.” This is a good rule to live by; some minimalist theory will tell you to completely strike beauty from the equation, but we all know that’s not realistic. Sometimes, an item’s purpose is simply that it’s nice to look at. Setting aside a day every few months to declutter will get you into the habit of understanding what you actually love and use, which in turn will help you stop buying the very things you’re getting rid of in the first place!

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Trends are temporary, but style is forever. It’s so much more satisfying to save up and spend a little more on pieces you love and won’t have to replace rather than buying whatever’s on the sales floor every five or ten years. It might mean keeping that IKEA desk for a little longer than you’d like, but it’ll feel amazing once you’ve finally picked up that antique writing roll-top you’ve been fantasizing about for as long as you can remember. A room should feel like you, not a catalogue.

Little sensory details can elevate even the most mundane tasks to pleasurable rituals. Washing the dishes becomes so much nicer when you’re using great smelling, natural soap and pretty wooden scrubbing brushes. A vintage feather duster makes cleaning off the bookshelf feel almost glamorous. This is the essence of slow living – making every moment count, making every action intentional and meaningful. Life, after all, is not only made up of the big stuff – and the key to happiness is in loving the moments between.

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CITRUS SUMMER TEA R EC IPE BY ROSS O C O F F E E R OA S T E R S

Serves 4-6

Ingredients: 20 grams Rosso Chamomile Organic Blend tea 48 ounces filtered water 4 cups ice 2-3 citrus fruits of your choice, sliced into rounds Honeycomb to garnish

Directions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Steep tea in 16 ounces of hot water for 4 minutes. Decant tea into a large pitcher that will hold up to 48 ounces of liquid. Add 32 ounces of cold filtered water and citrus fruits and stir. Allow tea to rest for 10 to 15 minutes for fruit to infuse. Add ice and serve with a piece of honeycomb.

FO LLOW ROS S O C O F F E E R OA S T E R S @ R O S S O C O F F E EROA S T ERS

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I’m scheduled to meet Alkarim Devani, founder of up-and-coming developer, RNDSQR, at his new office in their latest building: a 16,000-square-foot, two-storey on a corner in Altadore. The place is too new for Google maps; the algorithm sends me right instead of left, and I find myself on a street with no addresses. I park and easily find the side entrance on foot. The new Our Daily Brett coffee shop, Neighbours, is just opening up on the street level. I make my way around and find the RNDSQR offices on the second level. It’s their first commercial project, a big step for their new brand. The building is cool; a collection of rectangles surfaced in wood, black metal, and brick. The interior is white and black, crisp, like a museum. Even with the wrong turns, I’m early. I’m guided to hang out for a few minutes in a modern leather chair in their reception area. I collect my thoughts in front of a big TV showing nature scenes. They’ve just moved in, and you can tell everyone is still getting a feel for the new place. Shortly, I’m summoned into Al's office and park myself across from him on a compact couch. He fits the space he’s built around himself. Hat up high on his head. Top button done up. Cool shoes. Comfortable but considered. His enthusiasm pours out. A born-andraised Calgarian and graduate of the University of Calgary in commerce and marketing, it took a while to develop his creative vision. 124

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FOR AL, DESIGN AESTHETICS ARE JUST A SMALL PART OF THE PICTURE. IT REALLY STARTS WITH PEOPLE. “I always had an idea of… I would call it an eye for design. An aesthetic,” says Al. “But I never knew how to link it to construction and homes. It was more fashion and cool things. And sneakers. I was always into sneakers. With my wife, architect, Majida Devani, leading the charge, and my brother, Afshin, an already successful developer, bringing his expertise, we started Beyond Homes and ran with it. We were doing single-family homes, all in the inner-city, which was really exciting. Often, we didn’t have buyers, we just thought, ‘Hey, let’s do something really cool and we’ll find a buyer for it.’ And it worked!” For Al, design aesthetics are just a small part of the picture. It really starts with people. Building large, singlefamily homes was fun, but didn’t fit his idea of inner-city living. Wanting to create a more vibrant urban core led to the creation of RNDSQR. They wanted to make inner-city living more connected and more affordable. “That’s what RNDSQR is to us: it’s a cultural lifestyle development company. We want to help people live better, not only in their home, but out of their home. What does that look like? That’s what we’re trying to figure out every day. “We’re so used to space and size. You have to have a backyard. You have to have a two-car garage. Our whole thing is: why? Why do you have to have all that? If we have a great park space across the street, how do we engage it? And how do we have the city put more infrastructure into it, because we’re using it on a daily basis?

