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D OT E MAG AZINE . a well-styled and meaningful life issue four

spring/summer 2016


MARKET COLLECTIVE CHINESE CULTURAL CENTRE • $5 (KIDS GET IN FOR FREE)

Market Collective is an inde pe nde n t ma rke t c rea te d to showcase the works of local artists, a rtisa ns, de si g ne rs a nd musi c ia ns.

MAY 27, 4-9PM MAY 28, 10AM-6PM MAY 29, 10AM-6PM

JULY 8, 4-9PM JULY 9, 10AM-6PM JULY 10, 10AM-6PM

W W W.MA R K ETCOLLECT IV E .CA


our team

KATE KLASSEN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR @KATE.KLASSEN

JENNY FLAMAN MANAGING EDITOR

ALEXANDRA WIG STYLE EDITOR @PINKANDHONEY

SHANNON AYCOCK MARKETING DIRECTOR

VICKI MANNESS FOOD EDITOR @PRETTYSWEETYYC

BLAIR INKSTER RESIDENT PHOTOGRAPHER @BLAIRMARIE

our contributors ALLISON SMITH - WRITER @ALLISONJAYS

JILL HOFF - ILLUSTRATOR @JILLHOFF

AMANDA HOWARD - COLUMNIST @AMANDAHOWARD_

JILL MAYER - ILLUSTRATOR @ARTANDALEXANDER

ANGEL GUERRA - COLUMNIST @MARKETCOLLECTIVE

JILL WESTON - ARTIST @JILLWESTONART

CHANTAL HART - WRITER

KAIT KUCY - COLUMNIST @KAITKUCY

DARREN ROBERTS - PHOTOGRAPHER @DARREN_ROBERTS_ DAVID HEIDRICH - PHOTOGRAPHER @HEIDRICH_PHOTOGRAPHY ELISE MAREE TRICKEY - ARTIST @ELISEMAREET EMILY STANGL - WRITER @WARMTHHANDMADE EMMA KLASSEN - COLUMNIST @EMMA_KLASSEN ERICA COOK - COLUMNIST @ERICA.COOK GENEVIEVE RENEE - PHOTOGRAPHER @GENEVIEVERENEEPHOTO NICOLE HUDSON - COLUMNIST @BOTCOMM JAMIE HYATT - PHOTOGRAPHER @_JAMIEHYATT JAY CAPTION - WRITER @EL_JAY_MUNOZ

KRISTYN HARDER - PHOTOGRAPHER @KRISTYNHARDERPHOTOGRAPHY LAURA URBAN - WRITER @LAURA.S.URBAN MORGAN CHAPMAN - COLUMNIST @KIDLITBOOKADAY NATALIE ANDRUSIAK - PHOTOGRAPHER @HEARTANDSPARROW RYAN GARTNER - COLUMNIST @RYANNEVERSLEEPS REBECCA RAGAN - COLUMNIST @REBECCADAWNDESIGN SHANNON YAU - PHOTOGRAPHER @SHANNONYAU SANCIA TOTH - PHOTOGRAPHER @MYCANVASMEDIA SARAH VAUGHAN - PHOTOGRAPHER @SARAHVAUGHAN YULI SATO - PHOTOGRAPHER @YULISATO

Special thanks to Craig Manness, Chris Brown, Leanne Wood, Lindsay Stead, Alena Tran, The Babcock Family, Maryjane Peters Alexis Friesen, Mitchell Toth, Margaret Inkster, Joe Dort, Anna & Inez Niemczewski, Javaid Shah, Libby Nimijean, Jacquôt Marshall, Chelsea Bokor, Laura & Grayson Eyford, Alex Wright, Karine Ng, Primera Ngm Andrea & Ruby Grabek, Adam Onulov Reagan Mclean, Lori & Tom Shackleton, and Stephanie Buchan


*UNICORN NOT INCLUDED


D OTE MAGAZ IN E . COPY EDITORS Cheryl Manness Heidi Brown Chantelle Toews Krystle Pederson

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Ashley Hamilton

Piece By Piece (page 28) Giving Back :: Design for Life (page 54)

Megan Powell

A Styled Home :: Suite Retreat (page 66) Littles in the Sky (page 118)

Savaya Shinkaruk

Man With A Passion :: Say Something (page 58) Emma’s Doteables (page 128)

Anh Dang

Market Collective :: The Pretty Potter (page 34)

Mike Klassen

Simmons (page 48)

Vicki Manness Glow On (page 88)

LEAD COORDINATOR Heidi Brown

ASSISTANT Heather Row

COVER PHOTO Simmons Building Photographed by Jamie Hyatt Styled by Alexandra Wig All content and images are used by express consent of the contributing authors and photographers and were created for Dote Magazine. Printed by Printcor Print and Distribution Advertising opportunities Email :: ads@dotemagazine.com Check out our website :: dotemagazine.com Follow us on Instagram/Twitter :: @dotemagazine Mailing address :: #234, 5126 126 AVE, SE Calgary, AB T2Z 0H2

PUBLISHED BY Impact Group impactgr.com 403-279-0967 Contents copyright Š 2016 by Dote Magazine; may not be reprinted without express written permission from Dote Magazine. Dote Magazine will not be liable for any damages or losses as a result of the use of the reader and any information, opinions, or products expressed, advertised, or otherwise stated.


East Village. Wide open for all.

A new world has opened up in the neighbourhood where Calgary was born, and excitement continues to build. The National Music Centre, opening in 2016, will set the tone for musical culture in Canada. The Hilton also opens this year, ready to welcome visitors to the newest, oldest, coolest, warmest neighbourhood in town. The historic Simmons Building has become Calgary’s favourite new breakfastlunch-dinner rendezvous. St. Patrick’s Island offers Calgarians a new 31-acre regional park in the Bow River with year-round activities for all. Some 600 new EV residents moved in last fall and are settling into smart, welcoming riverfront condominiums. It’s 2016, and we’re building the city. Join us!

Experience life in East Village. evexperience.com

east village® is a trademark owned by Calgary Municipal Land Corporation.


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S IN THIS ISSUE PIECE BY PIECE ::

28

SIMMONS ::

48

PURPOSEFUL PLACEMENT ::

64

GLOW ON

88

PERSONAL STYLE

94

TIME TO TEA ::

104

A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO STARTING AN ART COLLECTION COMMUNITY, HISTORY, SUSTENANCE INTEGRATING FENG SHUI FLOW INTO YOUR HOME

TAKING A MOMENT FOR TRADITION

I N E V E RY I S S U E A NOTE FROM THE DOTE TEAM

15

ENTERTAIN :: THE PARTY PANTRY

16

BEAUTY + BLOOMS :: GIFTS FROM THE GARDEN

22

MARKET COLLECTIVE :: THE PRETTY POTTER

34

YOUR DREAM JOB :: PASSION VS. PAYCHEQUE

40

LOCAL LOVE :: WHY LOCAL? EAT THE FRESHEST

44

GIVING BACK :: DESIGN FOR LIFE

54

MAN WITH A PASSION :: SAY SOMETHING

58

A STYLED HOME :: SUITE RETREAT

66

HEALTH + BEAUTY :: REST YOUR BEST

72

BAKED :: RELIGIEUSE STACKS

114

LITTLES IN THE SKY :: EMBRACING URBAN LIFE WITH A BABE IN TOW

118

THE DOTE BOOK CLUB

123

EMMA’S DOTEABLES :: THE LOCALS

128


WE KEEP MOVING F O R WA R D , O P E N I N G NEW DOORS, AND DOING NEW THINGS, BECAUSE WE'RE CURIOUS AND CURIOSITY KEEPS LEADING US DOWN N E W P AT H S . - WA L T D I S N E Y

D OT E M AG A ZIN E .


I SEE THE MOON, THE MOON SEES ME SHINING THROUGH THE L E AV E S O F T H E O L D OAK TREE OH, LET THE LIGHT T H AT S H I N E S O N M E SHINE ON THE ONE I LOVE. -MEREDITH WILLSON

EVENT STYLING, PLANNING + COORDINATION VICTORIA + VANCOUVER ISLAND, BC

R O C K PA P E R S Q U A R E . C O M


o l l e H

friends and thank you for picking up the Spring / Summer 2016 issue of Dote Magazine. Even amidst uncertain times in the city, we can’t help but feel encouraged and excited as we watch Calgarians pursue new opportunities, open businesses, and continue to enjoy their hobbies and passions. Our team took time over the last few months to each commit to starting or learning something new. In the spirit of embracing lives that are well-styled and meaningful, we believe that continually learning new things is a way to stay inspired, spark creativity, and can encourage important self reflection. For some of us, this was an opportunity to focus on health and wellness. Through a commitment to weekly prenatal workouts and exploring the benefits of essential oils and aromatherapy, we chose things to better ourselves and our families. One of our teammates took on a new hobby and learned to knit. Starting with classes, and ending with a scarf in ever yone’s Christmas stocking. We now have an avid knitter on our hands. We also had a teammate take this challenge deeper by evaluating her finances and reading , researching , and committing to bettering her budget. For another one of our girls, this idea of learning something new came as a big ger challenge because of her busy life and commitments. She took this as an opportunity to simply learn a little bit more about something she’s always been inspired by: the moon. Personally, I’ve been increasingly inspired by home design, so I chose to learn about Feng Shui. Check out more of my thoughts and learnings about spacial arrangement on page 64. Aside from each of our personal grow th stories, we are so thrilled to now share ever y thing else that we’ve learned throughout the creation of this issue. From professional sleep advice (page 72) and starting an art collection (page 28), to plants that grow well locally (page 22) and building a tower of profiteroles (page 104), there’s lot ’s to learn. We can’t wait to hear what you’re going to tr y nex t. Read, enjoy, grow.

I LLU STRAT ED BY J I L L H OF F

Lots of love, Kate and the Dote Team 15


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EN TERTAIN

T H E PA RT Y PA N T R Y W R I T T EN A N D S TY LED BY ALEXAN DRA WIG PH OTOG R APHED BY G EN EVIEVE REN EE

E N T E R TA I N I N G AT H O M E

can be made simple with some smart organization and planning. Revamp your linen closet or clear out an underused cupboard and create a well-designed space where party supplies can be stored and ready for your next gathering. From extra dishware to candles to linens, building a pretty party pantry will keep your extra to-dos to a minimum and your entertaining plans simplified. A space like this will leave time for creativity, relaxation, and a truly enjoyable hosting experience.

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Stock Up Keep a well-curated collection of some key items, and you won’t be left running extra errands when you’re planning a get-together. We’ve also found that having these pieces on hand lets us add extra special touches to everyday moments simply because things are easily accessible. Whether that be bright napkins and straws to welcome the first day of spring or birthday candles to celebrate a half birthday (we do this!), you can add bits of whimsy and thoughtfulness to even the smallest of gatherings.

C a n d l e s – All shapes and sizes can come in handy:

taper, votive, tea lights, and birthday candles. Our go-to are pre-poured white votive candles from Superstore.

Storage

b a s k e t s – Pretty storage vessels are functional in the closet, as well as for endless party uses.

W r a p p i n g a n d k r a f t p a p e r – Use for gifts, for crafting on, or to make quick and easy table runners and placemats.

L i n e n s a n d d i s h w a r e – Build yourself a nice

collection of white linen napkins and tablecloths, clear glassware, and white ceramic dishware. This is most often the base of a well-styled tablescape.

C u t t i n g b o a r d s a n d p e d e s t a l s – Keep various shapes and sizes for food displays and centrepieces. Marble, wood, and ceramic are most useful and versatile.

D i s p o s a b l e d i s h w a r e – We can’t keep enough of this stocked for quick backyard dinners, picnics, or movie nights. Kitchen Papers by Hester & Cook, and Meri Meri are two of our favourite brands. B o t t l e d w a t e r – Store a selection of bottled still and sparkling water for convenience. We always try and keep lemons and limes stocked, as well. S t a t i o n a r y – A selection of pretty stationary always comes in handy for writing quick notes, welcome and thankyou cards, or for making into place cards.

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Keep a lint roller on hand for easy upkeep of linen table cloths.

Use clear garbage bags inside a wicker laundry hamper or big wire basket for a pretty garbage can.

Spray paint 3M hooks for a cute touch and store smartly by hanging items on the inside of y o u r p a n t r y d o o r.

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Invest in extra seating that’s easy to store. Ikea and Crate & Barrel have well-designed and affordable folding chair options. Turkish towels are lightweight, easy to store, and beautiful. Use them as a table linen, picnic blanket, or draped on chairs for guests to keep cozy.

Entertaining toolkit: • Extension cords

• Fishing line

• Matches and lighters

• Floral tape and shears

• Double-sided tape

• Sharpies

• 3M hooks

• White, black, and metallic spray paint

• Twine

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B E AUTY + BLO O MS

GIFTS FROM THE GARDEN W R I T T EN BY REBEC C A RAG AN PH OTOG R APHED BY S ARAH VAUG H AN I L LU S T R ATIO N S BY J ILL WES TO N

When I was a little girl, one of my favourite places to visit was my grandmother’s garden. Flowers of every hue, fragrance, and shape burst into bloom each spring in nearly every corner of her yard. The garden was a lovely place to play and let my imagination run wild. As my grandmother tended the garden, I went from flower to flower studying each blossom and taking in all the wonder. To this day, the smell of sweet peas takes me on a journey back to those childhood days. All of these fond memories of my grandmother’s garden are what make flowers such a comfort to me. She taught me a great deal about life through her garden. She taught me tricks learned from her years of gardening, like to run your nails over a bar of soap to fill the space so dirt would stay out. I thought this was so strange, but now I can appreciate the brilliance behind it. She also taught me about caring and sharing, about beauty, dedication, hard work, perseverance, and about the difference that one little act of kindness can make in a person’s life. I feel privileged to have grown up gardening at my grandmother’s knee. Our time in the garden always ended with cutting flowers for a bouquet that my grandmother would put on my bedside table. To this day I still have fresh flowers at my bedside as an ode to her. You too can easily bring some of the beauty indoors with fresh blooms from the garden. There’s no greater reward for hours spent labouring in the garden than a vase of lush peonies or tulips on your table. If you don’t have a garden, take advantage of the arrival of fresh-cut spring blooms at flower shops and local markets. One of the joys of arranging flowers is the creativity it inspires. Cutting flowers from around the garden is a lovely way to pull together a natural, spontaneous selection. Any plant should be up for grabs, and make use of every part: leaves, blossoms, pods, and buds. 22


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When properly conditioned, your arrangement can last a week or longer. Each type of flower has different requirements, but in general, here are some quick care tips: • Cut stems at a 45 degree angle so the plant can absorb as much water as possible. • Remove any foliage that will be under water in the vase. Leaves below the water will rot, promoting bacteria and algae growth. • Keep the arrangement out of direct sunlight and away from ripening fruit, which gives off ethylene gas. Both will cause the flowers to open more quickly and result in a shorter lifespan.

Helpful tips for treating different types of flowers B U L B S (tulip, daffodil, crocus, hyacinth) When arranging flowers that come from a bulb, cut off the white part on the bottom of the stem. The thick tissue does not allow the water to enter the stem easily.

C O L O U R E D P O L L E N (lily) These flowers are a stain-risk. Removing the stamens will prevent orange stains from appearing on clothes or furniture.

T H O R N Y S T E M S (rose) Wearing leather work gloves, run a hand down the stem from just below the flower downward to remove the thorns.

W O O D Y S T E M S (lilac, forsythia, crabapple) Cut the stems using a sharp, clean pruner and place in water immediately. The cut stem’s cells will dry and close within about twenty minutes, which will hinder its ability to take in water after arranging.

