Page 1

D OT E MAG AZINE . a well-styled and meaningful life issue seven

fall/winter 2017


AlbiHomes.com


ANYONE CAN HAVE

BEAUTIFUL SKIN Complementary Skin Rejuvanalysis™ Consultations • Halo™ Laser Treatments • Ablative Laser Resurfacing • Fractional Laser Treatments • Professional skin care maintenance programs • Dermal fillers/Botox • Facials and chemical peels

For more information or to book your consultation, contact us at: info@jeffreycdawesmd.com (403) 571-3141 www.BeautifulNaturalYou.ca


www.cinderandsage.com // @cinderandsage Enter code “DOTE� for 15% off your purchase


our team

KATE KLASSEN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR @KATE.KLASSEN

JENNY FLAMAN MANAGING EDITOR

ALEXANDRA JOY WIG STYLE EDITOR @ALEXANDRAJOYWIG

RODA MICHAEL INTERN @RODISAYMES

LEANNE WOOD CLIENT RELATIONS LEAD @LWOODER

EMILY THWAITES INTERN/WRITER @ITSSIMPLYEM_

VICKI MANNESS FOOD EDITOR @PRETTYSWEETYYC

KELLY AMONSON LEAD COORDINATOR @KELLYAMONSON

ANASTACIA JIDO INTERN/ LEAD DESIGNER @ANASTACIA.JIDO

our contributors ALEXANDRA MACDONALD - ARTIST @FLORAELISECO

GENEVIEVE RENEE - PHOTOGRAPHER @GENEVIEVERENEEPHOTO

AMY BELL - PHOTOGRAPHER @MODERN_NEST_PHOTOGRAPHY

JAMIE HYATT - PHOTOGRAPHER @_JAMIEHYATT

ANDREA OH - WRITER @SIXFOOTCANASIAN

KAIT KUCY - WRITER @KAITKUCY

ANDREW MACKIE - COLUMNIST @GOLDGRASSHOME

KRISTY ARCHIBALD - WRITER @KMARCHIBALD

ANGELA DIONE - COLUMNIST @MARKETCOLLECTIVE

MELANIE LUTHER - ILLUSTRATOR @MELLUTHER

ANGELA JONES - WRITER @ANGE_JONEZ

REBECCA RAGAN - COLUMNIST @REBECCADAWNDESIGN

BRIAN BOOKSTRUCKER - PHOTOGRAPHER @BOOKSTRUCKER

SARAH VAUGHAN - PHOTOGRAPHER @SARAHVAUGHAN

DAVID HEIDRICH - PHOTOGRAPHER @HEIDRICH_PHOTOGRAPHY

TARYN GARRETT - ILLUSTRATOR @TARYNDEANNE

DESERAE EVENSON - PHOTOGRAPHER @DESERAEEVENSONPHOTO

TYLER LEMERMEYER - ILLUSTRATOR @LEMERMEYER_

Special thanks to Lyndsay Garreck, Erin Donnelly-Ferguson, Madeline Needles and Deane House, Fieldstudy, Lyndsey Delamont and Eleanor Carlson of Carbert Waite LLP, co|create, Crave, Chelsea Hogan of Fern & Frond, AMARTINCREATIVE, Rosso Coffee Roasters, Skoah, Cinder & Sage, Lace Brick Designs, Drizzle Honey, Moth Chocolate (Kin + Pod), The Vanity Vault, Blush Lane, Plant, xx Balm, Cale Foulston, Alexandra MacDonald, Angela Romeril, Stacey Perry, and Mandi Schmale.


D OTE MAGAZ IN E . COVER PHOTO Photographed by Deserae Evanson Cover props from Crate and Barrel, Anthropologie, IKEA, co|create, Plant, Calgary Farmers' Market

COPY EDITORS Heather Wensrich Cheryl Manness Heidi Brown Janet Molchanko Stacey Sitter Chris Brown

DESIGNERS John Mancenito Janet Molchanko Ashley Hamilton Michelle Radomski All content and images are used by express consent of the contributing authors and photographers and were created for Dote Magazine. Printed by Mitchell Press Advertising opportunities Email: ads@dotemagazine.com Check out our website: dotemagazine.com Follow us on Instagram: @dotemagazine Mailing address: #242, 5126 126 Avenue S.E. Calgary, AB T2Z 0H2

PUBLISHED BY Impact Group impactgr.com 403-279-0967

P H O T O B Y S A R A H VA U G H A N

Contents copyright Š 2017 by Dote Magazine; may not be reprinted without express written permission from Dote Magazine. Dote Magazine will not be liable for any damages or losses as a result of the use of the reader and any information, opinions, or products expressed, advertised, or otherwise stated.


our vision is beyond sight

Kara Rohl Lifestyle Photography

My Optometrist Calgary is more than just eye health. Our passion is for overall wellness, supporting local businesses and brands, and giving back on a local and global level.

Comprehensive exams for all ages | Advanced Technology Calgary Dry Eye and Ocular Wellness Clinic | Community connection Four Locations: Midnapore | Sundance | Sunridge | Three Hills myoptometristcalgary.ca | @myoptomyyc


A DVE RTI SE ME NT

THE ESPY EXPERIENCE P HOTO G RA P HED BY A L I X B ROA DWAY A N D KE L L E Y M AT L E Y S T YLED BY CL A RK WH E TS TO N E , C A RO L I N A V E L A S CO L AYO UT D ES IGN E D BY M I C H E L L E R A D O M S K I

“In order to be irreplaceable, one m u s t a l w a y s b e d i f f e r e n t .” – Coco Chanel

Style is not a one-size-fits-all concept. It works differently for each individual based on taste and body type. We are all different, and our style is what reflects that to the world. Many clothing retailers are designed to fit a “standard form” of man or woman, and often that form is not something we fit into or want to follow. Espy, a clothing boutique nestled on 9th Avenue, in the heart of Inglewood, takes personalized style to a new level with their Espy Experience, a concept designed to provide service and style to make you feel good about yourself, no matter your shape, size, or desired form.

12


13


The Espy Experience is a service model designed to treat each customer as an individual, working with their body type, so they can make the statement they want. No matter what your size or shape, Espy specializes in finding the perfect fit and look for men and women of all body types.

To give you a truly unique experience, they offer services like closet interventions and personal branding. They also offer VIP shopping and “date night” for couples, which includes a personal styling session and a trip to a top neighbourhood restaurant.

“I believe that sometimes all it takes is one positive interaction to change someone’s self-image, and that belief drives all our interactions with our customers, to help them see the very best version of themselves, no matter if they are a mom on the go or a corporate executive,” says Megan Szanik, proprietor of Espy.

We don’t rely on following or trying to predict trends or sticking to one specific market or brand. We seek o u t , b u y, a n d s t o c k quality merchandise we know our customers will want and can’t get a n y w h e r e e l s e .”

Unlike many other retailers, who select sizes based on a standard mould, Espy ensures they have clothes to fit almost anyone. Rather than trying to mitigate risk and buy on a bell curve to maximize the amount they can sell, they buy for the edges of the curve as well, so there are fewer people overlooked. They specifically buy for categories like tall and slim men, curvy ladies, and people with long legs, stocking jeans for women in sizes up to 18 and tops up to XXL. “We know our customers, and we buy for them, as we want them all to find great pieces that fit the way they want,” Megan highlights.

–Megan Szanik

The name Espy comes from the word “espionage,” which means discovering something new. Helping their customers see the best in themselves and how fabulous they are, is what Espy strives to do every day, all while offering affordable designer concept fashion.

You can also look forward to some exciting events coming up at Espy, like their Outerwear Event on October 21 and 22, where they will take over the lobby of the Arts Block (the building where Espy is housed in Inglewood) and showcase amazing Canadian-branded outerwear. This event also includes a sample sale, so you can find that one-of-akind piece for the season at an amazing price.

With a focus on denim, Espy features over 200 styles for both men and women, ensured to fit anyone. They source pieces from local, independent designers and distributors from across Canada.

In October, keep an eye out for their denim coupons to save $100 on jeans, and sometime near U.S. Black Friday, be on the lookout for Espy’s It’s NOT Black Friday Sale, which is a secretly scheduled pop-up sale.

“I focus on and promote Canadian brands whenever possible because our customers want local, ethically-sourced, clothes and want to feel good about buying them,” says Megan.

Make sure you are signed up to receive Espy emails, so you can find out about all of these great events and opportunities. Sign up on espyexperience.com.

MODELS:

MICHAEL TOBIN, ROBBIE EDWARDS, KENNA J, AND AMY LYNN

CREDITS THIS PAGE (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT):

MATINIQUE PANTS, RUDSAK PUFFER JACKET | NATIONAL STANDARDS PLAID SHIRT, OOKPIK WINTER PARKA | SOSKEN WOOL OVERCOAT, NOEL ASMAR PUFFER VEST | BODYBAG BY JUDE CAPE

CREDITS RIGHT PAGE (FROM TOP DOWN, LEFT TO RIGHT):

SAND SHIRT, TED BAKER VEST | YUMI DRESS | TED BAKER DRESS | LIEF HORSENS BLAZER, MATINIQUE PANTS + SHIRT + TIE TED BAKER DRESS | STONES BLAZER, 34 HERITAGE PANTS SOSKEN WOOL OVERCOAT, NOEL ASMAR PUFFER VEST TED BAKER SKIRT, BANO EEMEE JACKET, ELLABEE FUR VEST

FOLLOW ESPY @ESPYEXPERIENCE 14


15


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

IN THIS ISSUE FEAR NOT, FOOD IS YOUR FRIEND

49

GOOD GRIEF

68

ABOUT THE WILL

74

BETTER TOGETHER

79

I N E V E RY I S S U E HELLO FRIENDS

21

BEAUTY + BLOOMS | WARM WELCOME

28

ENTERTAIN | AUTUMN GATHERING

35

BAKED | THE FRIENDSHIP BUNDT CAKE

40

GIVING BACK | THE POWER OF “ME TOO”

62

MAN WITH A PASSION | RANDOM BEATS

103

MARKET COLLECTIVE | NURTURING THE BARK

110

A STYLED HOME | SHARING SPACES

116

LITTLES GO TO SCHOOL | EMBRACING URBAN LIFE WITH A BABE IN TOW

122

EMMA’S DOTEABLES | GIFTS FOR TOGETHER

135


P H O T O B Y S A R A H VA U G H A N


Childbirth Education | Birth Doulas | Postpartum Doulas | Placenta Encapsulation

elitedoula.com

|

403-796-9222

|

@elitedoulagroup


BECOMING A DANCER ISN’T EASY Energy through the fingers

Smile Shoulders down

Soften the rib cage

Turn out Pull up through the legs

Cross the fifth

...but we know how to get you there.

BALLET AND CONTEMPORARY DANCE PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES. TAUGHT EXCLUSIVELY BY PROFESSIONAL DANCERS. REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

UPCOMING EVENTS True North: A Symphonic Ballet

The Blue Gala

Groundbreaking collaboration between five composers

A Gala to Counterbalance the Winter Blues

across Canada celebrating Canada’s 150th Anniversary

In support of Pancreatic Cancer Canada

Choreographed by our own Yukichi Hattori

Performances by internationally acclaimed artists

October 28, 2017 @ Jack Singer Concert Hall

February 3, 2017 @ Martha Cohen Theatre

Tickets available at www.calgaryphil.com

Ticket information available at www.hwballet.com

4 0 3 . 4 7 4 . 0 8 1 8 • I N F O @ H W B A L L E T. C O M • W W W. H W B A L L E T. C O M • H AT TO R I W I L L I A M S O N C U R R I E B A R R A C K S • 2 6 3 3 H O C H WA L D AV E . S .W. C A L G A R Y


HELLO@SHOLUXURYHOMECARE.COM


Hello Friends,

And thank you for picking up this issue of Dote Magazine! Our seventh issue marks our third year in Calgary, and we are so thankful that you continue to pick us up and enjoy our stories. As in all issues of Dote, we couldn’t have done this without our incredibly talented and generous contributors as well as all of the partners who support us. We are immeasurably grateful for all of you. This issue is about being together. “Together” is a word that invokes happiness, comfort, and warmth, but can also bring up feelings of loss, sadness, and disappointment. We cover the span of these emotions in the following pages. We talk about sharing meals and opening our homes, we chat with a couple of local ladies who are helping others feel less alone by bringing them together. We talk about grief with one woman’s journey through tragedy, and we follow along with another who has battled a lifelong rocky relationship with food. As we take our first few chilly breaths in those cool autumn winds, let’s get together. Take comfort in those around you and offer it to someone in need. And as the days get shorter and the nights colder, treasure those who bring you warmth because no matter what our social inclinations, we are always better together.

xo, P H O T O B Y S A R A H VA U G H A N 21

the Dote Team


A DVE RTI SE ME NT

THE CARDEL COMMUNITY T H E A L L U R E OF SHAW NE E PA R K WR ITTE N BY AVE RY LE E P HOTOG RA PH E D BY C A RD E L L AYO UT D E S IG NE D BY A SH LE Y H A MI LTON

Community has stood at the forefront of Cardel’s vision since the construction of their very first home in 1973. With the intent of establishing a strong sense of belonging in each of their neighbourhoods, what started as a small, family-owned business has now flourished into an international company.

than waiting for your favourite coffee shop to arrive or transit to be built, everything is already there. On the other hand, if it’s an escape from the concrete jungle you crave, this burgeoning neighbourhood backs onto the largest urban park in North America: Fish Creek Park, which boasts 3,000 acres of backyard terrain for lucky residents to explore.

Despite Cardel’s impressive growth spurt over the years, the company has still managed to maintain their integrity as a family business. At Cardel, building a community is about giving back, being involved, and contributing to something greater, rather than simply providing a structure for people to live in. It’s about going beyond bricks and mortar by supporting initiatives that bring people together. Through donating time and talent to worthy causes, such as food bank drives, breast cancer campaigns, and hosting various events to raise funds for local charities, Cardel is able to not only house people in their communities, but also enrich the lives of those living in them. They aim to create places for neighbours to meet, kids to grow, and memories to be made, which is exactly what they have managed to accomplish through the community of Shawnee Park.