“We’re kind of forcing it. We’ve designed a building type that encourages you to get out and interact with other people. Obviously, everyone wants a little bit of private amenity space, which we’ve accommodated for. The whole thing is, how do we encourage you to live differently?” Inspired by Zappos founder, Tony Hsieh, and his project to revitalize downtown Las Vegas as a mecca for startup businesses, Al works under the principle that bringing people together, forcing them into “meaningful collisions,” is where the magic of life happens. These “serendipitous” interactions are where relationships start. They escalate culture and spark creativity and innovation. He has a grand vision for communities, for the role of development, and for the role of design. It all starts with bringing more people together and having their lives overlap.

build community, whether it’s coffee shops, furniture stores, or places to get natural cleaning and laundry products. “One exciting example is that we’re working with YYC Growers, a really cool collective of farmers. They deliver what’s called a harvest box for 16 weeks of the summer. We’ve been working to provide them with growable spaces on our properties. We give them 200 sq. feet of plantable area for gardening. We tell the homeowners that we’ve partnered with YYC Growers. They’re going to maintain this area, and take the yield from the crops, but for doing that, you’re going to get a harvest box every season. We’re working out the kinks of what this looks like for everyone involved, but it’s an example of how we can add a value that no one else thought of.

“That’s the thing about development. It’s perceived as being very shallow, but it shouldn’t be. These buildings are not going “The things that density provides are often times slid under away any time soon, regardless of whether they’re ours or the carpet. You only hear about the negatives. But what somebody else’s. That’s the takeaway. We’re going to pour it about the positives? What about all in every single time. We’re bringing young people into these never going to do something communities? What about bringing that doesn’t represent or more vibrancy? What are the impacts align with our core values. of that? The most sustainable way for You’re not going to see our us to build our city is to build in the name on something that We’ve designed a building type inner city because it is underserviced. doesn’t represent who we that encourages you to get out Compared to anywhere [else], Calgary are. is not dense. We try to figure out how and interact with other people. to get through these barriers without “One big thing for me is that making too many people angry,” Al I don’t want anyone to think I says. do this by myself. I absolutely do not. This company is not It’s not an easy path. The first project me. Oftentimes, it needs they presented to city council was a face and a voice, but it shot down. According to Al, this was one of the best things definitely isn’t me. There are so many people here that pound that happened to their business. It sparked a relationship the pavement as hard as I do, if not harder at times. When with the city council, encouraged by a mutual exploration you find out what you want to do in your life, you have to find of how to bring about new concepts. There will always be people that align with that vision. Each person has such an naysayers. Bringing a community together to build the future important role. You can’t do it by yourself. To me, that’s critical. is a challenging prospect. A lot of times, you read these things, and it’s one person talking about what they do and what they love. I might be the person “We have to say: let’s not look only at your community today. talking, and it might be my photo, but to me it’s super critical Let’s look at your community 20 years from now. What should that all the people involved get their credit.” it look like? Should it be all single family homes? We’re saying this multi-family concept is actually more appropriate here As for where the motivation comes from? It’s all about the because of the density, the alternative modes of transportation, next generation. and the location.” “I’m about family, more than anything. My daughter is six. Forward-thinking in terms of design, sustainability, and inner- She’s the best thing in the world. I feel fortunate to be able to city lifestyle, RNDSQR finds ways to add layers of connection. In spend time with her and play with her and be a part of her life some of their projects, they have outfitted each unit with a free every single day. It’s the best time in the morning. It’s the best bike to encourage buyers to get out and use the path system. time in the evening.” They are always looking to partner with local businesses to