S T E M S W I T H N O D E S (carnation) Cut these flowers between the nodes on the stalk to maximize their water intake. H O L L O W S T E M S (amaryllis, delphinium, lupine) Hollow stems need to stay full of water. Holding the flower inverted, pour water into the stem and stop the end with a finger until you place the stem underwater. 24

M I L K Y S T E M S (poppy, euphorbia, hollyhock) These flowers expel a milky substance after their stems are cut. To extend the life of this type of flower, seal the nutrients in by searing the cut end with a match or quickly dipping it in boiling water for about 30 seconds.


3

2

7

5

1

4

8

6

1

Nigella

2

Ranunculus

3

Peonies

4

Hellebore

5

Sweet Peas

6

Peonies

7

Tu l i p s

8

Tu l i p s These are some of our favourite perennials that can be grown or purchased locally and can make beautiful cut flower arrangements. 25


Wi t h h e l p f ro m t h e C i t y o f C a l g a r y a n d t h e C a l g a r y H o r t i c u l t u r a l S o c i e t y, w e have put together a list of plants that are native to Alberta and will grow well w i t h l i t t l e m a i n t e n a n c e . Yo u c a n s e e t h e f u l l l i s t s a t c a l g a r y . c a / y a r d s m a r t

PLANTS THAT LIKE FULL SUN

“Elijah Blue”

Ivory Halo Dogwood

Blue Fescue

Common Peony

“Karl Forester” Feather Reed Grass

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Calgary Carpet Juniper

“Magnus” Purple Coneflower

Dwarf Korean Lilac


PLANTS THAT LIKE PA R T S U N , PA R T S H A D E

Lungwort

C l a v e y ’s D w a r f Honeysuckle

“Jack Frost” Brunnera

Hosta

“Sprite” Astilbe

G o a t ’s B e a r d

Old-Fashioned Bleeding Heart

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Piece

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By Piece

WRITTEN BY ALLIS O N S MIT H

PH OTO G RAPH ED BY S AN C IA TOT H

A B EG I N N E R’S G U I D E TO STA RT I N G A N A RT C O L L EC T I O N Starting an art collection is a romantic experience. Piece by piece you capture a moment of your life that you’ll cherish more with time. Each piece reminds you of a past love, a dark thought, or a place only real in your dreams. When you find that piece, it’ll stop you in your tracks: a serendipitous encounter. 29


Piece by piece you’ll learn what you love. A piece could be with you for a lifetime, sharing a part of your home and holding a place in your heart. When you’ll find the next piece to add to the collection is unknown. It could be at the next gallery, street market, or art show. It could be love at first sight, a rush that catches you completely off guard, or it could be a long active pursuit of emails, negotiations, and sleepless nights. For Stacey Walyuchow, Calgary-based art collector and online gallery owner/curator, buying her first piece of art was an emotional experience. “Honestly I was terrified. I had no intention of buying anything. I walked in and there was this one smaller piece that I really loved,” she explained. For Stacey, that original piece by an artist she had grown to know, meant more to her than just art, it connected her with a part of her past. For many, entering the art-collecting world may seem overwhelming, cold, or intimidating. Contrary to the misconceptions, starting an art collection is a lot more enjoyable and accessible than you may think. We asked Stacey what tips she’d recommend for beginner art collectors, and how to get past the misconceptions. Here’s what we learned: 1. Begin by educating yourself. Everyone was an art-collecting novice at some point. It’ll take time to learn about art styles and history. The nice thing is, you can start online in the comfort of your home. When you’re ready, reach out to an art expert. If there is a specific style you prefer, visit a public library to learn more about the subject and to browse art books. Or dive into one of the many continuing education art history classes available at Alberta College of Art and Design (ACAD), Mount Royal University, or University of Calgary. Understand that it takes time to learn about the art world and to really know what you love. 2. Learn what you love. Do you like realism or abstract, sculpture or watercolours, landscapes or portraits? Knowing what you love and what pulls at your heartstrings only comes with time and experience. At the end of the day, listen to your gut and don’t be afraid to steer off the mainstream art trends.

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3. Share the experience with an art-collecting partner. Grab a friend or loved one and commit some time to visiting

galleries, museums, auction houses, or art shows on a regular basis. It could be a weekly outing or a way to change up date night. 4. Get to know local artists. Keep it local and original. “Buying from emerging or established artists comes with the exciting commitment of knowing that you are buying into someone’s life,” Stacey explained. Visit artist or gallery websites, and scroll through their Instagram accounts. 5. Create a budget. Set a budget for yourself. This could be a monthly or annual budget. The price point is up to you. “I always assumed that you needed these big expensive pieces by well-known artists,” Stacey confessed. But you can find beautiful pieces under $100 or over $10,000. If a piece does fall above your budget limit, and it’s a have-to-have piece, most artists, galleries, or art establishments are open to setting up a payment plan, she added. That way, your heart is part of the decision-making process and not your wallet.


6. Know that you’re investing in a local artist. When setting your price point, keep in mind that you are buying more than the image or the canvas. Stacey explained, “You are buying years of training, experience, emotional journey, and the time it has taken for this piece to come to creation. Know that you’re buying a piece that could be with you for a lifetime.” 7. Visit local galleries that support local artists. See the listings of local galleries below. 8. Immerse yourself in Calgary art shows and events. Art markets, festivals, and shows are continuing to pop up across Calgary. Calgary Art Walk is an annual event where participants have an opportunity to visit local galleries. Art Spot is a nonprofit organization and alternative gallery space that hosts an annual event with art under $100. The Glenbow Museum hosts various fundraisers every year where they showcase art pieces and bring awareness to the contemporary and historical works in their extensive archives. Market Collective, Commonwealth Collector’s Club, Calgary Art Markets, and many others host multiple markets every year and feature local art in various forms. And don’t miss out on ACAD’s semi-annual Show + Sale featuring work from students in their programs. Visit Calgary Arts Development for more art event listings. 9. Commission a piece. First, choose the artist. Become familiar with their body of work and their average price point. Then approach the artist or gallery in one of two ways: either with little direction thereby giving them creative control, or give them more input such as colour tone, size, and imagery. Either way, the artist will likely have a conversation with you to discover some artistic inspiration. 10. Don’t be afraid to walk away. Over six years Stacey has purchased eleven pieces for her collection. “Once you’ve experienced the rush of purchasing a piece, it can be hard to walk away,” Stacey explained. Though, if she had purchased every piece she’s connected with, she would be out of wall space! Her advice is to walk out the door and sleep on it. If you’re up all night tossing and turning, thinking about the piece, then go back and buy it. You won’t regret it.

When you’re starting your first art collection, having a few simple parameters like a budget or an artist in mind will keep you from being overwhelmed. Piece by piece you’ll learn what you love. And like a true love, Stacey explained, “There are those beautiful stories of an art collection capturing your journey through life, the people you meet, and the places you’ve travelled.”

Putting the emotional aside, here are some other things to consider when starting an art collection: Investment When looking for an art piece as an investment it is important to note a few things about the artist. First, consider his/her history: experience, awards, and education. Does the artist hold an accreditation of: BFA, MFA, BD, etc.? There are various aspects about the artist that can lend to the value of your piece. Be sure to consult your gallery, artist, or auction house about these aspects. Appraisal To know the value of your art, you should have it appraised. Various galleries around Calgary, as well as Levis Fine Art Auction and Appraisals and Hodgins Art Auctions, just to name a few, are great sources for art appraisal. Insurance Be sure to insure your art. Whether it’s recently purchased from a local artist or passed down from a loved one, it’s important to know that you are covered from damage or loss. A FEW LOCAL GALLERIES: •

The Nickle Galleries at The University of Calgary showcase contemporary art from across Western Canada.

ArtPoint Gallery and Studios Society is an art cooperative in Ramsay that exhibits local artists and provides art education to its members.

Loch Gallery, with locations in Calgary, Toronto, and Winnipeg, carries work from established Canadian artists.

Masters Gallery, with locations in Calgary and Vancouver, offers access to many Canadian contemporary and historical artists, also with a full-service framing business.

Newzones Gallery of Contemporary Art is one of our leading contemporary art galleries promoting Albertan, Canadian, and international artists as well as young, up-andcoming artists.

Feather Gallery was originally built by A.C. Leighton in 1930, and now the space is committed to showcasing local art.

Esker Foundation is a forward thinking contemporary art gallery that showcases both emerging and established artists.

Trépanier Baer Gallery specializes in the exhibition and sale of Canadian and international contemporary art and is considered one of Canada’s leading commercial contemporary art galleries.

Herringer Kiss Gallery focuses on contemporary fine art by emerging, mid-career, and established artists from across Canada and the U.S. They also have a full-service frame studio onsite.

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Art+Artists (From left to right)

SOURCE GUIDE 1. Wyn Haldaman Oil on canvas Antique Junction 2. Z. Jarek Oil on canvas $1000 itsvintageyyc@gmail.com @itsvintageyyc 3. Jill Weston Floral Study 5, watercolour on cold-pressed paper $95 jillwestonart.com @jillwestonart 4. Tara Put Elephant, watercolour on paper $200 etsy.com/shop/taraput @taraput

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5. Heather Buchanan Doorway, acrylic on canvas $1,100 heatherbuchanan.ca @heatherbuchanan 6. Tara Put Rhino, print of original $20 etsy.com/shop/taraput @taraput 7. Reagan Cole Mclean Bison Study, acrylic on canvas $450 reaganmclean@gmail.com 8. Jill Paddock I Found a Dream, acrylic on canvas $300 jillpaddockart.com @jillpaddock.art

F OL LOW S TAC EY @FO S TERMAK ART

9. Philip Kanwischer Perched, photography $400 (in hand-made black walnut frame) philipkanwischer.com 10. Evan Smibert Infinite III, original lithograph $75 evansmibert.com @evansmibert 11. Mandy Stobo Bad Portraits, Custom Portrait, watercolour $100 badportraitproject.com @badportraits


MARKET COLLECTIVE

THE PRETTY POTTER W R I T T EN BY AN G EL G UERRA PH OTOGRAPHED BY Y ULI S ATO

“I AM SO HAPPY WITH WHERE I AM, BEING ABLE TO DO S O M E T H I N G I A M PA S S I O N A T E A B O U T E V E R Y D A Y. �

A mix of the Prairies, the mountains, and the coast, the ceramic work of Anna-Lise Schmidt is an exquisite combination of her surroundings. A native to Calgary, Anna-Lise began her studies at the Alberta College of Art and Design and then took her practice to Vancouver to finish up her artistic studies at Emily Carr University. The work that Anna-Lise creates is a perfect embodiment of who she is as a person. Beautiful, dainty, simple, sophisticated, whimsical, and adventurous, her work is sure to speak to you. In late 2014, Anna-Lise moved back to Calgary, and we had the honour of welcoming her into the Market Collective family. During her time with Market Collective we have watched her effortlessly connect with the community and collaborate with fellow MC artists, making her a warm presence at each event that she is a part of. 34


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MC:

We have watched many artists move around to different Canadian cities over the years, and it is always a pleasure to welcome them back home. After years of being away from Calgary, what are some of the changes you have noticed in Calgary upon returning home?

A S : When I moved away from Calgary seven years ago I felt excited to go to Vancouver. I felt that I would be in a place where art is more prominent. Every time I visited Calgary over the following six years I noticed small and exciting changes. One huge change was Market Collective. I would visit MC every time I could, and I could tell it was something special. The inspiration and community I felt was unlike anything I was experiencing in Vancouver. There are so many creative spaces expanding in Calgary; they are like little gems scattered all over the city. After noticing the changes happening in Calgary I decided that moving back felt right, I wanted that community and warmth. The biggest and most exciting difference that I have noticed is the development within the art community as well as the growing support for artists. MC:

What are some of the artistic qualities that you learned in Vancouver that you have been able to bring back to Calgary?

AS:

While I was in Vancouver it was a very introverted time in my life. I think the city played a part in that - quiet observant walks in the city and working inside while it rained. When I was working in Vancouver I really delved into the studio life. I spent a lot of time alone working. There’s something about Vancouver that made me feel very disconnected even though there are so many like-minded people. Because of this solitude I felt totally involved in my work with no distractions. To work in ceramics you have to enjoy that type of slow, quiet working. There are so many steps in the process that you have to be almost obsessive about it.

MC:

You have just begun teaching ceramics at North Mount Pleasant Art Centre. How do you feel that this exchange of knowledge has helped you to grow your own body of work?

A S : North

Mount Pleasant Art Centre (NMPAC) is a really special and unique gem in Calgary. I taught in Vancouver as well and it was a very independent job

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compared to the community at NMPAC. There are so many talented and inspiring people working and visiting there, and I feel that energy impacting my work. Instructing both children and adults and working through their problems is very energizing to my own work. The younger students are always inspiring me, they don’t have expectations, they roll with their outcomes, and are so creative. One of my six-year-old students gave me a miniature ceramic plunger they made. How great is that? I think that working with kids has really allowed me to get a bit silly with my work. I allow myself to experiment with projects and push them to a place of not knowing the outcome or if it will work.

MC:

Why were you initially drawn to ceramics, and how has your love for this medium changed and evolved over the years?

A S : Throughout

my degree I worked mostly in drawing and print-making. My practice in both mediums was all about process. The laborious task of mark making or carving linocuts is almost more rewarding than the final piece. Ceramics is a perfect craft for me because of the lengthy process to a finished piece. I like that there is always a continuous process of preparing clay, making a piece, allowing it to dry, trimming, firing, glazing, firing, and then you have a finished piece. Even within that simplified breakdown of the process there are so many other applications you can add such as slip, carving, stain, under glaze, and wax resist. One reason I have been so focused on this medium is that I never run out of ideas for what I can make with clay, it can really go anywhere.

M C : You have an adventurous heart. How does your time in nature contribute to the beauty of your creations?

A S : When I’m out for a hike in the mountains or at

my family farm in the fields, I like to observe quietly and pull colour combinations or patterns for glaze. Imitating or alluding to something I see in nature, which is full of patterns people have observed for ages, is so appealing to me. Even depicting my two cats and chameleon adds a level of personal joy for me that I think others can relate to as well. When I’m stuck on something in my studio or just need a break, I like to create fun little animals like scaredy cat ring holders or llama planters.

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M C : How do you see your practice growing over the next few years? AS:

I am so happy with where I am, being able to do something I am passionate about every day whether it’s teaching or working in my studio. I would just like to expand on what I already have, being able to produce more and have my work in other Canadian cities would be great. I’d like to work on some more collaborative projects because when you find an artist that is a good match it can be very rewarding. Lastly, I have been working on a plan of having some two-day workshops available at my studio, I think that could be really fun.

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FOLLOW ANNA-LISE @AS.CERAMICS


SHOP #mysunridge


YO UR DREAM J O B

PA S S I O N V S . PAY C H E Q U E W R I T T EN BY N IC O LE HUDS O N PH OTOG R A PH ED BY S ARAH VAUG HAN

Starting a business is a lot like entering a romantic relationship. You’re giddy, full of plans for the future. Sure, maybe you tried starting a business before, and maybe it didn’t work out. But this time, it’s different; this business is "the one." Soon though, the excitement starts to fade. Maybe routine sets in, maybe financial realities and the grinding day-to-day tasks start to overshadow the joy you and your business once felt, back when it was just the two of you. Sooner or later, most entrepreneurs will be faced with a similar challenge to love birds in long-term romantic relationships: is it time to move on or move to the next level? And, if you do move to the next level - whether that means going full time or hiring an employee - is it possible to keep the passion alive? I started Bot Communications almost two years ago, and have been working at it full time for about a year. I’ve attended and spoken at creative conferences. I’ve travelled across Canada helping individuals go after their personal goals of starting a business, blog, or passion project. Over 500 individuals have attended my branding workshops. It’s been a lot of fun and one hell of a challenge. If Bot were my boyfriend, it’d be time to take an inventory of the relationship. So, I’m checking in, hoping to take the next step. 40


In 2015, I didn’t necessarily think of the financial realities of running a business. That meant I would say yes to jobs before determining what those jobs should be worth. I was more interested in learning, building my brand, and exploring my passion, so I would ignore the details. Little things, like whether I was actually losing money or making a profit. Would I like to head over to Portland for a weekend to take in a conference? Don’t mind if I do! How about taking photos of some synchronized swimmers for nothing more than a free trip? Sure thing! But I’ve set some financial goals for myself in 2016 that could take some of the fun out of the business. The worry is, with bigger goals and more pressure, some of the passion will be squeezed out. I don’t want that. I spoke to three friends and mentors to help me find ways to keep the passion alive.