While the location of Shawnee Park is arguably the most tempting aspect, the exquisite houses nestled within present a worthy rival. A well-built house is the foundation of any exceptional neighbourhood, and it’s what Cardel knows best. No matter where you live, the structure, layout, and overall design of your home largely impacts your everyday life. This is exactly why you can expect to see all of these details closely addressed in each and every one of Cardel’s homes. Solid structures, striking interiors, higher standard specifications, energy efficient integrations, and functional layouts are beautifully displayed in each of the four Shawnee Park showhomes and carried out through every single-family and multifamily unit within the area. Cardel is more than just a business and, therefore, builds more than just houses. They are a community of people who aim to create dynamic neighbourhoods where families and friends are able to connect in a place they love. Establishing a healthy and sustainable urban forest, constructing strong, quality houses that are built for real life, and, above all, creating a sense of home are what make a neighbourhood truly complete. Shawnee Park is a community you’ll want to experience for yourself.

A variety of aesthetic and geographical aspects come together to make Shawnee Park an absolutely stunning neighbourhood, but what makes this community truly unique is its history. Shawnee Park is one of the first infill projects to be implemented in Calgary, allowing for a progressive urban development that encompasses the new while embracing the old. Unlike most new developments, Shawnee Park is already surrounded by a well-established part of the city, which means, rather

22


BUILDING A COMMUNITY IS ABOUT GIVING BACK, BEING INVOLVED, AND CONTRIBUTING TO SOMETHING GREATER THAN SIMPLY PROVIDING A STRUCTURE FOR PEOPLE TO LIVE IN.

23


To view the Shawnee Park showhomes, visit the Shawnee Park sales centre at 330 Shawnee Blvd S.W. For more details about Cardel Homes or the Shawnee Park community, visit www.cardelhomes.com. 24


@CardelHomesYYC | #CardelLifeYYC


P H O T O B Y S A R A H VA U G H A N


COME, FRIENDS. C O M E W I T H Y O U R G R I E F. COME WITH YOUR LOSS. C A R RY A L L T H E P I E C E S O F Y O U R H E A RT AND COME SIT WITH US. BRING YOUR DISAPPOINTMENTS A N D Y O U R FA I L U R E S . B R I N G Y O U R B E T R AYA L S AND YOUR MASKS. W E W E L C O M E Y O U N O M AT T E R WHERE YOU COME FROM A N D W H AT Y O U B R I N G . COME AND JOIN US AT T H E I N T E R S E C T I O N O F A C C E P TA N C E A N D F O R G I V E N E S S WHERE YOU WILL FIND OUR HOUSE OF LOVE. BRING YOUR EMPTY CUPS A N D W E W I L L H AV E A F E A S T. -KAMAND KOJOURI


B E AUTY + BLO O MS

WA R M W E L C O M E W R I T T EN BY REBEC C A RAG AN PH OTOG R A P H ED BY S ARAH VAUG HAN

T

here is nothing quite like a cozy, charming front porch or steps for relaxing and enjoying the crisp fall weather. This is your guests’ first impression of you, your family, and your home. You want it to be warm and welcoming, both to those who pass by for an evening stroll on the sidewalk and to friends and family that stop in for a visit. It also functions as transitional space into the house itself and should reflect the overall style of your home. However, if your front steps are currently lacking charm and colour, knowing how to style your outdoor space can be a challenge. More often than not, it is dismissed and turned into a storage facility of muddy shoes, rusty chairs, and neglected plants. The smallest of details can create a more inviting look and take your front steps from “stay out” to “hello, neighbour.” Here are some of my front door décor ideas for fall with a few tips and tricks to help you achieve a warm and welcoming entrance.

S H O T O N L O C AT I O N AT T H E H E R I TA G E H O M E O F E R I N D O N N E L L Y- F E R G U S O N 28


29


30


A More Inviting Front Porch

A u t u m n O u t d o o r D é c o r Ti p s

S e a t i n g - Depending on space, this may be a single

1 . Va r y y o u r l e v e l s - Use planter stands,

G o G r e e n - Whether it be hanging pots, flowers, shrubs, herbs, or any other greenery, plants are welcoming. Having plants provides natural beauty, colour, and texture and makes the porch look more alive.

2 . N a t u r a l t o u c h e s - Plant your seasonal

chair or full outdoor patio set. Regardless, having some furniture on your front porch invites guests to sit down and stay a while.

stools, baskets, crates, etc. to add some height variation. Use them to creatively display your pumpkins, plants, and other elements. If you have steps leading up to your door, use them; there is no need to go out and buy anything new. Shop your home and garage to find what you need. blooms or foliage in monochromic pots for a more modern, elegant look. Hardy heather and ornamental kale are perfect for providing some neutral but fallthemed colour.

G e t a R u g - A rug reminds people to wipe their feet, but, more importantly, it adds a little colour. It will also help make your porch feel like a natural extension of your interior living space.

3 . D o o r d é c o r - Hanging a wreath on your

P e r s o n a l i z e - Bring the indoors out with throws,

door is a simple way to decorate and helps show your personality, as well.

pillows, stools, lanterns, etc., which are a great way to cozy up your front porch. These elements will reflect your personal style and are a perfect way to make a statement.

4 . S i t a n d u n w i n d - Adding a chair will create the perfect spot for sipping your hot apple cider in the crisp morning air.

Get Ready for Fall

5 . T e x t i l e s - You don’t need to move everything indoors just yet. Add some wool throw blankets and a cozy pillow to your porch furniture, throw on a sweater, and make the most out of this gorgeous season while you can. It will up your curb appeal at the same time.

It’s easy to create a warm and welcoming porch for fall when you embrace the natural beauty of the season. Celebrate the harvest by using a variety of pumpkins or gourds to make a bountiful collection that welcomes guests with all of fall’s warm, happy hues. Not all fall décor has to be red and orange. Soft creams, peaches, and muted blues are especially beautiful in the fall, where they work with nearly all shades of autumn. Combined with weathered wood accents and galvanized steel, they are perfect complements to this existing light grey colour palette. The result is a bright, fresh, modern take on fall decorating.

6 . U n e x p e c t e d e l e m e n t s - Look around your home to see if you have some planks of wood, an old ladder, or a vintage table that can be repurposed into something fresh for your porch. You’ll be surprised what you have lying around. Even arranging some bundled branches can add height, interest, and character. 31


Hardy Blooms When choosing plants for fall, their ability to withstand cool temperatures, including frost, is the key to keeping your pots or containers looking great. There are plants that will bloom with fall’s limited daylight hours and do not mind if the temperature gets a bit frosty. Visit your local greenhouse for varieties that will work in your Plant Hardiness Zone (see map at www.planthardiness.gc.ca). Chrysanthemums and asters are everywhere in the fall, but there are a lot of other contenders that can handle our cool fall weather and still look great. Here is a short list featuring some of my favourites: • • • • • • • • • • •

Ornamental kale Sedum Heather Verbena Pansies Dusty miller Heuchera Silver dichondra Hardy ferns Vinca vine Ornamental grasses (fountain grass, feather grass, etc.)

Make your porch or steps into a favourite escape. The most important tip I can give for creating your own cozy fall front porch is to make it into something you love. Don’t compare it to mine, to your next-door neighbour’s, or to the perfect pictures on Pinterest. Make it a space that draws you outside on warm fall evenings to sit and admire the autumn colours or watch the kids play. If it feels warm, comfortable, and welcoming to you, that’s all that really matters!

33


WA R D R O B E S T Y L I N G B Y C A L E F O U L S T O N HAIR + MAKEUP BY CALE MAKEUP ARTISTRY

34


ENTER TAIN

A U T U M N G AT H E R I N G WRITTEN AN D S TY LED BY ALEXAN DRA JOY WIG PH OTO G RAPH ED BY G EN EVIEVE REN EE PHOTOGR APHIE

H O S T I N G A F E S T I V E FA L L PICNIC WITH FRIENDS

35


W

ith limited warm summer months, our city tends to fully embrace all the season has to offer. We sip rosé on patios, we float in the Bow, and we take in sunny festivals. We also tend to disperse. We head west to seek out vineyards and orchards, or east to lay by the lakes, or just outside the city to hike the mountains. Summer days can pull us in different directions, but come fall, there seems to be a regrouping and a call back to steadiness in schedules. Gone are those long weekend camping trips and quiet cabin times, and here are the welcomed changes in season, weather, and routine. There’s no better time to gather with friends and catch up about summer adventures, and there’s no better way to welcome fall than with a beautiful outdoor brunch. Blog and Pinterest-worthy gatherings aren’t as unreachable as you might think. All it takes is someone to make a plan, assign guests what to bring, and have everyone on board with giving a little extra thought to design and details. We’ve put together a guide to get you started on creating a memorable outdoor brunch gathering for you and your friends to reconnect and celebrate the changing season.

36


Choose a location Lucky for us, fall still lends some beautiful days that make an outdoor picnic possible. Picking a great location is key in setting the scene for a stunning gathering, so choose wisely. A local park, by the river, under a picnic shelter or big tree, no matter where you choose, look for somewhere quiet and attractive. Don’t forget to consider things like parking – you might have to make a few trips with your pretty picnic load, so choose somewhere that has easy access from your vehicles. Availability of bathrooms is also something to think about when planning an outdoor brunch. Of course, choosing to enjoy the outdoors in your own backyard, on your deck or patio, might be more your style and a much less complicated option than picnicking somewhere else. It is very possible to create a stunning scene no matter where you choose to eat alfresco. Keep an eye on the weather leading up to your event date and be prepared for a cooler day with cozy blankets and sweaters. It is also smart to have an indoor backup location if temperatures decide not to cooperate.

37


What to bring Aside from the great outdoors, set the scene with great textiles and textures, well-curated dishes, and linens. Think through form and function when collecting these pieces and have everyone attending pitch in and bring items from home. Planning is key, so go as far as deciding which bowl or plate will house each item. There’s no need to haul along extra things that won’t get used. Here is a list of items to consider bringing to your gathering: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Small to medium-sized area rugs Floor cushions and poufs Throw pillows Blankets and Turkish towels Large trays Wood or marble cutting boards Small side tables Wicker or wire baskets Drinkware, dishware, and serveware* Flatware* Linen or disposable napkins* A bundle of fresh flowers or potted plants Flameless candles or battery-operated lanterns • A portable speaker for music *try to use compostable options when possible

Menu ideas Your menu options are endless, but keep in mind that simple, fresh, and whole foods are beautiful and picnic-friendly. Opt for easy-to-transport and easy-to-serve items, and you can’t go wrong. Here are some menu ideas for a mid-morning autumn brunch: • • • • • • • • •

Dried or fresh whole fruit Nuts or trail mix Hardboiled eggs Croissants, muffins, or scones Charcuterie meats Mini quiches Assorted cheeses Seasonal fruit juice Hot or iced chai tea or coffee 38


Supplies Aside from all your pretty textiles, dishes, and food, you’ll need to bring along some supplies to help ease set-up and clean-up. Some practical items to consider: • • • • • • • •

39

Garbage bags Paper towel Baby wipes and hand sanitizer Dish towels Resealable bags and containers for leftovers Scissors A large plastic storage bin for packing A wagon for transportation


BAK ED

FRIENDSHIP BUNDT CAKE W R I T T E N BY VIC K I MAN N ES S PH OTOG R A PH ED BY G EN EVIEVE REN EE PH OTO G RAPH IE

I

n the spirit of togetherness, for our picnic brunch, we included a friendship bundt cake. We love the idea of friendship cake because it not only allows you to produce a beautiful cake but also share that ability with friends who can continue to pass it on. Friendship bread has been around for quite some time and comes from the Amish community. It’s called friendship bread, or cake, because it requires a starter, which should be shared and continuously added to. A portion of the starter is used for your cake. Pass the remainder of the starter to friends to make their own cakes, and they can pass it on, keeping the starter alive. Making this starter is a true labour of love. It takes ten days to feed and care for, but at the end of the process, you can make a delicious cake and share the love with friends. Of course, you could just whip up a quick batch of muffins or coffee cake for your picnic, but in a world of instant gratification, it’s so nice to work for something that takes some time and care to accomplish. Once the cake has been made, the effort you have put into it will make it that much better to enjoy with your friends, but this becomes a truly special recipe when you can pass along the starter for them to carry on the recipe and share it with others.

40


41


42


FRIENDSHIP BUNDT CAKE R EC I PE BY VI C K I MAN N ES S O F PRETTY S WEET

Ingredients (makes 1 bundt pan): 2 cups friendship starter (recipe on page 44) 2 cups all purpose flour 1 cup brown sugar 2 eggs ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons cinnamon 2 teaspoons cardamom ½ teaspoon nutmeg 2/3 cup unsalted butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup blackberries ½ cup almonds, toasted and chopped

Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350OF. 2. Add all ingredients into a mixing bowl and mix on low or by hand until all ingredients are combined. 3. Brush canola oil or melted butter on a large bundt pan, pour batter into pan and bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. 4. When cooled, top your cake with almond glaze and fresh blackberries.

Almond glaze: 2 tablespoons almond milk 1 cup icing sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla Mix all ingredients together and pour over cake to your heart’s desire.

43


S TA RT E R RECIPE BY VICKI MANNESS OF PRETTY SWEET

Ingredients: Starting

¼ oz envelope of active dry yeast (2 ¼ tsp) ¼ cup warm water ½ cup sugar ½ cup all purpose flour ½ cup whole wheat flour 1 cup milk Feeding (you’ll need this twice)

½ cup sugar ½ cup all purpose flour ½ cup whole wheat flour 1 cup milk

Directions: 1. First, it’s important to name your starter. You will be spending a lot of time together, so it’s important to become friendly with it. We have named ours Henry. 2. Start with a large container, around 3 to 4 litres, with a lid. Mix yeast in with warm water and let sit for a few minutes. The yeast mixture will become frothy. Add the sugar, flours, and milk. Give it a good stir, put the lid on the container, and store on the counter. *Make sure not to use anything metal in this process – it can hurt the yeast. 3. Stir Henry daily, making sure to scrape the sides of the container. 4. On day 5, feed Henry by adding all feeding ingredients and continue to stir daily. 5. On day 10 you will give Henry his last feeding by adding all of the feeding ingredients again. Let sit for one more day and on day 11 he is ready to use! 6. You should, at this point, have around 8 cups of starter. You will need 2 cups to make the friendship bundt cake. Use the rest to fill 4 250 mL jars and give to 4 friends for them to grow their own little Henrys. Keep the remaining 2 cups to grow another Henry of your very own. 7. If you are receiving a starter, follow steps 3 and 4, and on day 6 you can make your own cake. 44


Dr. Patricia Connick CCFP, FCFP, DTM&H, PgDip

Dr. Connick Is a clinical lecturer in the Department of Family Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, U of C. She has her Diploma in Practical Dermatology with expertise in managing skin conditions, and is accepting new patients.