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hile you might recognize her from the acclaimed CBC show, Heartland, actress Michelle Morgan has had her roots dug deep into the Calgary community since she was a child. Growing up in the southeast of the city, Michelle spent her summers with family at the community lake, riding bikes with friends, and ice skating in the cold winters. With her own young family, Michelle now spends half of the year in Calgary shooting Heartland and has found some causes very dear to her heart. “This is where I have known my neighbours and community more intimately than anywhere else in the world,” shares Michelle. “It’s the kind of place where people get to know each other, and I really appreciate that. When you and your family call a city home, I feel that it is so important to be connected to your community. Neighbourhoods like Inglewood and Kensington have always made me feel the most at home.” When Michelle moved away as a nine-year-old, she always found a special place in her heart for the city and came back as often as possible to visit. “When I got the job filming Heartland, I was so happy because it was a great excuse to spend more time where I grew up,” says Michelle. “Calgary has become home for me again because over the past ten years, since the beginning of Heartland, I’ve been here for six months of the year. I always moved around a lot growing up, but this is one of the most special places I have lived.” Citing Calgary as an extremely accessible city, Michelle names the arts and culture scene as one of the driving forces to her returning to the city as much as possible. “I really love the Sled Island Music Festival,” shares Michelle. “I’ve been attending since its first year, and I just remember riding my bike around, going from show to show — they have some amazing bands, and I love that scene.”

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Beyond her busy life as a mother and actor, Michelle is also a devoted volunteer and philanthropist, namely for organizations that support and assist the welfare of women. Having volunteered with women's shelters for over 17 years, Michelle has become a true advocate for developing programs of support and care for families in need. “It was always a cause that I felt I could make a difference in. I love supporting families who need help and by trying to make a difference in their lives, I can impact families in the community positively.”

VIC MATIÉ PEEP-TOE LOAFERS AT G RAVITY POPE . K ATE HEW KO RIN G S AT K ATEHEW KO. COM. SIMON S EARRIN G S AN D SAN PELLEG RIN O SOCK S AT LA MAISON SIMON S. N ASHELLE B RACELETS AT THE EMERALD FOREST.

Since being back, she has started working with a woman’s shelter here in the city as well as an organization called Home Front. She explains, “I act as their campaign ambassador when they do fundraising campaigns and events. I’ve really gotten to know these organizations and feel like I am able to help them raise money and awareness about the particular needs of the women they serve.”

Beyond loving the outstanding support for live music, Michelle is also a major foodie and finds the food scene in Calgary one of the best in Canada. “Before I had kids, I used to go out a lot to eat, and it was pretty abysmal how few options we had back then,” laughs Michelle. “Now, I live in Vancouver, which is praised as one of the best food cities in the world, but to be honest, I always miss the restaurants here. A few of my favourites are Una Pizza + Wine and The Nash in Inglewood. It is just such a great food scene that never feels pretentious or out of reach.”

“Home Front is an organization that assists victims of domestic violence. They're so interesting because they help their clients through the entire process — from the court appearances to finding housing and job searching — they will even run out and pick up diapers for you. We are really lucky to have Home Front. Not every major city in Canada has an organization like them, but they should.”

Having spent the past ten years building her character, Lou Fleming, on the hit show, Heartland, the show has become a massive part of her life. The fans are a huge part of the show’s success; hundreds came into Calgary last fall for the Calgary International Film Festival’s Showcase Alberta event that celebrated a decade of Heartland. Having developed very personal connections to these well-known characters and storylines on the show, Heartland fans are truly dedicated in supporting this part of Canadian television history.

Giving back to the community is an important part of Michelle’s life, and through working with Home Front and women's shelters, she feels we can make a difference in so many people’s lives. “I believe that we’re all born good — that we’re all born with good intentions and a good heart. Things can go wrong along the way,” shares Michelle. “I believe that if we begin by providing safe, loving homes, that is the best start that we can give children. We need to raise awareness about domestic violence because it’s eroding the very fabric of our community and our country.

“I know that we make a good show on Heartland, but it is still always very awe-inspiring to me hearing these stories of people who have travelled across the world to see the set or to meet us,” says Michelle. “We’ve heard some incredible stories of how the show has made an impact on people’s lives and helped them through hard times. These stories always amaze me — it is really incredible and touching.”

“Calgary has always been really good to me, and Heartland has been the best job of my career. It is so important for me to give back.”

When asked about why she thinks people find such a connection to Heartland, Michelle shared: “I suppose the story reaches so many people because they feel like they are part of a family. We’re always sitting at the table, eating, talking, spending time together in a home. I think people feel they can be a part of that family. I’ve really appreciated this since having children. My daughter has been watching since she was two (she is six now) and loves the show.”

