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VOLUME 2 0 NUMBER 3 2 013

A

M A G A Z I N E

O F

C O U N T R Y

L I V I N G

I N

T H E

H E A D W A T E R S

R E G I O N

Memories of War Stories of remembrance

Friends of Youth The old boys of Orangeville High

The science of art conservation A preview of the Festival Art Show


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Our history, our drama, our comedy, our daily lives

OUR STORIES For 20 years, Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Theatre Orangeville and In The Hills have been presenting and preserving the stories that shape our lives and our community.

Come and join all three for a fabulous anniversary celebration during Headwaters Arts Festival to salute two decades of collaboration and innovation, and to forge into the future.

Saturday, October 5th and Sunday, October 6th 10am to 4pm Dufferin County Museum & Archives – at the corner of Airport Rd and Highway 89

The two-day event features spoken word and musical presentations by very special and talented friends of the museum, the theatre and the magazine:

SATURDAY, OCT 5

SUNDAY, OCT 6

11.00am

11.00am

Ken Weber, columnist, author

Sarah Robinson, dancer

11.30am

1.00pm

Founders / Keepers, a play about the founding of Orangeville

Will Devonshire, on guitar

1.00pm

Dinah Christie, singer

Lily Frost, singer-songwriter

4.00pm

2.00pm

Cathy Elliott, singer-songwriter 2.30pm

2.30pm

Candescence, a female quartet performs in Historic Corbetton Church

T.O.Y.S choir alumni

A light lunch and, of course, cake will be served each day. So bring your family and friends and share in the reminiscing, the stories and the frivolity. Admission is free for the weekend (though donations to the museum and theatre are always welcome).

3.00pm

Dan Needles, columnist, playwright

www.dufferinmuseum.com

Between performances on both days there will be brief presentations by museum curator Wayne Townsend and archivist Steve Brown highlighting the stories behind some of the museum’s treasures.

www.inthehills.ca

www.theatreorangeville.ca


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E D I T O R ’ S

D E S K

VO LU ME 2 0 N U M B E R 3 2 013 PUBLISHER | EDITOR

Signe Ball O P E R AT I O N S M A N A G E R

Kirsten Ball GUEST EDITOR

Dyanne Rivers EDITORIAL

Douglas Grant Pearce 1936 – 2013

I received a note of sympathy after Doug died on June 30th this year from a reader who had met him only briefly. “I knew him more from his Countryside Digest writings,” he wrote, “and they demonstrated his love of history, human nature, humour, and attention to detail.” The note warmed me, because I knew it would have warmed Doug. When we met, Doug had already taken early retirement from a 30-year career as a scientist with the Department of National Defence, but he was never intellectually idle. During our marriage, he read three to four books a week, along with countless magazine and journal articles. There were occasional mysteries in the mix, but mostly he read about the subjects that concerned him: sustainable agriculture, global economics, and the environment, especially climate change and peak oil – peak just about everything really. He despaired that democratic nation states had given way to global “corporate fascists” who had not only seized and commercialized the levers of war – killing and impoverishing millions in the process – but had also purchased the fealty of our lawmakers and, in the name of growth and profit, were cynically and systematically destroying the ecology of our planet. Worse, they had been allowed to flourish by a populace stupefied into acquiescence by big media, “reality” TV, junk food, technological gadgetry, and the whole host of other opiates of our age. In short, he was pessimistic. However, he was also an uncommonly decent man, who thought and felt deeply, and was as aware of his own frailties as those of others. He rarely fulminated, almost never retreated to sarcasm, and had a finely honed sense of humour that was more wry than ironic. As a scientist, he had concluded pessimism was the only logical response to the state of the planet. It was, in fact, what motivated him, and infinitely preferable to the self-serving optimism of the willfully blind. He remained convinced that common sense and decency would ultimately prevail, if only people had the facts. And so, in his quiet way he used the Digest to deliver a compendium of them from his reading. Assembling them, as he said in his contributor profile in the spring issue, “to amuse, annoy, alarm and sometimes puzzle readers.” And over and over again readers reported it was the first page they turned to when the magazine arrived. With his intelligent, thoughtful, often funny take on the world, Doug will be missed four times a year in the pages of this magazine, and he is missed every day in my heart.

Doug’s obituary, written with love by his daughter Tralee, is on the magazine’s website. 8

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

Liz Beatty | Bernadette Hardaker James Jackson | Bethany Lee Dan Needles | Pam Purves Jeff Rollings | Nicola Ross | Ken Weber PHOTOGRAPHY

Rosemary Hasner Pete Paterson | Pam Purves I L L U S T R AT I O N

Shelagh Armstrong | Jim Stewart DESIGN | ART DIRECTION

Kim van Oosterom Wallflower Design ADVERTISING SALES

Roberta Fracassi | Erin Woodley ADVERTISING PRODUCTION

Marion Hodgson Type & Images EVENTS & COPY EDITOR

Janet Dimond WEB MANAGERS

www.inthehills.ca l www.foodinthehills.ca Valerie Jones, Echohill Web Sites www.kidsinthehills.ca Bethany Lee, Focus on Media A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

Cindy Caines Facebook Like us on www.facebook.com/InTheHills on Twitter Follow us twitter.com/inthehillsmag COVER

Harold’s Red Truck by Marlene Bulas, a participant in Headwaters Arts Festival Show & Sale — In the Hills is published four times a year by MonoLog Communications Inc. It is distributed through controlled circulation to households in the towns of Caledon, Erin, Orangeville, Shelburne and Creemore, and Dufferin County. Subscriptions outside the distribution area are $22.6o per year (including hst). Letters to the editor are welcome. For information regarding editorial, advertising, or subscriptions: PHONE E-MAIL

519-942-8401

info@inthehills.ca

MonoLog Communications Inc. R.R.1 Orangeville ON L9W 2Y8

www.inthehills.ca — The advertising deadline for the Winter (November) issue is October 11, 2013.

We acknowledge the assistance of the OMDC Magazine Fund, an initiative of Ontario Media Development Corporation.


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I N

T H I S

I S S U E F E A T U R E S 18

BEHIND THE PAGES

D E P A R T M E N T S 13

Profiles of our contributors by Jeff Rollings

Andrea Trace 14

Veterans’ stories sought

35 THE HOMECOMING

When Orangeville’s boys returned by Bernadette Hardaker 38 A PLACE LIKE HOME

Perkins Bull’s hospital for Canadian officers by Ken Weber 46 FRIENDS OF THEIR YOUTH 52

High school friends still meet by Bernadette Hardaker 50 THE FESTIVAL ART SHOW

A preview of this year’s show 52 THE ART OF THE NON-ARTIST

A visit with conservator Jayne Woods by Liz Beatty

66

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

FENCE POSTS

A country practice by Dan Needles 56 HOMEGROWN IN THE HILLS

25

62 GOOD SPORT

My not-so-glorious hockey career by Nicola Ross 64 HISTORIC HILLS

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A trip back to the battlefields by James Jackson

MUST DO

Our favourite picks for fall

25 MEMORIES OF WAR

26 MY GRANDFATHER’S WAR

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Growing garlic by Nicola Ross 60 HEADWATERS NEST

“Go, Braves, go!” by Bethany Lee

When doctors still made house calls by Ken Weber 66 AT HOME IN THE HILLS

A schoolhouse restoration by Pam Purves 80 WHAT’S ON IN THE HILLS

A calendar of fall happenings 90 A PUZZLING CONCLUSION

by Ken Weber


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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


A R T I S T

I N

R E S I D E N C E

clockwise from top right Prehistoric Fish-like mixed media collage on paper 9 x 12"; Memory’s Home acrylic on paper clay 11 x 8.5"; Aromacritica acrylic, collage and stitching on paper, mixed media book form 9 x 12"; Engraved Water acrylic on birch panel 12 x 16"; Document acrylic on paper clay 11 x 8.5"; Ghost Town (detail) acrylic on paper, serial monoprints 9 x 12"

Andrea Trace A graduate of Emily Carr College of Art in BC, Andrea worked in graphic arts for 20 years. In her recent return to painting, she is particularly inspired by “how we attempt to master our environment via language, laying human-scale boundaries over cosmic-scale concepts and realities.” Her current works enlarge on this theme “by increasing the physicality of the paper and its contents.” She is a member of Kame & Kettle Artists and her work is included in this year’s Headwaters Arts Festival Show & Sale and a group show at the Alton Mill Arts Centre in November. www.andreatrace.com IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

13


must

party

It will be two days of song, dance, stories and, of course, birthday cake when Theatre Orangeville, Dufferin County Museum & Archives and In The Hills put on their party hats for their joint 20th Anniversary Celebration – and everyone’s invited. In The Hills columnists Dan Needles and Ken Weber will tell stories, singers and musicians Lily Frost, Cathy Elliott, Dinah Christie and Will Devonshire will perform, as will the alumni of the T.O.Y.S choir, Sarah Robinson will dance, and Theatre Orangeville will reprise Founders / Keepers, a play written to celebrate this year’s sesquicentennial of the founding of Orangeville. In between, museum curator Wayne Townsend and archivist Steve Brown will introduce you to the tales behind some of the museum’s thousands of artifacts. It all takes place at the museum, located at the corner of Airport Road and Highway 89 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, October 5 and 6. Museum admission is free for the weekend. For the full schedule see www.theatreorangeville.ca, www.dufferinmuseum.com or www.inthehills.ca.

must do

A highly selective guide to the picks of the season.

must The ideal time to check out the Headwaters Arts Gallery, a beautiful, newly opened space dedicated to showing the work of local artists, may be during the Headwaters Arts Festival, which runs from September 20 to October 6. In conjunction with the Festival, the gallery is celebrating the bounty of the season

see

and the talents of local artists by hosting a juried art show titled Harvest. Gallery goers can enjoy the lovingly crafted works of celebrated wood turner Jim Lorriman í˘ą, the giddily colourful oil paintings of Inglewood artist Julia Gilmore í˘˛, and the hauntingly enigmatic images of contemporary realist painter Steven Volpe í˘ł.

í˘˛

í˘ą

The gallery is located in the Alton Mill Arts Centre at 1402 Queen Street, Alton. It’s open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The juried show concludes October 13. For information on the Alton Mill Arts Centre and forthcoming events at the Headwaters Arts Gallery, go to www.altonmill.ca.

í˘ł

The Vial of Life is a pill-sized bottle that could save your life in a medical emergency.

must Earlier this year museum curator Wayne Townsend, publisher Signe Ball, and theatre artistic director David Nairn got into the swing of their 20th anniversary.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

fill

If emergency responders are called to your home, a Vial of Life fridge magnet tells them that your medical history can be found in a pill bottle in the fridge. Inside the bottle a folded information sheet documents vital health information, such as your blood type and details of the medications you’re taking. If you’re unconscious or unable to speak, this information enables paramedics to start lifesaving procedures right away.

Sponsored by Dufferin County Community Services and the Dufferin County Paramedic Service, the Vial of Life program is geared toward senior citizens and others who may be at risk, especially if they live alone. To arrange for a group presentation on the program or to request a Vial of Life kit, contact the Dufferin County Paramedic Service at 519-941-9608.


must

eat and drink

World Food Day is on October 16, but Albion Hills Community Farm is marking the occasion by holding Farmstock, a celebration of local food, on Saturday, October 19. This fundraising event kicks off at 3 p.m. with entertainment, an auction and a cash bar featuring beer, wine and cider tasting. Locally grown produce will be available for sale, and at 5 p.m. teams of students from St. Michael Catholic Secondary School in Bolton will step into the spotlight and compete in the Harvest Top Chef Challenge. Visitors can buy a food pass that entitles them to enjoy the results of students’ culinary efforts. Winners of the challenge will be announced between 8 and 9 p.m. Farmstock 2013 takes place in the President’s Building at the Albion Bolton Fairgrounds, 150 Queen Street South, Bolton. Admission is free, but food passes can be reserved online for $20 (five tickets for a choice of five food courses) or purchased at the door for $20 (four tickets for a choice of four courses). For information and to reserve food passes, go to www.albionhillscommunityfarm.org.

must

Limited autumn bookings available. Free initial consultation. Call today…

tick off

Ticks are nasty lilittle l insects i that h ffeed d on bl blood blo and spread Lyme disease,, a bacterial illness that has become more common in southern Ontario. In its early stages Lyme disease is highly treatable with antibiotics, but if it goes unrecognized and untreated – and it often does – it can do lasting damage. To protect yourself when venturing outdoors, wear light-coloured clothing with long sleeves and long pants tucked into your socks. Because black-legged or deer ticks, the most common variety in the Headwaters region, tend to lurk near the ground, try to avoid brushing against shrubs and walking in long grass. Insect repellants containing DEET can ward off ticks, but should be applied with care. To find out more about Lyme disease and what to do if you find that a tick has latched onto you, check the following websites: Peel Public Health

L A N DSCAPE S

Ontario Ministry of Health

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Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation

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Be Inspired By Canadian Literary Excellence!

Introducing the MLF Maple Partners Program

ARMCHAIRS, AUTHORS & ART Presented by BookLore & The Headwaters Arts Festival

S.G.I. Centre, Alton • Thursday, September 26, 7pm DON GILLMOR Mount Pleasant In this darkly comic novel, middle-aged, old-monied, always-needing-more Harry Salter learns that when financial expectations and realities clash, it takes more than he ever dreamed of to repair the damage.

Become an MLF Maple Partner and help us to put Native Canadian Maples in the ground.

MAUREEN JENNINGS Beware This Boy From the author who inspired 2 TV series – Murdoch Mysteries and Bomb Girls – comes the latest Tom Tyler historical mystery, this time at a munitions factory explosion in Birmingham during the Blitz.

WAYNE JOHNSTON Son of a Certain Woman A sure-to-be-bestseller by a celebrated author, this witty and wise coming-of-age tale with its secrets, hormones, illicit love and, of course, the Catholic Church is set in the streets of 1960’s St John’s.

OAKLAND ROSS The Empire of Yearning

Visit our website, www.mapleleavesforever.com to learn more. We can help you to find your trees, teach you how to plant and care for them and we’ll even help you to pay for them. The Native Canadian Maple is our national treasure – our national arboreal symbol. Let’s get more of them back in the ground where they belong. “Dedicated to restoring the Native Maple to the Canadian landscape”

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

This sweeping tale of 19th century Mexico from an award-winning journalist explores the competing allegiances which force one man into an irreversible choice, affecting both him and his country.

NICOLA ROSS Moderator Back by popular demand, Headwaters author, regular contributor to In the Hills magazine, and Program Director of French River Adventures Lodge at Pine Cove where she runs creative writing workshops.

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F E N C E

P O S T S

by Dan Needles

I L L U S T R AT I O N S H EL A G H A R M S T R O N G

t ru e c on fe ssions from t h e n i n t h c once ssion

a

W

Country Practice

hen you decide to keep animals for food production, there are a number of elective medical procedures you are expected to perform without professional assistance. Tail docking, de-worming, vaccinations, emetics, soporifics, foot treatments, colon irrigations and holistic Shiatsu massage are part of the small farmer’s stock in trade. We are all genial quacks with well-stocked dispensaries and shelves sagging from the weight of books with titles like Common Sheep Diseases: Treatment and Cures. Sheep and chickens have an alarming instinct for selfdestruction, especially in the middle of a holiday weekend. The shepherd and poultry man must be on call 24/7 to respond to emergency trauma with either a suture or a shovel. My wife and I had a dream. We were going to live a quiet life in the country surrounded by softly clucking hens and gentle sheep, all of us working in harmony with Nature. But it turns out the natural world is a very violent place. Coyotes roam the fields at night, hawks patrol the skies by day. Livestock must be held in protective custody behind razor wire and high-voltage fences for their own protection. Even so, violence often breaks out within the prison population itself. I had a trio of hens that did not play well with others. They hived themselves off from the rest of the flock and took up residence on the sheep pen door. Chickens are cliquey and prickly creatures that are quick to take offence. “Pecking order” is a phrase we use today to describe the unpleasant quality of life in an insurance company or a church group, but

it originated from the study of life in the henhouse. Professor Schjelderup-Ebbe, the Norwegian zoologist who coined the phrase, said “defence and aggression in the hen is accomplished with the beak.” Anyway, the breakaway sect of chickens soon differed among themselves on some question of doctrine and came to blows. Before long, the little

We were going to live a quiet life in the country surrounded by softly clucking hens and gentle sheep, all of us working in harmony with Nature. grey hen had a bloody patch on the top of her head. So I decided to give them away to a friend who had just purchased one of those elegant mail-order henhouses on wheels and needed a starter flock. I thought maybe a change of scenery would snap them all out of their funk. At dark I snuck into the sheep barn, snagged the three hens and popped them into a cage overnight. The next morning when I delivered the birds, my friend knelt down to look in the cage and recoiled in horror. “What on earth happened to that chicken?” she cried. I looked more closely and realized the little grey hen hadn’t just been pecked ... she had

been scalped ... by her two closest friends. What to do? I took the hen home and went to the garden shed for a shovel. “No, no!” my wife protested. “She’s my favourite hen. We can fi x her.” My wife is descended from a long line of practical farm people who glance at a suffering chicken, smack it on the head and get on with their day. But that gene somehow skipped her generation. So while she held the hen on the kitchen table I cleaned it up with antiseptic solution, pulled the flap of skin back up to the crown and put five neat little sutures in her forehead using dental floss. Then we set her down and she walked back to the barn. That night she settled back on her usual perch alone on the sheep pen. Apart from the little tufts of dental f loss sticking out of her head, she looked pretty good. I gave her a couple of aspirins and told her to call me in the morning if there was any change. The next day she came to the veranda for breakfast as usual. When she turned her head, I saw that I had put a little too much tension on one side and her left eyebrow was now pulled up in a pronounced arch that made her look like Gloria Swanson. Gloria is now eight years old and still lives with the sheep, although this is a poor practice because sheep will pick up a virus from bird droppings if they can’t find any other way to do themselves in. But there’s something about Gloria that appeals to me. She is a Dissenter, a Party of One, the last member of the True Church. The expression on her face is wary, alert and extremely sceptical about everything, including the medical profession. ≈

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

17


RobertaFracassi

behindthepages BY JEFF R O L L IN GS

Over the last 20 years, In The Hills has been following the multitude of threads that make Headwaters such a rich tapestry. Sometimes it’s good news, sometimes it’s

R EB ECC A TA P L E Y

more disconcerting, but the magazine always features the most talented group of creative people and publishing professionals the region has to offer. As

Considering she spent 19 years as a dental assistant, perhaps it’s little wonder that Roberta Fracassi takes such pleasure in her current job as an In The Hills advertising sales rep. She says, “So many of my clients have become personal friends.” That likely doesn’t happen as often when you’re pulling teeth. She is rewarded to see her clients’ businesses grow, and as delighted as they are that their In The Hills ads get results. An Orangeville resident, Roberta is most passionate about living life to the fullest, and loves to travel and cook for her husband and two children. Her shocking guilty pleasure: The Young and the Restless.

part of our anniversary celebrations this year, we’re featuring brief profiles of all those who make up the In The Hills family. This is the third installment.

ErinWoodley

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

P E T E PAT ER S O N

RosemaryHasner A professional photographer for nearly three decades, Rosemary Hasner’s wide variety of subjects has been published internationally and featured in three books – Nature Hikes, Dufferin County (with fellow In The Hills contributor Nicola Ross), and The Maple Syrup Book. Her first assignment for this magazine, an image of a green tree frog, graced the cover in 2000. In 2008 she launched her business Black Dog Creative Arts, which offers both traditional photography and digital art that combines photos, collage and painting techniques. Like many photographers, she’s loath to have her picture taken, though she makes an exception if she can appear alongside an animal.

A newcomer to the In The Hills family, Erin joined our advertising sales team in June 2013 after moving to the area from near Sarnia. She spent 15 years as a high-performance synchronized swimmer, which gave her the chance to travel the world. She capped off her athletic career with a silver medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Erin sees her mission as helping businesses connect with readers, thereby supporting the local economy, and appreciates that her job affords her the opportunity to meet friendly, creative and interesting local people every day. She can often be found with husband John and their two daughters at Island Lake, or haunting farmers’ markets in the region.


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P E T E PAT ER S O N

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A common refrain heard by everyone involved with In The Hills is, “Even the ads are beautiful!” A lot of that is down to Marion Hodgson, a graduate of the Ontario College of Art in illustration and graphic design, and one-time creative director for the marketing firm Selling Arts, where her work was featured in Sears stores across Canada. Marion has been providing in-house design services to In The Hills advertisers from her home studio in Amaranth since launching her own design firm Type and Images 15 years ago. In addition to the business, Marion wrangles two children, three dogs and a cat, and squeezes in work on a children’s book she hopes to publish in the future.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

Bethany Lee claims she is most passionate about storytelling in all its forms: “You can’t fill me full enough and there are just not enough hours in the day.” It’s a good thing too. She has a full-time job as manager of communications for the Town of Caledon. Then there’s her regular In The Hills column “Headwaters Nest” in which she reflects on parenting and family life. Alongside the column, she gathers a compendium of family-friendly events. As if that weren’t enough, she is also the online editor of kidsinthehills.ca. Though you might wonder where she finds the time, Bethany and her husband Derrick take particular pleasure in entertaining friends at their home in Orangeville.

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JimStewart

Caledon artist Jim Stewart has been creating figurative and abstract paintings since graduating from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 1972. Though In The Hills readers may know him best for the illustrations which have adorned our events calendar right from the first issue, his award-winning work has also appeared in gallery shows, many national magazines, and two self-published books. Jim has taught art classes around the world, and practised and taught the Japanese martial art aikido for the last four decades. He spends part of the year at his home in Hawaii, “thousands of feet up a mountain overlooking sugarcane fields and the ocean.”

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Caledon writer and photographer Pam Purves is in the second year of producing her column “At Home In The Hills,” which introduces readers to local residential architecture. Her fine art photography has been exhibited in Italy, Nevis in the West Indies and Canada. Her writing has appeared in several financial and gardening publications, and she is currently working on a series of children’s books about a dog. She has a fine arts degree and lives with her labradoodle Fred in a 1950s modernist bungalow on 25 acres with a view of Devil’s Pulpit. Pam says it has been a particular pleasure to hear homeowners’ stories of how they came to love the region, adding, “There is a lot of romance in these hills.”

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Fina anc ncing g Avai A Av vai aila labl la ble bl e (O OAC AC)) Free Fr ee Est stim i at im ates es Tran Tr ansf sfer erab abl ble le Life Li feti eti t me e Warr War Wa rran antty ty

James Jackson received a master’s degree in journalism from Western University in 2010, and is currently a reporter for the Waterloo Chronicle, covering news and city hall. He feels everyone has an interesting story to tell whether they know it or not, and enjoys highlighting the uniqueness of people’s lives. His first In The Hills story, about ad man, radio host and author Terry O’Reilly, appeared in 2010. Originally a Caledon farm boy, James currently resides in Cambridge, where last year he bought his first home – a 900 square foot wartime dwelling – with his new bride.


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P H O T O O F O R A N G E V I L L E C EN O TA P H I N A L E X A N D R A PA R K B Y R O S EM A R Y H A S N E R

hen woven together, memories are the threads that create the fabric of history – and as Remembrance Day 2013 approaches, In The Hills’ writers have picked up some of those threads to tell three remarkable stories about the wartime experiences of Headwaters residents. James Jackson relates what happened when three generations of his family took a 21st-century drive across northern Europe to retrace the much more gruelling journey by his grandfather, Tom Jackson, and the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion in 1944 and 1945. Bernadette Hardaker recounts the story of how Orangeville and the family of Jim Welsh, a 13-year-old boy at the time, welcomed his father and other “hometown boys” back from World War II. And Ken Weber describes how, during the Great War, Peel historian and lawyer

W

William Perkins Bull and his wife Maria opened the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers in their home in London, England. As stories like these threaten to fade from living memory, Historica Canada is working to preserve this disappearing legacy through the Memory Project. Funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage, the nationwide project encourages World War II and Korean War veterans to tell their stories to ensure their memories will be preserved. “We’re recording thousands of stories of our veterans for eternity,” says Memory Project manager Alex Herd. On Wednesday, October 9, staff of the Memory Project will be at the Albion Bolton Branch of the Caledon Public Library to record the recollections of area veterans, who are also encouraged to bring in wartime artifacts that can be photographed, digitized and displayed

online. Because each one-on-one interview with a Memory Project staff member is expected to last about an hour, veterans are urged to contact the library to set up an appointment. Call 905-857-1400 x228 or email Mary Maw at mmaw@caledon.library.on.ca. The Memory Project is also reaching out to veterans who are unable to attend the event in Caledon or other southern Ontario communities this fall. Veterans can contact the Memory Project at 416-506-1867 to make an appointment to record a telephone interview. The stories collected in Caledon and elsewhere will be added to the many firsthand accounts already online on the Memory Project website: www.thememoryproject.com. Both Dufferin County Museum & Archives and the Peel Art Gallery, Museum & Archives have also gathered some recordings of veterans’ oral recollections. These can be accessed by visiting DCMA or PAMA.