1. Keep it casual After being encouraged for years (by yours truly, and a throng of other friends and colleagues), Natalie Westerbeek finally started pursuing photography professionally as a side gig to her career with Lululemon. Her plan had been to eventually transition into becoming a full-time photographer. But, things change - and I admire her willingness to change, too. “I’ve learned that my passions, dancing and photography, feed my soul deeply. I used to think that in order to be successful at them, I needed to make them my career. I’ve now learned that isn’t true in my case.” To keep photography fun and edifying, Natalie only takes the clients she wants to take, while keeping her life balanced with her job at Lululemon and her other hobbies. But, she admits, coming to that conclusion didn’t come easily or quickly. “The biggest lesson I’ve learned is to always honour my authentic self. I realized that I became so obsessed with wanting to make my life look perfect, I was missing out on opportunities that were right in front of me!” So she took a break from Instagram, where she had been pressuring herself to build her portfolio and clientele. Now that the pressure is off, the passion is back.

vendors, kind customers, and very supportive family and friends. I really am spoiled!” Sometimes, you keep the passion alive because you have bills to pay and mouths to feed.

3. Relax and recharge Finally, I spoke to Lane Edwards, owner of Pura Botanicals, makers of natural skincare and beauty products. Wife, mother, and business owner, Lane exudes warmth and serenity. She lives and breathes the culture of her brand, seemingly handling everything with grace and kindness. When I think of businesses that start from the heart, I think of her. Her passion came from an organic place. While pregnant with her second baby, she became extremely sensitive to conventional beauty products. Thankfully, she was raised by a mother who was passionate about holistic and preventative health, who also encouraged her to embrace her raw beauty. She took her mother’s lessons, and applied them to her business. Now, she keeps her passion alive by keeping a long-term perspective and enjoying the journey. “We are in different states of consciousness from day to day. We have to realize that feelings are fleeting and never permanent. Try not to get hung-up by a difficult week. I have days I feel overwhelmed, which can be de-motivating,” she says, “but then I just go back to the source of Pura. I’ll spend my time formulating a new potion or smell my most beloved perfuming notes and blend something beautiful just out of the blue. Or I’ll take a break and recharge in nature with my family. It’s the little things that make us fall in love with our path in the first place. Go back. Start again. Be an advocate for balance, and look after yourself. The passion never gets lost, it just likes to hide sometimes.”

2. Go all in After being laid off from her corporate job, Kelly Bruce was forced to take her side business, which had started as a casual thing, to the next level quicker than she expected. She founded Little Blue Canoe, an online shop for curated Canadian small business goodies, to fulfill her creative impulses and feed her passion for sending packages. If there’s one thing I can tell you about Kelly, she’s the queen of thoughtful cards and gifts, especially by way of snail mail. It’s no wonder she’d cultivate an online shop to save us the trouble of doing the shop research and shipping. Now, almost a year later, she says losing her corporate safety net was a huge blessing. She’s still crazy in love with her shop. Her secret? “I have surrounded myself with the nicest and most supportive network of people. I have incredible 41


YOU ARE NEVER TOO

OLD TO SET ANOTHER

GOAL OR TO DREAM A NEW DREAM. -C.S. LEWIS

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WE PUT DOWN NEW ROOTS!

WE’RE GETTING BIGGER, BRIGHTER, A N D B E T T E R . CO M E C H EC K U S O U T J U S T � D O O R S W E S T O F O U R O L D LO C AT I O N ! F I N D U S I N I N G L E W O O D AT � � � � � T H AV E S E , C A L G A R Y P L A N T T E R R A R I U M S .C A


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LO C AL LOVE

WHY LOCAL? EAT THE FRESHEST WRITTEN BY K AIT KUC Y PH OTO G RAPH ED BY K RIS TY N HARDER S TY LED BY ALEXAN DRA WIG

" We b e l i e v e t h a t b u y i n g l o c a l h e l p s t o e n c o u r a g e o u r l o c a l e c o n o m y, p ro v i d e s a n o p p o r t u n i t y f o r u s t o g e t to know the people behind the products and gives us access to the freshest and coolest products right in our neighbourhood!" - D e v o n L e C l a i r, B r i d g e l a n d R i v e r s i d e F a r m e r ’s M a r k e t

Red, juicy strawberries. Bales of hay repurposed as seats. Hot sun. A canvas tote bag lightly stained with a crushed tomato. A waffle cone dripping with mint chocolate. The scent of BBQ chicken fragrant in the air, mixed with geraniums and roses at a nearby flower stand. You are at a farmers' market, and it is summer.

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It is the peak of growing season in fair Alberta and the shoppers are frantically grasping at anything they can either munch on immediately, like carrots from Innisfail, or store away for the winter, like pickling the amazing cukes from The Cucumber Man. To me, it’s obvious why I would shop at a farmers' market all year round, but for people who might only go once a year, it is valuable to learn why these markets are so important. For one, the shorter the distance your food has to travel to get to you, the better. Learning about your food and knowing where it comes from is one way you can lower your personal carbon footprint. Farmers' markets also stimulate the local economy. Just like shopping from local makers or supporting your neighbourhood coffee shop, the farmers who descend upon places like Market on Mcleod and the Calgary Farmers’ Market each week will be impacted by how you spend your grocery budget. One of my favourite parts of shopping local is meeting the people behind the farms. You would be surprised by how many people at the stalls and booths on the weekend are actually the people who run the farms. It is certainly not a job for people who love to sleep; running a farm is hard work that requires a lot of patience and demands a lot of time spent building relationships. Developing a relationship with the farmers is a great way to get involved in the market community. Not only will you have that personal connection each week when you shop for your family, you will also likely get the inside scoop on what kind of products they will be bringing in as harvest nears. My hope is that eventually everyone will be purchasing their produce, meat, and plants directly from Albertan farmers. Increasing the demand for fresh and local ingredients will encourage more farmers' markets to start popping up. In the meantime, however, Calgary and area has a plethora of wonderful markets that truly make the shopping and eating experience something to be savoured.

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A I R D R I E FA R M E R ’ S M A R K E T

Open Wednesdays, June to Thanksgiving, 3:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. airdriefarmersmarket.com B A N F F FA R M E R S M A R K E T Open Wednesdays, June to September, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. thebanfffarmersmarket.com B E A R S PA W L I O N S FA R M E R S ’ M A R K E T Open Sundays, June to October, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. bearspawlions.com B R I D G E L A N D FA R M E R S M A R K E T Open Thursdays, June 23 to October 6, 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. bridgelandfarmersmarket.com C A L G A R Y FA R M E R S ’ M A R K E T

Open Thursday to Sunday, year round, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. calgaryfarmersmarket.ca C A N M O R E M O U N TA I N M A R K E T

Open Thursdays, May 26 to October 6, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. tourismcanmore.com C O C H R A N E FA R M E R S ’ M A R K E T

Open Saturdays, June to September, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. cochranefarmersmarket.ca CROSSROADS MARKET

Open Friday to Sunday, year round, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. crossroadsmarket.ca G R A S S R O O T S D E E R F O O T FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Open Tuesdays, June to September, 3:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. northlandmarket.ca H I L L H U R S T S U N N Y S I D E FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Open Wednesdays, year round, 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. farmersmarket.hsca.ca INGLEWOOD NIGHT MARKET

calgary-inglewood.com M A R D A L O O P FA R M E R ’ S M A R K E T

Open Saturdays, late May to early October, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. mardaloop.com M I L L A R V I L L E FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Open Saturdays, June 18 to October 8, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. millarvilleracetrack.com PA R K D A L E FA R M E R S M A R K E T Open Wednesdays, year round, 2:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. parkdalecommunity.com S T R A T H M O R E FA R M E R S M A R K E T Open Fridays, June 10 to September 23, 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. strathmorefarmersmarket.ca T H E M A R K E T AT S Y M O N S VA L L E Y R A N C H Open Friday to Sunday, year round, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. symonsvalleyranch.com 47


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SI M M O N S

C O M M U N I T Y, H I S T O R Y, S U S T E N A N C E

W R I T TEN BY J AY C APTIO N PH OTOG RAPH ED BY J AMIE H YATT

Calgary’s diverse infrastructure has always given our city worldwide appeal. Whether it is an interesting downtown display of the arts, a magnificent skyscraper with uniquely wellconstructed design, or a housing development with its own visual allure, it cannot be said that Calgary is without variety when it comes to local architectural culture. That culture has been built by a long rich history and it comes as no surprise that Calgary takes pride in where it has been, where it is now, and where it is going.

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“IT IS A PRIVILEGE TO BE IN A HISTORICAL BUILDING. THERE ARE VERY FEW LEFT IN CALGARY.” Built in 1912 by the Alaska Bedding Company, the Simmons Building in downtown East Village has long been a symbol of a once bustling working environment that was shut down many years ago. As confirmed by the Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC), since 1919, as part of the Simmons Mattress Company, the building was used for assembly and warehousing of hospital beds, nursery racks, and famous Beautyrest products were also assembled there. Simmons occupied the building until 1966. Standing alone just outside of the downtown core, for many years it served as nothing more than just a reminder of a rare early twentieth century industrial building. With no activity, it remained uninhabited for several years. Fast forward to this century and the Simmons Building is now far detached from the abandoned structure notoriety it once had. In 2007, the CMLC did base level improvements to the building and used it as their headquarters until the current Simmons tenants were selected and CMLC initiated extensive building improvements and restoration to make way for the new tenants. McKinley Burkart took on the task of designing the Simmons Building as you know it today. Diane Cassidy, lead interior designer, and Paolo Di Cienzo, lead architect, were careful in taking on a historical building restoration project to ensure they maintained original features. “Creating a distinction between new interventions and historic elements was at the core of the design process. We think our approach successfully respects the building and highlights its original characteristics,” says Paolo. “The Simmons is filled with historic pieces that tell a story. From an interiors standpoint, we were thrilled to be able to highlight this, making the preservation mandate an easy task. In many ways, these stories sparked new ideas for the space. For instance, the bright red colour of the dome lights in the café was colourmatched from the existing red vault door,” adds Diane. Today, the Simmons Building showcases some of Calgary’s best artisans at the helm of the infancy of a promising vision for East Village. Three distinguished Calgary businesses have come together to create an environment of community in a unique setting. 50

“The strong identity of each business made it easy to create distinction within the space without creating physical barriers,” says Diane. “This ties back to the overall vision. It was clear from the beginning that the spaces needed to be connected, a marketplace. In that sense we had one client.” A collaboration between Phil & Sebastian Coffee Roasters, Sidewalk Citizen Bakery, and Charbar, has invigorated and propelled what Sebastian Sztabzyb, co-founder of Phil & Sebastian Coffee Roasters calls an essential food destination. “The building is just so warm and unique. The fact that it is a building that has such cool character, is so rich with history, and is right by the river are absolutely contributing factors,” says Sebastian. “The Simmons holds a special place in East Village – it signifies not only the rebirth of the building but of the community overall. Bringing new life into old spaces and welcoming a new generation of East Villagers,” says Clare LePan of the CMLC. John Jackson, co-chef of Charcut and an owner of Charbar, spoke about the uniqueness of the space and the planned layout. “We felt it would become a gathering place and a culinary destination, the first of its kind. Just think about how incredible the historical Simmons Building is, sitting alongside the Bow River, and now we were going to be partnering with Sidewalk Citizen Bakery and Phil & Sebastian Coffee Roasters; like-minded local businesses where we would all share a common passion and feed off of what each other does best to create a hyper-local experience.” The importance of preserving and echoing history is an ideal all too important, and it is even presented within the menu of Sidewalk Citizen Bakery. “Our menu is inspired by the combination of the history of the building and street food. Since the building was a manufacturing facility, we created food for hungry people; nourishing, joyful, and affordable. In fact, our Kerosene Stove


lunch and dinner menu as well as our stuffed pita sandwiches are homage to little restaurants that were prevalent in Israel in the turn of the last century and were meant to feed the workers,” says Michal Lavi of Sidewalk Citizen Bakery. The building is also home to exceptional state-of-the-art machinery. From the espresso machines that brew your delightfully rich beverages at Phil & Sebastian, to the Argentine wood fired grill at Charbar, you are experiencing a first-of-itskind delivery in the culinary world from the moment you step in. And the history of the building plays a part in this delivery, as well. “True to its warehouse past, the building showcases the production aspect of each business. You can see where your bread is being baked and where your coffee beans are being ground. This brings a realness to the space and enriches the connection between customer, product, and supplier. This strategy unifies the larger architectural interventions with the interior components,” says Paolo. Unlike the often convoluted and unrythmic feel to a food court, each business compliments each other wonderfully at the now fully functional Simmons Building. The personal character displayed by each business resonates within a lot of the design that went into making this project happen. Michal commented that being from Israel, it was a must-have to share elements that would reflect this, such as the beautiful tiles that are used in their space reflective of the old buildings in Jaffa and Jerusalem. As a working space, they strive to make Sidewalk Citizen utilitarian as well as welcoming with personal touches. “As we miss the ocean, we commissioned our dear friend, Lisa Brawn, to do a large woodcut of a familiar scene: elderly women soaking in the blue ocean, pink and content in the hot sun. It also connects us to the river that flows just outside our door,” says Michal. Visually, the Simmons Building is impressive. The careful execution of key factors of the building were not only a compliment to the spot but necessary, as well. Naturally, for a building having weathered many winters, modern day construction safety was taken into consideration. The original radiators were removed where required, cleaned, and remounted; the building electrical and mechanical systems were upgraded to meet code and to serve modern

building/tenant requirements; and two exit staircases were added to meet code requirements. However, traits such as the “ghost” signage on the exterior were left untouched as unique expressions of the buildings age and the City’s historic rehabilitation requirements. The interactive setting is a truly remarkable endeavor well accomplished by the collaborative efforts of all involved, and where better to make history happen than a historic location? “The staircases are one feature I’m particularly proud of, they're industrial and modern. They connects all three levels of the space and to me symbolize the blurred line between customer and staff; for instance you see Sidewalk Citizen staff hauling up trays or bump into Connie (DeSouza of Charbar) as she goes from the private dining room to main kitchen,” says Diane. “I also think the tile finishes are pretty stellar. The colourful glazed olive green bar tiles in Phil & Sebastian’s café adds the retro character we were aiming for.” While immersing yourself in the interactive experience, it is an opportunity to engage fellow patrons as well as the welcoming staff of each business. Envisioning a platform for open dialog and community, it is clear that all of the owners echo a similar feeling in regards to where Calgary culture is going. The Simmons Building at the heart of East Village is just the beginning. “We wanted to create an awareness of who we are and what we do through design elements like our marquee ampersand and the Simmons Building is perfect for that. We aren’t just an everyday café. Our baristas aren’t just your average baristas. They are some of the best in Canada,” says Sebastian. “Just think, these huge wood beams, aged brick, and wood lath walls were our blank canvas. We sure had an incredible starting point,” says John. “It is a privilege to be in a historical building. There are very few left in Calgary,” says Michal. Next time you are savouring that exceptional coffee, a freshly crafted slice of sourdough, or the perfectly-aged, mouthwatering meat, look around to see if you can spot all of the little details, old and new, and appreciate the space that you are in for the history it has experienced and the future that it holds for our city. 51


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D E S I G N G IVIN G BAC K

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W R I T T EN BY AMAN DA H O WARD PH OTOG R APHED BY DARREN RO BERTS

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L I F E

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Design is often looked at as a nice-to and not necessarily a need-to. But when you consider that the design of a building, from a home to an office to a camp, can create opportunities for people with minimal space or special needs, design can be life-changing and a worthy cause for giving back. Matthew Kennedy and Mark Erickson started Studio North, a design-build firm, in 2013 as they were each completing a Masters in Architecture and they saw a need for smaller, more thoughtful architecture projects around Calgary.