Dr. Wendy Tink BSc (dist), CCFP, FCFP

Dr. Tink is ViveŽ Rejuvenation’s Medical Director, Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept. of Family Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, U of C.


“ True In c u bat o r w a s s u c h a v al u ab l e ex p eri en ce for me w h e n s ta rting my b us ine s s . From b uil d ing easy -to-u se marke t in g pla n s a n d f i n a n c i a l m od el s , to th e o ne -on-one me ntor s h ip w ith s ucce s s ful b us ine s s owners - I w o u ld re com m en d th i s p rog ra m to a nyone w h o w a nts to s e t th e ir b us ine s s up for s uccess.“ S heena Ro z a k - Ow n er, Rooted Mea l Prep | @ Roote d _Inc | Tr ue Incub ator Coh ort 1


ADVERTISEMENT

TRUE I N C U B AT O R HELPING Y YC ENTREPRENEURS SUCCEED A NONPROFIT BY TRUE BÃœCH www.trueincubator.com @true_incubator

* sho t o n l o c at i o n at t he Tre e E ra Tre e H o u se | www. t re e e ra.com


48


F E A R N O T, FOOD IS YOUR FRIEND WRITTEN BY K AIT KUCY PH OTO G RAPH ED BY DES ERAE EVANSON FO O D S TY LED BY MARIA KO UTS OGIANNIS

How one woman changed her outlook on food and turned her passion for the culinary w o r l d i n t o a c a r e e r. Wa r d r o b e b y F i e l d s t u d y 49


I

f there is one thing Maria Koutsogiannis believes in, it is the power of good food. The author and social media powerhouse behind FoodByMaria, a one-stop shop for mouth-watering recipes and food inspiration, is on a mission to spread the good word of eating healthy, eating well, and loving yourself.

overweight. I stopped eating and no one noticed. I realized not eating was hard to sustain, so for the rest of the trip I only ate greens and lost a lot of weight.” Maria viewed food as confusing as she entered a dark period during her university career. “I didn’t know what to eat to stay skinny or what to eat to stay healthy,” she says. “All I did was eat whatever I wanted, then shove my fingers down my throat to do it all over again. I hated my body a lot and because of this I ended up hating myself. That is when bulimia took over my life for a long six years.”

Maria has had a long journey with her relationship with food. As a survivor of body dysmorphia and bulimia, she spent years reconciling her issues with food to the point where she now lives, eats, and breathes healthy food and shares her body- and food-positive message with the world. With over 140,000 followers on Instagram, it is no secret that Maria Just like how her eating disorder journey began, Maria can’t connects with her audience in an authentic and unique way. define the exact moment when her perspective towards food and her illness changed from seeing food as something Her struggle with body image began as a child; being a figure toxic for her body to something she needed as nourishment. skater placed a lot of unnecessary pressures about size and She learned a valuable lesson that nothing is permanent, and weight on Maria. “To this day I still have no clue exactly if she didn’t like something, she could change it. when or why my eating disorder started,” says Maria. “Even though I didn’t have bulimia until I was an adult, I think these “Ultimately, I didn’t want to die, so I got my shit together external influences were just building blocks to toxicity and a and decided to get better,” says Maria. “It was the hardest, bad relationship with my mind and body.” longest process of my life, but I knew I had to do it. I cried every day while I was trying to get better. After you’ve One summer, in Maria’s teenage years, her family took a trip vomited for so long, you suddenly have to deal with to Greece, which she remembers as a particularly triggering everything in your body that got damaged in the process: period when she started making changes to her diet. your teeth, your digestive system, your skin, and your heart – the hardest part to fix.” “I always loved food growing up and never had a problem with it at all. Until one summer, when I went to Greece and Without doctors or treatment, needing to find the light at gained a few pounds within the first few weeks,” shares the end of a long dark tunnel was difficult for Maria, but, Maria. “A few family members commented on it and jokingly ultimately, she found her own inner strength by surrounding told me to ‘slow down’ and ‘eat a bit less.’ I’ve always been herself with positivity and people who helped empower someone with a naturally muscular and strong-looking body, her during this journey. but I didn’t want my family to tell me I was looking chunky or

50


52


“FoodByMaria actually started long before I knew it would be an actual company. My boyfriend and I were living in London at the time, and I had just been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome,” she shares. “I was sick with bulimia for six years prior, so reading a list of all of the foods I couldn’t eat really hit home for me. I don’t want to go down that road [of restriction] again. That is when I started documenting the recipes I made and writing down how they made me feel. It was a great stepping stone into where I am today.”

One of the most important things that Maria wants her readers to take away from this whole journey is that food is really good for you. Her message is one of empowerment, health, and positive self-talk. “Since starting FoodByMaria, I really have paid attention to what I am putting in my body. I don’t think there is anything wrong with indulging in food in a healthy, nourishing way,” shares Maria. “The important part is paying attention to how your body reacts to food or how your body craves certain food. You need to listen to your body to make healthy choices.”

Maria has come so far from her humble beginnings. Having previously pursued accounting as a career, when FoodByMaria started to grow, she decided to put all her efforts into her side gig, creating new content regularly and supporting other people who have struggled with eating disorders.

As 2017 wraps up, Maria has embarked on a few top-secret projects that will be coming to light for her over the next year. In the meantime, expect to see a lot more of FoodByMaria, whether it is through her writing, her videos, her photos, or through local events – she’s here to spread a positive message through beautiful food and personal experience.

Today, FoodByMaria is a wellness blog with a body-positive message and a large Instagram component. There are over 200 recipes on her website, with something for everyone – especially for people who have a relatable experience to Maria and want to repair their relationship with food.

“My words of encouragement for anyone going through a similar struggle would be to find it within yourself to believe that you deserve to get better,” shares Maria. “It won’t be easy; you don’t have to do it alone, and it is possible to get better. Bulimia makes you see someone in the mirror who doesn’t exist – you just need to find some cool shades to make yourself invisible for the person you see in the mirror to help you grow strong enough to face the woman or man you actually are!”

“It is a safe place for people who are going through eating disorders; a safe place for people who can’t find love within themselves. Hopefully, I can show them that it is possible,” she says. “It is my safe place, my hobby, my job, my passion; I’ve been so blessed to be able to do what I love.”

F OL LOW MARIA @FO O DBY MARIA 53


Q U I N O A + R O O T V E G E TA B L E S A L A D RECIPE BY MARIA KOUTSOGIANNIS OF FOOD BY MARIA

Ingredients: For the Salad 2 cups uncooked quinoa Oil spray of choice (avocado, coconut, or olive oil are great!) 1 large white onion, roughly chopped 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 cups red beets, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 cups parsnips, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 cups butternut squash, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes 3 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon coriander 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon clove spice 1/4 cup fresh thyme 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon fresh cracked pepper Fresh arugula and fresh sprigs of thyme for garnish

For the dressing (optional) 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 1/2 lemons, juiced 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper

Directions: 1. Prepare quinoa by boiling a large pot of water and adding 2 cups uncooked quinoa – follow the box instructions to get it perfectly fluffy.

4. Now you have a bit of free time to prepare: halve your tomatoes, set aside your salt and pepper, and get your garnishes in order (feel free to use whatever makes your family happiest).

2. Preheat oven to 375OF. Line two large baking sheets with parchment and grease with oil of choice.

5. To prepare dressing: simply add all ingredients into a mason jar (or any container with a lid) and shake. And VOILA!

3. While your oven is preheating, prepare your veggies (onion, garlic, beets, parsnips, and butternut squash) by peeling, chopping, and cubing. Once you’re done, add them all to a large bowl with the olive oil, coriander, cinnamon, clove, and thyme. Stir until well combined and spread over two large baking sheets. Make sure you have enough space among all veggies to ensure a super crisp outside and tender, juicy inside! Cook for 35 to 40 minutes, flipping halfway through to avoid sticking.

6. Once your quinoa and veggies are cooked, let them cool for around 10 minutes. 7. In a large serving dish, add your veggies, quinoa, tomatoes, salt, and pepper. Give it a good stir. Before serving, add your garnish of choice; I find arugula and mint were the best.

55


BEAN + BARLEY SOUP RECIPE BY MARIA KOUTSOGIANNIS OF FOOD BY MARIA

Ingredients:

Directions: 1. In a large pot, add your olive oil and let it heat up for around one minute. Next, add your onions and garlic on medium heat and cook for five minutes or until translucent. 2. Add your celery and cook for another five minutes. Stir occasionally to avoid burning. 3. This is about to smell delicious! Add your basil, salt, and pepper to the pot, and stir well. After about 30 seconds, pour in your stock and barley. Bring mixture to a boil, then simmer for around 20 minutes or until your barley is almost cooked. 4. Once your barley is al dente, you can add your beans and cook for five minutes. 5. Taste test to ensure you have enough salt and pepper – add more if desired. 6. Before serving, add your spinach. 7. Garnish with fresh basil and cherry tomatoes.

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 cup celery stalk, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon dried basil 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper 1 19 oz. can of white kidney beans, rinsed 6 to 8 cups low sodium vegetable broth 3/4 cup barley 4 cups fresh spinach Basil and fresh tomatoes for garnish

56


CANDIED PECAN AND PEAR CASHEW CAKE RECIPE BY MARIA KOUTSOGIANNIS OF FOOD BY MARIA

Ingredients: For the base of the cake: 1 cup dates 2/3 cup almonds 2/3 cup walnuts 1 tablespoon maple syrup Dash of vanilla 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon cloves

For the cashew cream: 2 cups cashews 1 cup caramelized pears* 1/4 cup coconut milk 1 tablespoon maple syrup Dash of vanilla

*For caramelized pear: 2 cups sliced pear, around 1/4 inch thick 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup For the candied pecans: 1 cup raw pecans 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Directions: For the cashew cream: 1. Add all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until smooth (around one minute). You may have to scrape down the sides of the blender a few times to make sure everything is well blended. 2. Once blended, transfer your mixture to the cake pan and spread evenly over the cake base. You can flatten the cream by tapping the pan on the table a couple times. 3. Place the pan back in the freezer to set for at least two hours, but I prefer leaving it overnight. For the candied pecans: 1. Heat a pan over medium-low heat. 2. Add pecans and maple syrup. 3. Consistently stir the pecans. You’ll start to see the maple syrup crystallize and coat the nuts in about five minutes. 4. Sprinkle candied pecans along with reserved caramelized pears on the top of the frozen cake.

Line a 9-inch spring pan with parchment and set aside. For the base of the cake: 1. Add all your ingredients into a food processor and blend until a large ball forms (if your processor is not very strong, this will not happen) or until well combined. You should still be able to see the nuts, but the dates should be nice and smooth. 2. Using your hands, flatten the base of the cake into the parchment-lined pan. 3. Place in freezer until your cashew cream is ready. For the caramelized pears: 1. Heat a pan over medium-low heat. 2. Add pears and maple syrup. 3. Consistently stir the pears. You’ll start to see the maple syrup crystallize and coat the pears in about five minutes. 4. Use 1 cup of pears for cashew cream and reserve the remainder to spread over the top of the frozen cake.

** Garnish cake with pumpkin seeds and fresh cherries 59


Trained Purveyors of Quality Decorative Hardware

1301 10 AVENUE SW, CALGARY WWW.BANBURYLANE.COM 403.244.0038


BREAKING NEW GROUND. ALBI LUXURY BY BROOKFIELD RESIDENTIAL IS NOW AT THE RISE AT WEST GROVE ESTATES. Experience Albi’s legendary craftsmanship and superior customer service in a brand new picturesque community in West Calgary. The Rise at West Grove Estates is designed to create a balance between both work and play. A short ten kilometre commute to downtown via Bow Trail and fast access to the Rockies for weekend escapes create a sense of balance in your life. Eight models to choose from starting in the mid $700s. Showhomes are now open. Visit us at 74 West Grove Way SW. westgrove@albihomes.com

AlbiHomes.com


G IVIN G BAC K

THE POWER OF “ME TOO� W R I T TEN BY AN DREA O H PH OTOG R A PHED BY DES ERAE EVAN S O N

S

omething special happens when people come together, sit down, and share a meal. Just ask Laura Coatsworth and Nicole Jackson.

Laura, a Counsellor at Sage Centre (a division of Hospice Calgary), and Nicole, the Policy and Strategy Coordinator for Accessible Housing, have dedicated most of their lives to helping those in need. Through their work and volunteer initiatives, they have proven to be caring, compassionate agents of change, who devote their time to helping others regain their strength and independence.

62


SHOT ON LOCATION AT DEANE HOUSE

FLOWERS BY FERN & FROND

C A K E B Y C R AV E


With both women coming from not-for-profit organizations, shared meals are a common occurrence. Colleagues come together to collaborate, share ideas, and enjoy a brief escape from the hectic pace of their often unpredictable days.

resources to meet the demand, Laura and Nicole wanted to “create a more efficient intervention to reach more people, alleviating the pressure caused by scarcity,” says Nicole. They also wanted to honour the participants with an experience that made them feel special, cared for, and beautiful again. Laura and Nicole believe each participant should have a reason to dress up and put on mascara, possibly for the first time since the loss of their spouse.

Around the table, regardless of the food being served, the world slows down for a little while, the stresses of the day melt away, simple comments turn into discussions, and nods can turn into smiles and laughter. If we take a moment to reflect on our own experiences, some of our fondest memories may involve holidays, special occasions, and a gathering of dishes shared with family, friends, and colleagues.

Laura and Nicole had a desire to create connections between the participants by engaging them in meaningful conversation about adjusting to life after loss and the challenges of suddenly becoming a single parent. Great care and consideration was put into the selection of participants, cultivating the right group dynamic, and creating comfort as each mother (hopefully) shared thoughts about her own experience.

A BEAUTIFUL DINNER In the spring of 2015, Laura noticed a common theme in the stream of clients coming to see her at Sage Centre: a significant portion were mothers who had recently lost their spouses. They voiced similar thoughts, fears, and concerns pertaining to their traumatic experiences. Similar to sharing a meal with her friends and colleagues, all discussing topics the group could understand and relate to, Laura wanted to bring these women together to share a meal, in hopes of providing another medium of support beyond Hospice Calgary.

A few months later, with the support of Hospice Calgary, “A Beautiful Dinner” became a reality as nine women found the courage to step out of their comfort zones, dress up, and share a meal with others in a non-judgemental and safe space. Bravery and optimism filled the room as each participant found comfort in the carefully facilitated discussion, opening up about their loss and sharing experiences as they took things one day at a time.