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


Three generations of a Caledon farming family travelled to Europe to retrace the steps of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion during the Second World War. BY J A ME S J AC K S O N

“We’re going the wrong way! Turn around – we’re going the wrong way!” My grandfather, Tom Jackson, was sitting in the back seat of our Renault rental car and shouting at my father, David, who was driving. The three of us – two farmers from Caledon and a first-year university student – were lost on the highways of Germany. It was mid-afternoon on May 20, 2005. Our flight to Hamburg had landed a few hours earlier, and we were on a three-week tour across Europe to retrace the route Grandpa had taken during the Second World War. We planned to do the trip in reverse, though, by starting in Germany and ending in England. But just a few hours into our journey, I was beginning to wonder if this was going to be a trip I would live to regret. During the war, Grandpa was a member of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, a group of highly trained soldiers who were dropped behind enemy lines in Normandy, France, ahead of the D-Day assault of June 6, 1944. Then, in the winter of 1944–45, the battalion was the only Canadian unit to take part in the infamous Battle of the Bulge, fighting in the Ardennes, the heavily forested region that includes parts of Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany. And in March and April 1945, the unit was part of the Allied spearhead that fought its way deep into the heart of Germany to end the war in Europe. The battalion never included more than 600 active soldiers, and for that reason it may go down in history as a footnote, but these determined and well-trained Canadians never failed to complete a mission, never lost an objective once it was taken, and advanced farther into Germany than any other Canadian unit during the war. Our plan was to start in the port city of Wismar on the Baltic Sea in northern Germany, drive southwest into Holland and Belgium, arrive in France in time for the anniversary of D-Day, and travel to England a few days after that.

Three generations: James, Thomas and David Jackson standing at the crossroads in France that Thomas helped defend as part of the Normandy assault on the morning of June 6, 1944. facing page : Thomas perched confidently on the back of a jeep during the war.

Dad drove while I navigated, leaving Grandpa in the back seat with a paper map he had picked up at the airport. It turns out he was right. We were going in the wrong direction, and after driving for two hours and nearly 200 kilometres, we finally listened to him and turned the car around. Maybe Dad and I should have placed a little less faith in an incorrectly calibrated GPS device and a little more faith in the man who once made his way across occupied France in the dark of night with little but a compass and a map. By the time the first soldiers scrambled out of their landing craft and onto the Normandy beaches on June 6, 1944, to start the Allied assault, 20-year-old Private Tom Jackson and the rest of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion had already been in the country for nearly five hours. continued on next page

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top : Thomas sitting in the cockpit of a Spitfire after returning to England following the march to Wismar. The pilot was best man at his wedding. inset : Thomas (far left) and other members of the battalion at their training base in the United States. facing page : Thomas (right) and another paratrooper in their training gear at their base in Benning, Georgia.

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paratrooper continued from page 27

Around 1 o’clock that morning, the Canadian paratroopers, as part of the British 6th Airborne Division, had jumped into France with orders to blow up bridges, destroy coastal artillery, hold strategic areas, and prevent German reinforcements from reaching the beaches once the main assault began. When I was growing up, I always marvelled at the newspaper clippings, memorabilia, photos and other war artifacts that filled Grandpa’s rec room, and when my cousins and I were little, he taught us the proper paratrooper tuck-and-roll landing manoeuvre on the bed. I am the youngest of eight grandkids though, and I never really understood what it all meant or what he endured during the war. That all changed in the spring of 2005. I was finishing my first year of studying history at the University of Guelph when my mother suggested that my father, grandfather and I

travel to Europe together. Starting with the 25th anniversary of D-Day in 1969, Grandpa had returned every five years, but my father and I hoped this trip, with all three generations of Jackson men, would be extra special. On May 19 we found ourselves on an overnight flight to Germany, and despite our unexpected detour, we arrived in Wismar a little less than 24 hours later. We were ready to begin our trip where the war had ended for Grandpa 60 years earlier. After the battalion jumped into Germany on March 24, 1945, as part of a joint British and American assault, the goal of the Canadian parachutists was to push north to Wismar. Their final task of the war was to prevent the Germans from retreating into Norway and Denmark, and they had orders from British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to reach the town before the Russians, who were approaching from the east. The advance to Wismar involved zigzagging north through Germany,

and the battalion covered more than 450 kilometres on foot or in the back of any vehicle they could fi nd. They reached Wismar at 9 a.m. on May 2, beating the Russians by just two hours. The two sides met later that day near the banks of the Elbe River and shared a toast of vodka, but political tension meant they rarely mingled afterward. We spent several days touring Wismar and looking for landmarks from Grandpa’s war days, but in many ways our trip across Germany mirrored that of the Allies in 1945. We moved quickly to make sure we arrived in Normandy in time for the June 6 commemoration of the 61st anniversary of D-Day, which meant a lot of time driving on unfamiliar European roads. Fortunately, I had learned how to operate the GPS and we didn’t get lost again, though I’m not sure if Grandpa ever put much faith in the device. It was during this drive across continued on page 30


out of the clouds and into history The 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion made history when it officially became Canada’s first specially trained parachute unit on July 1, 1942. The soldiers who had volunteered to try out for the unit were held to high physical and mental standards. Only about 20 per cent of the initial volunteers, including Private Tom Jackson, successfully completed the rigorous training program. The idea for creating a parachute battalion had begun to take shape in 1940 after Germany used airborne troops to successfully invade Belgium and the Netherlands. It was first envisioned as a homeland defence unit that would help protect Canada in the event of an invasion by German or other Axis forces. The battalion’s initial training took place at Fort Benning, Georgia, under American parachutists. In March 1943 training moved to the Canadian base at Shilo, Manitoba. Training was divided into four stages over four consecutive weeks. The first gruelling exercises, designed to weed out unsuitable candidates, included jujitsu and carrying a 60-pound pack on long marches. Then came a series of landing exercises, including the “man breaker,” a 32-foot-high structure used to practise plane-exiting drills. Next was parachute training from a 250-foot tower, and finally, soldiers were required to complete five successful jumps from a plane. In July 1943 the battalion was sent to England where the unit continued training as part of Britain’s 6th Airborne Division. A major difference between the British and American systems was that British paratroopers jumped through an opening in the floor of the plane, rather than out a side door. On D-Day, 50 aircraft transported the battalion to France. Battalion members wore distinctive maroon berets, and in addition to his normal equipment each parachutist carried a knife, a rope, and an escape kit that included French currency and two 24-hour ration packs. Total weight? About 70 pounds.

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paratrooper continued from page 28

Europe that Grandpa told us countless interesting stories, the kind that don’t usually end up in history books. By April 1945 most German soldiers had come to realize there would be no stopping the Allied advance into their country, and they simply wanted to surrender. Grandpa recalled riding on the top of tanks and in jeeps as they drove along the dirt roads – “dirtier than the devil” as he described them. As far as the eye could see, German soldiers were lined up on the roadside with their rifles slung over their shoulders. There wasn’t enough time to process the thousands of surrendering soldiers, so the Germans were just told to wait for the next group of Allied soldiers. On that trek, the Allied troops were sometimes forced to sleep in the rubble of bombed-out buildings, but other times they passed through cities that had been spared the Allied bombs and were able to rest with an 30

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

actual roof over their heads. Our trip continued west to the cities of Minden, Ladbergen and Hamminkeln, near the battalion’s drop zone. When I asked Grandpa what made him want to become a paratrooper in the first place, he seemed to dodge the question and started talking about my other grandfather, my mother’s father, who had been a crew member aboard a Halifax bomber. The mortality rate among bomber crews was one of the highest of the war, and Grandpa Jackson could not imagine what would possess a man to fly into battle aboard one of those planes. “They’d fly in and there would be anti-aircraft guns going off all around them. I wouldn’t want to be on one of those crews,” he said with a laugh, obviously unaware of the irony. Incredulous, I turned around and looked at him. “They probably said the same thing about you paratroopers,” I said. “At least they weren’t


“Dirtier than the devil”: conditions were extremely poor along the roads of Germany after the invasion in March, 1945. facing page : The Canadian drop zone during the invasion of Germany in March, 1945. The trees played havoc with many of the parachutists as some got caught in the branches and were shot before they made it to the ground. inset : Thomas (far right) and other paratroopers in a relaxed moment at the Rose and Crown pub, where he once got into a fistfight.

jumping out of the planes.” He just chuckled and nodded his head before returning his gaze out the window. On May 25, we arrived in Hamminkeln and met a local historian Grandpa knew from his previous trips to Germany. The historian took us on a tour of the drop zone, located in a farm field just outside the city limits. When we arrived, an old farmer was working the fields on his tractor, but once he learned Grandpa was a veteran – and we were a farming family – he readily gave us permission to look around. The Canadians had jumped into Germany as part of Operation Plunder, a co-ordinated series of assaults along the Rhine River. The airborne and glider portion of the assault was code named Operation Varsity. Unlike on D-Day almost a year earlier, the jump did not take place under cover of night. About 2,200 men from 12 different parachute battalions, representing British, American and Canadian forces,

started jumping into battle at 10 in the morning – in broad daylight. The largest airborne operation in history, it involved more than 10,000 aircraft, ranging from bombers and fighters to troop carriers and gliders. Their job was to drop on top of the Germans’ Rhine defences, which included specially trained antiparatrooper soldiers, to secure the drop zone and defend the Allied troops crossing the river should the Germans mount a counteroffensive. Both the old red-brick farmhouse and the barn at the drop zone still bear the scars of the battle that raged there more than 60 years ago. Bullet holes line the sides of the buildings, and in the years after the war, farmers had been known to use the landing gear of the gliders as fence posts. During our walk through the fields, I also learned what I had always wanted to know but had never had the courage to ask: How close had Grandpa come to dying in battle?

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paratrooper continued from page 31

A group of paratroopers is called a stick, and that morning Grandpa’s stick landed just south of a group of trees near the farm. As he advanced on the German position, the men on either side of him were shot and killed. Somehow, the bullets from the enemy machine guns missed him by just a few feet. More than 2,500 Allied soldiers were killed during the first two days of this operation. The dead included the Canadian commander Jeff Nicklin, who was shot before he even hit the ground after his parachute snagged in some trees. Grandpa was injured on March 25, when he suffered a relatively minor shrapnel wound to his leg. We continued our drive the next morning, making our way through Belgium and Holland. After spending several months in France after D-Day, Grandpa’s battalion had returned to England in September 1944 as Allied troops pushed ever closer to Germany. As a last-ditch attempt to counter this advance, the Germans tried to break and divide the Allied front line by attacking its weakest spot, the Ardennes. This German offensive, which took place in late 1944 and early 1945, is widely known as the Battle of the Bulge. On Christmas Eve 1944, the battalion set sail for Belgium aboard the SS Canterbury. Though there would be no parachute drop into battle this

time, the Canadian paratroopers were assigned to help plug the 70kilometre gap in the Allied front in the Ardennes. On January 2, the Canadians moved to the front and stayed there for nearly two months, defending the Allied position near Roermond, Netherlands, on the Maas River, a major waterway that flows through France, Belgium and Holland. Grandpa recalled the bitterness of the fighting that January and February – and their shortage of equipment. Supplies were so low that some men resorted to cutting up old blankets to warm their hands and feet. “They sent a truck out for more supplies and when they came back with warmer boots, they were either two sizes too big or two sizes too small,” he said. “But we wore them anyway.” But by February 21, the front was stabilized and the battalion returned to England, where the men remained until called into action for the final advance to Wismar. Grandpa, Dad and I pushed on and reached Normandy on May 30, in time to tour the sites the battalion had captured and held in the hours and days after their D-Day jump into France. On that jump, the Allied sticks were scattered all over the French countryside. Grandpa had landed in a swampy, f looded marshland and lost all his gear.


left : Thomas Jackson gives a salute to his fallen comrades after laying a wreath during the 61st anniversary of the D-Day landings, June 6, 2005. above : Some of the hundreds of Canadian graves at the Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery near the town of Groesbeek, Netherlands, final resting place for 2,338 Canadian soldiers from World War II.

Armed with nothing more than a revolver and a Sten gun, a lightweight submachine gun assigned to paratroopers, he and another battalion member made their way to the rendezvous point, a brickyard near the crossroads they were under orders to secure. The road was strategic for both the Allies and the Germans because it was in the middle of an enormous ridge that overlooked the beaches. Of the 27 Canadian officers and 516 other ranks who jumped into Normandy that morning, 117 men were lost on the first day alone. Over the course of the entire operation, 24 officers and 343 other ranks were either killed or captured. We toured sites in and around Normandy, and on June 5 we joined a group of British paratroop veterans on their tour bus. The next day we attended several memorial services throughout the region, including ceremonies at a number of war cemeteries. I humbly watched as Grandpa laid a battalion wreath and marched along the streets in the light rain, accepting candies from French schoolchildren.

Two days later, we left for England. There we visited several historic sites, including Stonehenge, but we really wanted to stop at the Rose and Crown, a pub not far from the Carter Barracks in Bulford (about 90 minutes west of London) where the Canadian paratroopers had been stationed. Our goal was to have a pint in the bar where Grandpa got into a fistfight with an Irishman some time before the jump into Normandy. Unfortunately, the pub was closed and we were scheduled to fly home just a few days later, so we never did have that pint. I was 19 years old at the time of our trip – the same age as my grandfather when he joined the paratroops in 1942 – and seeing row upon row of tombstones for fallen Canadian soldiers, many of them my age or just a year or two older, made the trip that much more visceral for me. On May 8, 1945, six days after the battalion arrived in Wismar, the war in Europe officially ended, and about a week later the Canadians were on their way back to England. They received a royal send-off on May 31 and sailed for Canada June 15 aboard the SS Île de France, arriving in Halifax on June 21. Rumours swirled that the unit would be sent to the Pacific to help the Allies defeat Japan, but with hostilities winding down through July and August – punctuated by the Americans’ dropping atomic bombs

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paratrooper continued from page 33

on Hiroshima and Nagasaki – and Japan’s surrender on September 2, the battalion officially disbanded on September 30, 1945. The timing of our trip couldn’t have been better, because by 2008 – just three years after we returned from Europe – Grandpa’s health began to fail, and he moved from his farm on Old School Road to a care facility in Brampton. However, on November 11 that year the three of us piled into the car once again and headed to the annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the Port Credit Legion. As a former branch president and one of the driving forces behind the branch’s construction, Grandpa expected to lay a wreath, as he had every year. The day was cold and blustery, but hundreds of people gathered at the cenotaph to pay their respects. When Grandpa’s turn came to lay a wreath, my father rolled him to the base of the memorial in his wheelchair and I expected Grandpa to pass the wreath to Dad. But true to his nature, Grandpa asked my father and another veteran to help him up the steps so he could lay his wreath among the others and give one final salute to fallen friends and comrades. At the Legion after the service, he laughed and joked with his remaining war buddies, and he even had a small glass of beer from the bar. It was the happiest I had seen him in months. That afternoon, we drove him back to the care centre and my father

Tom Jackson accepts candies from French children during the Normandy invasion anniversary on June 6, 2005.

wheeled him up to his room on the third floor. I stayed in the car, after saying what I didn’t know at the time would be my last goodbye. Grandpa passed away in his sleep on November 28, 2008, at the age of 85. Before his funeral we held a family service to inter his ashes in the family plot in Toronto’s Park Lawn Cemetery, just a stone’s throw from where Grandpa was born in Etobicoke. His ashes, along with a few sprigs of wheat from the farm, were interred in a simple pine box with the logo of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion emblazoned on the lid. Only half of Grandpa’s ashes were interred that day, however. The next summer, the rest were scattered from a military plane as it flew over Ex Coelis Mountain in the Canadian Rockies. Ex coelis – out of the clouds – is the battalion’s Latin motto, and the mountain’s four lower peaks bear names that honour the battalion’s operations in World War II. This was the final jump for an old parachutist who had fi rst risked his life more than 60 years earlier, when he leapt into the unknown of the pre-dawn blackness of a French spring night. ≈ James Jackson is a newspaper reporter and journalist who was raised on a family farm in Caledon.


the

HomecominG To a 13-year-old Orangeville boy in September 1945, news that the father he hadn’t seen in four years was on his way home from the battlefields of Europe was cause for high excitement BY B ER N A D E T T E H A RDA K ER

even hundred forty-one men and women from Orangeville enlisted to serve in the Canadian Armed Forces during World War II, and the 708 who returned didn’t arrive all at once. They came in dribs and drabs. Ernie Hodgson sneaked home in the middle of the night. Jim Welsh, a 13-year-old who was eagerly awaiting his father’s return, remembers Ernie was so tired that he didn’t want a big hurrah. Many of the guys, including Jim’s dad, Little Jimmy Welsh, felt the same way. But the homecomings were big news in town, recalls Jim, now 81. Orangeville’s population was barely 2,700 at the time, and when someone was expected home from overseas, the word “spread like hell,” he says. “‘Billy Whitfield is coming home! Ossie Whitfield’s on his way back!’ We knew them all. Most of them were about five years older than me. We looked up to those guys. They were the heroes of the town.” Little Jimmy Welsh, all five-feet-six-inches of him, had been a rivet thrower in the shipyards of Newcastle, England, and had come to Canada to continue plying his trade. On landing in Toronto he was shocked to fi nd boats, not ships, on the waterfront. In 1928-29, Little Jimmy ended up working on the crew paving Hurontario Street up Caledon Mountain. By the time he enlisted on March 31, 1941, he was a 33-year-old married father of three and supporting his family by running a spinning machine at Dod’s Knitting Mill, Orangeville’s major employer. Today, the mill has been transformed into the handsome brick apartment building at the corner of Mill and Church streets. “Dad didn’t have to join,” says Jim, who was known as Junior in those days. But four Englishmen, buddies at the mill, including Little Jimmy and Alf Sillet, who later owned the Texaco station on First

S

Jim Welsh’s father, Little Jimmy Welsh, broke his wife’s heart when he enlisted, but he cut a dashing figure in uniform and made it home safely after serving with the Princess Louise’s Hussars, a New Brunswick tank regiment, and later as batman for Major Clifford McEwen.

Street, had been talking about the war. It was Alf who put it pointedly: “The homeland’s in a lot of trouble over there, boys.” So that day Junior arrived home from school at lunchtime to fi nd his mother, Catherine, fretting. “I can’t understand where your father is,” she told her son. A person could set a watch by the routine of the factory workers. His mother soon sent Junior running to the mill to find his father, but Old Joe Dod hadn’t seen Little Jimmy all morning. This news further upset Catherine, who insisted that Junior come straight home after school. “When I came through the door, boy, Dad was catching hell from my mother,” says Jim. “She was crying and yelling. I had never seen them like that.” Little Jimmy had signed up for the army, and five months later he headed to England with the Princess Louise’s Hussars, a New Brunswick tank regiment. He ended up as the batman for Major Clifford McEwen, who was courting an army nurse from

Alliston. “The major took to my dad,” says Jim. “[Dad] was a likeable man and he would work very hard for you.” A few days before Jim’s father was due home, Armour McMillan, who ran McMillan’s garage and taxi service on Broadway (located roughly across the street from As We Grow, which is at 113 today) paid a visit to the Welsh home at 11 First Avenue. Junior and his two sisters, six-year-old Maureen and eight-year-old Sheila, sat in the dining room with their mother and the guest. Little Jimmy would arrive by train in Toronto, and McMillan knew the Welshes didn’t like to drive. How was Little Jimmy planning to get home from Toronto? McMillan asked, and offered to chauffeur the family to the city to meet him. “To answer the question,” says Jim, “I remember my mum, a frugal lady, blurting out something about not being able to afford the fare and Mr. McMillan saying, ‘Oh no, for free.’” Jim remembers enthusiastically decorating the house, inside and out, with streamers and signs saying “Welcome Home, Dad.” “We put them up a wee bit early,” he says, and the family had to replace them at least once because of the weather, but that didn’t matter. The whole town knew Little Jimmy Welsh was coming home. As a boy, Junior had thought of the war as a great adventure and he followed events on the radio, in the newspapers and through the newsreels that preceded the featured fi lm at the Uptown Theatre. “I knew my dad was over there fighting. But who in the hell is going to get killed? Nobody is going to get killed … but they were, left, right and centre.” When a local boy was killed, everyone felt it, he says. “All those guys on the cenotaph, I knew every damn one of them.” “My Aunt Monica, my mother’s sister who lived in Toronto, had said to my mother, ‘When you come down to pick up Jimmy, you come here before you go home, Cath. I’ve got to put my arms around Jimmy.’” Monica’s husband Cristy Jenkinson had been killed in Belgium on September 10, 1944. On the big day McMillan didn’t blink at the prospect of making a side trip to Monica’s home. “I’m yours for the day,” he said, no doubt thinking of his own son Donald, who wasn’t among those coming home. Donald was 23 when he was killed on February 1, 1945. As a navigator on heavy bombers, he had completed more than two dozen missions over Europe before his crippled aircraft crashed. He left his young wife Beatrice and baby daughter Patricia, whom he had never met. continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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homecoming continued from page 35

he returning troops arrived at Toronto’s Union Station by train from Halifax, where they had disembarked from the steamships that had ferried them across the Atlantic. The plan was to transport them by truck to the CNE grounds, where they would parade into the football stadium before being discharged. Their families were seated alphabetically in the stands. The Welshes were lucky to be seated with the rest of the Ws under the overhang, which provided some protection from the cold wind off Lake Ontario. But the wait seemed endless, despite the authoritative updates provided by the voice on the giant loudspeakers. “We could hear the band playing in the distance as they marched into the stadium,” Jim recalls. “My mother is there trying to keep the three of us in tow. ‘Don’t you get away on me! Don’t you get away on me!’ I am all anxious to see my father. In marched the first bunch. They all paraded down and got formed up, and by God, if I didn’t spot my dad.” The men were ordered to hold their positions and look toward the section lettered by their last name. According to Jim, that didn’t last long. “Well, we poured out of the stands. When I think about it, I don’t know how I didn’t kill myself. I guess I was young and agile. I remember the man on the speaker kept saying, ‘Please, please, hold your positions. Please, ladies and gentlemen, let the men get onto the football field.’ “I was standing on the field in front of my father. I was so proud. Then Mum and the two girls got there. Maureen is hanging onto Mum’s dress and looking at me. ‘Who’s that man?’ she asks. ‘That’s your dad.’” Meanwhile, Jim’s grandmother, cousins, aunts and uncles had congregated at Monica’s house. “My aunt had a terrible time. She wouldn’t let go of Dad. He didn’t know what to say to her.” McMillan then drove the family to Orangeville in the familiar pale blue, four-door Plymouth sedan that didn’t need a sign to be hailed. Shortly after the family arrived at the house on First Avenue, the phone began to ring and people started knocking on the door. “Hi, Jimmy. Good to have you home.” But all Little Jimmy could think about was his youngest, Maureen. Barely two and a half years old when her father had left for war, Maureen regarded him as a stranger. “I’ve got to do something about the baby,” a heartbroken Little Jimmy kept saying. So the next day, and every day for the next two weeks, he walked Maureen to Broadway and bought her an ice cream at Merv Henry’s confectionery.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

R O S EM A R Y H A S N ER

T

The cenotaph in Alexandra Park in Orangeville was unveiled in a ceremony on November 12, 1923. The names engraved on the monument now include all those from Dufferin County who never returned from the great wars of the last century. The list includes Donald McMillan, son of the Welsh family’s friend Armour McMillan. The most recent name to be added is that of Matthew McCully who died in 2007 in Afghanistan. Remembrance celebrations continue to take place at the cenotaph each November 11.