The duo went on to design and build the dining hall at Ross Creek Centre for the Arts in Ross Creek, Nova Scotia. Because of their ongoing draw to give back to the community, Matthew and Mark also began supporting 101 Heroes, an organization that builds learning centres for underprivileged children in rural villages globally. They were tasked with designing a learning centre in Pulilan in the province of Bulacan, Phillipines, creating an area where children would feel comfortable learning but also a functional space, protecting them from extreme weather.

Their appetite for charity work began in 2009 when they designed and built Camp at Cabot Beach in Malpeque, Prince Edward Island. The camp was created to support children and families connected to chronic illness and disabilities. Camp at Cabot Beach runs for three weeks annually The power of design can make and can house up to 100 people people’s lives better; our lives comfortably.

are shaped by design.

With the help of friends and community support, the two spent four months living and building their design on their Cabot Beach property.

“Building it, seeing how the kids inhabited the space and experiencing this first-hand, helped us create special moments,” says Matthew. Matthew recalls his memories of summer camp and how his favourite time was walking down a small path to the fire pit every night. They wanted the children to share similar memories, so they purposefully kept the small hiking trail down to the existing fire pit by the beach because they enjoyed it so much as children. Every detail of Camp at Cabot Beach has a purpose and was designed with their audience in mind. “The power of design can make people’s lives better; our lives are shaped by design,” says Mark. “Designing a kids’ camp is like a dream project. We really believed in the camps, and they opened so many doors for us.”

They designed a colourful, bright, and playful space for the children and raised money for the construction costs by selling waffles at Market Collective here in Calgary. The duo started Studio North to make architecture accessible. “One thing about architecture is that it tends to be elitist. Everyone has an idea that they can’t afford design, but we are trying to work counter to that, to do something that matters and gives back to our community.”

Now, the team at Studio North spend time doing projects around the city, including creating accessible laneway housing for Calgary residents. A laneway home, defined by the City of Calgary as detached garden secondary suites or detached garage secondary suites, creates many options for families as they grow older, such as a place for aging parents to move into or children returning from University trying to get on their feet. “Customizing what is best for you, this is what the laneway house does, it provides a lot of options for evolving families,” says Mark. If you don’t find the Studio North guys in their shared studio, Blank Page, in Kensington, you can find them around the city, sometimes serving waffles for charity or renovating their own heritage homes.

F OL LOW M AT T H E W AN D MARK @S TUDIO _N O RTH

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MAN WI TH A PA SSI ON

S AY S O M E T H I N G WRI TT E N BY RYA N G A R T N ER P HOTOGRA P H E D BY B L A I R I N KS T ER

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“The first time I ever touched a camera it was a photo camera, a film camera, and I completely fell in love with taking photographs. I was fascinated by capturing any moment I could. The idea that your photograph can live in a photo frame, I thought that was just the most magical thing. You can put something on the wall and it will mean something.”

“ I f I d o n ’t s a y s o m e t h i n g o f v a l u e , I ’ m a j o k e . I f I d o n ’t s a y s o m e t h i n g t h a t ’s w o r t h saying, I’m just an Instagram feed, which can be deleted.”

Brock Davis Mitchell wants to say something, not simply for the sake of it, and not because it’s what we all seem to do these days. We sit on our couches or in the comfort of our beds, spewing out opinions through the vast network of social media outlets, adding our commentary on the state of the world around us. Health, politics, religion. We all have so much to say. Brock is not interested in saying things of that nature, he wants to say something that really matters. Something that lasts and transcends. Something that stops time for a moment, that breaks down walls and barriers and breaks hearts. Brock wants to say something that holds true value. From an early age, Brock looked at the world around him through different eyes. There was more to be said about the things going on around him. There was more to the story than what he was seeing. The moment Brock received his very own point-and-shoot camera, he learned that he could capture moments in time, document them, and those photographs could say something far more lasting and meaningful.

Photography was simply the beginning of what would become a passion that would consume Brock from the inside out. It started as a simple pleasure and fascination to snap pictures and have them revealed and relived days or weeks later. Back in those days, you just had to wait to see the photos you snapped. Terrible, I know. But not for a guy like Brock; he loved the process. So much so that by high school he was submersing himself in the photography dark room, processing anything he could to the point where he was self taught. Cleaning machines, calibrating chemicals, he couldn’t get enough. “I was taking photos of nothing...coat hangers, door knobs, empty hallways. Just to see the immediacy in that dark room – I wanted to click it and see it! You could take photos, develop them yourself, print them out and boom, you have artwork in your hand. That is amazing!” Being a long-time skateboard enthusiast, Brock moved on from the exciting world of coat hangers and door knobs and took his passion to the skate parks where he would begin to capture and document the community around him. It was a music video, though, that blew Brock’s world of capturing moments wide open. The video was by Daft Punk. It was a five-and-a-half-minute film of a dog, very humanlike, with a cast on his leg walking around the streets of his neighbourhood with a ghetto blaster in his hand playing the song “Da Funk.” Brock had never seen a music video like it. A video without the band? With talking in it? “You can do that!? This is amazing! Do I want to be a photographer, or do I want to do that? Do I want to tell stories further than just one image?” This is the part where you might assume Brock’s mind was made. Not quite. He did what none of us do when it comes to choosing which path we’ll take in life. He flipped a coin. Yes, that’s right. Brock decided his future with a coin toss. One side was going to Alberta College of Art and Design for photography and the other side Southern Alberta Institute of Technology for cinema. It landed on cinema. 59


Over the years, Brock has not only honed his technical skills when it comes to making films and music videos, but he has developed the ability to tell a beautiful story, to say something, not only to represent what the artists or songwriters are trying to say, but also weaving in the things he wants to say: his fear of becoming a father, his fears about religion, death, and losing loved ones. “If I don’t say something of value, I’m a joke. If I don’t say something that’s worth saying, I’m just an Instagram feed, which can be deleted.” Working and growing with artists such as Michael Bernard Fitzgerald, Rueben And The Dark, and many other richly talented music makers, Brock has had more than a solid foundation and platform from which to tell his stories, to weave his narratives, and say the things that resonate with him. It hasn’t come easily, though. There has been great cost in pouring so much of himself into what he believes to be the most important thing in the world. Two failed engagements and lost friendships were the casualties of giving himself fully to something bigger. “Professionally it’s been really good, but it’s been a hard road personally. There have been times when I’m downtown in some city on the job and a friend has called me out because 60

we don’t hang out anymore. And I’ve thought 1,000 times... Is this what I’m meant to do?” Calgary has built an incredible community of artists both in film and music, and it’s this community that has caught Brock so many times when things were falling apart. It is a community that celebrates in his accomplishments and shares in his sorrows. “That’s why I moved back to Calgary. I had actually moved to Los Angeles a few years ago. I was working in the sports action industry doing skateboarding films for almost two years. I came back because of the camaraderie and the community that we have here.” Brock has been saying something. He has been saying something of value, and not only through his work but by the way he lives: through his passion and dedication to the art of filmmaking, his community, and the city he loves. Brock continues on his pursuit to make something he believes is truly great, truly valuable. “That’s what you should be striving for all the time as an artist: that legacy piece. Everything you make should be the last thing you make, in your heart and in your head.”

F OL LOW BRO C K @S H OTATTHEDARK


THINK IN THE MORNING. ACT IN THE NOON.

E AT I N T H E E V E N I N G . S L E E P I N T H E N I G H T. -WILLIAM BLAKE 62


THE SLEEP GUIDE

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PURPOSEFUL PLACEMENT

INTEGRATING FENG SHUI FLOW INTO YOUR HOME W R I T T EN BY K ATE K LAS S EN I L LU S T R AT E D BY ELIS E MAREE TRIC K EY

Like our team, I set out to try something new and gave generous thought to how and what I’d like to learn. With a move on the horizon for my family, I decided to do some research about Feng Shui, with a particular focus on the bedroom. In its basic form, Feng (air) Shui (water) is the Chinese practice of spatial arrangement and orientation based on the flow of energy. Following the rules of Feng Shui, in theory, will allow positive energy (chi) to flow in and negative energy to flow out, which in turn will help to increase health, happiness, wealth, and overall quality of life. Feng Shui lists rules for the placement of furniture, types of art to decorate with, colours to use, and the ideal orientation of rooms, all to ensure that the chi is flowing freely and not being stopped by an ill-placed sofa or other furniture. Whether or not you believe in chi, for me, the basic rules of Feng Shui align with the Dote lifestyle of well-styled and meaningful - simply taking time to lay out and design your living spaces to serve you best. As this issue explores different ways to maximize sleep, products to ease rest, and bedroom décor to help relax, it seems appropriate to share some Feng Shui concepts that apply to the bedroom. I spent some quality time at the Calgary Public Library to learn as much as I could from the many resources on the subject. Here are some Feng Shui-based tips to get you started if you’re looking to do some purposeful placing in your room.

THE BED

BOOKS

Should be as far away from the door as possible and never directly across from it. Should not be positioned between windows as this will allow positive energy to flow right out of the room. Should have a solid headboard and be placed against a wall in order to offer stability and safety while you sleep.

Should not be stored in large numbers on a bookshelf in the bedroom as they can subconsciously make you feel overwhelmed and weighed down. Only keep the books that you are currently reading or that have a sentimental value in the space.

FURNITURE

Place artwork across from your bed so you can see it when falling asleep and waking up. Art should be calm and relaxing to help you rest or inspirational to help you achieve your dreams. Refrain from displaying photos of family and friends to avoid the feeling of being watched. Place live plants in darker corners so that energy doesn’t sit stagnant.

Ensure all bedroom furniture helps to promote rest and relaxation, and isn’t too elaborate or ornate. Avoid sharp edges on furniture as they are thought to be poison arrows shooting negative energy through the space.

EQUALITY Create balanced and equal energy on both sides of the bed and throughout the room to ensure that the energy can flow freely. For example, a similar amount of space on either side of the bed, or a bedside table lamp on both sides.

ELECTRONICS Should be kept as far away from the bed as possible. Electronic devices create an unhealthy magnetic field that can prevent sleep and are a source of negative energy.

MIRRORS Are said to allow other people into the room and can in turn allow other people into a relationship. If a bedroom mirror is a must for you, make sure it is not directly across from the bed.

ARTWORK AND DECORATIONS

CLUTTER Having too many objects in your bedroom can cause you to feel overwhelmed, stressed out, and in extreme cases, depressed. Stick to the necessary furniture and décor in your bedroom and don’t use your bedroom for storage. Never keep things under you bed.

LIGHTING Choose soft lamp lighting for the evening as it will help you relax. Harsh overhead lighting will stimulate your mind and can hinder sleep. Keep your curtains open to allow natural light to shine through in the morning. Waking up to natural light is refreshing and can energize you for the day. 65


A S TY LED H O ME

S U I T E R E T R E AT W R I T TEN BY ERIC A C O O K PH OTOG RAPHED BY S HAN N O N YAU

When it comes to design, our homes are broken into three zones: public, semi-private, and private. Master bedrooms are overlooked because they are hidden in a private area of the home, not viewed by visitors. Perhaps it’s not even that complex, perhaps it’s just that we rarely take the time to address this area in our homes because it’s undervalued.  Time and time again, I’d visit new clients and discover that while they may have hired me to do a second makeover on their living room, they had never addressed their bedroom. On average, humans sleep six to eight hours a night. The reality of this is that we typically spend around 25 years of our lives in bed. 25 years! It seems silly that we would overlook giving this room in our homes the special attention it needs. Now, some would argue that if you’re sleeping, why 66

does it matter? I’ve actually heard that before. I’d have to say that everyone I’ve ever worked with on a bedroom update has exclaimed with excitement that they can’t believe how much better they are sleeping. If I could prescribe one thing to everyone, it would be to invest the time, effort, and budget necessary to make your room a comfortable space. Your room should be an oasis that helps you unwind at the end of the day and encourages restorative sleep so you feel refreshed in the morning.  For this issue, we worked on a master suite belonging to people who, like many of us, are always on the go. This busy couple with kids  realized that their time in the  evenings was precious. By  addressing this space, they would better enjoy the small daily pocket of time they shared here. I felt they needed the perfect inviting backdrop for those special


moments. Here I’ll share a breakdown of how we tackled this master bedroom to ensure them the best and dreamiest night’s sleep. First up was painting the space.  Colour is such a personal thing and it’s hard to say what’s best. I personally like bright and airy spaces; however, some people may find that they sleep better in a room that’s moody and dark. Whichever you choose, it’s good to acknowledge that a coat of paint is often one of the least expensive ways to update a room. We chose the loveliest light grey as the starting point. We also wanted to ensure we had all of the necessary furniture pieces. It goes without saying that we should most certainly invest in a good mattress. 

From there we introduced new bedside tables repurposed from another room in the house. It’s important to provide ourselves with an adequate surface to put a book and glasses on. Bedside lamps also provide the right amount of light because those precious pockets of time in the evening might involve some reading.  The right linens or bedding make such a difference. I remember when I first moved out, I kept scratchy sheets in my linen closet and used them regularly because I loved the pattern embroidered on the edging and I didn’t have much of a budget to change them. I realized after several poor nights’ sleep that no pretty sheet is worth keeping if it makes you uncomfortable. Sheets needn’t be a huge expense. There are plenty of decent  budget  options available; however, given the amount of time we spend in bed, I’ve always suggested 67


putting more of your bedroom makeover budget towards nice bedding if you can.  Next, we gathered a grouping of  sentimental objects and arranged them to create a gallery wall of sorts over the dresser. It’s important to be surrounded by personal mementos or things that remind you of happy memories, as these are the details that give a personal touch and make a space feel like home. We often see bedrooms in magazines or in stores with a slew of pillows all lined up in rows against the headboard. If this is a look you like, I say go for it. However, sometimes it ends up being a hassle to move them around every day. As a fan of the simple and practical, I suggest investing in good pillows to sleep with nightly and two euro pillows (26 inches by 26 inches) for a queen-sized bed or three for a king. They’re the perfect size to lean against when sitting up in bed reading and they look great in contrast to the two smaller standard pillows.    68


To make this a restful room, we layered in new linens, bedside lamps, vignettes of small simple luxuries, and a gallery wall above the main dresser. The time and cost were minimal, but the end result was a dreamy, light, refreshed space and a better night’s sleep. This lovely couple reports back that they adore their new room.  69


TIPS FOR CREATING THE PERFECT BEDROOM:

4 1 S h e e t s 101:  Invest in sheets that are 100 percent cotton with a decent thread count (anything around 400 is good). Look for sateen on the label. Sateen sheets are often the softest and last the longest with regular laundering. They have a slight sheen due to the fact that they are comprised of two tightly wound cotton threads rather than just one. Invest in two good quality sheet sets so that you can put a new set on immediately when one is in the wash.

2 Do u b l e u p : An extra quilt or coverlet always looks lovely at the end of the bed and serves to provide some extra warmth on cold evenings. This will also help to protect your duvet or comforter and extend the wash times. For this room, we chose a beautiful quilt handmade in Toronto by Lindsay Stead (lindsaystead.com)

3 Fl u f f i t :  If you’re in need of a new mattress but it’s not in your current budget, purchasing a feather bed will provide some comfort and will increase the life of your mattress by a year or two. Be sure to give it a good shake weekly when you change the sheets.  