Knowing this task would require careful planning and facilitation, necessary funding, and the help of others inspired to make a difference in the lives of women who have lost their spouses. Laura reached out to her close circle of friends. Without hesitation, Nicole volunteered her beautiful set of classic china and put her love of entertaining to good use.

With Laura’s knowledge and expertise, voices within the group gradually grew in number as participants became more at ease with one another. This was the first time many of these women had the courage to share their most intimate thoughts, without fear of ridicule or judgement. This was also the first time they heard the words “me too!” as they openly discussed the losses of their spouses and lives as single parents.

With a deep understanding of each other’s work, where there is never enough specialized help or physical

64


What started out as a room full of strangers seated around a dinner table has since evolved into long-term connections with women who can openly speak about, and understand, their spousal loss. “It has truly been a hope fulfilled,” says Laura, as friendships have been cultivated as a result of this first event and continue to this day. Laura has also observed positive changes in some of the participants that far exceeded her expectations!

to go beyond these beautifully planned events. The hope is for families to engage in discussions about personal loss and grief around every dinner table, long before they are necessary. With the holidays just around the corner, this time of year can be especially hard for families who have lost a spouse (and parent). Laura and Nicole encourage readers to visit the Hospice Calgary website (hospicecalgary. ca) and visit the Children’s Grief Awareness Day website (childrensgriefawarenessday.org) for more information and resources.

THE LEGACY CONTINUES Although “A Beautiful Dinner” was developed to further support those already seeking assistance through Hospice Calgary, it is beyond the scope of what they can afford on a continual basis. As an organization providing highly specialized professionals and infrastructure to help people cope with grief, it could only allocate funds for the initial event.

ABOUT HOSPICE CALGARY Hospice Calgary is a not-for-profit organization offering highly specialized services at both Sage Centre – Child + Family Grief Services and Rosedale Hospice. Fundraising efforts are essential to Hospice Calgary’s ability to provide support for parents, families, patients, professionals, and volunteers. For more information, visit hospicecalgary.ca.

With the generosity and support of local businesses and charitable organizations, Laura and Nicole have since coordinated two more events. The most recent one having been sponsored and hosted by Dote Magazine, with the help of other local businesses, took place at the newly renovated Deane House in Inglewood. Deane House also generously provided the beautiful dinner.

Many thanks to our partners for contributing to the gift boxes that the guests took home:

AMARTINCREATIVE Plant Crave Rosso Coffee Roasters Skoah Cinder & Sage

The intention of continuing this tradition for many years to come includes expanding these dinner events to other groups experiencing grief. In the end, the ultimate goal is for Laura’s and Nicole’s efforts 66

Lace Brick Design Drizzle Honey Moth Chocolate (Kin + Pod) The Vanity Vault Blush Lane xx Balm


Some thoughts shared by guests at the most recent Beautiful Dinner

My biggest hope for myself and my family is... To l i v e a l i f e m y h u s b a n d w i l l b e p r o u d o f To l i v e a n d e n j o y l i f e That we develop our own identity and are able to help others T h a t w e l e a r n t o b e k i n d e r t o e a c h o t h e r, to find a way to ease the discomfort together That we continue to move forward and feel whole again To h e a l That we learn to move forward with all the beautiful memories in our hearts That our loss will make us more resilient and empathetic to others That my son will still be able to become the man he would have been if he’d been raised with his dad 67


GOOD GRIEF W R I T T EN BY AN G ELA J O N ES I LLU STRAT ED BY A L EX A N D R A M AC DO N ALD, MELAN IE LUTH ER, AN D TARY N G ARRETT

W

hen we receive news that a loved one has passed away, we are immediately thrown into a world we are not familiar with. The grieving process that follows brings emotions we have been neither trained nor prepared for. Our families and friends are often unfamiliar with how to walk us through this pain. They don’t know the right words to say, and silence can sometimes prove to be the best answer for them. But silence is not always the best answer for the one who has experienced the greatest loss.

We a s k e d t h r e e l o c a l a r t i s t s t o e a c h c r e a t e a c u s t o m p i e c e t h a t represents their interpretation of grief. 68


By Alexandra MacDonald


B y Ta r y n G a r r e t t


" L e t ’s a c k n o w l e d g e t h e d i f f i c u l t y o f l o s s . "

Shirley Thiessen and her husband, Carey, were in California on a holiday when they received dreadful news their 23-yearold son, Jordan, had been killed in a tragic accident. Jordan had been working on an elevator at a power plant when the elevator unexpectedly started to descend and he lost his balance. Shirley and Carey had attended Jordan’s wedding only two weeks prior.

their life, but we will spend more time preparing for a family vacation than we will for an end-of-life issue. There are many who feel unable to approach the subject with the bereaved person, but all you have to say is, ‘I was thinking about your brother today…,’ they will either stop you right there or they will continue the conversation. You follow their lead. If you are waiting for them to bring it up, they most likely will not. The worst thing to say is, ‘They are in a better place,’ or ‘At least you had him for 24 years.’ The phrase ‘at least’ should be eliminated from your vocabulary. Do not minimize their loss; they just need you to feel their pain. ‘I actually don’t have any words right now. I am so sorry for your loss,’ those people endear themselves to me. Let’s acknowledge the difficulty of loss. This is powerful in itself.”

Shirley will tell you she did not have a lot of experience with grief or walking with others through their pain when she received the phone call on October 18th, 2012. When Jordan passed away, she was thrown into the depths of a process she was unfamiliar with. It was during this time she realized there are not many others who know how to grieve with people who have experienced loss. It’s a topic people shy away from, make awkward comments about, or respond to with a lack of empathy. Some stay silent.

Any small gesture toward a person who has experienced loss goes a long way. Shirley had a friend who would text her on the 18th of every month for four and a half years. She would send her a simple text, “Thinking of you today…” It was so simple, but the notion that Shirley had not been forgotten on this day spoke volumes to her. Anyone can do that for a friend. It takes intentionality and facing the awkwardness most people feel in these moments.

This experience drove Shirley to a commitment of helping people in their times of grief and coaching families and friends to support through the grieving process. She established Corner Bend Consulting to help the bereaved person as well as their grief companions. Shirley has been able to speak at schools, universities, and churches as well as to the police force, teachers, and grief groups.

“This kind of empathy and compassion is very transferable to other kinds of losses: loss of a job, a relationship, or your health, or divorce. When we acknowledge and connect with the person’s pain, speak into it, and tell them we care, it is powerful for the individual. We're in their corner.” Shirley and Carey’s friends took courses on grief when Jordan died because they wanted to gain experience walking people through the process. Those efforts were a powerful act for Shirley and Carey.

Why are so many people afraid to approach the subject of grief? “We never think of our own mortality; we think we live forever. It’s uncomfortable, you don’t know what’s going to happen. How are they going to react? Am I going to offend them? Am I going to make them cry? We are afraid of tears. The average person will grieve multiple times in 71


" I t ’s a c h o i c e I h a v e t o m a k e e v e r y d a y – t h a t I w i l l u s e m y pain to help others.”

Throughout Shirley’s personal journey of grief, she reached out to others who had experienced loss. She needed to know how to walk through this. Some helped and others did not. She saw that a lot of people were still stuck in their grief. “I could easily sit in a fetal position and cry until the end. I could be stuck and have bitterness settle in. I recognized that, within my pain, I had a choice to make. I didn’t want that to be my story. It’s a choice I have to make every day – that I will use my pain to help others.”

of young men Shirley prays for. She prays for them as if they were her own sons – another choice she makes, regardless of her pain, to help others.

Anger is another emotion Shirley had to face; it is part of the grieving, but some people tend to camp out in anger, which develops into bitterness and cripples them. Shirley refused to let anger take root, so instead she channeled that energy to set up a scholarship at Trinity Western University in Jordan’s name. She had a garden memorial built on campus that Jordan had dreamed of when he attended there.

“To the one who is grieving, I am so, so sorry for your loss. Although I would love to save you from a lot of anguish and grief, there are no shortcuts. Take it one day at a time, even one hour at a time. Don’t be overwhelmed by the future. Try to be in the present. Look for safe friends – the friends that allow you to talk about your loved one without judgement. They won’t change the subject, and they will think of creative, simple ways to be there for you. It’s okay to laugh when the moment calls for it; laughter is medicine. Continue living the way your loved one would want you to. Honour the memory of the person, and live well. Share your story with others, it gives you courage. Look for people to help.”

“I would say to the grief companions: learn all you can about grief. Know you cannot fix someone’s grief, but you can help carry it. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or just let them know that you are there for them. Be intentional with your care for them.

Through the many emotions, Shirley has always had to make choices, and it is her faith that has helped her make those daily decisions. In her prayers, Shirley chooses to say “yes” to God using her to help others in their grief. “I look for people I can serve. It takes the focus off me. Healing happens when you can walk alongside someone else and help them. I want to recycle my pain for a good purpose.”

Shirley will tell you she will always be a grieving mother, it will just look different at times. She will always be active in her grief, and in her pain, she will help others through theirs. It is not the path she had anticipated, but it is the path she is on, and she will do all she can to encourage those that need encouragement. She does this because she has been given a key to unlock the intimidating subject of grief and allow people to grieve together.

Shirley had prayed for Jordan every day since the day she had found out she was pregnant with him. When he passed away, she realized she had time in her prayer life for others. Shirley knew she could use that time to pray for Jordan’s three friends who had been his groomsmen, and two weeks later were his pallbearers. Today the list stands at 98 names

F I N D S H I R LEY AT C O RN ERBEN D.C O M 72


By Melanie Luther


ABOUT THE WILL I L LU S T R ATED BY K ATE K LAS S EN

We’ve all heard about wills, but do we really understand them? Do you need one if you aren’t a senior citizen with a hefty estate? What are the guidelines around making them? As we learned from Shirley in “Good Grief,” (on page 68) we should all be prepared for death and loss, so we’ve spoken with Eleanor Carlson of Carbert Waite LLP, who specializes in wills and estates, to help give us a better understanding of wills and why they are something we should all consider having.

What is a will?

A will is a document which outlines your intentions as to what happens to your property after you die.

74


Why is a will important, and what could happen if you d o n ’t h a v e o n e ?

People spend their lives amassing property and wealth, and a will permits you to control the distribution of those assets upon your death. You might see it as an extension of your independence and autonomy. If a person dies without a will, it is called dying intestate. If you don’t have a will, if your will is incomplete in that it doesn’t address all your property, or your will lacks the necessary formalities, (for instance: your signature), your property or any property not dealt with in the will, will be distributed according to the Alberta Wills and Successions Act. For example, in the circumstance of a married person dying intestate without children, that individual’s estate will pass to the surviving spouse.

Who should have a will?

Generally, all adults should have a will. Although a minor can have a will, minors typically do not need them.

testator (the individual whose will it is). To be valid, formal wills also require two witnesses. The intention behind these formalities is to protect against fraud, forgery, or undue pressure when drafting or signing a will. They also establish the intention of the testator to create a will. Holographic wills are those made entirely by the testator’s handwriting and signed by him or her. No witnesses are required for a holographic will; however, to be valid, the will must show the writer’s intention to make a gift that arises upon his or her death. Although holographic wills are valid in Alberta, they are not valid in all provinces.

How do I get started on writing my will?

You should start by thinking about what property you have and how you would like your property to be distributed upon your death. You should also think about who you would like to administer your estate and, if you have minor children, who you would like to be their guardian(s).

Do you have any tips for writing a will?

What are some standard things to include in your will?

My number one tip is to hire a lawyer and get your will drafted properly. That way, you can be confident and have peace of mind that, upon your death, your estate will be distributed as per your intentions. Generally, a lawyer will also draft your will in a way that will last for many years and account for contingencies that may arise in your life.

A standard will designates the person who you charge with administering your estate. This person is called an executor, and, if he or she accepts the role upon your death, they will use your estate to pay your debts and then distribute your assets to your beneficiary(s), for instance: a person, persons, or an institution, such as a charity. If you have minor children, it is important for you to provide guardianship instructions: who you would like to care for your children if upon your death your children have not reached the age of 18.

What are some good resources for more information?

The Alberta government’s Justice and Solicitor has a website on wills that provides some more information. www.justice.alberta.ca If you would like to speak with a lawyer about drafting a will, Carbert Waite LLP has a roster of lawyers who work in wills and estates and have extensive experience with the development of comprehensive estate planning.

What makes a will legally binding?

In Alberta, we have three types of wills. The most common wills are formal wills and holographic wills. Generally, when your will is drafted by a lawyer, it will be a formal will. These wills will be in writing and are signed by the

F OR M OR E I N F OR MATIO N, VIS IT C ARBERTWAITE .C O M 75


pretty sweet


BETTER TOGETHER W R I T T EN BY EMILY TH WAITES PH OTO G RAPH ED BY AMY BELL

WE ARE STRONG, EACH IN OUR PURPOSE, AND WE ARE ALL MORE STRONG TOGETHER. -BRAM STOKER, DRACULA

I

n any workplace, conflict and challenges are inevitable. Learning to effectively communicate with colleagues and resolve any issues is an important skill to develop, but how does this professional dynamic shift when working with family members? Looking at different types of workplace relationships, I met with five local family businesses to learn what it’s like to work with family or friends, and why each partnership believes they are better together.

79


80


“ We b a l a n c e e a c h o t h e r w e l l . B e i n g b r o t h e r s j u s t m a k e s a l i g n m e n t s o m u c h q u i c k e r a n d e a s i e r. ”

D AV I D A N D C O L E , B R O T H E R S

ROSSO COFFEE ROASTERS

W

ith a shared enthusiasm for bringing quality coffee to the Calgary community, David and Cole, halfbrothers and co-owners of Rosso Coffee Roasters, admit they didn’t have much in common growing up. “It honestly wasn’t until I opened the cafe that I really started to get to know Cole,” says David, who is ten years Cole’s senior. David established Rosso in 2007, and spent six months single-handedly running the first store in Ramsay, which celebrated its ten-year anniversary this September. The brothers never planned their business partnership, which was instead more of an organic process. Cole, now director of coffee, came on board as a barista at the Ramsay location two years after its opening. “The hospitality side is why I initially got involved; you get a five-minute window into somebody’s day, and you build these micro-relationships over time,” he notes. Cole worked his way up the ranks of his brother’s business, and, as time passed, he began to garner a true passion for coffee. Witnessing Cole’s keen interest evolve was a turning point for David. “When Cole asked me, ‘why don’t we start roasting?’ essentially that was the decision to partner with him in the company.” Ten years later, the pair continue to encourage curiosity in their business endeavours. “Coffee is this rabbit hole you go deeper and deeper into; there are so many questions to be asked,” says David, who finds excitement in watching the company grow each day.