“He did whatever the hell it took, and it took quite a while,” says Jim. But the strategy worked. Just ask Jim’s sister, Maureen Jessop. She thinks the world of her dad. ≈ Note: Jim Welsh graduated from Orangeville High School in 1950 and remains a member of the informal Old Boys’ Club. See “Friends of Their Youth” on page 46.


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a Place Like Home

For Canadian boys passing through England during World War I, the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers offered family warmth and the comfort of “home sweet home,” something all of them desperately needed. BY K EN W EB ER

C

hoosing a thank you gift has challenges. The gift should be thoughtful, of course. It has to be appropriate. And ideally it should stand out a bit, get noticed by being special. In 1918, with the guns of the Great War finally silent, a young Canadian officer named Grant McKeough was trying to find a gift that met these criteria, but he faced an even more intimidating challenge. The man he was so anxious to thank was one of those people who already had everything and seemed to be one of those who had already done everything too! That man was William Perkins Bull and the reason McKeough – and hundreds of soldiers like him – wanted to say thank you was that Perkins Bull and his wife Maria had carved out a circle of sunshine for Canadian boys in the terrible gloom of World War I. They had set up a hospital, one like no other.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


I M A G E S CO U R T E S Y P E E L A R T G A L L ER Y, M U S E U M & A R C H I V E S

Recuperating officers and VADs (Volunteer Aid Detachment) pose in the lush gardens at the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers.

Peel historian, lawyer and businessman William Perkins Bull and his wife Maria (above) founded the hospital in their mansion in London, England, as a home away from home for their countrymen wounded in the Great War.

a canadian home in england The reason the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers was so unanimously treasured by the men who stayed there was that the project didn’t start out as a hospital. It began as a home away from home. The house that held this home was “Wynnfield,” a mansion in one of the ritziest areas of London, England, and the former residence of Sir Ernest Shackleton, the famous explorer. By the time World War I began, the owner of Wynnfield was William Perkins Bull, a Peel County boy who through sheer talent and effort – and with the ideal mate – had become very wealthy. Raised on a farm in Chinguacousy Township, he was now a lawyer much in demand, an owner of huge swaths of real estate and an entrepreneur with worldwide business and financial interests. In 1912, Perkins and Maria had moved their young family from Brampton to England to better administer their extensive international connections. When war began in 1914, Perkins immediately offered himself to fight, but at age 44 with six children he was, understandably, ruled ineligible. But never one to stand on the sidelines (equally true

of Maria), he soon found a way to contribute to the war effort in a way that incorporated his wealth, the grand size of Wynnfield, and the boundless energy that characterized the Bull family. As London filled with military personnel in training, on leave, or convalescing, Canadian officers – who did not always get the welcome they deserved – found it increasingly difficult to fi nd places to stay, so late in 1915 the Bulls offered their home. Five of their six children were in boarding school, so they bought extra furniture to fill the empty rooms and let it be known there was now a place for Canadian boys to relax, refresh and feel at home. In no time at all, Wynnfield was fi lled to overflowing every night.

a hospital is added Although Perkins had opened the family home to Canadian officers with his characteristic energy and enthusiasm, the original idea had been Maria’s. Intelligent and resourceful, the former Maria Brennan from Hamilton was a perfect match for

Perkins Bull. And her compassion and kindness meant she was adored by every soldier who stayed at Wynnfield. Taken together, those qualities made her next idea seem natural, indeed inevitable: establishing a convalescent hospital for Canadians. Generally there were three stages to medical care in the Great War: casualty treatment at the front, longer term hospitalization behind the lines, and convalescence either at home (easily done for British officers) or in smaller, dedicated facilities. The Perkins Bull Hospital was one of the latter. As Maria listened to more and more stories about life at the front from the young men staying in her home, it became clear her welcoming arms had to spread even wider. Thus, in 1916, the Bulls leased an empty but aging mansion next door to Wynnfield, upgraded all the mechanicals and outfitted the place to convalescent hospital standards. The refit was a typical Perkins Bull venture, for besides hospital furnishings they added a dining table that could seat 44! Not only would patients recuperate here, they would be recharged as well. continued on next page

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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William Perkins Bull surrounded by VADS in uniforms Bull described as “dainty, becoming and practical.”

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filled to capacity The hospital opened officially on July 16, 1916, and stayed open months after the war ended for the simple reason that convalescence and the need for a home away from home did not end suddenly with the signing of the armistice in November, 1918. On a regular basis between 30 and 40 wounded men would stay an average of two to three weeks before rejoining their regiment. Next door, Wynnfield continued its role as a Canadian social centre and frequently took in an overf low of patients when the hospital was full. Among the features that made the Convalescent Hospital so loved and admired by patients and guests was the mind-and-body, heart-and-soul care it provided. It was affi liated with the Queen Alexandra Military Hospital, so medical issues were addressed by professional staff. But judging by the letters from hundreds of men who passed through on their way back to war, it was the opportunity to reconnect with gentleness, warmth and humanity that had the greatest impact. Crucial to that were young Canadian women called VADs (Voluntary Aid Detachment), volunteers whose principal duty in addition to everyday housekeeping was to socialize with

recovering patients. Dressed in uniforms Perkins described as “dainty, becoming and practical,” they were a reminder to men inured to the slaughter of this bloodiest of wars that the sun still shone.

not without critics As always, people who make things happen are criticized by those who watch what happens. Perkins and Maria were no exception. Among the first to complain were the Bulls’ neighbours in upscale Putney Heath who sniffed at the notion of so many young men in the neighbourhood, all socially uncertain and colonials to boot! (Perkins Bull’s memoirs say their home was “socially boycotted.”) It didn’t help either that the Canadians did such things as play baseball on the Bulls’ lawn, especially on Sunday mornings when proper people went to church. The carping mellowed, however, following a profound endorsement just six months after the hospital opened when none other than King George V and Queen Mary came to visit and make their encouragement of the project known. (Afterward, fresh game from the royal estate at Sandringham would periodically fi nd its way to the hospital kitchen.) continued on page 42


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Names of Note Grant McKeough (right, of the creative thank you gift) survived the war and returned to Europe to fight again in World War II. His son D’Arcy became a prominent Ontario MPP and cabinet minister. At Wynnfield, Grant rubbed shoulders with personalities such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Billy Bishop and Prime Minister Robert Borden, honorary president of the hospital, as well as such famous patients as Georges Vanier (below), later Canada’s governor-general. Vanier, as a young lieutenant suffering from shell shock, was one of the hospital’s very first convalescent patients and, after losing a leg near the end of the war, one of the last. He wrote his mother in 1916, saying he was in “a hospital which is really not a hospital but a home.”

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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like home continued from page 40

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from the heart In a letter to a Canadian official in 1917, Perkins summed up succinctly what he and Maria were trying to do. “We simply try to make the boys forget the war,” he wrote, “and forget that they are not in Canada.”

How they accomplished that, with effort and attention to detail and a myriad of special favours, is a tribute to their energy and their generosity. Fancy dress balls, theatre tickets, nightly dinners around the huge table, lawn parties with live bands, all at the Bulls’ expense, represent the grander side of things. But it was the quieter, more personal actions that perhaps best explain the depth of gratitude from the Canadian officers who passed through. Typical is the case of Perkins taking the time to chase down lost luggage for soldiers who’d gone back to the front, dealing at length with the CPR over a lost carton of maple sugar, arranging to have Canadian newspapers on hand to help stir the feel of “home,” or quietly paying a London hotel bill for a Canadian officer who had either forgotten or ignored it. Add to this the f lurry of personal letters he and Maria wrote to parents of the officers, sometimes reassuring, sometimes in sympathy, or other

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Funding issues also generated negative comments. Although the hospital bore the name Perkins Bull, significant financial support had come from the Canadian government, as well as from private donors and such associations as the Masonic Lodge. Still, the Bull family had spent huge sums of their own money and gave up their own home to make this most beneficial project happen, with no personal gain or ulterior motive involved. What is more difficult to accept, at least by present-day sensitivities, is that the Bulls’ great venture was for officers only. But that was not out of character for the culture of the times, especially for the military. A century ago, officers and enlisted personnel rarely associated socially, and the Bulls’ naturally gravitated to their own class.

Jeffrey Bull, William’s younger brother, and VAD Commandant Dorothy Perkins Bull (left), William’s daughter, with two VADs at the hospital c.1917. Jeffrey was killed at Amiens, August, 1918.

At the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers, 28 beds were occupied in February, 1919, requiring 2,352 meals for patients and staff. Among the quantities of several food categories consumed, the provisions report for the month lists 573 pounds of meat, 2,296 pounds of vegetables, 120 pounds of dairy product and 966 eggs of which 840 were “new laid” and 126 were “other”(!). Food preparation was largely under the direction of the cook employed by the Bulls. Wellness System - PEMF Magnetic Field Therapy


ƜȳɁȷȵȼȷȼȵΎɇȽɃɀΎȲɀȳȯȻΎȰȯɀȼΎȷȼΎɂȶȳΎȶȷȺȺɁ

Romance bloomed apace at Wynnfield and at the hospital, so much so the place was sometimes called the ‘Perkins Bull Matrimonial Bureau.’ This is the Gairdner-Smith wedding in the garden at Wynnfield.

letters using their connections to correct a personal problem facing one of their “boys.” The Bulls’ efforts on behalf of Canadian officers came from the heart. And the officers’ gratitude was returned from the same source. The hundreds of letters of thanks are proof of that, as are such gifts as the “Loving Cup,” a silver tankard presented to Maria and engraved with the names of many of the officers

who stayed at the hospital, and bronze and ceramic bulls presented by an officer who scoured antique shops throughout England and France (the Bulls were collectors). And what of young Grant McKeough, the officer who thought so long and hard about a truly special thank you gift for someone who already had everything? He found it in France: the casing from a 100 pound artillery shell. Perkins Bull was, in his own words, “tickled to death” with it. Now he really had everything! ≈

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The lion sits atop a silver tankard called “The Loving Cup” which is engraved with the names of several officers who passed through the hospital and later died in battle.

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Visit the Perkins Bull Hospital at PAMA Using Google Earth, you can see Putney Heath in London as it is today, but more interesting by far is a visit to PAMA (Peel Art Gallery Museum & Archives) in Brampton. In honour of next year’s centenary of the outbreak of the Great War, a special exhibition commemorating the Perkins Bull Hospital for Convalescent Canadian Officers is currently on display until November 2014. It includes photographs, letters and other artifacts, including menu cards, the “Loving Cup,” and patient registers. It’s a good excuse to visit PAMA which merits a trip in its own right following the recent completion of a multi-million dollar renovation that makes it one of the most exciting regional complexes in the province. Caledon residents especially will be fascinated by the ability to see local history and geography exchange themselves on the new interactive Tremaine map, along with such displays as the Harold Egan (of Bolton) lighting collection, the AVRO Arrow story, an introduction to Caledon land forms, aboriginal and geological history and much, much more. Plus PAMA is very kid-friendly.

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The friendship among graduates of the

Friends of their O

ver lunch at Orangeville’s Greystones Inn, the good-natured quips rise above the din created by a dozen men dining out on the stories of their youth. “I haven’t seen you, Mel, since ’49.” “I was just talking to Jean MacKenzie, Derek’s sister.” “Nobody could tackle like Derek MacKenzie.” “Did you know Billy Waters used to play poker in the post office on a Sunday?” “I thought he was responsible for burning down the school!” All the men are in their early 80s. Some see each other regularly, others have joined the crowd for the fi rst time in decades. What they have in common is an allegiance to the red and blue of Orangeville High School. All attended the old “school on the hill” in the final years before it was gutted by the great fire of February 1, 1948. Jim Welsh, who graduated from the high school’s commercial stream in 1950, launches into the story of the fire. “We lived at 11 First Avenue in those days, two or three houses down from St. Mark’s Church. After supper I’d gone up to visit Terry Webb. His dad was the fire chief, Fred Webb, and he owned Webb’s dairy bar (located at 5 First Street). We were hanging around the dairy bar. It was a very cold, blustery night and the snow was waist high in the campus of the high school. People were either at home listening to Lux Theatre on the radio or at St. Mark’s. “All of a sudden we saw this excitement – guys running out of the church. ‘Fire at the school! Fire at the school!’ 46

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

“Ed Jessop, who lived on the corner of First and First … drove the old 1931 Bickle fire engine from the station at Broadway and John Street. It got stuck in a snowdrift at Fead and Faulkner. It was bedlam. Terry and I beat it past Smallwood’s pill factory [located about where the Bromount condos stand at 8 Fead Street today] through Grove Lodge to the school.” Dan Webb, class of ’52 and no relation to Terry Webb, lived with his mother, brother and sister at 26 Zina Street. He and his buddies were outside when they heard the sirens. They raced up the hill behind the truck but couldn’t see much because of the crowd of spectators, so they climbed the two big maple trees in front of the school to watch their books burn. “At fi rst,” recalls Webb, “we were thinking, great, a holiday, but the next day as we wandered around the smoking mess to see what we could see, it didn’t feel so good.” Within a week the legendary Maurice Cline, who served as the school’s principal from 1941 to ’69, the nine teachers and the school secretary had commandeered classroom space for 230 students in several locations around town: in the Oddfellows Hall, above Patterson’s Furniture store on Broadway and in four different churches. Jim Lott, class of ’51, remembers the basement of First Avenue United Church was “so cold and drafty I had to keep a hand on my textbook or the wind would blow the pages closed.” Relief came when the new high school opened in 1951. By that year, most of the graduates sitting in Greystones more than 60 years later had moved away to take jobs or attend university. A few came

back and a couple, such as Welsh, never left town. Welsh retired in 1985 as purchasing manager at Camco’s small appliance manufacturing plant, located where Home Depot stands today. One day five years ago, he ran into Jim Wardlaw, class of ’49, at the Orangeville Mall. Wardlaw, who had returned to town in 1956 to practise law with his father, Norman, had been getting together fairly regularly with David Scott, class of ’50, a general surgeon who came back in 1962, and Mel Rennick, class of ’49. Rennick became a mining engineer and worked in northern Ontario for years before retiring in Toronto. When Welsh joined the group at their next lunch, they naturally asked if he knew the whereabouts of other classmates. They asked the right guy. Welsh is an amateur historian and avid collector. The bedroom of his tidy Orangeville condo boasts a display case fi lled with family cap badges and insignia from the world wars, his bookshelves are lined with regimental and local histories, and on his wall is a framed black-and-white photo of the rollout of RL-201, A.V. Roe’s CF-105, better known as the Arrow. Welsh was in Malton the day that plane flew, as well as the day it was cut to pieces after the Diefenbaker government cancelled the fighter jet manufacturing program in 1959. Welsh picked up the phone and started calling around town to relatives of his former schoolmates. Before long he had a list of 33 names, phone numbers and email addresses. He later tracked down the “girl” grads, and they joined the “boys” for a big gathering in October 2012.


P H O T O P E T E PAT ER S O N

old ‘school on the hill’ has stood the test of time.

youth Dan Webb left Orangeville in 1952 and ended up in Owen Sound. He became a highway construction engineer, involved in building long sections of the 401 near Chatham and the Trans-Canada Highway from Sault Ste. Marie to Nipigon. “You knew everybody in town growing up,” recalls Webb. “Jim Welsh was almost a neighbour. I can remember sitting on the Welshs’ porch after playing run sheep run, listening to his dad tell stories. You think Junior can tell stories? His dad could even more so.” Despite the passage of decades, the buddies felt an instant connection the first time they got together. “We were really good friends,” says Webb, “the demon fire consumes school As the High School fire was at its raging zenith, amateur photographer George McKennitt made this picture with a Zeiss Ikon.” From the Red And Blue Annual 1947/48 Edition

BY B ERN A D E T T E H A RDA K ER

who was known as “Skeeter” after a ballplayer of the day, or “Spider” for the Webb of his last name. “Their enthusiasm buoys me.” Many of the grads played sports together. From Grade 1 through 13, they were with the same boys in the same classes, and as the seasons changed, they moved together from rugby to hockey and basketball to lacrosse. In those days high school football was still called rugby. Six players, protected by lightweight leather shoulder and shin pads, as well as helmets that looked more like hats, took to the field at one time. Welsh, Dave Scott and Harry Cuming

More than half a century later, grads of Orangeville High School still meet regularly for lunch and conversation. Left to right: Mel Rennick, Donny Evans, Stan Stych, Jim Wardlaw, Danny Webb, Jim Welsh, Ed Nodwell, David Scott, Martin Dambeau, Bill Waters, Ron Coles, Jimmy Lot.

quarterbacked the team. Harry was a tremendous athlete, Welsh notes, and became a bank manager in North Bay, though he is not well enough to attend the group’s lunches. As if to counter the destruction of their school in the winter of 1948, the footballers brought glory the next fall, when they beat all comers, including Listowel and Acton, to end the season undefeated and capture the Ontario Rural High School League championship. One out-of-town newspaper reported this was the first time an Orangeville high school team had won a regional rugby championship, a big deal for a small town. But talk of the big win reminds the pals of a lost teammate. Derek MacKenzie was a 19-year-old senior known for his speed and agility on the field. He had been playing rugby hours before he died on November 21, 1947, likely of complications related to diabetes. Jim Wardlaw, a close friend and one of the pallbearers at his funeral, says, “It was a terrible loss. The entire school closed for the day.” Jim Lott, aka “Bimbo,” grew up near the old arena on Elizabeth Street and was a halfback on the rugby team. His dad, a mechanic at Bryan’s garage, died when Lott was 10, leaving his mother to raise three children on her own. She supported the family by working at Smallwood Pharmaceuticals and somehow found time to cook for all the “skinny guys” in the neighbourhood. Dan Webb remembers Mrs. Lott’s wonderful homemade bread and head cheese. Lott followed his older sister into teaching “back when they put you into a rural school with no continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

47


friends continued from page 47

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training,” he says. He upgraded his education over the years, retired as a public school principal and now lives in Tottenham. His biggest surprise since starting to attend the gatherings? What became of Bill Waters, class of ’50. Bill was adopted by Miss Edith Waters, “a good Christian lady” in her 50s and a former T. Eaton Company seamstress who had moved to Orangeville from Toronto to care for her aging parents. Miss Waters was as parsimonious as she was devout, but she backed her boy Billy’s business ventures – the legitimate ones at least. “I knew from an early age I didn’t want to live out my old age like my mother,” says Waters. At a time when many boys in town had one paper route, he had three. When he ran out of feed for the 300 capons he was raising beside their house on William Street, Miss Waters footed the bill for the extra he needed and put up with the smell, the noise, and an epidemic that killed 30 per cent of the birds. Bill sold the remaining healthy birds to butcher Bill Stirton and grocer Carm Davison. When he wasn’t trying to make a buck, Bill could be found at Morrison’s pool hall next door to Gillespie’s Hardware (148 Broadway – Moguls in M’Ocean occupies both stores today). Good marks kept him off Maurice Cline’s radar, but it was true that the principal periodically raided the poolroom for truants, though Waters insists that he played only after school hours. After graduating from high school and seeing no money was to be made working for A.V. Roe, he furthered his entrepreneurial education by buying the local taxi company from Art Langdon. “It was one car,” he says. “I had another. I paid no money down and the arrangement was I’d pay Art $100 a month for 36 months.”

This venture ended suddenly when Bill was arrested. It was 1953, and Orangeville and Shelburne were dry. A pair of OPP cruisers bracketed his cab one day while he was delivering a bottle of rye to a customer. Charged with illegal possession of liquor, he got off with a fine, but his bootlegging days were over. He returned to the aircraft industry and for the first time contemplated a university education. Today, Waters is a professor emeritus of economics and business at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management where he taught for 36 years, and he has donated millions of dollars to support non-traditional students’ pursuit of higher education. “And he’s just plain Billy to us,” says Jim Welsh, who has become the unofficial convener and statistician for what could be called the OHS Old Boys’ Club. “When you look over the

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Some of the Old Boys as they appeared in the school yearbooks back in the day.

48

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


1948 Orangeville High School champion ‘rugby’ team, left to right, back: Howard Lovell, Jim Lott, Ralph Mason, Jim Welsh, John Richardson, David Scott, Ed Woodland; front: Bill Dodds, Mel Rennick, Bob Thompson, Gerald Pendleton, Harry Cumings, David Brotherston, Bruce Burch, Coach Donald Thiers.

list of grads, they are a remarkably accomplished lot.” By Welsh’s count, the grads of that era include at least five engineers, three lawyers, three professors, three business owners, two doctors, two bankers, two geologists, an OPP officer, a hydro inspector, a liquor inspector, a draftsman, a salesman, a lineman, a farmer, a production worker, a real estate agent, a chartered accountant, a principal and an Anglican priest. These postwar grads have done well for themselves. Why? Most would agree they are the product of hard work, single-minded focus, strong role models and good family support, conditions the men believe are as valuable today as they were when they were growing up. But are they any more special than the grads who went before or who came after them? “I don’t think so,” says Dan Webb.

“We were lucky. After the war there was significant growth in the economy and opportunities everywhere,” says Waters. For what it’s worth, nine male alumni who graduated between 1949 and 1952 are recognized on Orangeville District Secondary School’s Wall of Fame. That’s out of a total of about 125 extraordinary graduates since 1884. And for the record, says Waters, “It wasn’t poker in the post office, it was hearts, and we started playing at 11 on Saturday night.” As for the teasing about his burning down the school, he retorts with a smile, “It was a Sunday night. The poolroom was closed. I was home for a change!” ≈

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The Orangeville High School Old Boys of 1949–52 continue to meet informally every spring and fall as long as good health and numbers permit. Although Greystones closed this fall, they plan to invite the women grads for lunch once again – at a new location. Bernadette Hardaker is an Orangeville writer specializing in personal history (lifestories.ca). Her three daughters are graduates of Orangeville District Secondary School.

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fall in As surely as the leaves turn gold, art blooms in the fall throughout the hills – and In The Hills presents our annual preview of the centrepiece of it all, the Headwaters Arts Festival Show & Sale. Including more than 40 local artists, the juried show is a perfect opportunity to see some of the finest work in the Headwaters region assembled in one place. The show and sale is open the last two weekends of September, with the preview gala on the evening of Friday, September 20. The preview features the annual Chef’s Challenge and performances by opera singer Jessica Scarlato, the Soulmé drummers, and the Community Living Dufferin Choir.

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to art You can also view the art show during another Festival favourite: Armchairs, Authors & Art, on the evening of Thursday, September 26. This year’s authors are Wayne Johnston, Don Gillmor, Oakland Ross and Maureen Jennings. The Headwaters Arts Festival runs from September 20 to October 6. To order tickets for the gala or authors’ night, and to see the full program of art tours and exhibitions, music, theatre and film, as well as some great workshops for kids, see www.headwatersarts.com or call 519-943-1149. 왔 Maria Drasilov Shimmer photograph 20 x 24" 왔 Valerie Ashbourne Madrigal fabric and fibre 24 x 24"

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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eteran art conservator and longtime Caledon resident Jayne Woods surveys a historic portrait belonging to a family with deep roots in Orangeville. To restore the painting, Woods had started by tackling a century or so of dirt, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry to choose a solvent that wouldn’t damage the type of paint she knows is typical of that era and location. But beneath the grime was another problem. The cracks of age over the face had pulled so far apart that the character was gone. The fi x had required much more than technical prowess. The challenge? To bring to life a person she had never met and whose portrait had been painted by an artist Woods didn’t know.