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S c e n t it:  A lavender candle or diffuser with lavender oil will gently scent the air. Lavender helps induce restful sleep. 

5 Cre a te a th ou gh tfu l be ds ide a rea: If you don’t have a drawer in your bedside table, keep a lidded box on top with a lip balm, face and hand moisturizers, travelsized Tylenol and Advil, a nail file, etc. These things will add a touch of luxury and provide the ultimate indulgence that you don’t have to move an inch to fetch something.  

6 G e t c re a tiv e :  Think outside the box when it comes to addressing your walls. Lovely art needn’t be expensive. We used an oversized shadow box to frame up this couple’s daughter’s baby quilt. It was cost effective to pull together but priceless as a heartwarming reminder of days gone by. 

7 Ke e pin g good orde r:  Do your best to limit clutter and provide yourself with an organization system and ample storage solutions. 


HEALTH + BEAUTY

REST YOUR BEST W R I T TEN BY LAURA URBAN PH OTOG R A PH ED BY N ATALIE AN DRUS IAK S T Y L E D BY ALEXAN DRA WIG I L LU STRATED BY J ILL MAY ER

B E AU TI F U L B E D LI N EN S P ROV I D E D BY GOLDGRA SS H O M E HAI R AND M A K E U P BY SIM P LYM E

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It’s been a restless night, but finally, toward dawn, sleep comes. The alarm sounds; your stomach sinks. It’s still dark outside, but it is time to get out of bed and start the day. Trying to ignore the alarm, you roll over, willing it silent. It doesn’t obey. You surrender and pull yourself out of bed knowing a tired day awaits. In a parallel universe, the story unfolds differently. The light breaks through the window; it is morning. Rising from bed, you meet the day with joy and expectation. After a night of deep, restorative sleep, the world is bright, bursting with hope and possibility. We all want the latter scenario to be the one that prevails. I spoke with five professionals who offered tips for how to rest your best in order to live life healthier, happier, livelier, and kinder.  

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The Sleep Doctor To learn more about the science of sleep, I spoke with Dr. Samuels, medical director of the Centre for Sleep and Human Performance. The Centre is a Calgary-based sleep medicine centre, where physicians study a full range of sleep disorders. Patients may stay overnight for testing and/or do home sleep testing. “Sleep is the foundation of recovery,” said Dr. Samuels. “It is the state during which our body and mind recover for the next day.” This recovery enables our mood and demeanor to be good and is critical in cognitive function and memory. When we do not sleep well, our memory, concentration, and mood all suffer. Also a critical time for metabolism, sleep helps to control appetite. When sleep-deprived, the part of our brain that manages appetite is altered, increasing desire for high calorie foods. This can lead to poor weight control as well as other illnesses: diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Shift workers are at especially high risk for these conditions. So what can we do to ensure that we sleep well? For starters, unplug all technology before bed. “Technology is the scourge of the universe,” he proclaimed. According to Dr. Samuels, smart phones, tablets, TVs, and computers all affect sleep negatively when used in the hours leading up to bedtime. “Some people find that though they fall asleep initially, they wake an hour later and are unable to get back to sleep.” In his work with elite athletes whose performance can hinge on a good night’s sleep, Dr. Samuels sets a firm 8:00 p.m. cut-off for technology use. Another factor to consider is pace of life. “Insomnia is the bulk of what we see in the clinic,” he noted. “This insomnia is due to excessive stimulation. People are legitimately busy, but they are not prioritizing sleep.” As a society, we are busier these days than in former generations, and we rely on technology to stay connected in our careers and interpersonal relationships. For young adults especially, getting careers going and raising young families, it can be tough to find time to wind down in the evening. Unfortunately, this has dire consequences for sleep quality. When we consume technology in the late day hours, our brain keeps trying to process all that information after we turn off the light. As Dr. Samuels said, “Our brain is not designed to just shut off.” The key to overcoming sleeplessness rests (ahem), at least in part, in developing a night-time routine that preps your body and mind for sleep. “Sleep doesn’t just happen,” 74

stated Samuels. “It has to be tended to.” For this reason, it is important, especially if sleep is a struggle, to make 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. a time for winding down and relaxing. Turn off technology, and turn down the lights. Late daylight exposure can lead to poor sleep, so keep your home dim during these hours. He recommends no light at all of any kind in the bedroom if you have insomnia. Make sleep preparation your main priority. Your routine could include a warm cup of herbal tea, a book, an easy stroll around the block, or a quiet conversation with a friend or partner. It is also important to manage your sleep environment. Invest in a good pillow and a good mattress that works for you. Adjust the temperature of your house and/or bedroom if needed. And, Dr. Samuels said, do not sleep with someone who snores if it keeps you awake. Exercise, caffeine, and alcohol are other factors to consider. He noted it may be better, in some cases, to exercise in the late afternoon rather than first thing in the morning. For instance, if rising to hit the gym at 5:00 a.m. means that you do not get seven to nine hours of sleep, it might be better to schedule late-day exercise instead (4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.). And while many of us lean on that late-day cup of coffee to get through the sleepy afternoon hours, he recommends one to two cups in the morning and no more, if sleep is an issue for you. Energy drinks are out of the question. Some claim alcohol helps with sleep, but this isn’t really the case. “Alcohol might help you fall asleep initially, but it does not help your sleep or help you stay asleep.” As for sleep medications, both natural and prescription, Dr. Samuels recommends first addressing the behavioural side of things, and then, if absolutely necessary, looking into the medication side. “The cornerstone of managing sleep issues is behavioural therapy, not drug therapy.” Seek out an online program or book, and if that doesn’t work, then see your doctor or be referred to the Centre for Sleep and Human Performance. Completely avoid over-the-counter sleep aids, as it has been proven that they do more harm than good. Dr. Arnel Beaubrun and his wife Dr. Andrea Beaubrun share I n f o r m a t i o n a l We b s i t e s : Centre for Sleep and Human Performance (centreforsleep.com) Canadian Sleep Society (css-scs.ca) National Sleep Foundation (sleepfoundation.org) American Academy of Sleep Medicine (aasmnet.org) Sleep Education from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (sleepeducation.org)


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The Naturopathic Doctor Integra Naturopathics, which began as a natural health centre to treat issues with infertility and has since blossomed into a family practice with a focus on treating autoimmune disorders. Echoing Dr. Samuels’ statements about sleep, Dr. Arnel explained that sleep is a time for the body to regenerate, restore, and rebuild. Nutrients are processed, the immune and endocrine systems undergo maintenance, and the brain repairs itself. “In babies, for example, there is a lot more going on during sleep than expected. As babies sleep, everything they learned and saw during the day is processed and organized, and from a neurological standpoint, integrated.” While many clients come to the clinic for help with insomnia, it is not insomnia that he treats. “Insomnia is a symptom of an underlying imbalance in the body,” said Dr. Arnel. Using the acronym “SAME,” which stands for “sleep, appetite, mood, and energy,” he seeks to pinpoint the source of the problem.

good source and can be made at home inexpensively and frozen for later use. Hormonal imbalances can be righted through the use of various herbs, which are not as aggressive as drugs. These herbs encourage the body to regulate certain hormones, which provides a long-term solution instead of a short-lived quick fix. Lifestyle changes are more difficult to effect, as it takes work to change ingrained habits. He made a few suggestions, the first of which is to go to bed before 10:30 p.m. at least 80 percent of the time, or five nights a week. Research shows that the best amount and quality of sleep occurs between 10:30 p.m. and 6:30 a.m. Deep breathing can also help to increase the amount and quality of sleep as it pushes the body into the relaxed state necessary for sleep. Do ten deep breaths before bed each night, in through the nose and out through the mouth slowly.

Usually, it relates to one of the following: adrenal function, hormonal imbalances, blood sugar regulation, and/or appetite. These areas can be addressed through nutrition, supplementation, and other lifestyle changes.

Find time to exercise, and be sure to vary the kinds of activities you do, as this variance brings on a different response in the body, which then leads to better rest. Dr. Arnel recommends tai chi and yoga.

“Nutrition is the first thing I look at,” he said, “as it is the building block of the body.” For example, is the patient consuming an adequate amount of the right kinds of protein and fat, which supply essential amino acids that help nourish the brain and support the nervous system? Bone broth is a

Contact Arnel and Andrea at Integra Naturopathics: integranaturopathics.com 77


The Bed Expert Black Sheep Mattress is a Calgary-based mattress manufacturer and retailer specializing in custom-made mattresses, all constructed of natural and organic materials. I spoke with Christian Schmidt, owner and founder of the company, to learn more about mattresses and to get some tips on mattress shopping. If you’ve spent eight hours in an uncomfortable office chair, you’ve experienced the after-effects: a stiff, sore back, knees and hips that creak, and overall bad posture. A bad mattress can be just as harmful, said Christian, as ideally you get to spend about eight hours a night there. “A bad mattress can be the source of a lot of problems,” he noted. “Sometimes we have customers who come in with back or neck issues, for example, and after finding a good mattress, their sleep improves.” For that reason, he urged, prioritize finding a good mattress, and take your time to do so. While there are many different types and styles of mattresses, the main two are foam/latex and spring-based. “Neither one is necessarily better than the other,” Christian explained. “You can purchase a well-made model of either style, but they have a different feel and different support.” It’s not necessary to spend a huge amount of money to get a quality mattress, though Christian did qualify that a queen mattress for $199 is probably not your best bet. There are several factors to consider when mattress shopping. The first and most important factor is firmness or density. “Firmness is key,” said Christian, “as it determines comfort and support.” Try to determine what level of firmness is best for you before you head to the store, and if you have no idea what you need, you can sample a range of mattresses in the showroom. “When someone comes into Black Sheep and has no preference, we have them start at the medium level of support and then increase or decrease the firmness, trying to narrow it down.” 78

Christian warned that an hour in the showroom is not necessarily enough time to find your best fit. If you find that the mattress is not right for you after taking it home for a test run, some companies, such as Black Sheep, will do adjustments, tweaking the mattress until it meets your needs and expectations. “We use zippered cases,” Christian explained, “so that we can open the mattress up, remove a layer, or adjust the springs.” If you share your bed with a partner, you’ll need to consider how your sleeping styles differ and how your needs differ. For instance, if you and your partner are vastly different in weight and size, you may need mattresses with vastly different levels of support. Black Sheep and some other companies can tailor-make your mattress with a different level of firmness on each half. Allergies are a key component, as well. “If you find a mattress made with natural materials, you can likely eliminate potential or existing allergens.” Mattresses have different levels of temperature control, so that is another factor to consider; there are some “hotter” mattresses out there. Rule those out if you tend to overheat at night. To extend the life of your mattress, flip and rotate on a regular basis. And if you purchased a mattress that is too firm, you can add a topper layer to increase softness. “If your mattress is not firm enough, there is probably not a lot you can do,” said Christian. “Shop around and do your homework,” he advised, “and make sure you can check all the boxes. It’s a big factor in getting a good night’s sleep, so be active in the process.”

Contact Christian Schmidt at Black Sheep Mattress: blacksheepmattress.com


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The Baby Sleep Consultant For many parents, night-waking is the hardest part of caring for a little one. When baby does not sleep, Mom and Dad don’t either, and the demanding nature of parenting during the day is made more difficult by exhaustion. For this reason, many parents opt to hire sleep consultants to get their children sleeping through the night. Kitty Raymond, founder of Raymond Parenting, has consulted with parents on their children’s sleep for over 30 years. Why is sleep so essential for babies and children? Presumably, for many of the same reasons it is important for adults: restoration and recovery. However, Kitty had some other components to add to that. Firstly, sleep promotes bonding between parent and child, as well-rested babies are more manageable. “It is a lot easier for a baby to fall head over heels in love with the parent, and vice versa, if they are both getting adequate sleep”, stated Kitty.   In addition, babies that rest well are more prone to approach the world around them with curiosity. “Babies need a certain amount of sleep so that they can wake up refreshed and then begin to show curiosity, which is an avenue toward learning and an interest in the world.” Lastly, growth hormones are released during sleep. “This is an interesting conundrum in some ways, in that if a baby’s rate of growth is slower than the doctors like, the logical response is often ‘I’ve got to feed this baby more.’” She believes it is rest that these babies need rather than more night-time feedings. Many parents wonder how much sleep their baby needs. According to Kitty, this is much debated. “There are charts aplenty that give a basic guideline on the amount of sleep, but one chart differs from the next.” She recommends about 11 hours at night, with regular naptimes during the day. “Many parents wonder if their baby doesn’t need as much sleep as another baby because they are quite chipper during the day and spend many hours without sleep. However, the consensus is that this will catch up with the baby eventually.” Babies’ sleep differs from that of adults in at least one important way: sleep cycles are shorter, and therefore they pass through the light (and sometimes noisy) stage of sleep more often than adults. This can sometimes cause parents to feel that they must intervene to help the baby back to sleep. Kitty asserted that many infants, if left alone, will go back to sleep on their own without intervention. “Infants are prone to have rather dramatic REM state changes,” she noted, “in which they grunt, cry out, and wrestle around, but as soon as they get back out of the REM sleep stage they settle right down.”

In some cases, this will necessitate some crying from the baby. So, does Kitty advocate the “cry it out” approach? Hotly debated in parenting groups, on web forums, and among baby sleep experts, this is often the question parents grapple with: to cry or not to cry? “It should not be a question of cry it out versus not cry it out, but rather, are we going to respond very quickly, instantly to every cry, or are we going to wait consistently and see if the baby can work things out? In other words, that is much better described as ‘stepping back.’” Kitty advocates slowing down your response time when you hear your child cry, which she said then enables that child to learn to self-soothe. She also suggests putting babies in their beds awake. “Do not put your baby to sleep with 100 percent of your help unless it is the last resort.” The importance of routine cannot be overstated. “Babies get a sense of security and mastery from routine,” she said, “and though they might protest bedtime, there is an underlying sense of security.” For both newborn and older babies, she recommends a short routine, about 10 to 15 minutes in length (not including the bath, which many parents choose to incorporate). “A longer routine makes it harder for them to part with you before you go.” Ideas for the nightly sleep ritual include a book, a song, or saying the same phrase every night, such as “I love you, good night, see you in the morning.” Older babies might enjoy walking around the nursery, saying goodnight to stuffed animals. When developed early on, healthy sleep habits may equip a person for better sleep in adulthood. “There is some speculation, though it has not been proven, that self-calming skills may help you avoid insomnia as an adult,” said Kitty. If your child is not sleeping well, Kitty believes it is essential to seek solutions to the problem as soon as possible. “Don’t let yourself cope for too long,” she said, “and don’t see this as a permanent condition.” She advises parents to ask for help on very tired days. “One study showed that sleep-deprived parents have the same slowed reflexes as a person who is slightly inebriated.” Get help in the form of a babysitter, a friend, or a partner. Postpartum depression is another risk factor, as it occurs more often in parents who are chronically exhausted. If you believe you are suffering from postpartum depression, talk with your family doctor. If you have a partner, work together to find solutions to the sleep problem, said Kitty, and work together to handle the consequences of the problem. “Many mothers tell me they do all the getting up in the night because their husband goes to work. I tell them, ‘You go to work, too, and in many ways your job is probably harder.’” Contact Kitty Raymond at Raymond Parenting: raymondparenting.com 81


T h e Yo g a I n s t r u c t o r Jilaine Beddoe, owner and yoga instructor at Junction 9, has practiced yoga for 15 years. She explained how yoga can help with rest and also suggested some yoga poses to help with sleep and relaxation. While all exercise helps us to process our thoughts and emotions, yoga is unique because its focus is on building awareness. “Yoga can provide an opportunity to check in with yourself and find out what is on your mind,” Jilaine said, “and why you are not sleeping well.” This awareness is important for finding solutions to poor sleep, and for ridding

the body and mind of anxiety that can affect sleep. Regular yoga practice can help an individual approach sleep with a more rested mind and body. While we find it hard to be still these days, busy as life can be, through yoga we find a window of time to relax and go through postures that build well-being. Not to mention, like all exercise, it releases endorphins and gives us that “shot of happiness” we need. Jilaine recommends the following poses for relaxation and sleep improvement.