All the work Michelle has done with Home Front and other shelters is her way of giving back to a city that she has always considered home.

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GIVING BACK

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Four women responsible for building a p o s i t i v e n e t w o r k o f c o m m u n i t y, p h i l a n t h ro p y, a n d s u p p o r t c o m e t o g e t h e r over coffee to talk change and making a d i f f e re n c e i n C a l g a r y.

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M E L I S S A G AY L A R D Melissa Gaylard, a Calgary mother of three and busy entrepreneur, found her cause and community rather unexpectedly, when all three of her children were born prematurely. “After our twins were born at 26 weeks, we wanted to figure out a way we could give back to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for everything they had given to us with our first child and the twins,” shares Melissa. “We decided to start a t-shirt line called Jacob Grace Designs with a special Small + Mighty shirt that would help raise money to give back to the hospitals and families that find themselves with premature or sick babies at birth.” Starting out as just a small operation, Melissa began designing the shirts that were inspired by her kids or by other kids that she has met throughout her NICU connection. With a decidedly hip and modern edge, it is no surprise that the collection took off and has gained a following worldwide, thanks to Instagram. Selling the entire collection in their online shop, as well as local pop-up shops and markets in the city, Melissa has made connections with countless families with similar life-changing stories to share, much like her own. “If you can just brighten one moment or one day for these families that have babies in the NICU, it actually makes a huge impact,” says Melissa, speaking from experience. “Our Small + Mighty Project aims to do exactly that. We collect donations from small shops in Calgary and around the world and create special gift bags for the families that find themselves in the NICU. Our goal is to be able to make enough gift bags so that every single family that walks through the NICU will get something to brighten their experience.”

F RO M L E F T: S A M M E N D OZA , BR E A NNE S ICH, TA NYA KOSHOW SK I, MELISSA G AYLARD, K AIT KUCY

Support comes in many forms. For the most part, it means having someone listen to you. Other times, it is a shoulder to cry on, a warm meal, a place to rest your head, or simply a welcoming community that understands. As humans, we all seek out support in different times of our lives, and I’m sure we can all remember a time that someone has made a difference to our well-being. In Calgary, a city currently going through so many changes – both positive and negative – we’re seeing the need for different kinds of support becoming more and more apparent. Gathering at Alforno Bakery over coffees and pastries, four women who all discovered a need for support, care, and community in Calgary came together for a fireside chat about the organizations and businesses they run. The four, interestingly enough, share common threads in that each of their organizations involve either food or design. Meet Melissa Gaylard, Tanya Kochowski, Sam Mendoza, and Breanne Sich. 138

As if she wasn’t busy enough, Melissa has another side project called Little Modern Market, which brings Calgary’s cool maker scene to the suburbs. Partnering with a fellow entrepreneur, they’ve grown a large following in a short amount of time. Participating in these local markets has brought the real-life connection to other families dealing with similar experiences a lot closer for Melissa: “I’ve met a lot of really amazing families since starting my company. I get emails from people sharing their stories – which again, continues to inspire me each and every day to do what I do,” says Melissa. “I am just so honoured to be able to meet so many of these families and these little ones that go through so much so early in life.” These connections made will last a lifetime for Melissa, her family, her customers, and the strangers that find themselves in the NICU with tiny babies. “It really does become a community. We usually have families who have received a Small + Mighty gift bag return the following year to help package them – a few have even started their own small shops to help contribute to the cause.”