“I’m no artist,” insists Woods, snaking her way between rows of leaning canvases in her chockablock Caledon studio. Her tone is matter of fact. There’s no feigning modesty for this professional conservator, who has spent the past three decades breathing life into tired and damaged artworks. Some of the artists who created the works have been celebrated, even revered, such as abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler and Lawren Harris of the Group of Seven. Many more have been unknown, some deservedly so. Nor is Woods apologetic. Her work as an art conservator is no fallback from a failed art career. “I have no burning creative vision of my own,” she explains with the dispassion of a

surgeon. “My thing is recognizing and recapturing the original truth of an artist’s vision. It’s a place where art and science intersect.” It’s also a place where a lack of ego and some MacGyverlike instincts are keys to success. “So there was this 11th-century Russian icon on wood with a lot of gold-leaf paint loss,” she says – and pauses as I gasp. “You see I don’t react emotionally to the pieces, whether they’re old or important. I just assess the whole picture and figure out the least amount to be done to bring back safely what the artist intended.” In the case of the icon, Woods guestimated the percentage of gold in the leaf to be replaced. She fi lled in the damaged areas and then added some patina to match the aging. You’d have

P H O T O S R O S EM A R Y H A S N ER

BY L IZ B E AT T Y


Jayne Woods is currently working to restore a large painting by Hugh Stollmeyer, called “Classical Trio.” Stollmeyer is the brother of Daphne Lingwood, a wellknown Caledon East artist and honoree of the Caledon Walk of Fame. His works are now in the care of Daphne’s son Rex Lingwood, who commissioned the restoration.

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to look at it under a UV light to see her handiwork. Woods starts every project with one key rule in mind: do no harm. She comes by this artsy take on the medical ethos honestly. Her father was a doctor. Her mother, now almost 92, is an art curator who championed the contemporary and sometimes controversial Painters Eleven, who rose to prominence in the 1950s. Kay Woods was the first curator of the Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, which features the works of the eclectic group. “Mom would buy Painters Eleven works for the collection and hold onto them until the gallery could afford them. The gallery always paid what she paid, exactly,” says Woods. “I learned from her to never take advan-

tage. The integrity of the art always comes first.” In a realm with plenty of room for questionable dealings, Woods made her standards clear from the get-go. With degrees in both science and fine art, and a conservancy internship under her belt, the young Woods was introduced to renowned Toronto art dealer Gerald Morris. “We’re really good at oil paintings. How are you at signatures?” he asked. Woods laughed out loud and the two became fast friends. Her integrity applies to the fine strokes of art conservation too. Sometimes there’s damage or the painting doesn’t fit a client’s living room wall, so she is asked to cut it down or fundamentally alter it. “Who am I to change

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that artist’s vision?” asks Woods. “I tell them that’s not up to me and I send them on their way.” Other times, she says, it’s a matter of less is more: “I’ve seen airbrush fi xes that covered a swath of four or five inches where a few strokes with the finest brush would have been ample. When I see this done, I have to remove the overpaint to fully restore the piece, but sometimes it’s tricky.” Which is not to say that some of Woods’ restorations haven’t required major intervention. One historic seascape arrived with only half the painting intact. “I found a tiny fragment of another mast under the boom of the one ship that was left. I researched possible vessels of the period and, with the client, chose one to repaint. I extended the water, added some cracks to match up the aging. The owner was thrilled.” And still, Woods insists she’s no artist. Other works require more forensic expertise, such as knowing the difference between the chemistry of an egg tempera painting and an egg yolkwater varnish. There’s also the surface on which the work was painted, when it was painted, the source of the damage, the type of paint and more. “We know a lot about restoring older paintings, but there are some contemporary pieces with issues that we still don’t have answers for,” she says. One of these mysteries cropped up in a painting by Christopher Pratt. Patches of white had emerged as the pigment disappeared from some areas of the work, a nude in a landscape. Woods interviewed the artist extensively about the process he had used when painting and sent tiny samples, each about the size of a typed period, from the damaged areas for expert testing in Ottawa – to no avail. “Weeks later I retrieved a package from my mailbox,” she says. “Some workmen were standing around nearby when I opened it to find two breasts by Mr. Pratt, painted in a similar period. A prankster, he’d cut up one of his paintings and sent it for me to observe how it changed over time. I framed it. Pratt’s breasts still hang in my bedroom. No changes yet.” And no solution to the mystery of the disappearing pigment. Woods freely admits her knowhow and experience sometimes get a boost from dumb luck. One of her projects involved a large contemporary painting by Gershon Iskowitz. The work was in rough shape. Damaged by water and smoke, then wrapped in plastic for three months, it was covered in mould more than an inch thick. Woods removed most of the mould, then placed the painting in a

humidity chamber to slowly reduce the moisture level by half. “The remaining mould seemed to eat away smoke damage that I could never have reached. I wish I’d saved some of it to use on other pieces.” Woods may be coolheaded and dispassionate, but everyone has a vulnerable spot. “Ten large pieces I received from Ground Zero were very emotional to work on,” she reflected. Her husband John Chappelle, a firefighter captain, died a few years later of a work-related illness. “I do feel emotional pressure in other areas of my work too, but not so much for the big names. Rather, it’s things like family keepsakes – those pieces are priceless.” As for the old portrait owned by the Orangeville family, Woods was determined to fi nd a solution. Delicately fi lling in flesh-toned pigment in the face was just the first step. “I had to fi nd the personality of the young woman, but there were no usable photos.” So Woods asked the client for pictures of family members who resembled the subject – a niece with the same mouth, a cousin with a similar nose, a son with like eyes. From these, Woods reimagined the face. “I never felt it was me repainting her,” she explains. “I was just reclaiming the life that the artist first saw. I always feel an obligation to be as precise as the artist, whoever they are. I have to be just as passionate and honest.” “But you’re not an artist?” I ask again. She shakes her head, not budging on this point. “So yours is the art of the nonartist,” I reframe. She pauses, smiles, then concedes, “Okay, I like that. The art of the nonartist.” ≈

Liz Beatty, a freelance writer who lives in Brimstone, contributes regularly to National Geographic Traveler and blogs on the In The Hills website about special places in the Headwaters region.


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above : Jayne Woods cleaned years of grime from this Lawren Harris painting called “Woman on the Street.” The detail shows the cleaning work in progress. below : Woods’ challenge with this painting by Christopher Pratt, shown here in two details, was to restore the pigment fading from the subject’s skin. below left : A detail of “Classical Trio” showing considerable damage. In this case, many hands do not make light work.

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I N

T H E

H I L L S

by Nicola Ross P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

H O M E G R O W N

DUFFERIN TOWN & COUNTRY FARM TOUR Saturday, September 28

SEE FARMING AS IT HAPPENS! This year, the tour will take you to the centre of Dufferin. See working farms - animals, agricultural production in action, participate in educational activities, talk to farmers and learn how food on your table is grown. On location - food booths and local produce for sale

The tour runs from 9 am to 4 pm - rain or shine GET PASSPORT ONLINE or on day of tour (9 am to 2 pm) at AMARANTH WORKS YARD 393045 Cty. Rd. 12, Amaranth (just north of Cty. Rd. 109) or BLUWOOD CANADA 309 Main St. W., Shelburne Admission: a non-perishable or cash donation for the local food bank

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

I

n ancient Egypt, pyramid builders are said to have survived on a diet of beer, f latbread, onions and raw garlic, which they believed kept them healthy and gave them strength. When they threatened to strike because of a shortage of garlic, Cheops, the pharaoh at the time, had no choice but to import more – at a cost of about $2 million in today’s currency – or risk watching workers down tools and leave his Great Pyramid of Giza half finished.

When King Tut ruled, 15 pounds of garlic could be traded for a healthy slave. In Palestine, bridegrooms tuck a clove of this member of the onion family into a buttonhole to guarantee wedding-night bliss, and in Ayurvedic medicine, Allium sativum is believed to increase semen supply. And then, of course, there is garlic’s effect on vampires. Add to all this the fact that garlic sells well in Canada and thrives in Ontario’s growing conditions, and you can understand why Andrew

Sharko started cultivating it. A self-described computer nerd from suburban Toronto, Andrew has been cultivating garlic since 2008 at Hidden Meadows Farm, just north of Caledon village. And though he was born in Germany, Andrew has had the unfortunate luck of the Irish. “Everything that can go wrong has gone wrong,” he confided, as we sat on a pair of rickety antique chairs at a farm auction west of Orangeville. As I interviewed him and his partner Deborah Robillard, Mennonites in


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Andrew Sharko (facing page) endured pestilence and drought when he first launched his garlicgrowing enterprise, but philosophically chalks it all up as a valuable learning experience. Andrew, along with Lisa and Bart Brusse (above) can be found selling garlic most Saturdays at Orangeville Farmers’ Market.

matching bonnets and long f lowing dresses wandered by and tried to inspect the chairs we occupied. In the background the auctioneer sang out the bids. Andrew was at the auction in hopes of finding parts for his aging farm equipment. “I never thought I’d become a farmer farmer,” he said. But clad as he was in a ball cap, jeans, a collared shirt and gumboots, he seemed every bit the part, right down to his greying hair and the admission that though farming is his passion,

it’s his computer work that puts bread on the table. For much of Andrew’s life, the family’s country property in Caledon was his second home. In 2000, when his mother threatened to sell the simple 750-square-foot house on 42 acres, much of it dense cedar forest, Andrew moved in instead. Inspired by recollections of his hippie youth in the 1970s, he figured he would get back to the land by planting a large vegetable garden. On the advice of his sister, he bought some garlic cloves from the grocery store and planted them, never think ing that more than a dozen years later he would still be harvesting the stuff. “That was my first foray into garlic,” he explained. The crop flourished, so he planted more. But his budding garlic-growing career aligned with China’s dumping of their cheap product on the Canadian market. Ottawa was slow to respond, and by the time continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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garlic continued from page 57

it did, there wasn’t much of a domestic garlic industry left to protect. As a result, large farm operators have been reluctant to return to the garlic business – and this has left the field open to small producers, including Andrew, as well as Bart and Lisa Brusse.

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Larry’s Small Engines 4 km north of Orangeville on Highway 10 519-941-1517 www.larryssmallengines.ca © 2012 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc (BRP). All rights reserved. ™, ® and the BRP logo are trademarks of Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. or its affiliates. In the U.S.A., the products are distributed by BRP US Inc. BRP reserves the right, at any time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring obligation. Some models depicted may include optional equipment. BRP highly recommends that all ATV drivers take a training course. For safety and training information, see your dealer or, in USA, call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887. In Canada, call the Canadian Safety Council at 613-739-1535 ext. 227. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: always wear a helmet, eye protection, and other protective clothing. Always remember that riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Never ride on paved surfaces or public roads. Never carry passengers on any ATV not specifically designed by the manufacturer for such use. Never engage in stunt driving. Avoid excessive speeds and be particularly careful on difficult terrain. ATVs that are classified as Category G ATVs (General Use Models) are intended for recreational and/or utility use by an operator age 16 or older. BRP urges you to “ TREAD LIGHTLY ” on public and private lands. Preserve your future riding opportunities by showing respect for the environment, local laws and the rights of others when you ride. Make sure that all laws, regulations, and BRP’s warnings / recommendations for ATV passengers are respected. Ride responsibly. 5108338

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

he Brusses love growing the crop so much that they call their small enterprise LOVE Garlic. Blessed with a borrowed acre of land near Hillsburgh that has the sandy loam preferred by garlic, LOVE Garlic has thrived since day one. Bart’s skill in growing trees and Lisa’s sales and marketing expertise have proven a winning combination. “Bart and I have always said we could do great things if we put our heads and talents together,” said Lisa. Every year the Brusses sell about 20 per cent of their crop at Toronto’s Garlic Festival. Friends and colleagues gobble up the stuff, and Janine Livingston takes as much as she can get to sell at her Broadway Farm’s Market on Heart Lake Road. Janine and her husband Jim own the land where the Brusses cultivate their plants. “People are really disappointed at the end of the season when we’re all sold out of LOVE Garlic,” said Janine. “Some of them plant a few cloves to see if they can grow their own.” Like most producers in Ontario, Andrew and Bart grow Music garlic, though the Brusses also cultivate a limited number of other varieties. Music is a “hardneck” variety that produces a tall, edible f lower stalk called a scape. (Lisa turns some of the scapes into a delicious pesto.) In addition to thriving in Ontario’s climate, Music garlic stores well, tastes great, and produces large, meaty cloves. Introduced to Ontario from the Adriatic area in the 1950s by Al Music, a former tobacco farmer, it is white-skinned with a pink blush and makes four to six easy-to-peel cloves. Like a curry dish that is packed with f lavour without being too spicy, Music garlic, said Janine, “has a ton of flavour without being too garlicky.” Andrew’s customers at local farmers’ markets are also keen to buy his garlic, but his success has come with a steep learning curve. Though he has avoided famine, Andrew has lost significant portions of his garlic crops to pestilence and drought. He also learned the hard way that storing garlic takes some care. But he is philosophical about the challenges he has faced. “Nature keeps giving me lessons,” he said, “so I’m hoping that I can help younger farmers because of my experience.”

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Bart is likewise motivated by what he can teach others. He said he and Lisa started LOVE Garlic when their children were young. “I wanted them to understand the cycle of growing their own food.” These days in Ontario garlic isn’t as valuable as it was in ancient Egypt, and for both Andrew and the Brusses growing it is more like a passionate avocation. At least it is so far – but all three dream of a day when their passion can become a livelihood. ≈


A

Garlic Grower’s Year

Garlic likes sun and well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. This year’s cool, rainy summer delayed the Brusses’ garlic crop so their annual harvest was later than usual. This guide is adapted from the LOVE Garlic website.

September

July

prepare the soil

cut the scapes

— Clear all weeds.

— Watch for the scape (the flower stalk) to curl around once, then cut or snap it off.

Add compost or manure, tilling or digging to a depth of 6 in (15 cm). Obtain garlic bulbs for planting (while locally grown supplies remain available).

October

plant the cloves — If you haven’t already, buy or trade for good-sized, locally grown bulbs. Split the bulbs into individual cloves. Save damaged or very small cloves for your next meal. Plant the cloves 2 to 4 in (5 to 10 cm) deep and 6 to 8 in (15 to 20 cm) apart. Note: Plant in early October, about 4 weeks before the ground freezes. Here in the hills, Thanksgiving weekend is the ideal time.

October–November cover with mulch

— Use straw, leaves or grass clippings to a depth of 2 to 4 in (5 to 10 cm). Do this before the snow stays on the ground to help with weed control, prevent drying out and provide insulation.

January–June wait and watch

— Enjoy imagining the cloves sprouting roots under the snow, growing through the spring and reaching full size in June. Water if there is a long dry spell (2 or more weeks) in May or June. Pull weeds that pop through the mulch. Garlic doesn’t like competition from weeds.

Cook, fry or barbeque the scapes in any recipe, just as you would a green onion or asparagus – delicious! Note: You can leave some scapes on some plants to watch small seeds, which are really clones, develop in a pod. But because producing scapes diverts energy from making bulbs, the bulbs on these plants will be smaller.

August

harvest and dry — Watch for the leaves to go brown from the ground up as the garlic matures in late July. Once half the leaves are brown (about August 1), dig up the garlic with a shovel or pitchfork. Shake off loose soil, leaving the roots and stems attached.

dé ttails

create the world you live in…

Move the harvested plants to an area that is open to the air but out of the sun. A shed or covered porch works well.

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Tie the plants in bundles of 10 and hang to dry or lay flat on a shelf that allows air to circulate. Once your plants have dried for a few days, try braiding some. This is a great way to store garlic – and the braided plants make nice gifts! Let the plants air for about 2 weeks, then cut the stem about 1 in (2.5 cm) above the bulb. Make sure the stem is dry all the way through. Trim the roots and store the bulbs in a dry spot, no colder than 50° F (10° C). Inside a paper or mesh bag in the kitchen pantry is ideal. Note: You can start using the bulbs as soon as they are harvested, but they won’t store well until they’re dried.

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Unique gifts for all occasions – for yourself and for others! IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

59


H E A D W A T E R S

by Bethany Lee

go! I L L U S T R AT I O N S H EL A G H A R M S T R O N G

Go, Braves,

N E S T

Lunch Box Ideas Head over to the library on September 26 at 7 p.m. for some lunch box ideas. Join naturopathic doctor Jilan Koch for an informative talk on preparing delicious, nutritious and satisfying pack-and-go school lunches, and learn about basic nutrition for kids. It’s part of the library’s Health and Wellness series. Registration is not required. Orangeville Public Library, Mill Street location. www.orangeville.library.on.ca

More Learning at the Library… Join the Orangeville Library LEGO Club on Tuesdays starting October 8 at the Alder Street location, and on Thursdays starting October 10 at the Mill Street location from 4 to 5 p.m. This free club welcomes kiddos ages six and older to get creative, play imaginary games and build with LEGO. This is a drop-in event. www.orangeville.library.on.ca

“Dress for a Mess” We love that the Headwaters Arts Festival is letting everyone know to “Dress for a mess.” How fun! The festival offers many activities dedicated to kids and families over the weekends of September 21 and 22, and 28 and 29. From pottery to photography, dance to encaustic collage, it hosts a number of events that lets kids loose to express their artistic side. Get your smocks ready and join the fun. The full schedule is at www.headwatersarts.com/festival/kidsfest-events

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

I

t’s been a long season of baseball for the Bolton Braves rookie rep team, and as I write this we are prepping for a “kids-versus-parents” game (and wondering if parents will stand a chance against the Rookies) and for the final Ontario playoff tournament.

My son Adrian is eight and a half now, and loves the sport of baseball. He tried out for the Bolton Braves rep team and was selected. Over the winter, the boys and the one girl on the team played indoors at a tiny gym in downtown Bolton. They travelled to Vaughan to an indoor baseball camp. It was a lot of fun, but sometimes they could barely keep the ball alive in drills, they missed throws, a visiting baby sister took it in the face when a throw went wild, and she dropped and bled profusely for the rest of the night (and, oh yes, it was my son who threw the ill-fated ball). Oh boy, this is going to be a long season, I thought. Combine it with Saturday mornings for race team on the ski hill, and I was feeling a mixture of, well, I wasn’t really sure how I was feeling about team sports. Give it a try, I said to myself. Keep the momentum going. Being the parent of a child in team sports is fairly new to me, even at Adrian’s ripe old age. But as an only child, he really did need companionship and other kids to play with, and adult figures to look up to. And a schedule. And accountability. Wait a second – I was getting sucked in to this whole “team” thing! I couldn’t have asked for more out of the season. It helped that I instantly liked the

coaches. They were a combo of three dads, and each brought excitement to the game in his own way. My heart grew three sizes when I read “The Rules of Baseball” that Coach Mike sent home with the kids. The energy was positive and peppy, and I could see over the winter months that the kids were improving. “Go, Braves!” they cheered. The spring day they lined up to receive their uniforms from Coach was a highlight. He had the blue stitched jersey, red warmup shirt and grey pants bundled by the belt, with the player’s number showing and the hat presented on top. He shook each player’s hand and asked them to wear it with pride. Swoon. What I didn’t realize was how competitive the field would be once the season began, and how our little Bolton team, while fielding a solid turnout and looking spiffy in their uniforms, was nowhere near the calibre of the teams North York, Barrie, Richmond Hill, Vaughan and the rest of the league had spawned. Those players were my size, I swear! It was intimidating, and we lost – over and over. But each time, the coaches thanked the other team, led a cheer, had fun out on the field and went over some lessons learned. Coaches and kids thanked the parents. We


Keeping the Air Clean for our Kids

Bethany Lee is the online editor of www.kidsinthehills.ca, a sister site of www.inthehills.ca, where she also writes a regular blog.

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Giving Makes the World Go ’Round As you get ready for the season of giving, consider a very special way to send your message this year. Marilyn Field is the founder of the DAREarts charitable foundation, an organization that has had significant impact at the local, national and international levels by bringing the arts to children from all walks of life. In 2003, she was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal and The Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal, and very recently she received a place on Caledon’s Walk of Fame. Through DAREarts, 3,000 local children paint original art cards to help Canadian Aboriginal children living in remote communities. Call DAREarts to buy the cards or find out where they will be available this season. 905-729-0097, www.darearts.com

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had a great pool party. The kids swam until they were blue and their teeth chattered, and they ate soggy chips and pizza with wet hands. We suffered near heat stroke several times, while at other times parents bought coffees to warm each other up. Meanwhile, I heard about a friend’s experience coaching hockey. His team had a few minor problems that tainted the experience from the beginning. A small handful of parents moaned about ice times and the amount of play time their up-andcomers were given. Letters were written, meetings had – and the sport of the game was soured by politics, criticism and troublemaking. In a recent survey by ESPN in the United States, conducted among youths (ages 10 to 18) who play competitive sports, the respondents reported that 87 per cent of their parents mention the amount of time and money sports participation costs, and 79 per cent get upset when their child “did not play as well as they would like me to in a game.” Furthermore, 70 per cent said the time they devote to sports makes it difficult to complete their school work. Hmmm. I feel badly that my coaching friend’s season was lost and he now wonders if he will coach again this year, or ever. He is a great volunteer and a very talented player. It would be a loss if he didn’t. These are the aspects of team sports that make us cringe. We pray that our child wants to learn springboard diving, or maybe ride a horse, or just keep playing solitaire on the living room floor. On the other hand, my heart sings for how much my son learned this year in baseball and how much he gained from making new friends, seeing new places, being challenged on the field and being looked after by his team. In the same ESPN survey, a whopping 98 per cent of the kids said they like playing their sport. And asked why they play, 90 per cent said they play to have fun! Did I luck out this year? I would like to think our experience is the norm. It was a summer that shone so brightly for me that I will never forget it, and neither will my son. I hope we’ll have a repeat performance next year, win or lose. “Go, Braves!” ≈

Kudos to Caledon for adopting the Peel Outdoor Smoking By-law, effective September 2, which makes it against the law to smoke outdoors within nine metres (30 feet) of entrances and exits of municipal buildings, playground areas and outdoor recreation facilities. The idea is to help protect children and the public from the harmful effects of second-hand smoke. Questions, or want to learn more about smoke-free living? Call the Region of Peel, Public Health at 905-799-7700 (toll free from Caledon at 905-584-2216), or visit www.smokefree-peelregion.ca

Back to school is upon us. We hope all is going smoothly for those who are returning to school, are first-time students, or have just moved to our area. Welcome – we wish you well this school year! And please drop by kidsinthehills.ca anytime to see what’s new. —Bethany IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

61


G O O D

S P O R T

by Nicola Ross

my not-soGlorious hockey career

“S

he shoots, she scores!” This feminine take on Foster Hewitt’s famous line wasn’t running through my head as I “skated” down the ice, “stickhandling” the puck. I glanced up and there was the goalie. Sporting a green jersey, enormous shin pads and a white mask, she seemed to fill the net. Her knees were bent, her stick protectively at the ready on the crease line, her glove opening and closing like a crab’s claw. “Come on, girl,” she seemed to be saying. “Let me have it. See if you can get one through the five hole. Just try.” Silence pervaded the empty arena. My teammates held their collective breath. No one stood between me and the net. I had been chosen to take a penalty shot, the first of my short hockey career. Truth be told, this shot was about to be my first of any kind on a hockey net. It was also my fi rst time on hockey skates and my first 62

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

time using a hockey stick on ice. Not very Canadian, eh? But true. Slowly, painfully and entirely without grace, I made my way down the ice looking at the puck, then at the goalie and then leaning on my stick for support. Puck. Goalie. Stick. Puck. Goalie. Stick. Despite my lack of sk ill, Janet Eagleson had invited me to play a game with Armstrong Petroleum, one of eight teams that play once a week in the Caledon Women’s Hockey League. And damn their collective souls, but didn’t they give me the full hockey-meal deal. I “played” forward in the first period, muddled my way through defence in the second, and prayed no puck would come near the net when I was stuffed into goalie gear for the third. My teammates, all of whom had seemed like such lovely women in the change room, whizzed by me. I felt like Unwile E. Coyote surrounded by a f lock of Road Runners. My brain was willing, but I could gain no traction on my pickless, and borrowed,

hockey skates. I couldn’t imagine anyone skating faster or shooting the puck harder than these mad women. The Caledon Women’s Hockey League (19 and older, non-contact) represents what’s good – and what’s problematic – about women’s hockey in Canada. The number of female hockey players in this country is rising like a Bobby Hull wrist shot.

Since 1995–96, shortly before women’s hockey made its debut at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, the number of girls and young women playing minor hockey has more than quadrupled and now tops 86,000. But the number of spaces in women’s recreational leagues hasn’t expanded at the same pace. In Caledon, for instance, more than 30 women are on a waiting list,

P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

But then, winning isn’t everything for the Caledon Women’s Hockey League


She may be wearing borrowed skates, but writer Nicola Ross looks every bit the part in her debut hockey game. She even did a turn in goal and grinned happily (perhaps with relief it was over) front and centre for the team photo.