81


With today’s total of seven locations across the city, David and Cole take pride that each store boasts its own personality to suit the neighbourhood it calls home. “We want them to, ultimately, look and feel different, so you don’t have that same cookie-cutter feel from one shop to the next,” says Cole.

of work can prove equally difficult. “I go home and I just sit in my own head. I don’t have anybody to discuss and hash it out with,” he adds. Another challenge the brothers face is their whole family’s desire to be involved. “Because we’ve got such an extended family – there are three moms between four siblings – there are even more people providing that input,” Cole laughs. “On the flip side, we can always lean on them. They’re always going to have an opinion or offer support,” adds David.

The pair consider themselves fortunate to travel across the globe to each of their sourcing locations. “Right now, it’s Costa Rica, Guatemala, Colombia, and Rwanda. We see a totally different glimpse of each country than you would going as a tourist,” says Cole. “It’s an incredible opportunity to have this platform to be able to do that.”

Despite not being close prior to working together, the brothers credit their strong business dynamic to running on similar wavelengths. “We both have goofy personalities,” says Cole. “We’re comfortable joking in front of other people, whether they’re paid employees or friends. I would say, from our staff’s point of view, we’re a pretty easygoing dynamic to work for.”

While David and Cole collaborate on the majority of crucial business decisions, each brother brings different value to the team. “Cole has run with the coffee aspect, that’s his bread and butter. I’m more the business side,” says David. As expected with any family business, there are times when working together can be challenging. David and Cole admit separating work and home life is often difficult, particularly as their third partner, Jessie, is also David’s life partner. “When I go home, Jessie and I will talk about the business quite extensively. It doesn’t ever really shut off, for better or for worse. It’s just part of being an entrepreneur,” he says. For Cole, being unable to continue these discussions outside

David and Cole value the simplicity of communication between one another. “I don’t have any trouble telling him that he did something wrong, or vice versa. You can have that direct feedback without feeling the guilt behind it,” says Cole. David agrees, noting they “balance each other well. Being brothers just makes alignment so much quicker and easier.”

F OL LOW R OS S O C OF F EE ROAS TERS @RO S S O C O FFEEROAS TERS 82


83


B R A N D I , B R Y T TA N N I , A N D B R O O K E LY N , S I S T E R S

P L A I D & PA I S L E Y L I T T L E S

84


“One of the best reasons we work well together as siblings is

that we’ve always had a very blunt and honest relationship.”

85


86


P

assionate about the slow fashion movement, which places emphasis on garment quality and longevity, sisters Bryttanni, Brandi, and Brookelyn established Plaid & Paisley Littles last September, following an unsuccessful search for ethical and sustainable children’s clothing in Canada.

Having been close since a young age, the girls agree their business partnership formed very naturally. “One of the best reasons we work well together as siblings is that we’ve always had a very blunt and honest relationship,” says Brandi. “We balance each other out a lot, and it’s really helpful,” says Brookelyn, adding that each of them brings a different value to the company. “It’s also such a good combination to have the three of us because there’s always a tie breaker. If we disagree, it’s an easy resolve,” she laughs.

Bryttanni and Brandi, both mothers, had struggled to find local companies with effortless, usable, and long-lasting clothing for their children. “We really didn’t want genderspecific clothing but classic basics that could be passed down from our daughters to our sons,” says Brandi.

The girls appreciate their husbands’ patience and support, admitting they spend many late nights working, because while Bryttanni and Brandi are stay-at-home mothers, Brookelyn is equally busy working as a full-time massage therapist. “When it comes to big deadlines, like before we release a campaign, we’re sometimes working until 4:00 a.m., but it’s done in a very non-hectic way,” notes Brandi. “We try to play classical music, light candles, and make it an experience because we do believe that what you put into your clothes emotionally really comes out in them.”

Plaid & Paisley Littles offers organic, ethically made children’s wear, sourcing textiles from a company in San Francisco that uses ethical, fair trade, and organic fabrics. “We focus on soy blends, hemp blends, and some bamboo – a lot of those more sustainable fabrics that feel better on your skin,” says Bryttanni. “Our soy is a very stable fabric, so it doesn’t stretch out or fade. That was really important to us.” As a child, Bryttanni was taught by her grandma to sew and use patterns, and had been making clothing for her three children prior to establishing Plaid & Paisley. When her eightyear-old daughter began questioning why her friends owned more shoes, Bryttanni realized the importance of educating her children on slow fashion. “We talk to her about why we do that, and it makes a really big impact. Now she wants to find clothing that’s ethically made; she’s very responsible,” Bryttanni smiles.

For Brookelyn, one of the main challenges of working with her sisters is staying focused. “Sometimes we’re dreamers, and we like to talk about all the things we want to do.” Brandi agrees, adding that while it’s important to strive for those dreams, it’s also critical to see them from a business perspective. “We have to be realistic about what people need and want, as well as stay true to what our company is and who we are as people,” she says.

While focusing on quality, Plaid & Paisley also embraces the Parisian approach of the capsule closet, where less is more. “It’s really good for the environment to have a small closet, because even if something is ethically made out of sustainable material, it still takes a lot of water, time, energy, and money,” notes Brandi. The girls agree their capsule closet concept was unknowingly implemented by their mother, who had her own capsule closet and practiced minimal closets for the girls. “What’s really inspiring about our mother is that, at that time, we didn’t have much money. It really showed us, growing up, that you can implement a capsule closet no matter how much you make,” she adds.

Reflecting on their success since starting out, Bryttanni appreciates that she and her sisters have really pushed one another to succeed. “We’ve accomplished so much in a year, and our knowledge is so much more than at the beginning. We’re really teaching each other a lot.” Most importantly, notes Brandi, working alongside her sisters provides an unending support system. “I think I speak for most women when I say we are very hard on ourselves. If I’m feeling guilty about wishing I took my kids to the park instead of answering emails, my sisters really help to build me up. No one knows you like a sibling knows you,” she smiles.

F OL LOW PL A I D & PA I S LEY LITTES @PLAIDAN DPAIS LEY LITTLES 87


88


“ E v e r y o n e f e e l s f re e a n d s a f e t o s h a re e v e n t h e s i l l i e s t i d e a . Wi t h t h e r i g h t t e a m a ro u n d y o u , b e a u t y a n d c re a t i v i t y c a n g ro w. ”

G A L I E N , Y U K I C H I , TA R A , A N D D R E W, M A R R I E D C O U P L E S

H AT T O R I / W I L L I A M S O N S C H O O L O F BALLET

B

allet is an art form based on passing the history and knowledge of one generation to the next, and for husband and wife Yukichi and Galien, opening a ballet school following their successful professional dance careers was a natural next step. “We thought it would be great to have a different type of school from those that currently exist in the city,” says Galien, director of ballet. “We didn’t want to teach syllabus but instead teach what dancers actually need to know to be versatile, valuable members of a professional ballet company today.” During their years at Alberta Ballet, the pair became close with another professional dancer, Tara. “We respected her talent, work ethic, and artistry,” says Galien. It was very clear Tara’s attitude and values aligned with theirs, so the couple proposed a partnership to both Tara and her husband, Drew. “Tara was dancing with Ballet BC at the time. It lined up really well with her desire to be back in the same city as her husband and to find the next move in her career,” shares Galien. The quartet started the ballet and contemporary dance school with the goal of establishing a new standard of dance instruction in Western Canada. “Not only are we expanding the range of dancers’ versatility between different dance techniques known around the world, but we are guiding them in the development of the mental strength and discipline required to succeed as a professional dancer,” notes Tara, director of contemporary.

89


A result of their collective experience and desire to share their passion for dance arts with the next generation of dancers, “Hattori/Williamson” is a blend of Yukichi and Galien’s surname and Tara’s maiden name. “We each represent a small ripple in the history of this art form. Through this school, it is now our turn to pass down the history and knowledge not only through the experiences of our teachers but our own experiences and interpretations, as well,” shares Yukichi, artistic director.

success. “We have a strong bond, so I can be confident about each and every step we take,” he says. “There are, of course, challenges that come with any partnership in terms of different opinions, but we always compromise to find the best solution,” notes Tara. Detaching professional and home life is important, says Drew, although when life gets hectic, it can be trying. “We’ve learned that in order to keep our sanity, we need to clearly separate the two, and keep work talk out of the house beyond a certain hour at night.”

Despite having no background in dance, Drew plays a vital role in the school’s success as director of business. “He has given my partners and I the guidance needed to succeed from a business standpoint,” says Tara, adding that an outside perspective from the dance world helps to create a company where all aspects are considered.

Opening their new studios at Currie Barracks this August was a huge undertaking for the team, who are proud to finally have their own space. “I think, at first we were a bit naive in terms of what was manageable for a new business, but we’re in our new home now, and we are so excited!” smiles Galien. With two beautiful and spacious studios, the team worked tirelessly to create a space that is both comfortable and welcoming for their students.

Although their business partnership consists of two married couples, Galien says she never really thinks of Hattori/Williamson this way. “For me, it’s working with three other great people. Because there are strong bonds on both sides, I feel like that makes us all the more invested.” Tara considers the strength of her friendship with Galien and Yukichi an asset in their partnership. “I have the highest respect for them. Their knowledge and direction for how they see dance developing, while maintaining tradition, is fantastic,” she says. For Yukichi, having multiple points of view is the key to long-lasting

Working together has been a unique and empowering experience for both couples, who agree they bring out the best in one another. “Everyone feels free and safe to share even the silliest idea. With the right team around you, beauty and creativity can grow,” shares Galien. “We are very lucky as two partners in life, partners in business, and as old friends, to rely and support one another through every step of this exciting journey,” adds Tara.

F OL LOW H AT TOR I / WILLIAMS O N @H ATTO RIWILLIAMS O N 90


91


“Our body language is from our kitchen, from years of playing s p o r t s t o g e t h e r. T h a t ’s a n a c c e s s y o u j u s t c a n ’t o t h e r w i s e g e t . ”

LISA, LACHLIN, AND LIAM, MOTHER & SONS

DISTILLED BEAUTY BAR

A

s one of Calgary’s most chic neighbourhoods, it is no surprise Marda Loop is home to Distilled Beauty Bar, a community-oriented social house offering guests an incomparable coffee, wine, and beauty experience. “Distilled is basically a refined process; it’s really about simplicity,” says Lisa, who opened the business in October 2016. “I think, despite the fact this place is large, it’s quite simple at its core: great coffee, good food, nothing overwhelming.” Lisa’s concept for Distilled began as a quaint idea to open a small and intimate coffee shop with just a couple chairs, but when the current Marda Loop space became available last year, she grasped the opportunity with both hands. “Marda Loop is really expanding, and it just seemed to make sense.” With a space much larger than anticipated, Lisa admits she initially felt a little overwhelmed. “I thought, this is too big, what am I going to do? And that’s how the family became involved,” she laughs. Recruiting her two sons, Lachlin and Liam, was a natural and obvious step for Lisa, who couldn’t manage the large space alone. Their partnership at Distilled was not the first family business venture for the trio, who have been working with one another since the boys were young. “I always wanted to work with the kids in some way. When they were very little, we started a pillow business, and they would sit during cartoons and stuff pillows with me,” Lisa says, adding that business conversations have always been a natural part of family life.

92


93


94


Well-seasoned in the catering industry and with a background in business, Lachlin exercises his creative flair to offer guests a one-of-a-kind refined menu. “We put a twist on everything; you won’t get a vodka soda, you’ll actually get a cranberry pomegranate. We’ll distill you,” he smiles. With similar service experience, Liam supports his mom and brother whenever he isn’t studying for his geology degree. Coined the “mangria,” Liam’s signature cocktail, served in a beaker glass, is a Friday-night hit with the locals.

careers are.” Lachlin agrees the city is a place for new ventures, and appreciates that small business owners are able to feed off one another for support.

“People think of beauty bars as very much for girls only,” says Lisa. “That’s not how I live my life. Having two boys, I wanted them to feel comfortable in here.” She worked with designers to create a space that reflected this, making customers feel welcome and at ease regardless of gender. “If you come here during the day, you’ll see people are sleeping in the pedicure chairs, dogs and kids are on the patio, business meetings are going on. It’s just very relaxed,” she notes.

For Lisa, Lachlin, and Liam, a major strength in working together is the ease of communication that transfers from home life. “There’s a fun dynamic, and when things go wrong or we get overwhelmed, we don’t have to talk to one another,” says Lisa, who habitually makes a clicking sound with her mouth to capture her boys’ attention. “Our body language is from our kitchen, from years of playing sports together. That’s an access you just can’t otherwise get.”

Having lived in Montreal and Toronto prior to Calgary, Lisa considers Calgary a great place to run a business because people here are fearless in their pursuits. “Young people, old people; you see huge swings in terms of what their

Being able to watch her sons excel in their work and form meaningful relationships with customers is particularly special for Lisa. “I love them, and this is only amazing because of them. I wouldn’t do it with anybody else.”

One challenge that stands out for Lisa in running a family business is remembering that you take licenses with family that you would never ever contemplate taking with others. “For me, the struggle is that I must be very careful not to over-penalize my children for things that happen in every other business,” she says.

F OL LOW D I S T I L L ED B E AUTY BAR @DIS TILLED_BEAUTY BARY YC 95


96


“ I t ’s f u n t o g e t t o g e t h e r w i t h m y f r i e n d s d o i n g s o m e t h i n g . Not just sitting down and talking, but work.”

K AT H Y A N D V I C T O R I A , B E S T F R I E N D S

M E R C AT O

W

hen Kathy and her husband, Victor, immigrated to Calgary in 1961, the couple left behind their lives in Italy to begin a new journey and build a future together in Canada. Little did they know, the family company they would establish just over a decade later would quickly become Calgary’s go-to destination for authentic Italian gourmet food. Mercato, meaning “market” in Italian, has roots dating back to 1974, when Kathy and Victor opened the Italian Centre Meat Market in Bridgeland with Victor’s brother and his wife. “They were sort of the pioneers in Calgary to bring those types of products in. It was a local landmark,” says Mercato’s Executive Chef, Spencer, of the deli goods imported from Italy. Across the street, another family business, Italian Gourmet Foods, was later opened by Kathy’s daughter and her husband. Using production scale pasta machines from Italy, they supplied delicious fresh pasta to destinations including Fairmont Banff Springs hotel and Chateau Lake Louise. On the second floor of the building, says Spencer, a 20-seat bar and demonstration kitchen offered a first-of-its-kind cooking school for Calgarians to enjoy weekly. When Kathy’s son Dominic bought the family businesses just over 13 years ago, he combined their key concepts under one roof to create what is now Mercato. “The idea for it was to continue on with cooking classes and demonstrations. What

97


happened was it slowly turned into a restaurant… that’s where I entered the equation,” says Spencer.

she is still able to spend quality time with her friends after so many years. “We’re very close. Just to be with them is special for me. We have coffee, we have donuts. They’re good bakers!” she says, adding that some of Maria’s baked goods, including apple pie and orange cookies, are sold in Mercato’s store.