TA N YA K O S H O W S K I Acting as Executive Director of Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids (BB4CK), Tanya Koshowski works in partnership with Calgary schools and dedicated volunteers to feed over 3,200 children every day who would otherwise go hungry. Working with community groups that include thousands of volunteers, BB4CK prepares lunches that ensure hungry students get the nutrition they need to focus and learn. “I started volunteering with them three years ago, and the whole organization really captured my heart,” shares Tanya. “I first connected with Brown Bagging about thirteen years ago. At the time, I was a single mom with two young kids, so I didn’t have as much time to come down to the kitchen to make lunches. I started working on some special projects and finding different ways to make a difference. I ended up accepting a position as the community coordinator eight years ago, and it is amazing the huge changes we’ve gone through since then.” Now, with Tanya as the Executive Director, BB4CK now has over 218 community groups (they started with three) that encompass my volunteers from various groups all across the city, including businesses, church groups, retired residents, and restaurants. In many of the participating high schools, they actually have high school students making lunches for themselves or other kids. “Sometimes the high school students will go beyond just making lunch. Kids are struggling in other ways, dealing with other problems, and having this community built in to their school is so positive for many students. It really is much more than just lunch.” A social change organization, BB4CK is striving to provide more opportunities to change their lunch recipients' lives, and with Tanya at the helm, it seems like possibilities are endless. “Personally, my big vision for Brown Bagging is that we want people to take meaningful action,” says Tanya. “That’s been a big part of my purpose – giving kids that opportunity to be the best they can be. Whether that is a meaningful action that you’ve experienced with a community – like smiling at somebody, helping them up the stairs – these are all meaningful actions we can take. Giving the kids a sense of love and belonging is just as impactful as the act of lunch. Our organization is more about people than just making lunches.” 139


SAM MENDOZA It has been proven that art can inspire change – and artist Sam Mendoza wanted to use her artistic abilities as a graphic designer to create something that would make a difference in people’s lives. Sam created Diamonds in the Rough Originals (DITRO), a t-shirt company that has become her platform for social change. Not only is she using her design and art talents to create a product that people want to wear and enjoy, but she is also raising money to donate to charitable organizations important to her. Sam was born and raised in Ponoka, Alberta, a small town known for the Centennial Centre for Mental Health and Brain Injury. “Mental health is just something that has always been in my life. Being compassionate towards others was part of my upbringing, and I wanted to find a way to support people through my creativity,” shares Sam. Creating small batch collections of limited edition Chari-Tee t-shirts, Sam’s designs all tell different stories that represent personal experiences that have made a huge impact on her life. “One of the editions is called Real Life, and the idea for that one is based on my roots growing up in a small town and how real it is to work as a psychiatric aide,” says Sam. “To be part of a community is to understand and care about the people that are around you.” In her spare time, Sam works with young entrepreneurs and start-ups to help them with their branding. Enjoying helping people who may have limited funds for design and marketing materials but amazing businesses, she is able to help create the branding they need to get ahead. Meanwhile, it took Sam about ten years to finally find the courage to put herself and DITRO out there into the world, but since launching, she’s had some incredible experiences and made new connections to programs that are really important to her. “This summer I am actually doing my first collaboration with the Calgary Drop-In Centre. I’ll be talking to the clients who live and reside in the Calgary Drop-In and I can’t wait to see what kind of creative brainstorming we will come up with.” The personal connection Sam brings to each Chari-Tee and organization that she partners with is what defines her as a person, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. “I just think that, at the end of the day, everybody deserves love, support, and help – if you can give back in whatever way you can, whether it is t-shirts, volunteering, or money, you can fuel this kind of inspiration in others too.”

BREANNE SICH Hunger is a problem in our city, and as Tanya Koshowski shared in her mission for Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids, there are solutions to be found with hard work and determination. Breanne Sich is working on another one of those solutions. Heading up the MealShare Aid Society program as the Community Leader and Digital Marketing Manager, Breanne has already made a big local impact with her team, sharing around 350,000 meals in Calgary at the time of this interview. “MealShare is a meal sharing program based on partnerships with restaurants all over the city and corresponding charities to build buy-one-get-one programs. In Calgary, our charities are Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids and The Calgary DropIn Centre,” shares Breanne. “The great thing about our concept is that you can order food normally at your favourite MealShare restaurant partner, and just because you ate off the MealShare menu, a child also got a meal. It is all built in.” Previously working in the culinary industry in both frontof-house and marketing capacities, Breanne already had a passion for restaurants and a lot of contacts in the Calgary food scene, which made moving to MealShare full-time an easy transition. “I had just finished my marketing degree, and I wasn’t sure where I was going to end up next, but I was happily working in the restaurant industry. The job posting at MealShare came up and seemed like a perfect fit because I wanted to stay in the industry but use my connections to leverage something good for the community,” says Breanne. “Since then, we have surpassed a million meals shared in the whole organization. We went from two co-founders to a team of twelve people. It has been pretty amazing.” MealShare continues to grow, with around 17 partner restaurants in Calgary alone and new branches of the program opening up in places like Austin, Texas. Breanne enjoys the excitement of being part of a charitable start-up that combines her love of philanthropy and food: “It has been such a whirlwind. I feel like every day I wake up, I don’t know what is going to happen – we could sign on a huge chain and go from zero-to-a-hundred real quick, or it might take longer for people to catch on to our concept. People are passionate about giving back to our community, and that is why it has been a success so far.” 140