The Udder Tournament To see Canadian women’s hockey in action, check out the Caledon Women’s Hockey League’s annual Udder Tournament. Organized in memory of the late Donna deBoer, one of the league’s founders, the tourney takes place in Caledon East from November 8 to 10. You can also follow the Caledon Women’s League on facebook.com/ caledonwomenshockeyleague

hoping to fi nd a permanent spot in the town’s winter league. “And we don’t take beginners,” says league president MaryLou Hurley. “These are women who have played before.” The surge in interest delights Kim Malcher, one of the league’s referees. Now 33 and the mother of two youngsters, Kim is arguably the best female player Caledon has produced. From 2000 to 2002 she was a member of Canada’s Under 22 national team. “There are many highlights to my career,” Kim says, but her favourite was the first time she sported a Team Canada jersey. “When I stepped out onto the ice, I could hardly breathe. I couldn’t imagine how I was going to actually play.” In a country that boasts a wealth of women’s hockey talent, Kim didn’t make the final cut for the Olympic team, but she still ranks among the best female hockey players in the world.

In the 1990s it was Kim’s mother, Lyn Malcher, and a handful of other women who got women’s hockey going in Caledon. They donned their figure skates, borrowed helmets and picked up sticks. The idea caught on, more players joined, and as their skills improved, so did their equipment. Though it took a few years for the league to adopt a full-equipment rule, the women added padding as injuries demanded. “Players would don an elbow pad here or a shin pad there to cover up their bruises from the previous week’s game,” Lyn says. For these women the camaraderie with teammates is a big part of the sport’s attraction. “It sounds clichéd,” says Armstrong Petroleum’s team rep Amanda Schaefer, whose mother was on the opposing team the night I took part, “but I play because of all the other great women.” My experience confirmed this attitude. Despite my abominable skating skills, and even though Armstrong Petroleum was behind 2–0 at the end of the second period, no one flinched as I skated over to take my place in net at the start of the third. Everyone on the team gave me the encouraging little glove-to-glove punch you see on Hockey Night in Canada. The women are serious about playing and like working up a good sweat, but they aren’t obsessed with winning. “We have a league draft to make up the teams,” explains MaryLou. This system ensures the teams are balanced, each with a similar number of skilled and less skilled players. “It’s great for the newer players to play with the more experienced ones,” she says. And then there was the penalty shot. I have a hard time imagining another team nominating someone of my calibre – Rick Mercer excepted – to take this shot. But there I was at centre ice. Only the opposing team’s goalie and that damned stretch of ice stood between me and a Hollywood ending to my nascent hockey career. Slowly, I made my ungainly way down the ice. Puck. Goalie. Stick. Puck. Goalie. Stick. Until finally, she shoots, she … well, I didn’t end up covered in glory, but true to form, the goalie graciously thanked me for not scoring. ≈ Nicola Ross is a freelance writer, cyclist, skier and tennis player who lives in Belfountain.

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63


H I S T O R I C

H I L L S

by Ken Weber

Before the days of clinics, emergency rooms and office hours, most medical treatment took place in a patient’s home. It was a challenging and uncertain process, and not just for the patient.

n 1905, when Dr. George Campbell made a house call somewhere in his practice based in Grand Valley and Waldemar, neighbours could usually judge the seriousness of the visit simply by watching him go into the house. If Campbell carried his little black bag and nothing else, the medical problem was probably something like measles or whooping cough, or a non-life-threatening injury. If Kate McFadzean, his nurse newly graduated from Royal Alexandra Hospital in Fergus, was with him, the situation was a little more serious. An additional medical bag in Kate’s hand might indicate a badly broken limb or perhaps a tonsillectomy (an operation typically performed with the patient seated in a kitchen chair or, in hot weather, on the back porch). However, if Kate was carrying a suitcase, the neighbours knew someone was due for major treatment because she was moving in. At that time, for the people of these hills, the closest hospital was in Fergus, so anything short of major surgery, especially an emergency, was dealt with by a house call. Nurses like Kate would accompany the attending physician, bringing along syringes, surgical tools, bandages, medications and, invariably, a crockery bedpan, along with enough clothes for several days’ stay if necessary. Kate’s role in this extended house call would include post-op care for surgeries, such as removing an appendix (usually performed on the kitchen table), or perhaps managing a lifethreatening illness such as pneumonia 64

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

Dr. George Campbell, 1868– 1923, was born in Belwood. His practice, based in Grand Valley, extended into East Luther and Erin townships.

or tuberculosis. Dr. Campbell would return regularly in his little Ford coupe – weather permitting. If not, Kate was on her own and would either stay or keep coming back until the patient was deemed recovered. W EL L I N G T O N CO U N T Y M U S E U M & A R C H I V E S , P H 9 59 2

I

O

nce upon a time there were house calls

A LOCAL ANGEL TO THE RESCUE Kate was not the only nurse in the Erin/Luther townships area in 1905, nor was Dr. Campbell the only “physician and surgeon” (the customary designation, because they were usually trained as both). By then the roads and railways had provided citizens of these hills with eventual, if not always immediate, access to professional medical expertise. Which raises the question: How did the first settlers manage their medical problems? One resource, if they could submerge the suspicions and prejudice brought with them from Europe, was the wisdom and natural medicine of the Native people. Another was the self-help medical “bible” carried by many an early pioneer (more on this later). And if they were lucky, there

was a Granny Beckel nearby. Remote communities were often blessed by the emergence of a key figure, usually a woman, with – for lack of a better word – a “knack” for healing. Such was Granny Beckel. She came to Horning’s Mills in 1855, then

aged 52, and until the arrival of Dr. John Barr in 1866, became a treasure throughout Melancthon Township and beyond. Granny’s expertise not only encompassed an encyclopedic knowledge of medicinal herbs, she was remarkably adept at setting broken limbs, adjusting dislocated joints, and dealing with wounds and deep-rooted infections. Yet what distinguishes the story of Granny Beckel more than anything is what she had to do to make her house calls. In all four seasons she would slog through the trackless wilds of Melancthon, ford streams and rivers, and face down wolves and black bears, all with a sack full of not just her medicines, but homemade jams and other goodies for the soon-to-begrateful patient.

A VARIATION ON THE HOUSE CALL The Shelburne Economist carried a front-page advertisement on January 21, 1892, announcing that Dr. Sinclair, a reputed specialist from Toronto with multiple degrees, would be offering consultations at the Royal Hotel in Shelburne the next day. This type of “visiting specialist” was common at the time. Dr. Sinclair’s consultations were offered free of charge, so it’s conceivable he was selling medications or special therapies. The ad carried several endorsements of Sinclair’s prowess in curing fits, catarrh, heart disease and dropsy, and it emphasized his success in treating “diseases of a private nature brought on by folly.”


D U F F E R I N CO U N T Y A R C H I V E S

Undaunted by weather or wildlife, Melancthon’s heroine, Granny Beckel, 1803–1880, brought cure and comfort across terrain often too rough for horseback. Her standard fee for house calls, no matter what the distance or the difficulty, was $2.

THE ‘HOUSE CALL BOOK’ Granny was also remarkable for her common sense belief in the benefits of fresh air, good diet, cleanliness and letting nature take its course – this at a time when bleeding and blistering patients were still solidly established practices. Which suggests that if Granny used a home medicine guide, a compendium of advice and treatment in which many of our ancestors placed their faith, she must have been able to separate the wheat from the chaff in its pages. Such publications were widely available and very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries because, for all but the rich, doctors were unaffordable, and in Upper Canada’s early days, unavailable in any case. Thus, tucked into many a pioneer’s baggage would be a publication such as William Buchan’s Domestic Medicine. First published in 1769, it went through 22 editions over the next century. These books reflected the medical knowledge of the time, so they were truly a mixed bag. Domestic Medicine, for example, recommended calomel (mercurous chloride) both as a purgative and a treatment for infections. Administered properly in tiny amounts, calomel can be effective for these purposes, but improper use can lead to mercury poisoning. Another effective but potentially risky recommendation was laudanum (tincture of opium) which appeared in such publications as a treatment for everything from headaches to tuberculosis and menstrual discomfort.

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(Domestic Medicine dealt with the last under the title “Diseases of Women.”) Ironically, impoverished readers of these home medicine guides generally avoided the risk of improper medicating for the simple reason they could not afford the required materials. Wealthier patients had a full inventory, however. In addition to a published guide, they customarily kept a medicine chest in their homes, fi lled with the packets of powder and vials of liquid that might – or might not – produce the desired cure.

FROM HOUSE CALL TO ER Fortunately, as Upper Canada morphed into Canada West and then Ontario, medical practice gradually became more informed and scientific, and over time more and more medical professionals established their practices in these hills. Orangeville, for example, had three doctors by the early 1860s, and Mono Mills had a doctor even before that. As early as 1835, Dr. Thomas Henry, a Dublin University graduate, was practising in the Sandhill area. By 1900, Peel County boasted 31 licensed physicians for a population of just over 30,000. For these professionals, house calls continued to be a normal and vital component of their medical practice, and remained so well into the 1950s and ’60s when the advent of hospital emergency rooms and clinics changed things dramatically. For nurses like Kate McFadzean, the major change took place quite a bit earlier. The opening of Orangeville’s Lord Dufferin Hospital in 1912 and Brampton’s Peel Memorial in 1925 meant that although she and her colleagues still played an important role in house calls, they no longer had to take along a suitcase and a bedpan. ≈

BLANKET CURES? As a 1905 nursing graduate, Kate McFadzean received what was then current training in the treatment of pneumonia and tuberculosis: 24/7 exposure of the patient to fresh air no matter what the season. Understandably, wide-open windows in a sick room in December and January was counterintuitive, so the instruction from Kate and her colleagues often generated real battles with the family – not to mention the patient!

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

65


A T

H O M E

I N

T H E

H I L L S

by Pam Purves

Living with History George Booth has gone back to school – at the Silver Creek schoolhouse. The decorative touches that set the Silver Creek schoolhouse apart from its plainer counterparts include buttresses along the side walls, a charming circular window above the main doors, and the buff-brick voussoirs that form a rounded arch above both the large side windows and the two smaller multipaned windows that flank the entrances. Buff bricks were also used to create a pattern of decorative quoins at each corner of the building. inset : An historic photo of the school before the maples, planted by students, grew to tower over it.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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he current academic program at S.S. #3 Caledon, aka the Silver Creek schoolhouse, is not demanding, but this makes no difference to George Booth. He is intensely interested in the history of this former one-room schoolhouse that overlooks the intersection of Kennedy Road and the Grange Sideroad. Here, generations of local students mastered the three Rs, and George, who now owns the property, has assembled a small archive of documents that illuminate the early history of the red-brick building that is an official Caledon heritage site. A deed suggests the site may have been designated for school use as early as 1846, when a log structure was probably built on the west side of the lot. Another document, dated 1887, deeds the same lot to the school trustees of Caledon Township – for the princely sum of $25. Why two deeds were necessary isn’t known.


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The current building was probably built in 1884, before the land transfer was formally recorded, a situation that wasn’t uncommon. More ornate than many Ontario schoolhouses, whose plainness often ref lected the frugality of school officials, S.S. #3 includes some surprising flourishes that suggest its construction may have been a labour of love for the unknown

builder or builders. Children from Silver Creek village, on Kennedy Road just north of the school, and surrounding farms attended the school until 1965, when a new four-room elementary school opened at Kennedy Road and Charleston Sideroad. Caledon Central Public School was built at a time when the province was amalgamating school continued on next page

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The leaded-glass transoms over the boys’ and girls’ entrances were designed and crafted by Gene Aliman, the previous owner and a noted art director. Although not original to the school, the student desk is a reminder of school days past and makes a practical and whimsical side table.

districts, an initiative that led to the closing of the one-room schoolhouses that had dotted Ontario’s rural landscape for more than a century. News of Silver Creek school’s closing was featured, complete with photographs of teacher Violet Cook and some of her 28 students, in the Family section of the Toronto Daily Star on May 22, 1965. At one time the school and the post office up the road were the social centre of Silver Creek village. The Kidd family was also central to the community, and the school was built on a corner of the property that was long known as the old Kidd orchard. Much of this orchard remained until a few years ago, although the trees had become wild and overgrown.

George recalls Mr. Kidd as a familiar and well-loved figure. Though he was completely blind, Mr. Kidd walked to the schoolhouse every day, winter and summer, to pump two buckets of water from the well so the students would have drinking water. And this wasn’t just any old water – it was reputedly the best “sweet water” in Caledon. In an old extension at the back of the school, two stoves helped supply heat – and the cast iron stove that remains in the main room is the same one that kept students warm in winter. One of the teacher’s jobs was to arrive early to get the fires going. For a few years after the school closed, the building sat empty and boarded up. Then, in 1972, Gene Aliman and his wife Laura bought


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the relic of a bygone era for $4,500. Purchasing the fi xer-upper took some courage, but it saved the schoolhouse. After Gene’s death his family brought a medallion and some of his ashes to the site, placing these mementoes in the crotch of one of the historic maple trees that line the schoolyard. Students planted these trees in 1897 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. George Booth never attended the school, but after spending every weekend and summer of his childhood on a family farm just up the road, he felt deeply attached to the neighbourhood. And as a member of both Caledon Ski Club and Caledon Mountain Trout Club, he continued to nurture his strong connection to the area.

So when the school property came up for sale about 12 years ago, George seized the opportunity to return to his childhood haunts. By then the school had been transformed into a comfortable living space. When George moved in it boasted three bedrooms, a tiny kitchen, the original boys’ and girls’ entrances and the boys’ washroom. George retained many of the changes Gene and Laura had made. A talented artist, photographer and craftsman, Gene designed and created the stained glass in the transom windows over the entry doors and recovered many of the newel posts and banisters from a church that was being demolished on Jarvis Street in Toronto. He also found the unique continued on next page

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The upper hall leads to a series of small bedrooms and a study that is open to the living space below. Stair railings and newel posts are reclaimed elements from Toronto churches. The bathroom tiles were collected by the previous owner who had an eye for great design and colour.

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tiles that are mounted behind the bathtub. Some time after the school closed, the original bell was stolen, but Gene found another and replaced both it and the belfry. Other items came with the building. These include a f latback cupboard, the chalkboard that is now in the grandchildren’s playroom, the cabinet where chalk was stored, and the teacher’s desk. Since the purchase George and his partner Jean Hickey have put their

own stamp on the schoolhouse. They have repainted, put in a new kitchen, brought in more contemporary and comfortable furniture and added a deck on the south side. The improvements are delightful, brightening the spaces and taking advantage of the spectacular view over to the Devil’s Pulpit. The generous main room has become a centre for neighbourhood gatherings. And although George and Jean don’t live in the schoolhouse full-time, the next generations of their family are

following in George’s footsteps by visiting regularly. Their grandchildren ensure that children’s voices continue to echo through the building and around the schoolyard. The Silver Creek schoolhouse is clearly a place of attachments. It was built with care, served generations of students, was given new life by its previous owners and is loved by the current ones. Its future seems secure. ≈ Freelance photographer and writer Pam Purves lives in Caledon.


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S

MOFFAT DUNLAP

O

REAL ESTATE LIMITED, BROKERAGE

LD

905-841-7430 www.moffatdunlap.com Moffat Dunlap*, John Dunlap**, Peter Boyd, Murray Snider, George Webster, Peter Bowers, Nik Bonellos*** *Chairman, **Broker of Record, ***Sales Representative

2 HOUSES, 2 LOTS, 85 ACRES

76 ACRES, HOCKLEY VALLEY Fully updated Century farmhouse with stone & timber frame addition. Large detached studio building. Garages for 5 cars. Det workshop. Immaculate 3-stall stable, board paddocks, hayfield, wooded trails, riding ring. $1,495,000

SILVER HILLS FARM, MONO Elegant Napier Simpson 3-bedroom country home on 40 acres situated a stroll away from the Mono Cliffs Inn and across the road from the 732 ha Provincial Park. Coach house. Barn. Very private setting. $990,000

BRIDLEWOOD FARM, CALEDON A property for a discerning family with a taste for the best in country living. Fully restored 5-bedroom farmhouse. Swimming pond with waterfall. 11-stall barn with tack room, paddocks. 57 acres. $2,295,000

STONEGRANGE, BELFOUNTAIN Fully renovated 1864 stone house with superb living room, kitchen and deluxe baths. 2 ft thick stone walls. Gym. Rec room. $2,595,000

HOCKLEY VALLEY GOLF Elegant 4-bedroom home overlooking the hills, valleys and fairways of private Mono Hills Golf Club. Rare opportunity! Combined kitchen, dining, family room. Great views. $1,049,000

HIGH HOCKLEY, MONO Set on 148 rolling acres. The BC Cedar clad 3+2 bedroom home is perfectly sited to capture the magnificent endless vistas. Kilometres of trails traverse the hills and dales. $2,775,000

NATURAL STONE, ERIN Exceptional quality 9-year-old stone house on 50 acres. Walnut hardwood floors. Exceptional chef’s kitchen. Exterior is Owen Sound Ebel ledge rock. Mix of open meadow, hardwood, pine, cedar woods, trails. $1,750,000

ACTON TROUT CLUB, 126 ACRES Established in 1928. Multiple ponds, meadows and fields. Walk to downtown Acton. Original 5-bedroom stone lodge building, 3-bedroom stone tenant home, stone stable. Your chance to restore this piece of history. $1,995,000

GEORGIAN MANOR, CALEDON Prime location. 3 finished levels with 5 bdrms. Newly renovated kitchen. Huge dining room with fireplace. Elegant master suite. Distant views. Stream. Tennis. Pool. Room for outbuildings. 27 acres. $1,995,000

“TRALEE”, CALEDON 110 acres of rolling land. Massive pond. 2 houses + staff apartments. Wedding/special event centre. Vet clinic + 29-stall barn, arena. Very unique offering. $3,300,000

10 ACRES, NEAR ALLISTON Updated 3-bedroom country home on a country road in Essa Township. Three large paddocks accompany the 4-stall barn. Views for miles. 10 acres. $599,900

COUNTRY CAPE, ESSA 4-bedroom Cape Cod style home. 8-stall stable with heated tack room. Drive shed. Riding rings and trails. Wonderful views over your own property and surrounding hills. 10 acres. 5 mins to Alliston. $699,900

STONEHILL FARM, HOCKLEY VALLEY 90+ rolling acs w/ 2 beautiful ponds, useable farmland & a small woodlot. The original board and batten farmhouse has been updated with new kit, bthrm and Muskoka room. Incredible views. Large swimming pond. $1,275,000

BY THE HUMBER, CALEDON 2+1 bdrm bungalow overlooking the Humber. Completely private setting next to the Albion Hills Conservation. Deck overlooks river cascading through centre of property. $729,000

ON THE CREDIT Hidden oasis in Belfountain. Located on a very private road. Custom built house on the Credit River. This is the first time in 30 years this property has become available. Exclusive

FORKS OF THE CREDIT A special country property. Expanded by the current owners. Elegant design and luxury finishes. Massive 2-storey family room with fireplace and stone floors. 2 ponds. Detached workshop/office at gate. $3,250,000

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BRINGING FAMILIES TO ERIN 14 Main St, PO Box 1076, Erin, On N0B 1T0

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LIZ CRIGHTON liz@lizcrighton.com

CALEDON ESCARPMENT VIEWS 14.89 acres w/ spectacular GTA views. Secluded, private property w/ 4,404 sq ft contemporary style, 4+1 bdrm, 3.5 bath w/ 3-car grge, solarium, sunrm w/ hot tub, sauna, 6-pc master ens w/ jacuzzi rm, hrdwd flrs & 2 high-efficiency heat pumps. $1,325,000

WEST ORANGEVILLE CUSTOM Backing to conservation on a pro-landscaped 1.04 acre lot w/ 14’x28’ heated saline pool, this 2,680 sq ft, 3+2 bdrm, 4 bath, stone & stucco bungalow has a 4-bay heated grge, 3 gas fps, mstr 7-pc ens, rec & media rms plus 1,200 sq ft one-bdrm apartment. $998,900

1.8 ACRES BUNGALOFT Built last year, open design, 4,500 sq ft of finished luxury living space. Thousands spent on landscaping. Great location on a quiet paved road south of Erin village. Turn key! $939,000

SECLUDED AND PRIVATE! Elegant custom built home situated on a private 1 acre. West Credit River to the south and west of property, quiet but paved road. 4 bedroom, 3,500 sq ft home boasts 9' ceilings, large windows, open concept, updated and immaculate. $849,000

CALEDON 1890’S VICTORIAN Manicured 1.5-ac lot w/ maple treed laneway, rockery accents, 4-car det garage/workshop (35’x22'). This 4-bdrm, 2 bath has enclosed sunrm, patio, country kit w/ cookstove, high ceilings & baseboards, crown mldgs, orig pine flrs, upgraded windows. $648,900

CALEDON CUSTOM + STREAM Superior finishings in 2,900 sq ft, 3+2 bedroom, 5 bathroom bungalow w/ walkout basement games & rec rooms. Great room with gas fireplace open with cherry wood kitchen, granite counters, hardwood on main floor, 9 ft ceilings throughout! $878,900

25 ACRES A long tree-lined driveway leads to a 3,900 sq ft Victorian home. Elegant, high ceilings, spacious hallways and landings, restored and maintained beautifully. Bank barn, 3-bay workshop, fenced fields and approved forest plan. $878,800

PRIVATE ACRES In the centre of its own little pine forest. Craftsman style open concept home, custom built in 2012. This bungalow has a finished open and bright walkout basement. The workshop/studio is amazing and full of surprises. $669,000

CALEDON STRAWBERRY FIELDS Backs to green space, this 2.5 year open concept 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath has custom highend kitchen w/ centre island, breakfast bar, granite counters, stainless appliances + upgraded hand-scraped engineered hrdwd on both flrs. Upper fam w/ gas fp. $638,900

CHELTENHAM HERITAGE BEAUTY Charm & character in upgraded 3 bdrm, 2 bath w/ tin ceiling in kit, plank & oak floors, cherry banister, solid wood doors, unique rounded trims, high baseboards, living rm w/ gas fp, library, office, gas htg & town water. Deep mature lot with picket fence! $548,900

PREMIUM LOT 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath beauty on premium .52acre lot in executive subdivision. Gorgeous private backyard backing onto green space. Fully landscaped front & back. Easy commute to GTA. Updated bathrooms, newer hardwood and fantastic location! $739,000

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH Totally renovated, 3,500 sq ft of luxury living space. 4.74 beautiful private acres on the Credit River surrounded by mature trees. 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, hardwood, slate and marble floors throughout. 4-car garage. $799,000

HALF ACRE ON HIGHWAY 10 Presently landscaping business w/ 3-car det garage/shop, 10-car parking, plus 3+2 bdrm bungalow w/ oak kitchen, living rm w/ stone fireplace. Income from Bell easement at front. Ideal for similar business or contractor. Commercial taxes on garage. $604,000

CALEDON LAKEFRONT COTTAGE Muskoka in Caledon without the driving! Rare offering in exclusive private, gated enclave for 3-bdrm cottage sharing 2 lakes & forested acres w/ trails. 8 months occupancy. 1 hour from Toronto. Wrap-around deck, dock & detached garage. $548,900

IN THE HEART OF CHELTENHAM VILLAGE Spacious custom built log home on 89.5 acs of farmland, wood land w/ small stream and pond. Perfect property in the best location, mins from GTA, Caledon Ski & Golf clubs, the Bruce Trail and transit. $2,499,000

SPECTACULAR VIEWS! You will want this house before you step in the door. Established gardens, swimming pool and workshop/barn. 1.7 acres with breathtaking country views in every direction. Wonderful location, minutes from Erin village. $779,000

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


ERIN, CALEDON, MONO AND SURROUNDING AREAS

519-833-0888

www.CPCountry.com

Patrick Bogert**, Sandy Ball*, Sue Collis*

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A PROPERTY ONE COULD ONLY DREAM OF... An unparalleled country residence on approximately 50 acres set back and hidden from a quiet country road. An immaculate contemporary designed residence seamlessly added to a charming century farmhouse. $4,350,000