“When I grew up, I’d get up in the morning and my mother would have eight kids in the house,” recalls Kathy, now seventy-six. She fondly remembers learning to cook pasta as a child, where cooking together as a family is a rite of passage. For Kathy, the concept of family extends far beyond blood relations. With two of her closest friends, Maria and Victoria, Kathy has been sharing a unique experience at Mercato for the past decade.

Rolling the gnocchi by hand is one of the many Italian traditions the family has brought to Calgary and kept alive. “We brought over machines to make gnocchi, but we don’t want to use them. Everything you make by hand has a different taste,” notes Kathy. “You can try to simplify things or make them more efficient, but doing things the old school way is more special for the people eating it,” adds Spencer.

Once a month, the trio get together with Kathy’s family and the Mercato team to take on an arduous yet incredibly rewarding task: hand-rolling over 350 pounds of gnocchi. “We start with Yukon gold potatoes, we steam them and peel them, then we grind them all and let them cool overnight,” says Spencer. “Then we make the dough, which consists of flour, eggs, and the ground potatoes. You let the dough rest and then start cutting and rolling it. It’s a long process.”

For three and a half hours, the team works tirelessly in the kitchen, but for Kathy and her friends, it’s a gratifying experience followed by a wonderful lunch after their work is complete. “It’s fun to get together with my friends doing something. Not just sitting down and talking, but work. If I didn’t have this going with them, when would I see them? This keeps us closer,” she shares.

Having met Maria and Victoria during her early days in Canada working as a seamstress, Kathy appreciates that

F OL LOW M ER C ATO @ MERC ATO _MIS S IO N @MERC ATO WES T 98


99


HOLIDAY SERIES CYǽɰǿ CYȄɰǽǟ CYÇ˝Č É°Ç˝Čƒ

%Y.yȀVCɰȅVCɅ]cgYyǽǟCɰȂVCɅ]gDyǽǟCɰȂVC Market Collective exists to showcase the works of artists, artisans, designers, and musicians and to strengthen the community of Calgary.

Ę…Č %JYc+s;DÉ’;.]ǽǞDgDY%Y .D&=sJJsY+Jg]ɢǽǿȅǟÇ˝Čƒc+r]ÉŁ

www.marketcollective.ca #marketcollective #mccheer2017

100


S T R A N G E I S O U R S I T U AT I O N H E R E U P O N E A RT H . E A C H O F U S C O M E S F O R A S H O RT V I S I T, N O T K N O W I N G W H Y, YET SOMETIMES SEEMING TO A DIVINE P U R P O S E . F R O M T H E S TA N D P O I N T O F D A I LY L I F E , H O W E V E R , T H E R E I S O N E T H I N G W E D O K N O W : T H AT W E A R E H E R E FOR THE SAKE OF OTHERS —ABOVE ALL FOR THOSE UPON WHOSE SMILE AND WELL-BEING OUR OWN HAPPINESS DEPENDS, FOR THE COUNTLESS UNKNOWN S O U L S W I T H W H O S E FAT E W E A R E C O N N E C T E D B Y A B O N D O F S Y M PAT H Y. M A N Y T I M E S A D AY, I R E A L I Z E H O W M U C H M Y O U T E R A N D I N N E R L I F E I S B U I LT U P O N THE LABORS OF PEOPLE, BOTH LIVING AND D E A D , A N D H O W E A R N E S T LY I M U S T E X E RT MYSELF IN ORDER TO GIVE IN RETURN AS M U C H A S I H AV E R E C E I V E D A N D A M S T I L L RECEIVING. - A L B E RT E I N S T E I N , L I V I N G P H I L O S O P H I E S


102


M AN WITH A PAS S IO N

R A N D O M B E AT S W R I T T E N BY AN DREW MAC K IE PH OTOG R A PH ED BY H EIDRIC H PROTO G RAPH IE I L LU S T R AT ED BY TY LER LEMERMEY ER

103


T

hey’re late. It’s my fault. I’m roasting in the sun in front of the Rosso on 9th Ave, waiting. I’ve brought them down to Inglewood, forgetting the chaos of Night Market, Stampede, and who knows what else. It’s a mob scene and parking is scarce.

“When I saw Dexter perform his solo work, it was synth pop oriented, so he’s had some experience with the stuff I wanted to mess around with. We got together, we started making beats. Random beats. Some were kind of hip-hoppy or all over the place.”

I’m slotted to meet with a couple of the guys from Citysleep, a chillwave band starting to turn heads on the Calgary scene.

Exploring new styles and new equipment, they started to jive right away. They quickly added a few new members to the experiment, and everything kept clicking.

He comes running up. “Sorry we’re late, man. Dexter’s circling looking for a spot,” Jerrick says, breathing hard. We get up to go rescue him, then find a cooler, quieter place to talk in a park a few blocks over. Jerrick and Dexter are two founders of the now five-piece group. Their latest show was at Sled Island, wrapping up a string of live shows that started in late fall. Citysleep is a young band, only having been together as a collective since 2015. But they’ve been busy. Two fivetrack EPs complete, a third in the works, and over 20 shows played have made for an eventful year-and-a-half. It started as an inkling, a small idea to try something new. Momentum has been growing faster than they’d imagined possible. “It started late 2015,” says Jerrick. “Time flies by. I’d been a singer-songwriter. I’d never gotten into the electronic thing. It was always something I’d wanted to do but never really had the chance to dive in. Then I started hosting the Café Koi open mic every Tuesday.

“That’s what’s great about making music with this kind of stuff. We pretty much started from the same place. We all did – all five of us,” explains Jerrick. “We didn’t know what to do with it. We didn’t know how to do it. Reaching into a different genre of music was really interesting.” “You have the technology to make this type of music,” Dexter adds, “and you have this talent. It’s like, what else are you going to do, man? You gotta make music! It has to happen! When you’re the artist, you’re supposed to be pushing the boundaries. “People out there in Calgary don’t know what to listen to. A lot of people who listen to [local] music and say that Calgary’s music scene is just okay, I don’t think they’re looking hard enough.” Jerrick continues, “It’s giving them the opportunity to find something unique. Honestly, with our music, I didn’t think anyone would like it. I was just going to make it for myself and maybe perform it once or twice. I didn’t think it would get to this scale.”


I ask them what it’s like being a band in the modern world, where it’s easier than ever to push your songs out to the public but, at the same time, easier than ever to get caught up in stats and metrics. “Soundcloud, Spotify, Apple Music,” Dexter responds, “strangely enough, when we uploaded our songs, we were getting a lot of listens. “We went out for drinks every milestone we had. 50 listens. 100 listens. And upwards. It got out of control at one point. It was a good sign…” “It’s been a crazy growth,” adds Jerrick. “I guess it’s due to the kind of work ethic we have, especially in the studio. Looking back on everything we’ve done this year, it’s hard to believe.” They’re loving the creative freedom, unrestricted by the traditional struggle to pay for studio time or the limitations of professional opinion. Making music is play, and their creative process is flowing. “For me, that’s the most important thing: to make the music we want to make, as opposed to something we don’t want to be writing,” says Dexter. “And in terms of getting it out there in the industry, to be honest, I care, but at the same time, I don’t,” adds Jerrick. “We manage ourselves, so we do things at our own pace, play gigs that we want. We write music, but we also work day jobs just to pay for the bills. We’ve still got a long way to go.”

105

“I’m happy with our songs,” chimes Dexter. “That’s what I really wanted to do. I wanted to make music that I would listen to.” Even though they are technically the founders of the band, Jerrick and Dexter find handing things over to the collective dynamic is exponentially rewarding, with each person bringing their own ideas and challenging each other to improve and find their best. “I think we have a good judgement of what each of our musical tastes is like,” says Jerrick. “We’re aware of each other’s abilities and potential. Sometimes they’re like: ‘I think you can do a little better than that,’ and I have to say: ‘Okay. Let me take this back to the lab.’ “Once you’re in a comfortable space with your bandmates, outside of music, it’s easier to understand what’s expected. Criticism without being offended, that’s the thing. We joke about our songs all the time. I don’t mind criticism – I’ll take criticism over silence.” I ask the requisite questions about where they get their inspiration. They can list hundreds of bands, songs, or albums that affected their lives or their music, but more than that, they are trying to capture mood, emotion, and feeling. It’s something people who love music can’t necessarily explain but we can all feel. “Influences… It’s all music based out of the night time. When I go home and make beats, I always have that kind of attitude. Everything I make is in the night time. It already has that kind of feel,” Jerrick explains.


106


Dexter says, “I’d like to think our music is a little original. We do carry a lot of influences from people that we love. We get a tone, an attitude. We have a certain frequency. We have different types of songs, but we know when the song sounds good. I’ve been trying to think about this. How do you know when the song is good? And how does your friend know the exact same thing? Why do you guys like this, but I like it too?”

“It’s weird when people ask you: ‘What do you do for a living?’ I have to be like ‘I’m not there yet. I’m working on it.’ I want to say that I do music. I want to do this for a living. I want to tour the world and share my music with everyone. That’s the dream. I’d love to have someone come up to me after a show and be like ‘Dude, you’ve saved me from… myself, through your music.’ There are so many artists I’d like to go up and say that to.”

For them, music is all the time. It’s a constant passion. It fills, in some way or other, part of every passing minute. The constant challenge of creation keeps them motivated and positive.

“I grew up in the Phillipines,” adds Dexter. “I grew up in a lot of poor neighbourhoods, and, coming to Canada, I’m really interested in how other cities and other people work. For me, it’s a big deal having the opportunity to just do the music. I think we have an obligation to actually make something amazing.

“I’m just lucky I found music, you know,” says Dexter. “I talk to a lot of my friends who just work office jobs, and they’re telling me sometimes they get bored after work, and they don’t know what to do, so they end up going out and drinking. “Sometimes, before I go to work, I’m just playing on the keyboards. Whenever I can.” Jerrick adds, “Sometimes people come up to me and ask: ‘Why are you so down?’ I can never tell them in person. But writing songs about it, and that whole creative outlet… it’s a lot easier for me to explain myself through music.

“People out there are listening to the music, so we’re doing something right. We’re on to something; I think we might be on to something, but we’ve got a long way to go. It’s a learning process, and we’re happy to be where we are.” Watch for Citysleep to pop up at your local club this fall. And check out their songs on Apple Music, Soundcloud, and Spotify, or download them at citysleep.bandcamp.com.

F OL LO W C ITY S LEEP @C TY S LP 107


It’s all in the details PickUpTheThread AtGlenbow New exhibitions open October 7 glenbow.org

Caitlin Thompson, Rhizome (Hot Gossip) [detail], 2017, Collection of the artist. On exhibition in Eye of the Needle.


M ARK ET C O LLEC TIVE

N U RT U R I N G T H E B A R K W R I T T EN BY AN G ELA DIO N E PH OTOGRAPHED BY J AMIE HYATT

T

he origin of an entrepreneurship can come in many forms. It can start from a passion, an integral need for change, or forces of life that make you do something against your will. No two start-up stories are the same. What intertwines these start-up stories together, however, is the moment you decide to keep going. To make that call, end that job, and take the plunge of no return. To continue the learning, growing, and path that leads to becoming an entrepreneur. Rhonda Law began her company after adopting her first greyhound cross, and from there she followed a path that led her into growing the successful company of BARK. Her business didn’t start with a concrete business plan or model; it started from a nurturing heart. She was conscious of and inspired to take care of someone she loved.

110


111


I had the opportunity to spend some time with Rhonda as she shared her story with an openness and frankness that shows her true spirit.

MC:

BARK first came into our lives through Market Collective, and since then, we have seen you at various pop-ups around the city. Can you tell us how your business began? What made you want to be an entrepreneur?

R L : BARK started off kind of serendipitously,  after my fiancé and I adopted our first greyhound cross, Bruno. He is extremely fussy with his food and treats, so I took on the fun challenge of whipping up a variety of healthy, all-natural biscuit recipes until Bruno  was pleased with the outcome. After a lot of trial and error, I finally created a recipe that was grain, gluten, and preservative-free. I thought it would be neat to start selling my homemade dog biscuits, and that was the beginning of BARK. A couple months later, I was a vendor for the first time at Market Collective. I was so overwhelmed by the amount of support I received from both the maker community and its customers. That very market instilled confidence in my business, and I began to see the potential of what BARK could become. A little over a year after that first Market Collective, I took on BARK full-time. My decision to take this giant leap was, in part, due to a desire to live the most meaningful and happy life possible. I was experiencing anxiety and stress from my previous job, and that negative energy would seep its way into my life at home and was beginning to affect my mental and physical well-being. With the support of my amazing fiancé, Matt, I knew I needed to make a change. Once I was able to allocate more energy into BARK, I began to see my little business flourish.

MC:

You rescued two greyhounds, and they are now a part of your family. What are the joys of adopting animals? What is some advice you would give to others?

R L : Our greyhound cross rescues, Bruno and Lola, have brought so much happiness into our lives. They were adopted through greyhound rescue organizations based here in Alberta. When we first adopted them, they were not familiar with toys yet. We had to teach them how to play with their toys and what treats were. One time, I bought Lola a chew treat called a bully stick. She was afraid of it, so I crawled on all fours around the house with the bully stick in my mouth, hoping to convince her it was a treat and nothing to fear. I learned later what a bully stick is (they are made from the pizzle of a bull), and it makes me laugh to think of all the ridiculous things we do for our pets. The best part of adopting the dogs was watching their personalities come out as they adjusted to living with us. If you are looking for an easy-going, low-maintenance dog, I highly suggest you consider adopting a greyhound. Contrary to popular belief, they are very low energy dogs and spend most the day sleeping. We are so blessed to provide them with a forever home. 112


MC:

BARK is very collaborative in nature, and you have had some great relationships begin through your company. Can you share some of your favourites?