C h i l d ’s p o s e ( B a l a s a n a ) This posture releases the muscles in your back away from your spine and comforts your body and mind. • Position yourself on a yoga mat on the floor (use a carpet if you don’t have a mat). • Kneel on the floor and bring your big toes together to touch, with your knees wide apart. • Walk your hands out in front of you and bring your torso between your thighs, resting your forehead on the floor. • Keep your arms straight out in front of you and press into your fingertips. • Stretch your sit bones back towards your big toes, and reach your fingers in front of you. • If you have tight shoulders, try to keep your knees together. Rest your torso upon your quadriceps, bringing your arms down alongside your body with fingers towards your toes and palms open to the sky. • Breathe in deeply. Upon inhalation, make a conscious effort to breathe into the back of your ribs. Exhale completely, emptying your lungs to make room for your next inhalation. Challenge yourself to balance your breath so that it is even in length and depth on both your inhale and exhale.

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L e g s u p t h e w a l l ( Vi p a r i t a K a r a n i ) This is one of the most therapeutic poses in yoga. It is also good for blood circulation, which helps relieve tired legs and feet by reversing the effects of gravity. It holds many benefits for individuals who stand and sit most of the day, and when done regularly can support a more active digestive system through rest.   • Sit with your right or left shoulder perpendicular to a wall. • Gently lower yourself down to your mat, while swinging your legs up the wall (this will help get your bum closer to the wall without a huge amount of effort). • Bring your legs flush against the wall. If you have really tight hamstrings you can bring your bum further way from the wall so your legs are at an angle. • Keep you neck and back neutral. • Make sure to bring awareness of your breath – long and slow. • Press the tops of your thighs towards the wall to help relieve stress on your lower back. • Give yourself some time to be in this posture: it could be a minute or up to 15 minutes. • As you get more comfortable with the basics of this posture, you can start to add a block and then a bolster underneath your sacrum. • Your thighs will naturally and easily fall into your hip socket, making it a gentle hip opener. Variation: send your legs into a V shape, bending your knees with feet flat on the wall. Bring the soles of your feet together and let your knees splay out.

Supine spinal twist (Jathara Parivartanasana) This twist helps to release stress and tension from your spine. This is a great posture if you spend a lot of your day sitting, as it helps counteract the stress caused in the body by being in the same position for an extended period of time. At the end of your day this pose will help massage all of your internal organs and stimulate the kidneys, abdominal organs, bladder, and intestines. This pose also helps stretch your hamstrings and glutes. Bend both knees and place your feet on the floor, then pick up your hips from the floor and shift them an inch or two to the left. • Bend your knees up towards your chest and then let both knees drop to the right. • Extend both arms perpendicular to your spine in a T shape, and look over your left shoulder. • Be aware to keep both shoulders anchored to the floor, especially the shoulder opposite to your knees. • On each side, change the direction of your gaze, looking away from the side your knees are on. • For a deeper stretch you can work to straighten the bottom leg.

Contact Jilaine Beddoe at Junction 9: junction9.ca 83


Relax and Unwind

A few favourite bedside products

Rose/Lavender Hydrosol Produced by distilling plant materials, hydrosols have subtle aromas and are safe and refreshing for skin. Rose is a brain tonic and helps to hydrate and restore the skin’s elasticity, while lavender eases anxiety, insomnia, and calms the nervous system. Use as a bedtime spray on your face and body. Adorn Infusions, adorninfusions.etsy.com

F o g L i n e n Wo r k S l i p p e r s Made of breathable linen with soft leather bottoms, these luxurious, unisex slippers are perfect for your bedside. Goldgrass Home, goldgrasshome.com

Sandoval Aromatic Interior Spray Made from a blend of palo santo, sandalwood, frankincense, and patchouli, this spray is wonderful for your linens and bedroom. These natural essential oils are known to generate states of calmness, relaxation, and focus. Goldgrass Home, goldgrasshome.com

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Himalayan Salt Candle Holder This pretty pink Himalayan salt candle holder cleanses and purifies the air and is a natural negative ion generator. Use it near electronic devices that emit positive ions which can disrupt sleep patterns. It are also available as a lamp that produces a calm, soothing glow that is perfect for a nightlight. Kootana Gallery, kootanagallery.etsy.com


MY MISSION IN LIFE I S N O T M E R E LY T O S U RV I V E , B U T T O

THRIVE; AND TO DO SO W I T H S O M E PA S S I O N , S O M E C O M PA S S I O N , SOME HUMOR, AND SOME STYLE. - M A YA A N G E L O U

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GLOW ON W R ITTEN BY EMILY S TAN G L PH OTOG RAPHED BY BLAIR IN K S TER

“OWN YOURSELF AND EVERYTHING THAT YOU A R E – A N D M O S T I M P O R TA N T L Y, M A K E T H E T I M E TO DISCOVER WHAT MAKES Y O U G L O W. ”

Poise, fearlessness, confidence. These are traits we admire and are drawn to in others, and we all crave a little more of for ourselves. Confidence is that warm feeling you get when you know you’re on the right path, or the calmness you feel when you’re walking through a room. It’s that feeling of exhilaration when you speak your mind, and it’s that feeling of having no limits. Confidence permeates into every aspect of our lives – our career, relationships, health, home, and family life, as well as our own spiritual development. With a strong sense of confidence we can take life head on and as thought leader Brené Brown has said, “Dare Greatly.” As a society we’re faced with a lot of pressure to portray a perfect image, and when we put ourselves out there for the world to see, our own personal style or self aren’t always received well. There are nay-sayers, cyber bullies, and judgment coming from all over, and the best way to fight it is to ensure we focus on improving and building up our confidence. So, how can we build our confidence to create an even better version of ourselves, so that we can be greater, stronger individuals?

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Confidence is defined as a feeling of self-assurance arising from one’s appreciation of one’s abilities or qualities. Confidence is all about loving yourself both inside and out – when you love yourself, those around you will feel that radiance. Meet, Chelsea Frederick, lifestyle design coach and expert on how to be a better you. If you’re not familiar with the term lifestyle design coach, it is a unique type of coaching where clients design how they want their lives to look with the assistance and guidance of an expert. Chelsea is one of the most down-to-earth people I’ve ever met; she’s intelligent and has a strong sense of self. It’s through this strong sense of self that she is able to guide her clients on their own unique path to building confidence. So, where does confidence start? “Confidence starts with trusting yourself,” says Chelsea. “Own yourself and everything that you are – and most importantly, make the time to discover what makes you glow.” Here are a few simple tips from Chelsea that can help you on your journey of building your confidence.

1.

Get clear on your fears and do something that scares you. First, u n d e r s t a n d y o u r f e a r s a n d a c k n o w l e d g e t h e m . Wr i t e o u t p o t e n t i a l s i t u a t i o n s a n d h o w y o u ’ d d e a l w i t h t h e m i n a p o s i t i v e w a y. T h e n g e t o u t t h e re a n d t r y s o m e t h i n g n e w.

2.

P u t o n s o m e t h i n g t h a t m a k e s y o u f e e l g o o d , w h e t h e r i t ’s a l i t t l e b l a c k d r e s s o r a g re a t p a i r o f j e a n s , w e a r t h i n g s t h a t m a k e y o u h a p p y.

3.

Think about what is not working in your life and the things that may be holding you back. Think about the small changes that you can make to your life that would propel it forward.

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K e e p a j o u r n a l o f y o u r d a i l y h a p p y m o m e n t s . Ta k e t i m e t o l i s t t h e s m a l l joys and blessings in your day-to-day and remember to be grateful for all of them.

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Let go of the “should haves.” Everyone has regrets – choose to focus on a strong, positive inner voice and treat the regrets as learning moments rather than mistakes.

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F o l l o w y o u r h e a r t . T h i s a p p l i e s t o c a r e e r, r e l a t i o n s h i p s , h e a l t h , a n d e v e n s p i r i t u a l i t y. A m a z i n g t h i n g s c a n h a p p e n w h e n y o u f o l l o w y o u r h e a r t a n d n o t the path you think you should take.

It’s important to take a moment to absorb each of these tips and figure out what they mean to you. This will be different for everyone, and each individual will take his or her own journey in discovery. Confidence is one of those things that can take a long time to build and does not take much to be broken down. It’s important to remind yourself of ways that you can continually rediscover your glow. Anybody can begin to tackle this list slowly and bit by bit. Confidence is the true goal and although this may seem unattainable at times, with one small change at a time, it can be achieved. Let’s all try a little bit harder to be more confident in our own skin, care less about what others think, and give all that we have to give. Because when we’re more confident, we can allow for our whole soul to glow. FOLLOW CHELSEA @REDISCOVERYOURGLOW 90


“MY CONFIDENCE COMES FROM BEING BOLD AND P U T T I N G M Y C A PA B I L I T I E S TO ACTION.” - LORI, 44 91


WHAT GIVES YOU CONFIDENCE? “MAKING EMPOWERING CHOICES AND BEING WITH A COMMUNITY THAT ENCOURAGES ME DRAWS OUT MY CONFIDENCE.” – REAGAN, 28 “ N O T L E T T I N G F E A R D I C TA T E M Y D E C I S I O N S . ” – T O M , 4 7 “CONFIDENCE IS KINDNESS.” – CHELSEA, 26 “MY CONFIDENCE COMES FROM ABOVE. IT’S HELPED M E T O R A I S E A FA M I L Y, E N J O Y A C A R E E R , A N D H A V E P U R P O S E . ” – M A R G A R E T, 7 5 “TRYING NEW THINGS AND DRAWING ENERGY FROM OTHERS. CONFIDENCE IS SOMETHING I W O R K O N D A I L Y. ” – S T E P H A N I E , 2 9 “MY COMMUNITY GIVES ME CONFIDENCE. SHARING K N O W L E D G E A N D L O V I N G P E O P L E . ” – J A C Q U Ô T, 3 0 “ M Y D A U G H T E R . S H E I S A C O N S TA N T R E M I N D E R T O THINK POSITIVELY ABOUT MYSELF IN ORDER TO TEACH HER CONFIDENCE.” – ANDREA, 30 “ A N A L Y Z I N G H O W I S E E M Y S E L F A N D W H O I WA N T T O B E , A N D N O T B E I N G A F R A I D T O S H O W I T. ” – J A VA I D , 2 4 “ACKNOWLEDGING SMALL VICTORIES AND SUCCESSES. C H A L L E N G I N G M Y S E L F. A N D R E D L I P S T I C K ! ” – A N N A , 3 4 92


50 g | 1.7 Fl oz


Personal Style PH OTOG R APHED BY DAVID H EIDRIC H

Real style is never right or wrong. It is a matter of being yourself on purpose. -G. Bruce Boyer

Every season brings new styles that we are expected to embrace as our own. It’s always fun to flip through fashion magazines or scroll through blogs to see what’s new and trendy, but discovering your own style is essential. Trend or not, we are usually drawn to pieces or looks, and these instincts tend to make up our personal style. Why is it important to define our individuality through style? How do we go about doing that? We chatted with some stylish locals to help us discover the importance of personal style and how we can find it for ourselves.

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H A I R A N D MAK EUP BY REDBLO O M S ALO N


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Derek MacDonald President + Event Producer, Boom Goes the Drum

How would you define your own personal style? My own personal style is classic. I really like classic forms and the use of fashion technology. Things like collars and the way things button are really important to me. An item also has to make sense in the way that I wear it.

In your opinion, what is personal style? Xavier Dolan said, “The costume is an actor’s first line.” I totally believe that. If you can walk into a room and say something about yourself before you have opened your mouth, then you’re one step ahead. You’ve created an impression and that can go a long way.

Why is personal style important? Fashion is a way of sending a message about yourself or presenting your personality. I just think it’s fun. I like the exploration of it.

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? I would like to tell people to wear what they feel comfortable in, but for a lot of people that would mean wearing pajamas. But I do find the function of clothing to be the most important thing. Your style should make sense for what you’re doing and reflect who you are. I love the idea that life presents us with all of these opportunities, and remember that you don’t have to fit into a category to find the perfect fit.

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How would you define your own personal style? My personal style evolves daily with my mood and what’s inspiring me at that moment. Right now, I’d describe it as feminine yet tailored, minimalistic and neutral-toned, with consideration for small details like a great nail colour, bold, architectural jewelry, and a ‘60s era-inspired fringe and cat-eye.

In your opinion, what is personal style? Quite simply, personal style is a strong sense of selfawareness, which means that you know who you are, what you like, and equally what you dislike, allowing you to express yourself fully and authentically with how you look, but you also know that things go wrong sometimes and it’s an ever-evolving process.

Why is personal style important? It’s a form of communication without the use of language. You can express yourself through more of a feeling than with words, which reaches people on a completely different level. That’s important because the relationships you build from that will be stronger and more impactful on your life, and equally on theirs.

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? Someone trying to discover their own personal style is someone who is driving to discover who they are and what they have to offer the world. Personal style goes hand in hand with knowing yourself, what you deserve, and what you can contribute. I would ask them what they want to say, and why it’s important to them. From there, it’s about knowing your body: what works and what does not, and discovering the quirks that make you unique.

Sarah Hutchings Calgary Shop Director, Kit and Ace

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Designer + Founder, Lauren Bagliore

Lauren Bagliore

How would you define your own personal style?

My personal style is edgy but feminine. It’s a bit conceptual but completely wearable. I lean towards a more futuristic look, and of course I wear a lot of black because I’m a native New Yorker. Black is normative.

In your opinion, what is personal style? Personal style is a means of expressing oneself. I always tell women who come in the store expressing that they can’t wear certain items because they don’t have an occasion or event to wear it for, that they have the opportunity to share with the world a bit of who they are with what they put on.

Why is personal style important? I think it is so important because we get to be the canvas. We get to share with the world on any given day, our opinion on ourselves, our fashion, and what we believe in. Personal style is multo importante because it’s a reflection of who we are. I believe in healthy body image and I believe that clothing and fashion can help women towards that. I always try and help people by thinking, what will they walk around feeling amazing in? Finding those pieces is what makes personal style so important.

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? Helping someone on their journey to find their personal style is what I love most of all. It brings me such joy. I start by finding out who they are, what they do, what their lifestyle is like. I love challenging women to put things on that they normally wouldn’t. Sometimes it might be something edgier than they would have considered, but they end up loving it and that will add to their journey to personal style and building confidence. 98


How would you define your own personal style? My personal style is casual-sophisticated. I like to keep it natural, easy, and comfortable. I work in the fashion industry and I want to look the part, but I also don’t want to look like I’m trying too hard. I want to be welcoming, and when you dress comfortably you are not stressed, you don’t feel confined in any way. I just try to keep it consistent and easy.

In your opinion, what is personal style? Personal style is a very important tool that people don’t realize holds a lot of power because it’s your statement to the world. Wearing things that fit you, are age appropriate, and that show how you want people to perceive you are key. Why is personal style important? When you meet someone for the first time, even before you speak, they look at you and form an opinion about you. Those first impressions are really hard to change. It’s good to invest a little bit of time and thought into what you are putting on.

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? I would ask them, What is it that you want to tell the world through your style? Personal style is something that you use to reflect yourself to the world. Who are you and what do you want to accomplish through personal style? It’s good to be current and outside your comfort zone and to try different things, but at the same time it has to be you. It’s also important to buy pieces that you will wear more than once. We should try and reduce our carbon footprint. My advice is buy less, wear it a lot, have fun with it, and make sure it’s you.