ALL OF THE ORIGINAL CHARM PRESERVED A stately Ontario century stone and brick residence circa 1875. Obviously one of the more gentrified properties in the area in its time. Storybook appeal with ponds, aged maple trees, rolling green lawns, established natural gardens, stone barn with stables and more. $995,000

A CHARMING CENTURY FARMHOUSE Overlooking rolling green lawns, surrounded by established gardens and aged trees. There is a large natural pond and a tennis court completing a perfect setting for an all season country retreat. In top move-in condition. $715,000

102 ACRE FARM METICULOUSLY RESTORED 1870’S FARMHOUSE A charming country farm in move-in condition w/ every modern comfort & all the magic of years ago. Rolling land & pastoral views. Beautiful aged trees & natural gardens. 70 acs of worked fields & the remainder woodland & conservation. $1,080,000

PREEMINENT COUNTRY ESTATE ON 50 ACRES An elegant country estate created from an original 1846 stone farmhouse on open farmland, now discretely hidden from the road. A very large pond draped with willow trees, wraps around the house. Rolling lawns, gardens, tennis court, and beautiful pool await you. $2,300,000

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** Broker *Sales Representative

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EQUESTRIAN FACILITY Exceptional state-of-the-art facility. Minutes to Caledon Equestrian Park, 101 acres, Humber River, trails, barns, arena, custom stone home, post & beam. $3,500,000 Marc Ronan*** or Sarah Lunn* 1-888-936-4216

ADJALA HORSE FARM Picturesque horse/hobby farm near Palgrave! Fabulous bank barn, 7 large box stalls, outdoor sand ring, dbl-fenced paddocks with run-ins & charming Century home! $729,900 Dagmar Skala* or Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

PRIVATE PARK SETTING Rolling hills of Adjala. Sprawling bungalow on 23 acres with swimming pond, workshop/barn, paddocks, saltwater pool and oversized 3-car garage. Approximately 1,000 feet road frontage. $1,100,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

WORKSHOP, SCHOMBERG! Pride of ownership. Park setting on 4 acres, raised bungalow, approx 2,100 sq ft workshop with 3 phase hydro, four 10x10 rollup doors, heating & air, separately metered, ample parking. $765,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

PRESTIGIOUS PIPERS HILL Custom-built bungalow has over 3,300 sq ft of high quality fin living space. The open concept design is an entertainers’ dream. 3 w/o’s to cedar deck on 2.2 picturesque acres. $829,900 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

COUNTRY ESTATE LIVING! Gorgeous property w/ mature trees, gardens, multiple w/o’s to patio & deck. Fully fin bungalow with 3-car garage, sunroom. High speed internet & gas heating. Privacy, shows 10+. $799,900 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

EXECUTIVE HOME! Unmatched quality exudes throughout this stone bungalow. Over 4,300 sq ft of exceptional workmanship, 9’ ceilings, infloor heating, 5 bdrms, 4 baths, walk to downtown Alliston. $799,900 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

67 ACRE COUNTRY ESTATE Large custom raised bungalow, hrdwd forest, ponds and your own 9-hole golf course. Fully equipped pro shop, workshop. Have your own course or continue existing public play. $1,499,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

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MAD RIVER LEASE/SALE Lease to buy option. Ideal for 2 families. Majestic great room, south facing windows and w/o to huge deck, river and 32 acres. 3 levels of living space with 6 bedrooms. Perfect for Mansfield or Glen skiers. $899,000

CREEMORE FOR LEASE Soaring ceilings, original woodwork, large principal rooms, renovated kitchen and baths. Combining best of old & new. Dbl fenced lot, det garage with 24x17 loft for studio playroom. Immed occupancy possible. $2,200 per mo

SKYTOP...HOCKLEY HILLS Hilltop setting. 15 acres including pond, views, privacy in the Hockley Hills. Grow organic veggies, 10 fruit trees, 1 owner octagonal, arch designed home, pine and deciduous forest. 1 hour to Toronto airport. $548,000

HOCKLEY HILLS FARM Huge maples and a great century barn at the lane’s end. Create your own Mono classic or enjoy the Century home and barn on 77 rolling acres with pastoral views, pond, woods and arable land. $668,000

CREEMORE RUSTIC LUXURY 4,000 sq ft log home on 3-acre treed lot. Easy walk to village. Open concept great room with fieldstone fireplace. Main floor master wing. Ideal for Devil’s Glen and Mansfield skiers and Mad River Golf. $995,000

NOISY RIVER, DUNEDIN A lovely 6-acre mix of forest and the Noisy River. Fieldstone fireplace in 2-level living room, comb dining/kitchen overlooking the water. Detached garage/workshop. Cast from your deck! $599,000

DRAMATIC MULMUR RETREAT 38 private acs with great view, woods, trails, pond, tennis court, spectacular pool and spa. Chef’s dream kit/dining. Great rm with fieldstone fp. Home theatre, screened and open porch for al fresco living. “The works.” $2,200,000

MAD RIVER FARM...CREEMORE 94 acres and over 2,000 ft of Mad River. Approx 50 acres arable. Fenced tennis court and old farmhouse of minimal value. Privacy, long south-east views. Perfect for Mansfield and Devil’s Glen skiers. $499,000

Ginny MacEachern B.A. B R O K E R

1-800-360-5821 gmmulmur@bconnex.net www.ginnymaceachern.com

RCR Realty, Brokerage Independently Owned & Operated

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Kathy Ellis Sales Representative

76

1-888-877-5165 / 519-833-9714 kathrynrellis@gmail.com www.kathyellis.ca

www.jilljohnson.ca 905-877-5165 johnsonhom@aol.com

BROOKFIELD FARM All set beautifully on 10 acres in Mono. Well maintained house w/ newer kit, bthrms, floors, windows, family room addition w/ stone fp. Super barn w/ 15 fabulous stalls, 4 lrg paddocks, smaller barn, drive shed. $539,900

SUPERB 67 AC IN TERRA COTTA Delightful custom home with cathedral ceilings, fieldstone fp, hardwood flrs, situated with complete privacy. Hardwood and softwood forest, hiking, skiing trails and open pasture land, wildlife abounds. $830,000

NORTH HALTON HOBBY FARM Charming 3-bedroom reproduction Victorian farmhouse set on 14 acres. No need to board your horses when you have your own 7-stall barn with oak board paddocks and run-in shelter. Located within the Halton School Board and “AAA” equestrian neighbourhood. $879,900

GREENFIELDS FARM Classic Ontario country estate. Lovely restored heritage stone home. 50 superb acres with Rogers Creek, pond, paddocks, gorgeous 17-stall barn, arena, drive shed. Terra Cotta locale. $1,595,000

TWO COTTAGES IN BELFOUNTAIN Charming and updated, newer roof, freshly painted, newer broadloom or old plank floors in great shape. Incredible property w/ stream, total privacy on a quiet road. Rent one to pay the mortgage, live in the other. $419,000

SHAWS CREEK Very pretty 15-acre parcel on Shaws Creek. Great location north of Olde Base Line, south of the Grange. Don’t miss this opportunity to build your own dream home in a triple “A” location with several possible building sites. $425,000

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


Susan Brown Serving Mono, Mulmur, Caledon and Orangeville Sales Representative

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2 HOMES, 79 ACS, RIVER & POND Room for everyone. Gorgeous stone & log main house with eat-in kitchen, 3 bdrms and inground pool with spa. 2nd home with 2 bdrms. Bank barn, round pen, paddocks, hangar and 2,250 ft grass runway. $1,375,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

148 ACRES, ARENA, FARMLAND Plus 4-bdrm home with large eat-in kitchen, sep dining room, study/family room, 3 fireplaces, 5 washrooms and two staircases. Inground pool with flagstone patio, gazebo, pond, paddocks and outdoor ring. $2,350,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

SERENITY ON THE BANKS OF BOYNE RIVER 25 private acres with a 3,000 sq ft house on two levels, guest bunkie and workshop. Mix of bush, trails and open areas. MULMUR HILLS $779,000

71 ACRES SOUTH OF CREEMORE Views of surrounding countryside, this stunning executive style stone bungalow with soaring celings, dark maple hardwood floors, infloor heating and all the “I wants”. MULMUR $699,000

SPECTACULAR PROPERTY! Gated entrance to 126 acres with open fields, trees, 5 large ponds, streams, waterfall and artesian springs. 5-bedroom main house, pool, drive shed, stone stable + 3-bedroom tenanted house. Halton Hills. $1,995,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

90 ACRES - INCREDIBLE VIEWS 4 bdrms, awesome living rm with fp, vaulted ceiling & wood floors open to eat-in kitchen w/ granite counters, breakfast bar & w/o to deck. Lower level rec rm w/ walkout to patio. Paddocks, pond & restored 1800s barn. $1,799,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

NATURE LOVERS PARADISE ON 73 ACRES WITH POND On 73 acres. Abundant deer and wild turkey. Wooded with 20 acre open field, pond, stream. Impeccable bungalow. NEAR SHELBURNE $650,000

DESIRABLE PIECE OF MULMUR ON 9.5 ACRES Private with bush, trails and stream. Open concept bungalow, walkout basement, cathedral ceilings and separate studio. MULMUR $579,000

GREAT CHARACTER & CURB APPEAL 4 bdrm stone/stucco home with gorgeous front porch with stone archways & pillars with view of river across the road in Grand Valley. Large eat-in kitchen & 4 bedrooms. $429,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

1837 STONE MASTERPIECE Pillars, archway, driveway, walkways and home feature incredible stone craftsmanship. 3 bedrooms, library, country kitchen, master suite, solarium, wood floors, decks, w/o from basement. 2 acre private setting in Erin. $899,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

STRIKING LINDAL LOG POST & BEAM HOME Large treed lot ensuring privacy in an enclase of exclusive homes. Immaculate condition. Cedar interior with floor-to-ceiling windows. LISLE $550,000

VICTORIAN GEM Beautifully restored on 1.9 acres. Outbuildings can be for horses, business or hobby. Country kitchen and gracious dining room. 1 hour to GTA. NEAR ALLISTON $549,900

YEAR ROUND RECREATION Gorgeous 32 acres in Erin with trails, huge pond with dock, stream, bush, open land and barn. Custom-built raised 3-bedroom bungalow with finished walkout basement with kitchen, family room, bdrm & full bath. $829,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

98.5 ACRES - SCENIC FARMLAND 4-bdrm brick farmhouse with board & batten addition. Open concept kit, dining & living rms. Master with cathedral ceiling, ensuite, walk-in closet & potential loft space. Drive shed, paddocks, bank barn with stalls & silo. $1,399,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

ATTRACTIVE STONE BUNGALOW ON 1.1 ACRE LOT Scenic rolling hills, privacy. Approximately 1,700 sq ft and 1,000 sq ft finished walkout basement. 2 fireplaces. Inground pool. MULMUR $479,000

OVERLOOKING MANSFIELD SKI HILLS ON 1.5 ACRES Unique country house backs onto conservation. Near skiing, golf. Totally upgraded. Great for entertaining. MULMUR $420,000

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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RCR Realty, Brokerage Independently Owned & Operated

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HOME ON THE GRANGE - CALEDON Tree-lined drive winds to builder’s own natural stone raised bungalow built in 2004 to exude stature & presence. Serene views over 82 acres of rolling countryside in prime location. Heated 2-storey workshop. $2,750,000

HOWLING HILLS FARM - ERIN Magnificent country estate w/ century stone home totally transformed/expanded in 2010. Enjoy open concept understated luxury in idyllic 84-ac setting. Swimming pond, hayfields, pine forest, barn & paddock. $1,499,000

THIRD LINE, MONO 48 private acres hosts river and trails. Interior features exposed log beams. 3 generous bedrooms, separate 2-bedroom guest house, indoor pool. Close to skiing, golf and Mono Cliffs Park. $799,000

HIGH STREET, TERRA COTTA Charming retreat on just under an acre. Reno’d and updated 2-bdrm century home w/ character and style. Updated guest house w/ gorgeous new bthrm. Walk to Terra Cotta Inn, hiking trails, 20 mins to Pearson. $679,000

COUNTRY CLOSE TO TOWN - ERIN One year new 2,300 sq ft home w/ main floor master suite & home office. 3 bdrms upstairs; privacy for everyone! Cathedral ceilings on main level, hardwood/ceramic throughout. 1 acre. Quiet paved road. $749,000

2 ACRE COUNTRY SETTING - ERIN Stunning two year young bungalow loaded w/ luxury features for the discerning family in convenient location mins west of Orangeville. Finished open concept lower level with 9’ ceiling + nanny suite/office. $779,000

BRAWTON DRIVE, PALGRAVE Here is your opportunity to own in Palgrave’s highly desirable neighbourhood. 3-bedroom with finished walkout basement, lots of light, mature yard. Close to hiking, biking trails and golf. $529,000

CARVER’S BLOCK, ERIN Ever wanted to be the boss? Successful business for sale. Owner willing to work with new purchaser. Lovely patio behind. Lots of opportunity to expand, call for details. $99,000 (just reduced)

Creemore Hills Realty Ltd

Sales Representative

Brokerage

519.941.5151 direct: 519.942.5156 orangeville@rogers.com www.JoannLaflamme.com

Austin Boake, Broker of Record/Owner

Royal LePage Sales Awards

705.466.3070

www.CreemoreHillsRealty.com

78

Where Town Meets Country

RCR Realty, Brokerage Independently Owned & Operated

2009-2012

1998-1999 2003-2005 2007-2012

“FERN HILL” MULMUR ESTATE 32 private rolling acres with spectacular views, forest, meadows and stream. Meticulous attention to detail. $995,000

MAGNIFICENT CREEMORE ESTATE 84 acres, contemporary design, 5,000 sq ft, stunning views, privacy, incredible spring-fed infinity swimming pond. $1,625,000

348286 FIFTEENTH SIDEROAD MONO Beautifully updated country home on 42.6 acres of trails, open spaces and nature at it's finest. The unobstructed views of the Escarpment take your breath away. Truly, a rare opportunity and being offered for the first time. Close to ski hills, golf, trails, spa and just 30 minutes to the city. Open House: Sat Sept 21, Oct 5, Oct 19, 11am to 1pm. $799,000

FIELDVIEW FARM Restored to perfection. Century red brick on 4 private landscaped acres. Near Creemore. Executive style finishing. $649,000

MANSFIELD SKI CLUB Ski in/or ski out at base of ski hills. Year round recreation, backing onto forest, the Pine River and swimming pond. $395,000

20088 MAIN STREET, CALEDON (ALTON VILLAGE) This outstanding home has been built with specific attention to detail. Right from the zero maintenance stone & Malibec exterior, custom walnut kitchen, right down to the finer details of soffit lighting & poplar trim. This home is sure to please those looking for quality finishes & reflective workmanship. All in a country village setting w/ room to roam on 4.6 acs & still be an easy commute to the city. Open House: Sat Sept 21, Oct 5, Oct 19, 2pm to 4pm. $899,000

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


* Chris P. Richie Broker of Record/Owner

Philip Albin Broker

Dale Poremba Sales Representative

Sean Anderson Broker

905-584-0234

1-888-667-8299 www.remax-inthehills-on.com

NEW CONSTRUCTION, CALEDON 4,800 sq ft, custom built, 16+ acres, open concept. Sensational views, backs onto conservation lands. $1,495,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

HORSE/HOBBY FARM, CALEDON 33 acres, bank barn, detached drive shed, 4 bedrooms, pond. Farm tax credit, 2-car detached garage. $1,350,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

SUPERB EQUESTRIAN FACILITY Approximately 24 acres, easy access to Hwy 10, in Inglewood. Sprawling brick bungalow. 24-stall barn, indoor arena, thoroughbred sand track, viewing area and 6 paddocks. 2-bedroom trailer for staff. Caledon. $2,149,999

MAJESTIC STONE & BRICK BUNGALOW Ideal for large or extended families. Views over a forest and pond, approx 5.94 acres. Private loft area and fin w/o bsmt. 3 kitchens, 5+3 bdrms & 5 baths! Fieldstone fp, hrdwd floors, 3-car garage. Caledon. $995,000

2 CUSTOM HOUSES, MONO 68 acres, panoramic views, swimming pool, tennis court, geothermal. Very private, manicured trails. $1,279,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

ACROSS FROM DEVIL’S PULPIT GOLF 10 acres, 3 bedrooms, home office, large heated shop, renovated house. Reduced. $949,000 Jackie Mazze, Sales Rep

HORSE/HOBBY OFFERING Spacious bungalow on approximately 25.51 acres. Vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, granite tops. Finished walkout lower level. Arena, 6-stall barn, 6 paddocks, pool and tennis court. 2-car attached + 2-car detached garage. Caledon. $1,585,000

UPSCALE EXECUTIVE HOME Large rooms, soaring ceilings, chef’s kitchen, walkout to rear garden. Beautiful landscaping and inground pool. 4+1 bedrooms, 5-baths, finished basement and 3-car ‘dream’ garage. Approximately 2.36 acres. Caledon. $1,079,900

HISTORIC SCHOOL HOUSE, CALEDON 3 bedroom, 1 acre, open concept, loft, approved NEC development permit for addition/renovation. $799,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

BUNGALOW, GARAFRAXA WOODS Lovely open concept, ranch bungalow, comfortable living on beautiful landscaped one-acre lot. Enjoy the front porch or watch the world from your covered rear deck. $679,000 Susan Huntley, Sales Rep

THE PEAK OF INGLEWOOD Brick & stone bungalow. Cathedral ceiling in great room, massive windows. Open concept, custom kitchen, 7-pc ensuite. Finished walkout basement, separate entrance. 3-car garage, patterned concrete patio. $1,050,000

‘CALEDON WOODS’ ESTATE Meticulous home, upgrades impossible to replace. Premium, approximately 5-acre lot. Onyx fireplace surrounds, cherry floors and granite tops. Finished walkout basement, theatre room and bar. $$$ spent on landscaping, saline pool. Caledon. $1,149,000

RAVINE LOT IN VALLEYWOOD, CALEDON 4 bedrooms, finished basement, with walkout, inground swimming pool. $699,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

COUNTRY CHARM, BELFOUNTAIN 3 bedrooms, updated kitchen with granite, private yard, 2-car detached garage with workshop. $499,000 Jim Wallace, Broker

24 ACRE PRIVATE RETREAT Gardens, orchard, vineyard, grass tennis court and trails! Unique combination of log and brick. Vaulted ceilings, stone fireplace, 2nd kitchen. Ideal for extended family situations. 3-car garage. Caledon. $999,999

EXCEPTIONAL CALEDON ESTATE Approximately 25 acres, rolling and extremely private. Paved drive. Stone and stucco home, 5+1 bedrooms, ICF construction, expansive heated storage facilities! Great room overlooking the saline pool. $1,275,000

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I L L U S T R AT I O N S J I M S T E WA R T

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What’s on in the Hills A

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Headwaters Arts Festival Event

arts+crafts NOW – ONGOING : NEW ART SHOW

Artist of the month in the store’s gallery. See website for openings. 10am-5pm. Curiosity House Books, 134 Mill St, Creemore. 705-466-3400; curiosityhousebooks.com

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NOW – OCT 6 : ACCIDENTAL CHAOS – BRIAN BARRER A gentle turbulence of

images connect nature and man. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-940-0199; altonmill.ca NOW – OCT 6 : THE MISSISSAUGA WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY See their works

in the Falls Gallery. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-9400935; altonmill.ca

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NOW – OCT 13 : HARVEST IN HEADWATERS ARTS GALLERY Juried show

of local artists in permanent, new space. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-943-1149; altonmill.ca NOW – OCT 20 : ROCK, WOOD AND WATER Forest and waterscapes from Lab-

rador and Ontario. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. Paul Morin Gallery, 519-942-4918; altonmill.ca

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NOW – NOV 11 : JAN NOVAK AND JANET SWEET Jan Novak: Now-Sep 30.

Janet Sweet: Sept 30-Nov 11. See website. 7am-10pm. Millcroft Inn, 55 John St, Alton. 519-943-1149; headwatersarts.com NOW – JAN 22 : JOSEPH LAMMIRATO: HOME Installation art. Reception:

Sep 22, 2-4 pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055; pama.peelregion.ca 80

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

SEP 15, 21 – OCT 13: ART IN THE CHURCH – THE NATURE OF ERIN Show

& sale. Sat, Sun 11am-5pm. Melville White Church, 15962 Mississauga Rd, Caledon. Erin Artists’ Alliance, 519-833-7105 SEP 15 – 27 (SUNDAYS) : PEEL ARTISTS: LILA LEWIS IRVING & DOREEN RENNER

Abstraction in water-based media. Sept 22: reception, 2-4 pm. 1-5pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055 x3632; pama.peelregion.ca SEP 16 – JAN 11 : FIGURATIVELY... Diverse

expressions in figurative art. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055; pama.peelregion.ca

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SEP 19, 28 & 29, OCT 5 & 6 : ELORAFERGUS STUDIO TOUR See website for

details & maps. Sept 19: reception, 7pm, Elora Centre for the Arts. 10am-5pm. Free. 519-846-9177; elorafergusstudiotour.com

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SEP 19 – OCT 6 : HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL Juried art show & sale,

events, open studios, readings, concerts, talent contests and workshops. Locations throughout the Hills of Headwaters.