RL:

Calgary has such a supportive and talented maker community. I am so lucky that I can call so many of these creative individuals my friends. Being able to work with them to create fun products is the cherry on top. Some of my favourite local collaborations include cheeky glitter banners with Dixie + Twine, honey dog biscuits from Drizzle, modern houseware for the crazy dog lady with co|create, and pet bandanas with beautiful artwork from Calgarian artists including Jill Paddock, HOBBYSMITH Glass Co., Emmary Heinrich, and Gypsy Skulls.

M C : What are the benefits of collaboration as a small business owner? What are some lessons you’ve learned along the way? RL:

I love collaborating because it’s a great way to cross-promote and bounce creative ideas off each other. I think many small business owners can agree that owning a small business can feel lonely sometimes. Reaching out to like-minded makers and artists is a wonderful way to network and build lasting relationships. I’ve learned that it’s so important to build community and support one another. Each of our small business endeavors is so unique, and by sharing our experiences and advice with one another, we can help each other navigate the challenges that come with running a small business as well as celebrate the successes together.

MC:

You refer to yourself as the girl boss, baker, and threader behind BARK, providing healthy treats and cute accessories to animals across North America. Can you see yourself adding another title or element to your business?

R L : In the past year, I have started to design my own fabric patterns, which has been a fun and exciting learning curve. Two years ago, I never would have imagined myself in this kind of a design role. However, it has been rewarding to create patterns unique to BARK and provide my customers with products that have even more of a local component.

M C : Between baker and threader, what do you like about each role? R L : When it comes to sewing, I see that as my “me time.” I close the studio door, put on a good podcast or Netflix series, and sew for hours at a time. I find the sound of the sewing machine so soothing, and ideas run through my head as I cut, thread, and sew. When I bake, there is a social component to it, which I very much enjoy. I chat along with my fiancé while he helps me prepare the batter. Our Airbnb guests will often sit across the kitchen, share their travel experiences, and ask for local recommendations as I bake.  M C : As a small business owner, there are many struggles and freedoms to the dream of entrepreneurship. What is some guidance you would share to others starting out on this journey? RL:

I would emphasize to others starting out on their journey of entrepreneurship that it is okay to say “no” and to identify your own boundaries and limitations to avoid burnout. Learning how to say no is much harder than saying yes. I used to try to say yes to every opportunity that came my way, as I thought it was the best and most efficient way to reach my goals. Unfortunately, this led to a terrible cycle of anxiety, exhaustion, and burnout. Saying no does not make you a bad business owner. I strongly believe it pushes you to evaluate what holds most value to you in your life, whether it is time with your family and/or your physical and mental well-being.

MC:

We love BARK and would love to see more! How can people contact you and see what you do outside of these pages?

R L : To view new product releases, collaborations, and endless photos of adorable dogs, follow @Shop.BARK on Instagram. Visit www.BARKYYC.com to find out where BARK will be popped up next, and to shop biscuits, pet accessories, and more! I can be reached via email at hello@BARKYYC.com.

F OL LOW RH O N DA @S H O P.BARK 113


114


P U P P Y PA N C A K E S REC IPE BY RHO N DA LAW OF BAR K

Ingredients:

Directions:

Yields approximately 12 small, grain-and-gluten-free pancakes.

1. Mix chickpea flour, egg, and broth in a large bowl until a smooth consistency is achieved. 2. Mix in your dog ’s flavour of choice. 3. Warm a griddle or frying pan over medium heat and lightly grease it with coconut or olive oil. 4. For each pancake, place 2 to 3 tablespoons of batter onto the griddle or frying pan. 5. Cook until pancake surface bubbles. Flip carefully, and cook until the underside turns a light golden brown. 6. Make sure the pancakes have completely cooled before feeding to your furry friend. 7. Optional: spread a thin layer of peanut butter between pancake layers and garnish with blueberries. 

1 cup chickpea flour 1 egg 1 cup homemade beef or bone broth 3 tablespoons of your dog’s favourite flavour (ie. peanut butter or cheddar) 1 to 2 teaspoons coconut or olive oil

115


A S TY LED HO ME

S H A R I N G S PA C E S W R I T T EN BY K RIS TY ARC H IBALD PH OTOG R APH ED BY BO O K S TRUC K ER

T

hink back to your favourite spot or hideaway as a child. What was it about the space that made it so special? What were the familiar aromas? How was it decorated? Was it big or small? Was it a plain, yet cozy sanctuary that left room for your vivid imagination to grow and wander? Or was it a magical room full of all your toys and playtime activities, waiting for you to wake up each day and bring them to life?

116


117


Reminiscing on these quintessential memories of our own brings us to a very important and essential realization when it comes to creating a space in our home for our kids. Ultimately, it’s these spaces where kids will create their first and fondest memories that will be remembered and impact them throughout their entire lives. It’s important, especially if your family is growing, to dedicate certain spaces in your home that can be easily transitioned to grow with your kids as they get older. These spaces will be where they’re encouraged to generate and apply their creativity, develop stories, dive into their imaginations, and most importantly, be a spot to simply have fun. From a design perspective, the key to creating these spaces, whether it be their bedrooms, a nook in the main living room, or their own separate playroom, is to take a thoughtful approach to a functional, dynamic, fun, and exciting area. This might look very different to each family, but the main idea that stays constant is to create designated spaces in your home that are unique and meet the developmental needs of your children. Earlier this year, Alykhan (Aly) Velji of Alykhan Velji Designs was commissioned to renovate an urban family home in Elbow Park, which included the redesign of a shared bedroom and playroom of twin girls, whose favourite colours are purple and pink.

“The colour palette was the starting point for the rooms,” Aly says. “We wanted to create spaces that were whimsical and spoke to the girls’ personalities, while having the ability to grow with them as they get older.” For the statement walls in both rooms, they opted for a beautiful flamingo wallpaper from Cole and Son. This pattern anchors the rooms while giving them a pop of earthy pink hues to make the spaces come alive without being too busy or overwhelming. “We always recommend using wallpaper for kids’ rooms,” says Aly. “It’s such an easy way to add whimsy and character to a space. Plus, there are so many different designs available to choose from these days.” Sourcing two twin beds from IKEA, Aly’s team upgraded the frames by adding custom padded headboards featuring a textured pink fabric. “This not only elevates the bed frames but provides a soft head rest for the girls when they’re reading,” notes Aly. “The headboards can also be reupholstered at any point when and if they tire of the pink as they grow up.” Something Aly and his team highly recommend when putting together a shared kids space, is to swap bunk beds for two separate beds. “In many instances, such as this one, the girls had a separate play room, so there was space to play with,” says Aly. “Two beds, even in a smaller room, makes the space feel larger and eliminates the potential of fighting over the top bunk!” 118


A large, modern, and simplistic dresser occupies the space between the beds, providing the girls with extra storage while separating their individual areas. “We recommend not cluttering up your space with a ton of furniture,” remarks Aly. “The space under the beds provides lots of toy storage, and the closet and dresser are perfect to house clothing, books, and accessories, making it reachable and adjustable for the girls to access.” Two chic, eclectic wall sconces, framing the dresser, fold out and swivel to help the girls get ready at night. These give the room an elegant feel, as if it were located at the top of a magical castle. To pull the bedroom together and complete the space, they chose to keep things casual with simple linen bedding and grey ikat patterned throws to ground the end of each bed. To provide the girls with privacy, they had custom window shades created in linen that feature fabric detailing, tying in the colour on the headboards. “We’re big fans of using patterns and textures in a space, and these rooms were no different,” says Aly. “From the wallpaper to the fabrics on the beds to the area rugs, they all fit and complement each other in a natural, organic way but still leave room for any personal touches the girls may want to add later.” When asked what other tips Aly and his team had to create shared spaces that kids can grow with, they had a few things to note. First and foremost, they recommended using a consistent colour palette throughout the entire space. “If you can ensure the colours flow, that will help to carry the eye around the room,” mentions Aly. “It helps to start with a fabric, wallpaper, bedding, or rug. This way, you can pull colours from it to use throughout the rest of the space. With that being said, we like to always keep spaces neutral with pops of colour shown through fabrics and accents, so it can be easily changed up when the kids get older.” Aly also recommends “keeping the décor in these spaces fun and light-hearted, but not so much so that your little will tire of the space in a year. If you have two rooms, rather than being in separate bedrooms, try for the first few years to make one into a play or study area, so that you’re not trying to fit so many things into one space.” With children’s short attention spans, it’s important to keep things as simplistic as possible, so they are not as easily distracted. Making the space interactive is important, but trends will come and go, so it’s best to keep it minimal, classic, and consistent to create order in your home. F OL LOW A LY KH AN VELJ I DES IG N S @DES IG N S _AV 120


403.966.5585 www.jonburrowsrealestate.com

Moving in? Moving out? Moving up? Real estate can be complicated. Jonathan Burrows Real Estate is here to help. Specializing in Residential Real Estate Investment Real Estate

LET’S TALK TODAY! @jonburrowsrealestate

jon.burrows@gmail.com


LITTLES GO TO SCHOOL E M B R AC I NG UR BAN L I FE WI TH A BABE I N TO W

W R I T T EN BY ALEXAN DRA J OY WIG I L LU S T RATED BY K ATE K LAS S EN

T

he start of a fresh fall means something quite different when you find yourself with school-aged little ones. Whether you are looking ahead to when your toddler will be a first-time preschooler or you have a seasoned thirdgrader, no matter the age of your littles, the autumn season brings all kinds of milestones and emotions. As always, in our “Littles� column, we look to explore and celebrate urban life with wee ones, and in my personal case, right now, this means a daughter, freshly four years old, in her Converse sneakers, snack in hand, who recently experienced her first day of preschool.

122


Of course, I was excited about shopping for all the sweetest school clothes and searching out the cutest products and fun lunch ideas, but, moving forward, as a parent of a child in school, I also have some bigger questions to ponder and things to prepare for.

This is a great chance to spend quality time together and open discussions about preparing to meet a new teacher and class. It’s also a great way for teachers to easily get to know a child and helps them engage and identify with their new student.

As we enter the land of pencils and backpacks, here are some thoughts and suggestions from an early childhood educator about managing emotions, adjusting routines, and some overall ideas for prepping you and your littles for school days.

We also love Lyndsay’s idea to include a family portrait or small photo book in your little one’s backpack for times when they need a little dose of home.

We’ve also included some favourite sources for snacks, products, clothes, and little activities and ideas to help the whole family ease into this new season and celebrate each step of the way.

Ask Miss Lyndsay

We chatted with Lyndsay Garreck, a Calgary local who has been teaching kindergarten and grade one for seven years. She’s experienced her share of excitement and jitters from little ones just starting out. “My favourite part about a new school season is the positivity the kids bring to school after the summer,” she says. “It feels like there is a buzz of excitement as the classrooms fill up again. It’s such a good way to start off the year!” “I also love seeing familiar faces from previous years and meeting the new little ones starting school for the first time.” Lyndsay says it can be quite an emotional time for young ones who have never experienced a school setting or the structure. “Change can be hard on young children and a mix of emotions can arise, affecting their behaviour,” Lyndsay explains. “This could come in the form of having a tough time saying goodbye to parents, tears, tantrums, or showing stress.” The good news? She says these behaviours are common and are typically short lived, subsiding as a child settles into the routine of school. I asked if there was anything parents could do to best support teachers with transitioning young kids into school. Lyndsay suggested creating an “All About Me” book. A journal-type book parents and children make together and then take to the teacher within the first weeks of school to introduce themselves. You can include: name, age, siblings, pets, hobbies, likes and dislikes, and what the child is most excited about regarding school.

123

Lyndsay has some other great suggestions and ideas about how to further prepare and support little ones with a smooth, positive transition into school. A dju s t rou tin e s “A lot of kids I’ve worked with thrive on routine and predictability, so preparing for those changes before school starts is smart. Visual schedules are a good way for children to know what is happening or expected.” Lyndsay suggests taking pictures of your child at each step in their new routine (getting dressed, eating breakfast, etc.) and creating a fun school-day morning schedule. This will be helpful once the time comes to implement the new routine. P re pa re toge th e r Involve your children in the process of preparing for school, from shopping for clothes and supplies to picking outfits the night before for easier mornings and packing snacks and lunches during the week. “You’ll want to be sure to label everything they take with them, including things like clothing and shoes. There are a lot of good online options for ordering personalized, premade labels.” E x pre s s fe e lin gs “One great way for parents to help their child understand and express their feelings is to take photos of them making various faces – happy, sad, mad, silly, shy, etc. Then write or draw some things the child can do when they are experiencing that feeling. This activity can be useful throughout the year.” Jou rn a l “Ask your child a few light questions at the beginning of the day and a few at the end of the day, after school, and jot down their answers,” suggests Lyndsay. “It’s a good way to debrief how the child feels at the end of a school day.”


Pack

those snacks

Som e o f our favo u r i t e st o p s: Packing school snacks and lunches is a great opportunity to spend time together and involve your little one in an important routine. We like to take a weekend trip to the Calgary Farmers’ Market (calgaryfarmersmarket.ca) and choose snacks together.

A fe w of ou r fa v ou rite ite m s for pa c k ing sn ac ks a n d lu n c h e s : I’m always looking for style, as well as function, when it comes to kids’ products, and mealtime is no exception. Fjallraven Kanken backpack – Purr, purrclothing.ca

Beeland – for all the different flavours of honey sticks.

The Honest Co. hand sanitizer gel – Indigo, indigo.ca

Going Nuts – for dried fruit and handmade granola bars.

Sandwich cutters, various shapes – Pottery Barn Kids, potterybarnkids.ca, (CF Chinook Centre)

Better – for cold-pressed juice and smoothies. They sell a 250 mL size, perfect for kids. Innisfail Growers – for those famously sweet Beck Farms carrots.

Takenaka bento box – Indigo, indigo.ca Lunch kit notes – Stevie and Bean, stevieandbean.com S’Well water bottle, 9 oz. – Indigo, indigo.ca For y ou r te a c h e r: Your little’s teacher is going to need to stay caffeinated as much as us parents, so give them a gift, like a Rosso Coffee Roasters to-go KeepCup and gift card.