Aleem Arif

Designer + Founder, Bano eeMee

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Jade Davis

Model, The Nobles Management

How would you define your own personal style? I always dress for where I’m going and how I feel. My usual staples are jeans, anything with leather, silver/gold hardware, and I love to play with textures. These are my go-to items that make me feel the best.

In your opinion, what is personal style? Style is an instant language. What you wear is how you present yourself to the world.

Why is personal style important? Your style is your second skin. Isn’t that important?

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? I have many friends that find a look on Pinterest and then go out and seek that identical look. They only do that because it’s cool, but to me it’s obvious they’re lost and lacking knowledge of their own identity. Dress for your comfort, character, figure, and day-to-day activities. What makes you feel good? Find what style is unique to yourself, but still identifiable with others. You will always look the best when your style is a true reflection of who you are, no matter what that may be.

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How would you define your own personal style? My personal style is curated and classic. My wardrobe is a collection of things I love.

In your opinion, what is personal style? I look at personal style as both a representation of who you are and who you aspire to be.

Why is personal style important? Personal style is important because it plays a role in building a personal brand, which might not seem important to everyone, but it can add to the building of self confidence and self understanding. Owning your brand or your style gives you an identity to show to the world.

How would you guide someone through trying to discover their own personal style? I would start with understanding who they are and how they live their lives. From there I would have them describe who they want to be, and I would help them create that persona by building a style that fits somewhere in the middle.

Greg Fraser

Art Curator/Designer, DaDe Loft 101


HEART + SPARROW PHOTOGRAPHY

WWW.FLOWERSBYJANIE.COM | INFO@FLOWERSBYJANIE.COM


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TIME TO TEA TAKING A MOMENT FOR TRADITION WRI TT EN BY C H A N TA L H A R T P H OTO GRAPH ED BY S A R A H VAU G H AN STYLE D BY A L EX A N D R A W I G

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fternoon tea is a classic tradition that lends itself to sophisticated soirées, celebratory occasions, and special gatherings of friends.

Historically, it has been noted that afternoon tea is a British tradition dating back to the 1800s. It is said to have been created by the seventh Duchess of Bedford as a way to fill the gap between lunch and dinner, as at that time, dinner was served later in the evening. Purportedly, she started having her servants sneak her some tea and assorted breads around 4:00 in the afternoon and from there it evolved into a social occasion that included friends. The trend caught on. Afternoon tea has since become a time-honoured tradition in many places and cultures. Here in Calgary, afternoon tea has been served in some form at the Fairmont Palliser since it opened its doors in 1914. Jacqueline Tyler, communications manager at the historic hotel, believes the practice is still enjoyed today because people are simply looking to spend time together in a special way. Especially when much of our time spent “socializing” is done online. “In a world full of distractions, our hope at the hotel is to turn moments into memories for our guests while they enjoy afternoon tea in good company. It’s more than a cup of tea; it’s a special occasion with inspiring conversation.” She says fashion also plays a large part in the tradition of afternoon tea, and ladies will often arrive dressed up like Audrey Hepburn with the hair, the pearls, the gloves, etc. HOSTE D AT TH E FA I R M ON T PA LLI SE R H OTE L WA RD RO B E P ROVI D ED BY NORD STRO M A N D J. C R EW C REWCU TS PA P E R ACCE SSO R I ES BY RE AGA N CO LE MC L EA N HAI R BY LI ND SAY L A R S EN A ND M E LI SSA LA LON D E OF HE DK A ND I SA LO N NAI LS BY B E ACH B EAU T Y

“People in our era don’t have the opportunity to dress up as much as they used to,” says Jacqueline. A traditional afternoon tea experience would typically consist of freshly baked scones with clotted cream and preserves, tea sandwiches such as cucumber and cream cheese, and of course, dainty desserts. Originally, a black tea from India or a Ceylon tea would have been served when the practice of afternoon tea began, but these days a selection of loose leaf teas are often offered. Whether you’re looking to host your own afternoon tea party, or leave it to the pros at the Fairmont Palliser, gather your friends, dress up, and take some time for tea. Pinkies up!

M A K E U P BY LE A N N E W OOD 107


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WHERE TO TEA Calgary and surrounding areas have several unique places to experience the wonder of afternoon tea, some more traditional than others, but all well worth the experience. Reservations are highly recommended. Fairmont Palliser (133 9th Avenue SW) Those looking for a more formal affair are in for a real treat at one of Calgary’s most notable hotels. fairmont.com/palliser-calgary The Dove’s Nest (Glenmore Landing - 106A-1600, 90th Ave SW) The charming yet casual atmosphere with pale yellow walls and proper china tea cups is reminiscent of having tea at Nana's house. thedovesnest.ca Bow Valley Ranche Restaurant (15979 Bow Bottom Trail SE) During the winter months leading into spring, enjoy afternoon tea at this sophisticated ranch house rich with history in Fish Creek Provincial Park. bvrrestaurant.com Lougheed House (707 13th Avenue SW) The restaurant at the historical Lougheed House is a lovely space to enjoy afternoon tea with a group of friends or for special celebrations. lougheedhouse.com Heritage Park (1900 Heritage Drive SW) Step into the 1930s and enjoy a cup of tea or glass of lemonade with afternoon tea service on the veranda of the Famous 5 Centre of Canadian Women. heritagepark.ca Mount Engadine Lodge (Kananaskis & Spray Valley Provincial Park) For those who like their tea with a side of adventure, afternoon tea at Mount Engadine Lodge offers both. Located approximately 90 minutes outside Calgary, the lodge offers their unique version including local meats, cheeses, fresh fruit, and baked goods. mountengadine.com Azuridge (178057 – 272 Street W, Priddis) Nestled in the foothills southwest of Calgary, Azuridge is an idyllic location for an afternoon getaway. Available only on Mother’s Day as their Fascinators in the Foothills special, celebrate the ladies in your life with an afternoon tea served by the finest of English traditions with expert knowledge from the only English Guilded Butler in Canada. azuridgehotel.com 109


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WHY TO TEA For centuries tea has been sipped by the young and old, savoured and appreciated for its tranquil attributes. The popularity of this universal beverage only seems to be gaining momentum and has clearly evolved beyond the familiar orange pekoe with milk and sugar. Although in many parts of the world tea has long been recognized for its medicinal purposes, it seems like now more than ever we are paying attention to the health benefits the humble tea leaf has to offer. Angela Hayward, a local specialty tea retailer, travelled extensively and visited several tea estates throughout her journeys prior to founding Grounded, an online tea shop (livegrounded.ca). Angela says a little known fact is that white, green, oolong, black, and pu-erh are all derived from the same plant. The leaves are oxidized and processed differently, which accounts for various levels of caffeine and antioxidants. It is also what gives each its unique flavour. “The most unprocessed or unoxidized tea is green tea. That’s why people talk about it so much for its health benefits. It has the least amount of oxidation and black tea would have the highest,� says Angela. In general, the more the leaves have been oxidized, the more caffeine the tea will contain. Green tea flaunts one of the highest levels of antioxidants, as it has been oxidized very little. It has been praised for its properties said to lower the risk of various types of cancer and control blood sugar levels.

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Angela says matcha, essentially green tea that has been ground to a fine powder, is probably one of the healthiest teas you can drink because it is one of the only teas where you ingest the entire leaf. While tea in general offers plenty of antioxidants, different varieties offer other health benefits. Among other things, white tea has been touted for reducing cholesterol and fighting signs of aging, black tea for increasing the immune system and helping to prevent diabetes, oolong for boosting metabolism, pu-erh, a fermented black tea, for aiding digestion and helping to reduce body fat, and rooibos, from an entirely different plant, for being naturally caffeine free and containing high levels of antioxidants. Herbal teas are caffeine free and typically a blend of ingredients such as plants, herbs, flowers, fruits, spices, and nuts. Health benefits vary based on specific ingredients. Angela says tea blends using whole ingredients are becoming a trend and people are pursuing high quality ingredients when shopping for tea. Other contributing factors to reaping the most from your cup of tea are following specific steeping instructions. One could say the diverse and appeasing nature of tea teamed with its many health benefits makes it the perfect beverage. Even coffee drinkers would be hard pressed not to find a reason to make room for it in their cupboards.


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Dainty desserts like profiteroles, a slice of opera cake, fruit tarts, and colourful macarons often make an appearance at afternoon tea. Drawing on these traditional sweets, we looked to create and share a recipe for something classic but with an eclectic twist. Inspired by elements of Wes Anderson’s, The Grand Budapest Hotel, we decided on a traditional French pastry called a religieuse. The foundation of the pastry consists of choux paste: flour, sugar, eggs, water, and butter, which is also the base for more familiar pastries such as profiteroles and éclairs. Working with choux paste is not necessarily difficult, but it’s specific and the chemistry is important. While a traditional religieuse is quite petite and twotiered, our version plays with different heights and sizes, and varying uniformity. The delicate pastry is typically glazed with chocolate or caramel and filled with a classic custard or cream filling. Instead, we created a more playful version complete with an unconventional raspberry glaze and a rose cream filling. The floral flavour of the rose mixed with the tartness of raspberry creates a balanced profile, and a well-contrasting treat.

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BAK ED

R E L I G I E U S E S TA C K S M A K E S 1 2 S TA C K S O F 3 R EC I PE BY VIC K I MAN N ES S

C H O U X PA S T E INGREDIENTS:

TOOLS:

6 tbsp salted butter ¾ cup water Pinch of salt 1 cup all purpose flour 1 ½ tsp sugar 4 eggs

Sifter Medium sauce pot Piping bag Parchment paper Skewer Large round piping tip Small round piping tip Cooling rack

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 450°F. Sift together flour and sugar, and set aside. In a medium saucepot, bring the water, butter, and salt to a rapid boil, remove from heat, and add the flour mixture all at once. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until it’s incorporated.

When done baking, let cool completely before filling.

Place saucepot back on medium/high heat and cook, stirring constantly for 1 to 2 minutes or until the mixture forms a ball and comes away from the pot, leaving a thin film on the edges of the pot.

Prepare the rose water cream (page 116). Using a piping bag with a small round tip, fill each puff with cream through the poked hole.

Transfer the hot dough to a mixer with a paddle attachment (you can also continue this process with a wooden spoon – get ready to build some muscles!). Mix the dough on low speed for about 1 minute to let cool slightly. When the dough is no longer too hot to touch, add eggs one at a time. After adding each egg, ensure that it incorporates fully before adding the next egg. Dough should end up thick and ribbony.

When cooled, use a skewer or toothpick to poke a hole in the side of each puff.

Prepare each of the raspberry glazes (page 116). Starting with the darkest glaze, dip each of the 3-inch puffs and place back on the tray or a cooling rack to dry. Repeat step with the lighter glaze and the 2-inch puffs, and then again with the lightest glaze and the 1-inch puffs. Let the glaze dry. Meanwhile, mix up a quick royal icing (page 116). Set aside, covering the bowl, so it doesn’t dry out.

Line 3 cookie sheets with parchment paper. Fill a piping bag with the dough, using a large round tip, start by piping 12 large mounds, 3 inches in diameter. Pipe each mound 2 inches apart. On the next tray, pipe 12 medium-sized mounds, 2 inches in diameter. On the last tray, pipe 12 small mounds, 1 inch in diameter.

Once glaze is dry to the touch you can start to stack your puffs. Start each stack with the large puff at the bottom. Pipe or spread a small portion of royal icing on the bottom of the medium puff and place on top of the large puff. Repeat with the small puff on top of the medium puff. Let the royal icing dry to ensure the stacks are sturdy.

Place trays in the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes, when they have puffed up and they start to look golden, reduce heat to 350°F and bake for another 10 minutes or until they are golden brown and the creases show no moisture. This may take a tad longer for the large and medium-sized trays.

Play around with how you embellish your stacks. Make different colours of royal icing, use different piping tips, try out various types of sprinkles, etc. Have fun with it! Make sure to store in the fridge until serving. 115


R O S E WAT E R C R E A M INGREDIENTS:

2 cups 35% cream 3 tbsp icing sugar 2 tsp rose water (Superstore) 1 drop red food colouring (optional)

DIRECTIONS: Whip cream in a mixer with the whisk attachment until soft peaks form. Add in the icing sugar, rose water, and food colouring (to get a lovely blush colour). Mix until combined.

RASPBERRY GLAZE INGREDIENTS:

3 cups icing sugar 3 tbsp raspberry puree 3 tbsp milk

DIRECTIONS: To make the darkest coloured glaze, mix 1 cup of icing sugar with 2 tbsp raspberry puree, cover, and set aside. To make the medium colour glaze, mix 1 cup of icing sugar with 1 tsp raspberry puree, and 1 1/2 tbsp milk, cover, and set aside. To make the lightest glaze, mix 1 cup of icing sugar with 2 tbsp milk and a few drops of the raspberry puree, cover, and set aside. All three glazes should be various shades of pink, if two colours are too similar you can use a little extra raspberry puree or a drop of food colouring to achieve the desired shade.

R O YA L I C I N G INGREDIENTS:

1 egg white 1 cup sifted icing sugar

DIRECTIONS: Beat egg whites with icing sugar until thickened and smooth. 116


Littles in the sky E M B R AC I NG UR BAN L I FE WI TH A BABE I N TO W W R I T T EN A N D C URATED BY ALEXAN DRA WIG I L LU S T R ATED BY K ATE K LAS S EN

B e i n g a ma ma i s t r u l y th e best. How ever, l i ttl e on es can l en d a certai n el eme nt of c o mp l i c a t i o n t o e v e n th e most mu n dan e si tu ati on s, mu ch l ess ai r travel . Yet, there’s n o t h i n g b e t t e r t h a n t aki n g off on an adven tu re somew h ere to create n ew me m ories t o g e t h e r. L i ke ma n y of y ou , th e desi re for travel an d adven tu re di dn ’ t cease with a n a d d i t i o n t o o ur fami l y. O u r dau gh ter, Cl over, h as don e n oth i n g bu t i nspire u s t o c re a t e me mori es an d ex peri en ces w i th h er, even i f th at mean s strategic p l a n n i n g fo r su ccessfu l an d sty l i sh travel l i n g. A s a l wa y s, t hi s col u mn i s abou t i deas an d i n spi rati on for th e modern parent wh o i s l o o k i n g to con ti n u e to embrace th ei r u rban l i festy l e an d i n troduc e t h e i r l i t t l e s t o ci ty dw el l i n g at i ts fi n est. Th ose same desi res appl y t o e x p l o r i n g o t h e r ci ti es. Th i s i ssu e, I’ ve gath ered th ou gh ts, ti ps, produ c ts, a n d i d e a s t o h el p en cou rage an d i n form y ou for th e n ex t ti me y ou j et set so me wh e re w i th y ou r mi n i squ ad. Bon voy age!

For the Mamas There a re ce rta in re a l i t i e s t h a t c o me wi t h b e i n g a paren t, bu t I’ ve l earn ed w ay s to make su re I sti l l fee l s tyli s h a n d ca rry p ro d u c t s t h a t I l o ve wh e n t ra v el l i n g, al l w h i l e keepi n g practi cal i ty i n mi n d. 