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SEP 19 – OCT 5 : THE HEELS OF HEADWATERS Mixed-media show featuring

shoe-themed pieces. Sep 19: Reception, 7-8:30pm. Shoe Kat Shoo, 85 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-942-1176; shoekatshoo.com

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SEP 20 – 22 : MAD FOR MADSTONE JEWELLERY New York trunk show of

fabulous jewels, priced from $250 to $20,000. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-938-8386; gallerygemma.com

S Showcase & classes. Free. Williams Mill SEP 20 – OCT 5 : FALL INTO ART

Gallery, 515 Main St, Glen Williams. 905873-8203; williamsmill.com

SEP 21 : NOTTAWASAGA HANDWEAVERS AND SPINNERS GUILD MONTHLY MEETING Apply small mirrors in the

Indian style of shisha embroidery. 11am2pm. $5. The Gibson Centre, Alliston. 705-435-6991; nottguild.ca

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SEP 21 & 22 : HILLS OF ERIN STUDIO

Self-guided tour of artists’ studios in Erin and Hillsburgh areas. See website for map. 10am-5pm. 519-855-4735; hillsoferinstudiotour.com

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SEP 21 & 22 : INSPIRED ARTISTS – COMMUNITY LIVING DUFFERIN ARTISANS Photography, pottery, jewellery,

recycled art. Noon-4pm. Community Living Dufferin, 065371 Cty Rd 3, W of Orangeville. communitylivingdufferin.ca

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SEP 20 – 22, 27 – 29 : HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL SHOW AND SALE Over

250 juried artworks from 45 artists. Fri 5-9pm. Sat, Sun 10am-5pm. Sep 20: Opening night gala preview, gourmet tastes by local chefs, 7-10pm, $50. SGI Centre, 20490 Porterfield Rd, Caledon. 519-943-1149; headwatersarts.com

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SEP 21 & 22, 28 & 29 : MARGI TAYLOR SELF STUDIO Traditional techniques with

abstract edge. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-940-0935; taylorself.wordpress.com

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SEP 21 & 22, 28 & 29, OCT 5 & 6 : HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL – ALTON MILL ARTS CENTRE New shows, open

studios, workshops, demos, special activities. 10am-5pm. The Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-940-9300; altonmill.ca

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SEP 21 & 22, 28 & 29, OCT 5 & 6 : SILVER CREEK ARTS PROJECT OPEN STUDIO Paintings, drawings, furniture,

pottery. Sep 28 & 29: sculpture demos, 2-4pm. Silver Creek Farm, 16849 Kennedy Rd, Caledon. 519-927-5639; silvercreekcaledon.com

SEP 21 – OCT 5 : OUTDOOR SCULPTURE Large sculptures throughout

grounds. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill,1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-943-1149; headwatersarts.com

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SEP 21 – OCT 5 : THE UNAPOLOGETIC LANDSCAPE Oil

paintings with dramatic light, by Janet Simmons Sweet. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-9431149; janetsimmonssweet.ca

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SEP 21 – OCT 6 : ARTS II STUDIO: PETER AND MANUELA MARSHALL Fabric

art, images burned in wood, paintings, quilted works. 10am-4pm. 223214 Station St, Waldemar. 519-928-3415; artsii.blogspot.com

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SEP 21 – OCT 6 : BIJOUX LIBELLULE TRUNK SALE! Three Quebec jewellery

designers. 10am-5pm. Dragonfly Arts, 189 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-5249; dragonflyarts.ca

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SEP 26 : ARMCHAIRS, AUTHORS AND ART Don Gillmor, Maureen Jennings,

Wayne Johnston and Oakland Ross. An evening of books, wine and art. Tickets at BookLore or online. 6:30pm. $30. SGI Centre, 20490 Porterfield Rd, Caledon. 519- 942-3830; headwatersarts.com SEP 28 – 29 : PAMA CULTURE DAYS – DROP IN Hands-on activities for all

ages. 1-5pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055 x6211; pama. peelregion.ca

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SEP 28 & 29 : NORTH OF 89 STUDIO TOUR 24 artists, 13 studios, various

media, in Mulmur hills. See website for map. 10am-5pm. Free. northof89.ca

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SEP 28 & 29 : TERRA TROVE STUDIO – WARREN GALLOWAY AND ANNE JORDAN Landscapes in oil, decorative

pots & platters. 10am-4pm. Free. Terra Trove Studio, 81 Zina St, Orangeville. 519307-0210; headwatersarts.com

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SEP 28 & 29, OCT 5 & 6 : CALEDON HILLS STUDIO Eight artists open their

home studios. 10am-5pm. See website for map. Caledon Hills Studio Tour, 416-6684390; caledonhillsstudiotour.com


SEP 29 : HOW TO STORE AND CARE FOR ART Assistant curator Jerrie Loveys offers

a peek inside PAMA’s art storage. 2pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton, 905-791-4055 x6211; pama.peelregion.ca OCT 4 – 6 : CREEMORE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS Theatre, dance, authors, juried art

show, artisan show and sale, children’s activities. Fri 7-10pm. Sat & Sun 10am10pm. Most events free. Creemore. 705446-8005; phahs.ca OCT 5 & 6 : SCROLL SAW ARTWORK

Show and sale wildlife themes, window displays, lamps, Christmas ornaments by Ted Holden. 9am-4pm. Dragony Woodcraft, 875135 5th Line, Mono. 519-941-7076; juttahol@sympatico.ca OCT 5 & 6 : HOOKED RUG SALE Hand-

crafted by local artisans. 10am-5pm. Rug designer Martina Lesar, 16311 Mississauga Rd, Caledon. 905-838-3022; jane@fournie.ca

S

OCT 5 & 6 : ORANGEVILLE ART GROUP FALL SHOW AND SALE Paintings,

pottery, glasswork. 10am-5pm. Tony Rose Sports Centre, 6 Northmen Way, Orangeville. 519-940-0550; orangevilleartgroup.ca

S

OCT 5 & 6 : TERRA COTTA COUNTRY STORE’S BUZZFEST 2013 A day where art

and food converge. 11am-5pm. 119 King St. 905-877-2210; terracottacountrystore.ca

vendors, quilt appraiser. Sat 10am5pm. Sun 10am-4pm. $6. Orangeville Fairgrounds, 247090 5 Sdrd, Mono. 519941-1201; dufferinpiecemakers.org OCT 20 : EMPTY BOWLS Buy a bowl, ďŹ ll

with soup, take bowl home to ďŹ ght world hunger. 11:30am-2pm & 3:30-5pm. $35. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-9382092; altonmill.ca OCT 23 – NOV 21 : COMMUNITY THREADS – TAPESTRY EXHIBIT Visions

of our community interpreted in yarn. 10am-5pm. Gibson Centre 63 Tupper St W, Alliston. Nottawasaga Handweavers & Spinners Guild, 705-435-6991; nottguild.ca OCT 26 : CRAFT & BAKE SALE, SILENT AUCTION Early Christmas presents, BBQ.

8:30am-2:30pm. Caledon Seniors’ Centre, 7 Rotarian Way, Bolton. 905-951-6114; caledonseniors.ca OCT 26 : REPRESENTATIONAL PAINTING WORKSHOP Add spontaneity to painting,

with Merv Richardson. 10am-4pm. $70, register. Victoria Parks Community Centre, Mono Mills. Orangeville Art Group, 519307-0210; orangevilleartgroup.ca NOV 1 & 2 : SEASONAL WRAPSODY SHOW & SALE Local handmade items,

various media. Fri 6-9pm. Sat 10am-4pm. Gibson Centre, 63 Tupper St W, Alliston. Nottawasaga Handweavers & Spinners Guild, 705-435-6991; nottguild.ca NOV 2 & 3 : INNISFIL STUDIO TOUR

OCT 7 – 31 : FALLING FOR ORANGEVILLE – ILMA BARAYUGA-DOHERTY Art by

Ilma Barayuga-Doherty, photographs of Orangeville, book launch. Mon-Thurs 11am-3pm. Fri-Sun 1-3pm. Ilma Arts Studio, 185 Diane Dr, Orangeville. 519-941-4533; ilmaarts.com

Sculpture, photography, paintings, jewellery. 10am-5pm. Various studios around InnisďŹ l. See website for map. innisďŹ lstudiotour.ca

Falls Gallery. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-941-9300; altonmill.ca OCT 14 : TOUR THE MILL THIS THANKSGIVING! Open studios, gallery

NOV 3 – JAN 5 : ROCK AND ROLL ONE OFFS Photographs by Viliam Hrubovcak

OCT 9 – NOV 3 : INNERSCAPES – GEORGE PERDUE AND OTHERS In the

shows, treats, unique gifts. Wed-Sun 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. 519-941-9300; altonmill.ca OCT 19 : MACVILLE CRAFT SHOW

Gifts, rafes, Scholastic book fair. 9am3pm. 7280 King St, Caledon. Macville Community School, 905-857-3448; julia. shepherd@rogers.com OCT 19 & 20 : THE MAGIC OF CLOTH ACT V – QUILT SHOW 300 quilted items,

Sept. 28 – 29, from 1 – 5 p.m.

Sept. 28, at 2 p.m.

Sept. 29, at 2 p.m.

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9 Wellington St. E. Brampton, ON L6W 1Y1 905-791-4055 pama.peelregion.ca facebook.com/visitPAMA

NOV 3 – JAN 5 : ABA BAYEFSKY: THE TATTOO SERIES Paintings based on

Japanese and Canadian tattoo culture. Nov 3: Curator talk, 2pm. Nov 17: reception, 2-4 pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055 x3632; pama.peelregion.ca

S

September Culture Days

Join us for Culture Days at PAMA. This free weekend will offer fun family-friendly activities including a variety of hands-on activities and behind the scenes tours.

& Jolie Fejer of musicians from the ’70s to today. Nov 17: reception, 2-4pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055 x3632; pama.peelregion.ca NOV 9 & 10 : A TRIO OF ARTISTS Joyce

Buck, Jill Sadleir & Fiona Logan, various media. Sat 10am-5pm. Sun noon-4pm. 995725 Mono-Adjala Townline. 705-4343283; sadleir@mie.utoronto.ca continued on next page

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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A continued from page 81 NOV 16 : CHRISTMAS CRAFT SHOPPE

C A L E N D A R

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H A P P E N I N G S

SEPTEMBER 20 – 22: GRAND VALLEY FALL FAIR Demo cross derby. grandvalleyfallfair.ca

Crafts, baking, preserves, café. 9am2pm. Caledon East United Church, 6046 Old Church Rd. 905-584-9974; caledoneastunitedchurch.ca

OCTOBER 11 – 14: ERIN FALL FAIR

NOV 16 : NON-OBJECTIVE ABSTRACTS WORKSHOP Acrylics with Marianne

Visit unique homes, lunch, silent auction. Proceeds to Headwaters Health Care Centre equipment. 9am-4pm. $40. Headwaters Health Care Auxiliary, 519-9412410 x2268; headwatershousetour.com

SEP 29 : PURINA WALK FOR DOG GUIDES Register, collect pledges

online. Proceeds to Lions Foundation of Canada Dog Guides. 9:30-11am. Fendley Park & West End Trails, Orangeville. Amaranth Lions Club, 519-942-2121; purinawalkfordogguides.com

Hands-on horse experience in the Equine Tent. erinfair.ca SEP 14 : HEADWATERS HOUSE TOUR

Broome. 10am-4pm. $70, register. Victoria Parks Community Centre, Mono Mills. 519-307-0210; orangevilleartgroup.ca NOV 19 : THE ART OF CARVING IN WOOD Techniques, history, tools, with

local carver Winston Uytenbogaart. 1-2:30pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca NOV 21 : HOLIDAY DÉCOR WITH FLORIST CHRIS McCOY Make your own

centrepiece. 7-8:30pm. Materials fee, register. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca

community NOW – OCT FARMERS’ MARKETS ORANGEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET :

Saturdays until Oct 26. 8am-1pm. Next to the Orangeville Town Hall. 519-942-0087, orangevillefarmersmarket.ca CREEMORE FARMERS’ MARKET : Saturdays until Oct 12. 8:30am-12:30pm. Station on the Green parking lot. 705-794-8943, creemorefarmersmarket.ca CALEDON FARMERS’ MARKET : Saturdays

until Oct 12. 9am-2pm. Albion Bolton Community Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-584-2272 x4286, caledon.ca/ farmersmarket ALLISTON FARMERS’ MARKET : Saturdays

until Oct 26. 8am-2pm. Mill St & Victoria St. 705-435-1787, allistonbia.com AMARANTH FARMERS’ MARKET : Wednesdays until Oct 9. 4:30-8pm. Amaranth Municipal Office, 374028 6th Line. 519-941-1007, bogi@execulink.com INGLEWOOD FARMERS’ MARKET :

Wednesdays until Oct 9. 3:30-7pm. Village of Inglewood. 905-584-6221, eatlocalcaledon.org SHELBURNE FARMERS’ MARKET : Thursdays until Oct 17. 3-7pm. Besley Country Market, Victoria St. shelburne farmersmarket2013@gmail.com SOUTHFIELDS VILLAGE FARMERS’ MARKET : Thursdays until October 10th.

3:30-7:30pm. SouthFields Village Public School, 110 Learmont Ave, Caledon Village. ERIN FARMERS’ MARKET : Fridays until

Sept 27. 3-7pm. Erin Agricultural Society Fairgrounds. 519-833-2808, erinfair.ca ROSEMONT FARMERS’ MARKET : Fridays

until October 11. 3-7pm. Orange Hall parking lot, beside Globe Restaurant, Hwy 89. pam@pamssoaps.com

SEP 29 : MANSFIELD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 150TH ANNIVERSARY

Church service followed by reception at Dufferin County Museum and Archives. 1:30pm. Mansfield Presbyterian Church, 705-435-6844.

SEP 15 : PALGRAVE TERRY FOX RUN 10km

run/walk/ride on the Caledon (TransCanada) Trail. Free breakfast 8am. Pledge forms online. 9am-noon. Stationlands Park, Palgrave. Rotary Club of Palgrave, 905-880-3774; terryfoxrun.org

SEP 21 & 28 : RUMMAGE SALE Gently

used clothing. 9am-noon. High Country United Church, Camilla, W off Hwy 10, 15 Sdrd Mono. 519-941-2291; neavison@ hotmail.com

SEP 17 : AUTHOR GRAHAM McLEOD

Getting published, marketing books, by the author (aka Russ Graham) of the Don Carling mysteries. 1pm. Orangeville Public Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca SEP 18 : UNIVERSITY WOMEN MEET AND GREET SOCIAL Join interest groups, hear

speakers. 7-9pm. Free. Maples Country School, 513047 2nd Line, Amaranth. 519941-7452; cfuworangeville.ca

SEP 21 & OCT 13 : WHOLE VILLAGE ORIENTATION Farm and eco-residence

tours. 1-4pm. $10. 20725 Shaws Creek Rd, Caledon. 519-941-1099; wholevillage.org SEP 23 : DOUBLE BOOK LAUNCH WITH RICHARD SCARSBROOK Nothing Man

and the Purple Zero, and Six Weeks. 6:308:30pm. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca SEP 26 : STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS

SEP 18 – NOV 20 (WEDNESDAYS) : LIFETREE CAFE Explore life and faith in

a comfortable coffee shop atmosphere. All ages. Topics on website. 7-8pm. St. James Anglican Church, 6025 Old Church Rd, Caledon East. 416-579-9977; lifetreecafe.com SEP 21 : SOIRÉE EN BLANC Bring your own gourmet meal to mystery location revealed by text message. Wear your best whites. Proceeds to OneWorld Schoolhouse Foundation. 5:30-10:30pm. $40, reserve. Caledon/Orangeville area. oneworldschoolhouse.org SEP 21 : AN EVENING WITH DAN NEEDLES Musings of a humourist

on Dufferin’s early days. Reception, homemade pies. Proceeds to DCMA’s quilt book. 7-9pm. $35. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com SEP 21 & 22 : GYPSY VANNER HORSE FAIR AUCTION AND EXOTIC SUPER CAR SHOWCASE Equestrian events,

entertainment, food, vendors, crafts. See website. Proceeds to Headwaters Health Care Centre. 8pm. $10-$20. Orangeville Agricultural Centre, 247090 5 Sdrd, Mono. Deerfields Stables, 905-880-5585 x700; vannerfair.com

Advantages & disadvantages, importance of business plan. 9am-noon. $10. Tony Rose Sports Centre, Orangeville. Small Business Enterprise Centre, 519-941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca SEP 28 : HEADWATERS HUMAN LIBRARY AT ORANGEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET

What exactly is a human library? 9-11am. 87 Broadway. Headwaters Human Library, 519-941-0610; infolibrary@orangeville.ca SEP 28 : SALAMANDER FESTIVAL

Farmers’/artisans’ market, entertainment, local food, kids’ eco zone, real river critters and live animals. 10am-3pm. Belfountain Conservation Area. 905-6701615 x285; creditvalleyca.ca SEP 28 : CULTURE DAY AT ORANGEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET Art workshops,

demonstrations. 9am-1pm. 87 Broadway. 519-942-0087; events@ downtownorangeville.ca SEP 28 : CHICÀBOOM PARKING LOT SALE High-end clothing and décor for sale

by donation. Proceeds to Bethell Hospice. Rain date: Sep 29. 10am-2pm. ChicàBOOM, Caledon Village. 519-927-9300 SEP 28, OCT 26 & NOV 23 : WESTMINSTER UNITED CHURCH CLOTHING SALE Most items sell for

a quarter to $2. Good condition. 9am-noon. 247 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-0381; westminsterorangeville.ca

OCT 1 : SENIORS’ FALL LUNCHEON

Hosted by Caledon Library, Caledon Meals on Wheels and Town of Caledon. Noon-2:30pm. $10, register. Albion Bolton Community Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-1400 x250; caledon. library.on.ca OCT 1 : GENEALOGY DATABASE WORKSHOP Free tips on using Ancestry

Library Edition, accessible free in the library. 7-8pm. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 4 : PALGRAVE PIE BEE Make

delicious pies, help prepare pies for community events. 9am-12pm. Palgrave United Church, 34 Pine Ave. 905-8800303; palgravekitchen.org OCT 4 : WESTMINSTER UNITED CHURCH ROAST BEEF DINNER Plus homemade

pies. $15; $17 at door; children 12 & under $6; under 5 free. Call to order. 247 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-0381; westminsterorangeville.ca OCT 4 : FALL FASHION FLING DINNER & FASHION SHOW All proceeds to

Bethell Hospice. 6-10pm. $60, advance. Caledon Golf & Country Club, 2121 Olde Baseline Rd, Caledon. It’s Roxie’s Boutique, 905-838-4386 OCT 5 : PALGRAVE UNITED CHURCH LOCAL HARVEST TURKEY DINNER Food

from local farms. Tickets at door 4pm. 4:30pm-8pm. $20; senior $15; child $10; take out $17. 34 Pine Ave. 905-880-0303; palgravekitchen.org

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OCT 5 & 6 : 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY – LOOKING BACK, GOING FORWARD DCMA, Theatre Orangeville

& In The Hills celebrate two decades with performances, displays, good food & drink. 10am-4pm. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com OCT 7 & NOV 4 : CREATIVE WRITING ROUNDTABLE WITH RICHARD SCARSBROOK Bring works in progress for

feedback. 6:30-8:30pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 8 : IMPROVING YOUR ONLINE VISIBILITY Keep up with search engines

Preserving the Harvest. shelburnefair.com

& smartphones. 6:30-9pm. $20, register. Alder Street Recreation Centre, Small Business Enterprise Centre; 519-941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca

SEPTEMBER 20 – 22: BOLTON FALL FAIR

OCT 9 : THE MEMORY PROJECT ARCHIVE

NOW – OCT FALL FAIRS SEPTEMBER 13 – 15: SHELBURNE FALL FAIR

Truck and tractor pull. boltonfair.ca

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

WWII and Korean War vets can share


Rd 124, Ospringe. Upper Credit Humane Society, 416-706-7406; uppercredit.com OCT 26 : INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF AUTHORS Discussions, Q & A with

noted authors. 7-9pm. $20. Station on the Green, 10 Caroline St E, Creemore. Curiosity House Books, 705-466-3400; curiosityhousebooks.com OCT 27 : CLAUDE CHURCH 170TH ANNIVERSARY 10:30am: worship. Noon:

dinner followed by video and hymn singalong. Free, register. 15175 Hurontario St, Caledon. 416-668-4390; claudechurch.com memories. 10am-4pm. Free, register. Caledon Public Library, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-1400 x228; caledon. library.on.ca OCT 12 – 14 : ERIN FAIR EQUINE TENT

Demos, events, tack swap & sale. Sat: Frank Grelo follows 10am presentation. 9am-5pm. Fair admission. Erin Fairgrounds. 519-833-2808; erinfair.ca OCT 18 : CLICK CREATE CELEBRATE AWARDS NIGHT Art display, writing and

music. 6-8:30pm. Free. Caledon Public Library, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-8571400 x250; caledon.library.on.ca OCT 18 : SWEET SEATS Food, fashion and fun. Vendors, beauty advice. Proceeds to Community Living Dufferin. 7-10pm. $25; table of 8, $200. Horizons Event Centre, 633419 Hwy 10, Orangeville. 519-941-8971; sweetseats.weebly.com OCT 19 : ALBION HILLS COMMUNITY FARMSTOCK 2013 Local food, drink,

music & auction. Reserve food pass online. 3-9pm. $20, advance (5 vouchers); $20 at door (4 vouchers). Albion Bolton Fairgrounds, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 647981-6281; albionhillscommunityfarm.org OCT 20 : TEARS, TRIUMPHS AND TRAIN WRECKS Radio host Bernadette Hardaker

shares best and worst from her side of the microphone. 2-3pm. $19. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com OCT 23 : BREAKFAST WITH GENERAL RICK HILLIER Talk by former chief of

defence staff of the Canadian Forces and senior advisor, TD Bank Group. 7:309:30am. $15, register. Best Western, 7 Buena Vista Dr, Orangeville. Orangeville Economic Development Centre, 519-9410440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca OCT 24 : GOOGLE ADWORDS ADVERTISING SEMINAR Create affordable

dollars. 9am-noon. $20. Tony Rose Sports Centre, Orangeville. Small Business Enterprise Centre, 519-941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca OCT 30 : HAUNTED ORANGEVILLE WITH ANDREW HIND AND MARIA DA SILVA

An evening of chills and thrills. 7-8:30pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca NOV 2 & 3 : DUFFERIN HOME & BUSINESS EXPO In time for the holiday

season. Orangeville Agricultural Centre, 247090 5 Sdrd, Mono. Greater Dufferin Area Chamber of Commerce, 519-9410490; gdacc.ca NOV 6 : STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT STRESS

Natural ways to reduce stress, with Dr. Wendy Davis. 7-8pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca

www.sweetseats.weebly.com 519.941.8971 Thanks to Sponsors:

story, discussions, breakfast & lunch. 9am-3:15pm. $60. Monora Park Pavilion, Hwy 10 N of Orangeville. University Women Orangeville & District, 519-9417452; cfuworangeville.ca NOV 9 : TRINITY CHURCH CAMPBELL’S CROSS BAZAAR AND SILENT AUCTION

Baking, crafts, books, treasure table, lunch. 9am-2pm. 3515 King St, Caledon, 905-838-1623; ruth.wiggins@sympatico.ca NOV 9 : BANTING DAY/WORLD DIABETES DAY CELEBRATION Historic

exhibits, music. 2-5pm. Free, donations. Banting Homestead Heritage Park, 5116 Sir Frederick Banting Rd, Alliston. Sir Frederick Banting Legacy Foundation, 705-434-3283; sadleir@mie.utoronto.ca NOV 12 : EDITORIAL CARTOONS WITH CLARE McCARTHY Hysterical-historical

OCT 25 : FALL STORYTELLING Dufferin

liability. 8:30am-3:30pm. $30, register. Portico Community Church, 1814 Barbertown Rd, Mississauga. 519-9420001 x230; carters.ca

$30; nail clipping $5. 10am-1pm. Premier Equipment Dealership, 8911 Wellington

Enjoy friends, food, fashion and fun. Check out the fabulous vendor tables, bid on the silent auction items, get a first hand glimpse at the seasons latest fashions and take home some expert beauty advice; all this and more.

NOV 9 : CELEBRATE WOMEN: WE CAN, WE WILL Nicole Moore’s remarkable

look at Orangeville’s past. 1-2pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610 x5232; orangeville.library.on.ca

OCT 26 : RABIES AND MICROCHIP CLINIC Microchip $30; rabies 3-year,

Friday October 18 ~ 7-10pm Horizons Event Centre Table of 8: $200. Tickets $25. ea.

OCT 29 : CREATING A MARKETING CALENDAR Maximize your marketing

marketing campaigns targetting regional customers. 9am-noon. $22.90, register. Georgian College, Orangeville. Small Business Enterprise Centre, 519-941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca Circle of Storytellers with live music. 7-8pm. $10. Tickets at BookLore/Jelly Craft Café/DCMA. Historic Corbetton Church, Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com

Sweet Seats

Gather your team and join us for a fun filled night fundraising to provide life enriching programs for adults, teens and children supported by Community Living Dufferin.