Best (and

dressed

not just on picture day)

Like with other kids’ products, I’m always on the lookout for stylish, affordable, and wearable kids’ clothes. For fall, I like to invest in stylish shoes and coats for my little one and then mix in less expensive, trendy pieces that can be worn and washed easily. Some of our top shops: Nordstrom – for the best kiddo shoe selection, nordstrom.ca (CF Chinook Centre) The Skinny – for quirky, quality, and playtime-friendly clothes, shoptheskinny.ca Joe Fresh – for inexpensive basics perfect for messy crafts and the playground, joefresh.com Zara – for the cutest fall coats, zara.ca (CF Chinook Centre) Preshrunk – for well-curated second-hand pieces, preshrunk.ca Purr Petite – for unique, well-made clothes and accessories, purrpetite.com

124


WHAT ARE SOME EXCITING

THINGS ABOUT GOING TO SCHOOL? “Saying my letters, playing outside, having snack time, and enjoying myself.”

- Clover, preschool

“ B e i n g a t m y b i g s i s t e r ’s s c h o o l . ”

- Holden, kindergarten

“Going to the playground, writing, reading, and drawing.”

- Maia, preschool

“I’m excited to learn French, playground, and meet friends.”

play

on

the

- Solomon, kindergarten

“ L e a r n i n g h o w t o r e a d , m e e t i n g a n e w t e a c h e r, making new friends, and learning songs with actions.”

-Charlotte, kindergarten

“Playing with my friends.”

-Paige, preschool

“Doing what my teacher says for me to do. Like eat snack! I’m excited about that.”

-Isaiah, preschool 125


CU RATING CANADA Happy 150th Canada!

A D U LT A P PA R E L & AC C E S SORIE S . B ABY & KID S . B AT H & B E AU T Y . HO M E D EC OR & E N T E R TA I N I N G . STAT IONE RY & FU N . T HE HAPPIE S T C OL L E C T I O N . U S E C O D E D OT E F W 1 0 FOR 1 0 % OFF YOU R NE XT PU RC HAS E W W W. L IT T L E B LU E C AN OE .C OM F O LLO W U S @L IT T L E B LU E C ANOE


AGNES IN AUGUST

@TRUE_BUCH www.truebuch.com


www.deseraeevenson.com | @deseraeevensonphoto

Use code DOTE15 for 15% off at matchstickwax.com


Accessories and furniture for the modern home. guildhallhome.com

PLANTS FOR THE PEOPLE � � � � � T H AV E S E C A L G A R Y

Local DJ + Local Booth = The BEST Party Ever!

Book Local DJ and Local Booth together for a $500 discount.

localdj.ca

thelocalbooth.ca

P L A N T S H O P. C A


Boutique, sustainable products inspired by raw honey and local beekeepers.

Use DOTE15 at drizzlehoney.com for 15% off

Join us Sundays at 10:30am at Cranston School 205 Cranston Dr. SE Cale Foulston Professional Makeup Artist/Stylist Cale Makeup Artistry 780.686.1469

theexchangechurch.com @exchangeyyc


“Quality product offerings, premium service and innovative thinking, never seem to go out of style.” – CHRISTIAN VÖLKERS

Our team focuses on beautiful and unique homes. Our discerning clients expect nothing less than the absolute best in advisory communication, meaningful marketing and exemplary service. The team’s customized approach focuses on each client’s marketing needs fully and diligently to ensure a successful sale.

www.thestarnesgroup.com www.evcanada.com www.luxuryrealestate.com www.luxuryhomes.com

STARNES GROUP


The New Standard in Skin Care Through a combination of tool-assisted massage, fascial stimulation and fluid-guiding, The Löschn Facial Method immediately reverses the effects of aging, resulting in symptomatic loss of muscle tension and improved firmness, softness and glow of the skin.

natural reduction of lines + wrinkles • relaxing sharpening of jawline + cheekbones • immediate non-invasive (no needles, fillers, botox or lasers) • cost-effective Book Today - Loschn.com | (403) 686-7242 7337 Sierra Morena Blvd SW #22, Calgary, AB


EMMA' S DOTEABLES

A C U R AT E D G I F T L I S T

GIFTS FOR TOGETHER PH OTOG R APH ED BY AN AS TAC IA J IDO

S

ince the theme of this issue is “together,� we decided to split the gift guide into different ways to spend time with friends and family. We've curated gift ideas for a movie night with your besties, a relaxing spa day with your favourite person, cooking together at home, and a fun day date. In this guide, we aimed to feature both local makers and North American small businesses whose small batch, responsibly-made, intentional products convey the simple pleasures in life. We choose artisans who believe things made with care bring the greatest joy and will serve a lifelong purpose. We hope that you find the perfect gifts for your friends and family to help bring you all together!

135


Movie night with your besties.

1.

NATURAL HANDWOVEN BACKSTRAP WOOL POM POM CUSHION, HECHO, HECHO-SHOP.COM

2.

FACEPLANTER, FRIEND ASSEMBLY, FRIENDASSEMBLY.COM (PLANT)

3.

POM POM CLIP SET, FELLER, SHOPFELLER.COM

4.

UNDER THE COVERS CANDLE, MATCHSTICK WAX CO., MATCHSTICKWAX.COM

5.

GOOD PLANET PULLOVER, FREE LABEL, SHOPFREELABEL.COM

6.

GOOD HUMAN T-SHIRT, WENDY POLISH, SHOP.WENDYPOLISH.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

7.

FLORIE CROPPED PANT, PAPER LABEL, PAPERLABEL.CA (SHADES OF SLEEP)

8.

THE BIG FACES HIGH SOCKS, TINY COTTONS, SHOPTHESKINNY.CA

9.

PINK FACETED POTTERY GLASSES, KALIKA BOWLBY, KALIKA.CA (PLANT)

10. ROOT BEER, ANNEX ALE PROJECT, ANNEXALES.COM (THE UNCOMMONS) 11. 52% GUATEMALA DARK MILK SALTED CHOCOLATE, MOTH CHOCOLATE [KIN + POD], KINPOD.CA 12. CANDY, GUMMIBOUTIQUE.CA (GUMMI BOUTIQUE) 13. TPCC BALLET MOCCASINS, HIDES IN HAND FOR TIFFANY PRATT, TIFFANYPRATT.COM/SHOP 14. EMBROIDERED MINI BANNER CRAFT KIT, MADE SOCIAL, MADESOCIALCO.COM 15. MUDCLOTH LUMBAR PILLOW, HUNTED HOME GOODS, @HUNTEDHOMEGOODS 16. BLUE LINE PILLOW COVER, FELLER, SHOPFELLER.COM 17. NAIL POLISH, KESTER BLACK, KESTERBLACK.COM (LUKES DRUG MART)

136


1

2

3 4 5- 7

9+ 10

8

14

11 12

15

13

16

17


5

1-4

6-9

11 10

12 13

1 4 - 16


At-home spa day with your pals.

1.

HAND-DYED LINEN SCARF, SYMMETRY & GRACE, SYMMETRYANDGRACE.COM

2.

SCRUNCHIES, CHELSEA KING, SHOPCHELSEAKING.ETSY.COM

3.

CHASING SLOW, ERIN LOECHNER, INDIGO.CA

4.

HERBAL STEAM FACIAL, GOLD APOTHECARY, GOLDAPOTHECARY.COM

5.

HERBAL EYE PILLOW, LA AQUARELLE, LAAQUARELLE.COM

6.

1930'S BANDANA, OZMA, OZMAOFCALIFORNIA.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

7.

CARINE BOXY CROPPED PULLOVER, PAPER LABEL, PAPERLABEL.CA (SHADES OF SLEEP)

8.

LACE BRALETTE, THE SKINNY, SHOPTHESKINNY.CA

9.

SARAH DRESS, PAPER LABEL, PAPERLABEL.CA (SHADES OF SLEEP)

10. ROSE 31 BODY LOTION, LE LABO, LELABOFRAGRANCES.CA 11. TERRACOTTA MOONS MOBILE, LENNON + BIRDIE, LENNONANDBIRDIE.BIGCARTEL.COM 12. SOAP, ANTO YUKON, ANTOYUKON.COM 13. LOVE AND GLOW ORGANIC HERBAL POTION, THE GUT LAB, THEGUTLAB.CA 14. PALO SANTO | JASMINE FACIAL TONIC & HAIR MIST, ADORN INFUSIONS, ADORNINFUSIONS.COM 15. HONEY TOBACCO CANDLE, PICOT, PICOTCOLLECTIVE.COM 16. TIFFANY PRATT MAGIC SOAK, GOLD APOTHECARY, GOLDAPOTHECARY.COM 17. AIR PLANTER, FRIEND ASSEMBLY, FRIENDASSEMBLY.COM (PLANT)

17 139


C o o k i n g t o g e t h e r.

1.

MARKET POM POM BASKET, BOHEMIA, 28BLANKETS.COM (28 BLANKETS)

2.

CHOCOLATES, MELT CONFECTIONS, MELTCONFECTIONS.COM

3.

HANDCRAFTED SPOONS, NORSEMAN WORK SHOP (PLANT)

4.

WOOD HAND SERVER, WATCHMAN WOODWORKS, FIELDSTUDY.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

5.

GREEN FACETED POTTERY GLASSES, KALIKA BOWLBY, KALIKA.CA (PLANT)

6.

LINEN TEA TOWELS, LISSU, LISSULINEN.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

7.

PINK MUG, MAGGIE BOYD, MAGGIEBOYDCERAMICS.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

8.

BEESWAX CANDLES, TINY RITUAL, TINYRITUAL.COM

9.

WOOD CARVED HAND, WATCHMAN WOODWORKS, FIELDSTUDY.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

10. WHITE AND RED CLAY FOOTED TUMBLER, HANDS ON CLAY COLLECTIVE, @HANDSONCLAYCOLLECTIVE 11. FACET COLLECTION SCALLOP PLATES, KALIKA BOWLBY, KALIKA.CA (PLANT) 12. ALPINE DRY GIN, PARK DISTILLERY, PARKDISTILLERY.COM (PARK DISTILLERY) 13. LAVENDER SIMPLE SYRUP, CAHOOTS, CAHOOTSMADE.COM 14. CERAMIC COLLANDER, AURA MAY, @FUTURECRAFT.AIRSTREAM 15. MAPLE CUTTING BOARD, HOLD., HOLDGENERAL.CA 16. THE BLACK SAINT AND THE SINNER LADY, MINGUS, SHOP.LUKESDRUGMART.COM (LUKES DRUG MART) 17. FAGIOLATA ‘BEAN STYLE’ PASTA SAUCE, SUGO SAUCE, SUGOSAUCE.COM (LUKES DRUG MART) 18. BEET FUSILLI, SFOGLINI PASTA SHOP, SFOGLINI.COM (LUKES DRUG MART)

140


2 1

3- 5 8

9

6+7

10

16

11

17+ 18 1 2 - 15


1

3

2 4-6

8

7 9

10 12 11

13

14


Day date, for the gal.

1.

SMALL CAMEL SQUEEZEBOX, ERIN TEMPLETON, ERINTEMPLETON.COM (FIELDSTUDY)

2.

HP SPROCKET PHOTO PRINTER, HP, BESTBUY.CA

3.

GLASSES, RAY BAN, MYOPTOMETRISTCALGARY.CA

4.

BUTTER BLANKET SCARF, BUTTERCREAM CLOTHING, BUTTERCREAMCLOTHING.COM

5.

THE ERINN CARDIGAN 2.0, THE SKINNY, SHOPTHESKINNY.CA

6.

JOHNNY TEE, FREE LABEL, SHOPFREELABEL.COM

7.

LONG LINK EARRINGS, SOFT-GOLD.CO, SOFT-GOLD.CO

8.

REZA WRAP CHOKER, COUTUKITSCH, COUTUKITSCH.COM (THE LIVERY SHOP)

9.

LIP TINT AND CONDITIONER, HERBIVORE BOTANICALS, HERBIVOREBOTANICALS.COM (LUKES DRUGMART)

10. DOTE BRACELETS, SOFT-GOLD.CO, SOFT-GOLD.CO, 11. TIGER EYE + PINK OPAL DOUBLE STONE RING, SOFT-GOLD.CO, SOFT-GOLD.CO 12. THE ROUND WATCH, BERG + BETTS, BERGANDBETTS.COM 13. BOTANY NATURAL PARFUM, FLORE BOTANICAL ALCHEMY, FLORE.CO 14. SOFT OXFORD, POPPY BARLEY, SHOP.POPPYBARLEY.COM

143


Day date, f o r t h e g u y.

1.

LEATHER COFFEE SLEEVE, ILLO LEATHER, ILLOLEATHER.COM

2.

SUNGLASSES, PRADA, MYOPTOMETRIST.CA

3.

THE FAMILY MAN T-SHIRT, THE BEE AND THE FOX, SHOPTHESKINNY.CA

4.

THE RICHMOND HAT, COAL, COALHEADWEAR.COM (THE LIVERY SHOP)

5.

FORGE BACKPACK, MOTHER CO., SHOP.MOTHER.CO

6.

THE KENSINGTON WATCH IN CHOCOLATE NATO WITH GOLD BUCKLE, MONSIEUR WATCH COMPANY, MONSIEURWATCHCO.COM

7.

CLASSIC CREW SOCK, RICHER POORER, RICHER-POORER.COM (THE LIVERY SHOP)

8.

THE CALGARY WINGTIP, POPPY BARLEY, SHOP.POPPYBARLEY.COM

9.

OM-D E-M10 MARK II MIRRORLESS CAMERA, OLYMPUS, GETOLYMPUS.COM

10. CAMERA STRAP, BRAND & IRON, MUTTONHEADSTORE.COM (THE UNCOMMONS) 11. BERGAMOT LIQUID CASTILE SOAP, STEELE & CO., STEELEANDCO.CA 12. BLACK BIRCH AFTERSHAVE, STEELE & CO., STEELEANDCO.CA 13. DAPPER MAN COLOGNE, ADORN INFUSIONS, ADORNINFUSIONS.COM

144


1

3

4

2 5 6

7

9+10

8

11 +12 +13


THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO PARTICIPATED IN OUR ISSUE 6 #READINGDOTE! FOLLOW ALONG WITH US TO SEE WHAT WE’RE WORKING ON AND HOW OUR READERS ARE ENJOYING DOTE. INSTAGRAM @DOTEMAGAZINE WEBSITE DOTEMAGAZINE.COM TAG YOUR PHOTOS #READINGDOTE AND #DOTEMAGAZINE


lunch, dinner, weekend b runch

Merrymaking

8 0 6 - 9 t h Av e n u e S E

deanehouse.com

@ d e a n e h o us e y yc


WRINKLES.

Dote Magazine Issue 7  
New