Wha t t o w e a r Dres s f o r co m f o rt a n d v e rsa t i l i t y. I l o v e c o zy l a yers, den i m, Con verse ru n n ers, an d my h ai r u p i n a bun th a t w ill la s t a ll d a y. C h e c k o u t t h e c h e e k y an d w earabl e sw eatsh i rts from BRUN ETTE th e L abel . B ecause if yo u ’re not a c t i n g c o o l a n d c o l l e c t e d , at l east y ou r ou tfi t w i l l be. ( B RUN E T T E the Labe l, brune tte thel a b el .com )

G et p a m p e re d Take so m e tim e f o r y o u rse l f a n d g e t p re p p e d for a tri p w i th a qu al i ty man i cu re an d pedicure. O p t f o r s h e l l a c fo r l a st i n g re su l t s b e cau se w e al l kn ow th at l i ttl e on es pl u s travel is n ’t e a s y o n y o u r h a n d s a n d fe e t . O n e o f my favou ri te l ocal spots i s F ri l l y L i l l y. ( Va r i o u s l o cations, frillylilly. ca) 

St ay h y d ra te d Pl enty o f H 2 O a n d a q u a l i t y wa t e r b o t t l e a re t ravel essen ti al s for both y ou an d babe. S’ w el l bo ttles co m e in th e b e st c o l o u rs a n d p a t t e r n s a n d keep l i qu i ds both h ot an d col d for h ou rs. Did yo u k no w th a t if y o u ’ re t ra v e l l i n g wi t h a b aby 0 to 24 mon th s ol d, y ou can bri n g baby fo o d , m ilk , f o rm ula , wa t e r, a n d j u i c e i n y o u r c a rry - on bag? C h a p t e r s /I ndigo, chapte rs. indigo.ca ) 

T hi nk h a n d s - f re e Too mu ch g e a r is s im p l y o v e r wh e l mi n g. I l i ke t o pack l i gh t an d smart, an d w h ere better to s tas h yo u r n e ce s si t i e s t h a n a st y l i sh d i a p e r backpack? Th i s fau x - l eath er pi ece i s by Th e Honest Co m p a n y a nd l o o k s a s g o o d a s i t i s fu n cti on al . ( N o r d s t r o m, nords trom. com)

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Products to Pack Th e lis t o f well-d es ig ned b aby products is endless, but here is a brief l o o k a t s o m e o f my m us t -haves f or air travel. 

Wi pe s

Socks, onesies, PJs

Airpo rts, a irp la n e s, p u b l i c re st ro o ms, a n d t o d d lers are al l a little g e rm y. I l i ke A l e va N a t u ra l s B a mb o o Baby Wipes f o r d ia p e r ch a n g e s, h a n d s, a n d fa c e s, b u t th ey are als o g o o d f o r a q u i c k sa n i t i ze o n a i r p l a n e a rm- rests and tra y ta b le s.

Pack ex tras for baby ! I th row a pai r of paj am as in my carry - on as a comfortabl e an d easy backup outf it becau se I w as on ce th at mom on rou te to Ca lif ornia, barel y th rou gh ai rport secu ri ty an d al ready in the bath room ri n si n g ou t l eggi n gs w h i l e Cl over ran around pan t- l ess.   N ever agai n !

Mul t i- u s e t o w e l

Quality lotion

Thi s Turk is h to w e l by Lu l u j o c a n b e u se d a s a t ow el , blanke t, nurs in g co ve r, c h a n g e ma t – t h e o p t i o n s are l imi tle s s. I t f o ld s u p sma l l , i s l o v e l y, a n d i t ’s C a n adi an mad e.  

Stay i n g h y drated goes for both y ou r an d baby’s skin. Ch oose on e l oti on th at w orks for th e w h ol e f am ily to carry w i th y ou . Crème de Corps i s a l on gtim e favou ri te an d i s great for face, h an ds, an d body, and i t comes i n a carry - on fri en dl y si ze.

(P la n e t Organic, plane torganic. ca ) 

(We s t C o a s t Kids, we s tcoas tk ids. ca )

( K i e hl ’s, k i e hl s. ca )

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Activities and Entertainment   Anot h e r e n d l e s s lis t , b ut I hav e a few go- to products that have helped me on f l i g h ts. Creativity and versatility Wash i tape comes i n th e best col ou rs, i s versatile, en cou rages creati vi ty, an d peel s off su rfaces e asily. L et y ou r mu n ch ki n decorate th emsel ves, n otebook pages, or th ei r su rrou n di n gs. Th i s acti vi ty i s perf ec t for fl i gh ts becau se i t’s cl ean , qu i et, an d creat iv e. ( R e i d’s, re i dsta ti o ne rs. co m )

M ake believe En cou rage pl ay an d w on der w i th a w ooden ca m era. Wh at better w ay to embrace a tri p th an pretending to captu re memori es w i th a cu te toy camera? ( Tw i g C re a ti v e, the tw i gco. co m )

Smart snacks Sn acks are a key su ccess factor i n travel l i n g with babes. M i n i al ph abet pretzel s dou bl e as a qu i c k snac k an d an acti vi ty. You n ger on es can si mpl y sn ack, while ol der ki ddos can practi ce th ei r l etters or spelling. ( S upe rsto re, re a l ca na di a nsupe rsto re. ca )

One- piece wonders Toy s th at are messy an d h ave a mi l l i on parts are l ess th an i deal for pu bl i c travel . F i n d acti vi ti es an d toy s th at don ’ t come apart, l i ke th ese sw eet Jan od Al ph abet Cards. ( L uke ’s Drugm a rt, l uke sdrugm a rt. co m ) 

Tech Tips Make s u re y o u ch a rge u p t h a t sma r t p h o n e o r t abl et. Toca Boca apps an d Doo d le Bu d d y a re w e l l - d e si g n e d a n d fu n fo r a happy di stracti on . I al so n ever travel w ith o u t a w h i t e n o i se o r mo n i t o r a p p. Tr y Wh i te N oi se ( i t’s free! ) w hich ha s a s e le ction o f 5 0 a mb i e n t so u n d s, a n d Cl ou d Baby M on i tor w h i ch has high q u a lity liv e vi d e o c a p a b i l i t i e s a n d u n l i mi ted ran ge. (iTu n e s, a pple. com/ca/itune s )

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From Calgary International Airport Our frie nd s a t Ca lg a r y In t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t p a s sed al o ng s o m e g re a t tip s fo r wh e n y o u a n d y o u r l i ttl es are fly in g o ut o f YYC.

K i ds Po rt p la y area Locate d o n the De p a r t u re s Le v e l , t h i s a c t i v i t y c en tre i s eq uip p e d w ith a j u n g l e g y m, t e l e vi si o n , g a me s, an d s eati ng f o r p a re nts. Yo u ’ l l a l so fi n d a d d i t i o n a l k i ds' play a re a s a cro s s f rom In t e r n a t i o n a l A r r i v a l s a n d i n each C o n co urs e.

Pr i v a t e f a m i ly ro o m s C o ncours e s A a n d C h a v e fa mi l y ro o ms wi t h c h a n ge tab les a nd s e a ting t o p ro vi d e e x t ra p r i v a c y fo r paren ts w i th ba b ie s.

Family - f riendly shops Both Col es an d Vi rgi n Books h ave produ cts for little on es, an d be su re to ch eck ou t th e Wh o’s Wh o in the Zoo toy stores w i th l ocati on s pre an d post- se c urity.

Watch airplanes Watch ai rcraft acti vi ty an d en j oy th e ci ty sky line and mou n tai n s from Ban ff Hal l on th e Departu res lev el.

Food and beverage Smooth i es for th e l i ttl es, coffee for th e parents; fami l i ari ze y ou rsel f w i th th e man y food an d bev erage opti on s i n th e mai n termi n al . V i si t yyc. co m / sho pdi ne f l y Fo l l o w @Fl yY Y C f o r m o re i nf o rm a ti o n, upda te s, a nd spe ci a l i ni ti a ti v e s.

From our Dote Readers We as ke d o ur re a d e rs fo r t h e i r t i p s a n d t r i c k s f or easi n g fl y i n g w i th th ei r babi es an d recei ved so man y am azing ideas !  Playdo u g h / b a b y w e a r i n g / wa t e r- b a se d ma r ke rs / N ex u s cards for qu i ck cu stoms an d secu ri ty l i n es / c hec king your stro lle r a t the g a t e / b re a st fe e d i n g / sl o wl y i n trodu ci n g n ew acti vi ti es an d toy s th rou gh ou t a tri p / hav ing reali s tic e x p e cta tio n s a n d a l l o wi n g y o u r k i d s t o w ow y ou / au di o books / temporary tattoos / n oi se canc elling head p ho ne s / ca n d ie d g i n g e r t o e a se mo t i o n si c kn ess / bal l oon s for l ay over fu n i n th e ai rport / pl en ty of health y s n a ck s a nd a fe w sp e c i a l t re a t s / a c c e pti n g h el p w h en offered / smi l e, be pati en t, an d embrace these amaz in g tim e s w ith y o u r c h i l d re n .  

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W R I T T EN BY MO RG AN C H APMAN I L LU S T R AT I ON S AN D C ALLIG RAPHY BY J ILL MAY ER

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W H AT W E ’ R E R E A D I N G N O W FICTION

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NON-FICTION

CLASSIC

FA T E S A N D F U R I E S BY LAUREN GROFF

B R AV E E N O U G H B Y C H E RY L S T R AY E D

M A N S F I E L D PA R K BY JANE AUSTEN

Every story has two sides. Every relationship has two perspectives. And sometimes, it turns out, the key to a great marriage is not its truths but its secrets. At the core of this rich, expansive, layered novel, Lauren Groff presents the story of one such marriage over the course of twentyfour years. We are excited to take this journey with them and see where it leads.

This beautiful little book makes a lovely gift for a dear friend or to treat yourself. Cheryl Strayed’s words – taken from her three prior books and Dear Sugar columns are presented in quotes, each on a single page, ready to inspire us to a life of more love, compassion, and grit. It’s been called a “miniinstruction manual for the soul,” and we’re so excited to dive in.

Mansfield Park is argued by many Austen fans to be her best work. Taken from the poverty of her parents’ home, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with only her cousin Edmund as an ally. Mansfield Park, I’m sure like so many other Austen novels, is filled with romance, heartache, and the injustice of the time. We can’t wait!


YOUNG ADULT

THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH BY ALI BENJAMIN

After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting – things don’t just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory – even if it means travelling the globe, alone. Suzy’s achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe, and the potential for love and hope right next door.

CHILDREN’S FICTION

PICTURE BOOK

D O R Y FA N T A S M A G O R Y BY ABBY HANLON

HOME BY CARSON ELLIS

I’m just going to say that I think (and my children and students agree) that Dory is the modern day Ramona. Her spunk and imagination make this hilarious book, which is the first in a series, a joy to read, whether you are reading it aloud, or your child is reading independently. The brilliant author is a former grade one teacher and mother to twins and her intimate understanding of the quirkiness of a five to six-yearold mind shines through.

This beautiful meditation on the concept of home comes from artist Carson Ellis, wife to Colin Meloy of the Decemberists and creator of the gorgeous art that accompanies all of their albums. She has also collaborated with Meloy on the art for his middle-grade novel, Wildwood. In this simple picture book we travel around the world to see homes in the country, in the city, and even in a shoe. Home may be on the road or the sea, in the realm of myth, or in the artist’s own studio, and children will love adventuring to all of these homes within the pages of this lovely picture book.

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R E V I E W S O F W H AT W E ’ V E R E A D FICTION

CLASSIC

T H E M O U N TA I N S T O R Y BY LORI LANSENS

WHY NOT ME? BY MINDY KALING

TENDER IS THE NIGHT B Y F. S C O T T F I T Z G E R A L D

"A fantastic, brilliantly plotted survival novel. A beautifully written coming of age story. An amazing character exploration. Each of these is rare enough, but imagine finding all three rolled into one book. That’s what Lori Lansens’, The Mountain Story was to me. I’m a long-time fan of Lansens’, from the time I picked up The Girls on a whim at an airport before a flight. (By the way, aren’t those the absolute best surprises...when you know nothing about a book, buy it, and fall in love with it?) I think this is her best work to date."

"I listened to Why Not Me as an audiobook, narrated by Mindy herself. She had me laughing out loud throughout the whole book. I felt like I was part of her social circle as she humorously described both the exciting and the not-soglamorous parts of her Hollywood life. As I was listening, I felt like she was talking right to me. Now that I know all the dirt on her, I am pretty sure Mindy and I should be best friends."

"I liked this novel better than The Great Gatsby. There’s more going on here. Fitzgerald touches on the demons of mental illness, infidelity, and alcoholism that he struggled within his own life and marriage. The Divers and their friends are complicated people living through long periods of promise, disappointment, and change in this book, in a way that feels very contemporary almost 100 years later."

-Jennifer Hicks

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NON-FICTION

-Shannon Hart

-Stephanie


YOUNG ADULT

WE ARE ALL MADE OF MOLECULES BY SUSIN NIELSEN

"What an emotional ride! I would be lying if I said this book didn’t make me shed a tear or two – although I did have to look as composed as I could because I read it on the school bus. It was truly amazing. I was also really touched, especially at the end. It was just too beautiful for me not to cry. Also, the title and its importance in the story made me smile because this is a thought I absolutely love."  -Laurence Roberge

CHILDREN’S FICTION

NIGHTBIRD BY ALICE HOFFMAN

"I really loved this book. It’s magical and imaginative, the perfect book to read when the world outside feels difficult. Yes, it’s a children’s book, but I think many adults would love it! And the writing and imagery are beautiful, as one expects from Alice Hoffman. This is a book that made me happy." -Theodora Goss

PICTURE BOOK

THIS IS SADIE B Y S A R A O ’ L E A R Y, ILLUSTRATED BY JULIE M O R S TA D

"Oh my heart. This book is everything. This book is about as perfect as a book could possibly be. This book isn’t just about Sadie. This book is about us all. We are all Sadie. Some of us just have to look harder than others to find her within ourselves. But she is there. Gift this book to your daughters to show them they can do anything or be anyone they want to be. Gift this to your sons to show them it’s OK to be “like a girl.” Sadie is a role model to kids and adults alike. Let’s not forget there’s a Sadie in all of us." -Beth Shaum

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EMMA' S DOTEABLES

The Locals T h e w e ll- cu rate d wish list of a stylish 11-year- o ld W R I T T E N BY EMMA K LAS S EN PH OTOG RAPHED BY S AN C IA TOTH

5 1 6

2 3 4

7 128


I

am so excited to let you know that for this Emma’s Doteables, everything was made right here in Calgary. Getting to meet the people that make the things that I love is so much fun and makes me feel good about what I spend my money on. I am working on building (or curating, as my mom says) my own art collection, so I have also chosen three of my favourite local artists along with some other spring-y things.

1.

Underwater Friends print by Tara Put :: $10

2.

Cat earrings by Cinder and Sage :: $20

3.

Origami ball by 2Point54 :: $6

4.

Doughnut print by Kim Smith :: $20

5.

Chocolates by SweetDoe Chocolate :: $13.50 / 6

6.

Custom family portrait by Little Me Paper Co. :: $110 / 3 people

7.

Crocheted cactuses by Bubble Gum Belles :: $22

etsy.com/ca/shop/TaraPut

cinderandsage.com

2point54.com

kimprints.bigcartel.com

sweetdoechocolate.com

etsy.com/shop/littlemepaperco

etsy.com/shop/BubblegumBelles

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I H O P E T H AT I N T H I S Y E A R T O C O M E , Y O U M A K E M I S TA K E S . BECAUSE IF YOU ARE MAKING M I S TA K E S , T H E N Y O U A R E M A K I N G N E W T H I N G S , T RY I N G NEW THINGS, LEARNING, LIVING, P U S H I N G Y O U R S E L F, C H A N G I N G Y O U R S E L F, C H A N G I N G Y O U R WORLD. YOU'RE DOING THINGS YOU'VE NEVER DONE BEFORE, A N D M O R E I M P O R T A N T L Y, YOU'RE DOING SOMETHING. -NEIL GAIMAN

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f ine art wedding cinematography

w w w. pa r fa i t w e d d i n g s . c o m


Dote Magazine Issue 4