F OL LOW T H E G I R L S : MEL I S S A - @ JAC OB.G R AC ED ES I G N S TAN YA - @ BB4 C K S AM - @ D I T R OR I G I N AL S BR EAN N E - @ MEAL S H AR E

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EMMA'S DOTEABLES WR ITTEN BY EMMA KLASSEN PHOTOGR APHED BY JUSTINE MILTON PHOTOGR APHY STYLED BY ALEXANDR A JOY WIG

The well-curated home list from a stylish twelve-year-old

While walking through Inglewood as well as visiting my favourite local markets, I found some things that remind me of spring and summer but are all for the home. I chose some things for indoors and outdoors, some things that are useful, and some that are just plain pretty. My three favourite things here are the wooden tray with the golden handles that was made right here in Calgary, the Turkish towels because we use them for picnics and the beach, and, obviously, the pink flamingo pot because, well, duh, it's a pink flamingo pot (and it's also made in Calgary!).

Left shelf

Right shelf

To p : •• The Fern Gallery by Jill Weston, original watercolour, $85.00, jillweston.com •• Grizzly Bear string art by Agnes in August, $38.00, agnesinaugust.com •• Candles by Alchemy Produx, $59, Fresh Laundry, freshlaundry.co.  

To p : •• Concrete bowl by Mdrn Krft, $20.00; fly swatter by Bürstenhaus Redecker, $22.00; Deuce pitcher/watering can by Umbra Shift, $80.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com •• Flamingo pot by A.S. Ceramics, $85.00, as-ceramics.com

Second: •• Concrete trinket dish in select colours by Co|Create, starting at $14.00, cocreateco.ca •• Lavender glass cleaner, hand soap, and linen water by Common Good, $14.00, Fresh Laundry, freshlaundry.co •• Checked imprint flower pot by Day Home, $28.00; flowerpot brush, wineglass brush, corner scrub brush by Bürstenhaus Redecker, $15.00 to $20.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com

Second: •• White linen sheet set by Bella Notte, starting at $850.00, Shades of Sleep, shadesofsleep.ca Third: •• Black walnut wooden tray by Jeremy Zingeler, $125.00, Shades of Sleep, shadesofsleep.ca •• Concrete bowls by Mdrn Krft, $20.00 to $42.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com •• Chamomile Organic Blend tea by Rosso Coffee Roasters, $12.00, rossocoffeeroasters.com •• Raw Local Honey (Spring) by Drizzle Honey, $15.99, drizzlehoney.com

Third: •• Agnes vases by Normann Copenhagen, $38.00 to $48.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com •• The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking, $12.97; This Can Be Beautiful by Tiffany Pratt, $20.70; Domino: The Book of Decorating, $31.60; Domino: Your Guide to a Stylish Home, $34.20, Indigo, chapters.indigo.ca •• Brass seashell bookends, vintage

Bottom: •• Duvet cover by Mondovi, starting at $769.50, Shades of Sleep, shadesofsleep.ca

Bottom: •• Turkish towels by Sunday Dry Goods, $40.00 to $64.00, Fresh Laundry, freshlaundry.co  

Magazine rack: •• Gazette magazine rack by Umbra, $60.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com •• Looking at Mindfulness by Christophe André, $32.95; Colette’s Lost Pet by Isabelle Arsenault, $22.99; The Art of the Scarf by Libby Vanderploeg, $20.99, Indigo, chapters.indigo.ca

Basket: •• Medium bamboo basket by Day Home, $185.00 (part of three-basket set); carpet beater by Bürstenhaus Redecker, $29.00, Guildhall Home, guildhallhome.com •• Turkish towel by Sunday Dry Goods, $64.00, Fresh Laundry, freshlaundry.co

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Dote Magazine Issue 6