NOV 14 : CARTER’S CHURCH & CHARITY LAW SEMINAR Reduce exposure to legal

NOV 14 : SMALL BUSINESS INSURANCE

Determine what you need. 6:309pm. Free. Alder Street Recreation Centre, Orangeville. Small Business Enterprise Centre, 519-941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

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A continued from page 83 NOV 15 : WINDOW WONDERLAND & TREE LIGHTING Decorated merchants’

windows dramatically unveiled. 6pm: Christmas tree lighting. Horse & carriage rides, carol singing. 6-9pm. Erin Village. villageoferin.com NOV 16 : UPPER CREDIT HUMANE SOCIETY EMPTY BOWLS SOUPFEST

Sample local chefs’ soups. 11:30am-2pm. 1 ticket, 4 soups $10; seniors/kids 12 & under, $8. Centre 2000, 14 Boland Dr, Erin. 416-706-7406; uppercredit.com NOV 16 : COME VISIT THE STABLE & BETHLEHEM BAZAAR Nativity scenes,

silent auction, baking, crafts. 9am-2pm. Free. Westminster United Church, 247 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-0381; westminsterorangeville.ca NOV 16 : PALGRAVE UNITED CHURCH CHRISTMAS BAZAAR Vendors, bake

sale, silent auction. Lunch available. 10am-2pm. 34 Pine Ave. 905-880-0303; palgraveunited.ca NOV 19 : SMALL BUSINESS FRAUD

Protect your business, presented with TD Canada Trust. 6:30-9pm. Free. Alder Street Recreation Centre, Orangeville. Small Business Enterprise Centre, 519941-0440 x2286; orangevillebusiness.ca NOV 20 – 23 : SAMARITAN’S PURSE OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD Fill

a shoe box with toys and supplies for children living overseas in poverty. Drop off Wed-Fri 3-7pm, Sat 9amnoon. Covenant Alliance Church, 3 Zina St, Orangeville. 519-940-9479; samaritanspurse.ca NOV 21 : ZONTA CLUB OF BRAMPTONCALEDON’S WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Recognizing outstanding

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SEP 19 : ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING FOR FARM LANDLORDS Sustainable

practices and funding. Free, register at eventbrite.com/event/6625153011. 7-9pm. Terra Cotta Conservation Area. 1-800668-5557 x436; creditvalleyca.ca SEP 21 : BEES AND BIODIVERSITY IN DECLINE Information session, kids’ bee-

related activities, vendors. 10am-12:30pm. Free. Horizons Event Centre, 633419 Hwy 10, Orangeville. Mono Mulmur Citizens’ Coalition, 519-925-2107; monomulmur.com SEP 21 : DCMA’S MAGICAL TECHNICOLOUR FALL BUS TOUR An

adventure through Dufferin County. Includes lunch. 10am-3pm. $30, register. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com SEP 21 : GREAT CANADIAN SHORELINE CLEANUP Clean up the Tramner

property. Meet in the park off Quarry Dr, Orangeville. See website. 10am. Free, register. Credit Valley Conservation, 905670-1615 x441; shorelinecleanup.ca SEP 22 : CARROT FEST U-pick carrots,

fantastic food, music, hands-on farm workshops, kids’ activities. 11am-5pm. Free. Everdale Organic Farm, 5812 Sixth Line, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4859 x102; everdale.org SEP 22 : FERGUSON MEMORIAL WALK

In memory of Heidi Lee Ferguson, née Bogner. Proceeds to Family Transition Place, White Ribbon Campaign. Start at Island Lake Conservation Area pavilion. 9:30am-12:30pm. $20; under 5 free. fergusonmemorialwalk.com SEP 24 : POLLINATION Pollinator-

women in our community and beyond. See website. Pearson Convention Centre, 2638 Steeles Ave E, Brampton. zontabramptoncaledon.com

friendly gardening methods, with Victoria MacPhail. 7:30-9pm. Orangeville Seniors’ Centre, 26 Bythia St. Upper Credit Field Naturalists, 519-925-3968; joanneavison@ yahoo.ca

NOV 23 : ROTARY CLUB OF PALGRAVE SILENT AUCTION Live band, champagne

SEP 28 : CHASE THE COYOTE TRAIL RACE

reception, hors d’oeuvres, dinner. 5:3011:30pm. $75. Royal Ambassador, 15430 Innis Lake Rd, Caledon. 905-880-7037; alderdice1@rogers.com NOV 25 : HEADWATERS FOOD SUMMIT

Discovering new ways of working together to positively impact the Headwaters foodshed. See website for updates. headwaterscommunities.org

outdoor SEP 17 : SHELBURNE & DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY MEETING

Tom McCavour on therapeutic gardening for zoomers. 7pm. Royal Canadian Legion, 377 William St. 519-925-2182; shelburnehort.blogspot.com SEP 17, OCT 15 & NOV 19 : BOLTON & DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY MEETINGS SEPT 17 : Assessing Your

Landscape. OCT 15 : Gardening Is for the Birds. NOV 19 : Creating Indoor Garden Areas & Eco-friendly Plants. 7:30-9pm. $2. Caledon Community Complex, 6215 Old Church Rd, Caledon East. boltonhort.info 84

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

14.4 km challenge and 5.7 km sprint. See website. Proceeds to Dufferin Hi-Land Bruce Trail Club. 8:30am-1pm. $50, free kids’ event. Mono Cliffs Provincial Park. Run Dufferin, 905-936-3801; chasethecoyote.com SEP 28 : DUFFERIN TOWN & COUNTRY FARM TOUR Self-guided tour of working

farms in Dufferin. Farm-related activities, buy produce. See web for online passport. 9am-4pm. Bring non-perishable food or cash for food bank. 519-942-0984; thehillsofheadwaters.com SEP 28 : PROCYON WALKING FOR WILDLIFE Palgrave

Forest/Wildlife parking lot Finnerty Sdrd (W of Hwy 50). Lunch provided. Silent auction. 9:30am-3pm. Min sponsorship $50; $20/child 14 & under. Register. 905-406-0201; procyonwildlife.org

H A P P E N I N G S

SEP 28 : SEED SAVING Bob Wildfong

on advanced techniques used by seed professionals. 10am-4pm. $85. Everdale, 5812 6th Line, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4859 x101; everdale.org OCT 2 : TLC FOR YOUR TREES AND SHRUBS WORKSHOP Species, location,

maintenance. 6:30-8pm. Free, register. Caledon Library, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. Healthy Yards Program, Toronto and Region Conservation, 416-661-6600 x5786; trcastewardshipevents.ca OCT 2 – NOV 20 (1ST & 3RD WEDNESDAYS) : HEADWATERS FLY FISHING CLUB All levels welcome,

no experience/equipment required. 7:30-9pm. $40, annual. Victoria Parks Community Centre, Mono Mills. 519-217-8566; facebook.com/ headwatersflyfishingclub OCT 5 : GREAT LAKES, GREAT RESPONSIBILITIES: TAKING YOU TO THE SOURCE Bus tour shows practices &

projects to protect water & lakes. 8:30am2:30pm. $10, includes lunch. Register by Sept 19. Credit Valley Conservation, 905670-1615 x445; creditvalleyca.ca OCT 5 : CREATIVE WILDLIFE HABITAT ON YOUR PROPERTY 10am-12pm.

Free, register at eventbrite.com/ event/7214676291. Terra Cotta Conservation Area. Credit Valley Conservation, 800-668-5557 x440; creditvalleyca.ca OCT 5 : HEADWATERS HORSE COUNTRY STABLE TOUR 10am-4pm. Free. The Hills

of Headwaters region, various locations. 519-942-0314; headwatershorsecountry.ca OCT 6 : BRUCE TRAIL DAY Guided

hikes, talks on history & biodiversity, all-day BBQ. 10am-3pm. Free. Forks of the Credit Provincial Park, Caledon. caledonbrucetrail.org OCT 8 & NOV 12 : ORANGEVILLE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY MEETINGS OCT 8 : Photography through the seasons in your garden, silent auction. NOV 12 :

NOV 7 : CARING FOR YOUR LAND AND WATER Manage wetlands, septic systems,

wells, landscaping. Free. 6:30-9:30pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St, Alton. See website, register by Nov 1. Credit Valley Conservation, 1-800-668-5557 x436; creditvalleyca.ca OCT 26 : ORANGEVILLE’S DUCKS UNLIMITED CONSERVATION DINNER

Prizes, auctions featuring firearms, equipment. Proceeds to conserving wetlands. 5-10pm. $60; couple $100. Orangeville Fairgrounds, 247090 5 Sdrd, Mono. 519-941-9759; kr1941hunter@yahoo.ca OCT 27 : BOLTON ROTARY HAUNTED HILL 5/10K RUN/WALK 5km loop, wear costume,

family event. 9:30am. Humberview Secondary School, 135 Kingsview Dr, Bolton. 905-951-0603 x22, rotaryhauntedhill.com OCT 29 : TURTLES Threats and successful conservation projects, with Don Scallen. Free. Orangeville Seniors’ Centre, 26 Bythia St. Upper Credit Field Naturalists, 519-925-3968; joanneavison@yahoo.ca NOV 16 : WOODLOT MANAGEMENT

Options & CVC’s forest management services. 9am-noon. Free. CVC Forestry Operations Centre, 15526 Heart Lake Rd, Caledon. Credit Valley Conservation, 1-800-668-5557 x440; creditvalleyca.ca NOV 16 : CARING FOR YOUR HORSE AND FARM WORKSHOP AND FARM TOUR

Manage manure, improve pasture, protect natural features. Light lunch. 10am-4pm. Free. Caledon Community Complex, Caledon East. Credit Valley Conservation, 1-800-668-5557 x430; creditvalleyca.ca

music NOW – SEP 25 (WEDNESDAYS) : ORANGEVILLE CHORUS, SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL MEMBERSHIP DRIVE Free singing

lessons, friendship, barbershop-style. 7-9:30pm. Horizons Event Centre, 633419 Hwy 10, N of Orangeville. 905-584-2538; membershipteam@orangevillechorus.com SEP 20 : HEATHER BAMBRICK AND FRIENDS JAZZ CONCERT Presented by

Shade gardening using native plants, AGM. 7-9pm. Orangeville Seniors’ Centre, 26 Bythia St. orangevillehort.org

Orangeville Concert Association. 8-10pm. $30; students $15. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway. 1-800-424-1295; orangeconcerts.ca

OCT 20 : FRIENDS OF ISLAND LAKE TRAIL TOLL Help complete the final

SEP 21 : PALGRAVE UNITED CHURCH MUSIC FUNDRAISER Evening of music

phase. 9am-5pm. Vicki Baron Lakeside Trail entrances, Hockley Rd/Mono Amaranth Public School, Hwy 10. 519-9413599 x227; landscapesforlife.ca

and song. Proceeds to new roof and solar panels. 7-9pm. Donation. 34 Pine Ave. 905-880-0303; palgraveunited.ca SEP 22 : WILL DEVONSHIRE FALL BENEFIT CONCERT & DESSERT SOIRÉE

Classical & original guitar compositions. Proceeds to Erin Food Bank, Orton Community Association. 7pm. $10. Orton Community Church, John St. 519-855-6385; bill.devonshire@gmail.com

S

SEP 26 – 29 : WICHITA LINEMAN – THE MUSIC OF GLEN CAMPBELL Take

a trip down memory lane with Aaron Solomon, Leisa Way & Randall Kempf. Thurs 2pm. Fri & Sat 8pm. Sun 2pm. $40. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway. Theatre Orangeville, 519-942-3423 x0; theatreorangeville.ca


OCT: LIVE MUSIC AT ROSE THEATRE

OCT 19 : BLACK FAMILY CONCERT

All performances at 8pm, unless noted. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca

10 multi-talented children sing, dance and play old-time fiddle. 2 & 7pm. $12. Grace Tipling Hall, 120 Main St, Shelburne. 519-925-3037; blackfamilymusic.com

OCT 16 : RICK SPRINGFIELD OCT 24 : YOUR TOWN THROWDOWN TOUR FEATURING CHAD BROWNLEE, DERIC RUTTAN AND JASON BLAINE OCT 25 : JESSE COOK Platinum-selling

world music guitar sensation. OCT 26 : GINO VANNELLI Piano-voice

concerts, symphony orchestras & pop ensembles. NOV 1 : JOEL PLASKETT Innovative artist

joined on stage by his dad Bill. NOV 8 : JOE SEALY AND PAUL NOVOTNY

Juno-nominated & esteemed fixtures on the Canadian jazz scene. NOV 9 : DR. AMIT ARYA Canadian-born

Indian classical vocalist. NOV 14 : FRESH PRINCES OF BRAMPTON

Ali Rizvi Badshah, Keith Pedro & Jazz Mann. NOV 14 : KURT ELLING Outstanding jazz

OCT 19 : BOB MILNE’S RAGTIME Music and stories told in Bob’s inimitable style. 2:30pm: performance and afternoon tea. 8pm: performance. $29. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com OCT 26 : GOSPEL NIGHT Gospel music, refreshments. 7:30pm. $15 door; 12 & under free. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. Hillsburgh Community Christian Church, 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com OCT 26 & NOV 23 : CALEDON CHAMBER CONCERTS OCT 26 : Reiner Duo. NOV

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23 : Cecilia String Quartet. Tickets at BookLore, Howard the Butcher and Forster’s Books. 8pm. $30; students 16 & under, $15. St. James Anglican Church, 6025 Old Church Rd, Caledon East. 905880-2445; caledonchamberconcerts.com

vocalist. NOV 15 : GENTLEMAN’S RULE 10-man

a cappella group performs music by Bob Marley, Stevie Wonder and others. NOV 21 : CELTIC TENORS Classical

crossover artists from Ireland. NOV 22 : BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA Five-

time Grammy-winning gospel group. NOV 23 : LIONA BOYD Classical guitar

virtuoso, composer and singer.

OCT 27 : OLD-TIME HYMN SING Local

performers in four-part harmony. Join in. 2-4pm. Donations welcome. Historic Corbetton Church, Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com OCT 27 : THE POWER OF MUSIC Local performers of all ages and experience. Proceeds to Orangeville & District Music Festival Scholarship Fund. Tickets at Scotiabank, BookLore, Broadway Music, Aardvark. 7:30pm. $20; children 12 & under $10. Westminster United Church, 247 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-9428675; odmf.ca

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NOV 2 : CLASSICS CONCERT AND FRENCH BISTRO DINNER 4pm: Robert

Hennig & Shelagh Tyreman. 6pm: dinner. $20; dinner $15; concert and dinner $30. St. Mark’s Anglican Church, 5 First St, Orangeville. Headwaters Concert Choir, 905-495-6752; bach4550@rogers.com NOV 2 : ROOTS OF COUNTRY The Muir OCT 3 & 4 : BRAMPTON INDEPENDENT ARTS SHOWCASE Jam with Brampton’s

local talent. Free. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2000, brampton.ca OCT 4 : DAVE YOUNG & TERRY PROMANE OCTET CONCERT Orangeville Concert

Association present jazz bassist and tenor trombonist/tuba/bass trombonist. 8pm. $30; students $15; series of 4, $95. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway. 519-9423423; orangevilleconcerts.ca OCT 6 : BENEFIT CONCERT FOR THE STANTON HOTEL Original music by Carl

Tafel. 2pm. $10. Whitfield Church, 10 Sdrd and Centre Rd, Mulmur. Community Association to Save the Stanton Hotel, highcounty@sympatico.ca OCT 6 : CANDESCENCE – ILLUMINATING THE SOUL WITH SONG Female quartet

performs Broadway, jazz, contemporary and classical favourites. 4-5pm. $10. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Hwy 89 & Airport Rd. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com

Family performs hits from great country performers. 8pm. $25. Century Church Theatre, 3 Hill St, Hillsburgh. 519-8554586; centurychurchtheatre.com NOV 3 : A TIME TO REMEMBER A Remembrance Day tribute by Orangeville Community Band. 7pm. Free. Salvation Army New Hope Community Church, 690 Riddell Rd, Orangeville. 519-942-2348; orangevillecommunityband.ca NOV 3 : BRIAN PICKELL BAND

Traditional, energizing music. 7:30-9pm. $20 at ticketscene.ca; $25 at door. Claude Church, 15175 Hurontario St, Caledon. 416-668-4390; claudechurch.com NOV 10 : SCOTT WOODS BAND – OLD TIME CHRISTMAS Local fiddling

champ. Tickets at Holmes Appliance & Music, Remax Orangeville, All-Mont Doors. 2-4pm. $20; children $10; 5 & under free. Grace Tipling Hall, 120 Main St, Shelburne. 519-941-1829; valleybrook@sympatico.ca

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theatre+film

NOW – DEC 18 (WEDNESDAYS) : HILLSBURGH PLAYGROUP-OEYC Drop-in

SEP 13 – 22 : SAME TIME NEXT YEAR

Lovers rendezvous once a year. Fri, Sat 8pm. Sun 2:30pm. $20. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com SEP 14 : CALEDON TOWNHALL PLAYERS 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR AND BBQ

Tour the theatre, free BBQ. 10:30am-1pm. Old Caledon Town Hall, Caledon Village. 519-927-5460; caledontownhallplayers.com SEP 19 : DANCING WITH RAGE – MARY WALSH From This Hour Has 22 Minutes,

Mary navigates pop culture, politics & capitalism. 8pm. $59-$69. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca SEP 26 : THE X-RATED SHOW Darren

Frost and Kenny Robinson. 8pm. $25. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca SEP 27 : WOMEN FULLY CLOTHED

Everyday life, guilt & laughter. 8pm. $54-$64. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca SEP 28 : CALEDON TOWNHALL PLAYERS 50TH ANNIVERSARY MEMBERS’ DINNER – DOWN MEMORY LANE AND BACK

Dinner, wine & cheese. See website. 6:30-11:30pm. $35. Old Caledon Town Hall, Caledon Village. 519-927-5460; caledontownhallplayers.com SEP 28 : DECADE OF THE ARROW

Presented by the Oakville Historical Society. 2pm. Peel Art Gallery, Museum and Archives (PAMA), 9 Wellington St E, Brampton. 905-791-4055 x6211; pama. peelregion.ca SEP 30 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED (14A)

Danish with subtitles. A hairdresser with cancer faces trials, travels to Italy, meets a new friend. 4:30 & 7pm, $9; 9:10pm, $7. Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville. mondaynightmovies.ca OCT 4 & 5, 11 & 12 : GROUNDED

Passengers wait for a delayed flight – but are they who they seem? 7pm. Fri $12; Sat $15. Grace Tipling Hall, 120 Main St, Shelburne. Tipling Stage Company, 519925-2600; tiplingstagecompany.com

S

OCT 7 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – SPRING AND ARNAUD Art,

love, mortality explored through the lives of Canadian artists Spring Hurlbut and Arnaud Maggs. 6:30pm. $12 at BookLore or at the door. Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville. 519-942-4724; brendagoetz@rogers.com OCT 16 – 20 : DOUBT Sister Aloysius

suspects Father Flynn of improper relations with the school’s first AfricanAmerican pupil. Wed-Sat 8pm. Sun 2pm. $30. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca OCT 18 : JASON BISHOP Sleight of hand, grand illusions, close-up magic. 8pm. 86

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

H A P P E N I N G S

$38-$54. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca OCT 19 : TRIPLE TREAT! 1:30pm:

Credit Valley Explorer – Forks of the Credit. 5:30pm: Dinner at Mill Creek Restaurant. 8pm: The Numbers Game play. 1:30-10pm. $110; alcohol extra. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway. Theatre Orangeville, 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca OCT 20 – NOV 3 : THE NUMBERS GAME

First crushes reconnect 37 years later. Sun, Wed 2pm. Thurs 2 & 8pm. Fri, Sat 8pm. $33-$40. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway. Theatre Orangeville, 519-9423423 x0; theatreorangeville.ca OCT 28 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – THE HUNT (18A) Danish

with subtitles. Divorced daycare worker hopes to win custody of his estranged teenage son. 4:30 & 7pm, $9; 9:10pm, $7. Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville. mondaynightmovies.ca OCT 31, NOV 1 & 2, 8 & 9, 15 & 16 : THE ODD COUPLE – FEMALE VERSION

Slob and neat freak room together with hilarious results. 2:15 & 8:15pm. $15; matinée $12; dinner and show $28. Old Caledon Town Hall, Caledon Village. 519927-5460; caledontownhallplayers.com NOV 4 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – THE ANGELS’ SHARE (PG) Bittersweet

comedy follows Robbie, trying to ensure his newborn son avoids a tragic life like his. 4:30 & 7pm, $9; 9:10, $7. Tickets at BookLore. Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville. mondaynightmovies.ca

P U Z Z L I N G Match the Latin A–4 B–6 C–7 D–5 E–1 F–9

activities for parents/caregivers and kids 6 & under. 9:30-11:30am. Free. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 81 Trafalgar Rd. East Wellington Community Services, 519-833-9696 x227; meetup.com/ewcs-childrens-playgroups SEP 13 : PARENTING EDUCATION WORKSHOPS Parenting a child 6 & under. Child-

care available, small fee. 9:30-11am. Free. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090; cp-cc.org SEP 13 & 27, OCT 11 & 25 : HULLABALLOO

Dance and sing to favourite kids’ songs. 10-11am. Free. All Saints Anglican Church, Erin. 519-833-9696 x227; meetup.com/ ewcs-childrens-playgroups SEP 17 – DEC 17 (TUESDAYS) : LET’S GET TOGETHER Connect with other families

to explore parenting a child with special needs, 6 & under. 5:45-7:15pm. Free, register. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090 x28; cp-cc.org

At the Market in Creemore Peggy – 94 Mark – 74 Dolores – 41 Ernie – 23 (plus the one he ate) “It’s Never Discussed!” Jim is the oldest and Trent the youngest. From Melancthon to Mississippi If Gary were truly a ‘farm boy’ he would not have the faucet running all the while he brushes his teeth. Farmers are on wells and don’t waste water that way.

children paint original art cards to help Canadian Aboriginal children in remote communities. Headwaters schools. 905729-0097; darearts.com SEP 20 – DEC 20 (FRIDAYS) : PARENTING ENRICHMENT WORKSHOPS For parents

of children 6 & under. Childcare, small fee. 9:30-11am. Free, register. Caledon ParentChild Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090 x28, earlyyears@cp-cc.org, cp-cc.org SEP 21 : KIDZZ TO KIDZ SUPER SALE

Gently used baby and kids’ items, birth-16 yrs. 9:30am-1pm. $2. Brampton Fairgrounds, 12942 Heart Lake Rd, Caledon. Twins Plus Association of Brampton, 905-843-0210; facebook.com/ KidzzToKidzSuperSale?fref=ts

S Dress for a mess. From pottery to

SEPT 21 & 22, 28 & 29 : KIDS’FEST

photography, dance to encaustic collage, a host of events that lets kids choose their own way to express creativity during the Headwaters Arts Festival. Full schedule on website. 519-943-1149; headwatersartsfestival.com

SEP 19 : THEATRE ORANGEVILLE YOUTH SINGERS (T.O.Y.S) Open to 8- to 16-year-

olds who love to sing and perform! 4-6pm. $380. St. Mark’s Anglican Church, 5 First Ave, Orangeville. 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca SEP 19 – DEC 19 (THURSDAYS) : POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP For mothers

affected by postpartum depression. 1:303:30pm. Free childcare. Register. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090 x28; cp-cc.org

S

SEP 20 – OCT 5 : HEADWATERS SHINING STARS Contest for talented

youth in Headwaters. See website. Koros Games, 113 Broadway Ave, Orangeville. 519-943-1149; headwatersarts.com

S O L U T I O N S

G–2

S

SEP 20 – OCT 5 : DAREARTS DARE2DRAW CARD PROJECT 3,000 local

from page 90

A Rainy Day Challenge Our solution; there are others if the two ‘starters’ are ignored.

SEP 23, 30 – OCT 7, 21 – NOV 25 (MONDAYS) THEATRE ARTS FOR YOUTH WITH SPECIAL NEEDS Skill-

based program uses games, music and improv, ages 1-17. 5:30-7pm. Info session Sep 23, 7-8pm. $180. Theatre Orangeville Rehearsal Hall, 065371 Cty Rd 3. Kerry’s Place, DCAFS, Theatre Orangeville Academy, 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca SEP 26 : LUNCHBOX TALK Naturopathic

doctor Jilan Koch on preparing delicious, nutritious school lunches. 7-8pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-9410610; orangeville.library.on.ca SEP 30 – OCT 7, 21 – NOV 25 (MONDAYS) : MAKE IT MUSICAL II Singing, dancing,

acting, ages 11-14. 7-9pm. $180. Theatre Orangeville Rehearsal Hall, 065371 Cty Rd 3 & Hwy 9. 519-942-3423 x2806; theatreorangeville.ca OCT – NOV : READY TO READ SERIES

Reading readiness activities for various ages at Orangeville Library. At 275 Alder St – Tues: Ones & Twos, 9:15-10am; Five & Under, 10:15-11am; Babies, 1:30-2:15pm. Fri: Threes to Fives, 9:15-10am. At 1 Mill St – Wed: Threes to Fives, 10:15-11am. Thurs: Ones & Twos, 10:15-11am; Threes to Fives, 10:15-11am; Five & Under, 11:15-noon; Babies, 1:30-2:15pm. OCT 1 – NOV 19 (TUESDAYS) : PLAYING WITH PANTO II Traditional British

pantomime based on a fairytale, ages 7-10. 6:30-8:30pm. $160. Theatre Orangeville Rehearsal Hall, 065371 Cty Rd 3 & Hwy 9. 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca


To submit your community, arts or non-profit event, go to www.inthehills.ca and click what’s on on the menu bar. That takes you to the listings page. Click submit your event and complete the easy form. For the winter (November) issue, submit by October 11, 2o13. We reserve the right to edit submissions for print and web publication. For up-to-date listings between issues, go to inthehills.ca and click what’s on on the menu bar.

OCT 2 – NOV 20 (WEDNESDAYS) : BRIGHT LIGHTS ON BROADWAY III

Fundamentals of musical theatre. 6pm. $160. Theatre Orangeville Rehearsal Hall, 065371 Cty Rd 3 & Hwy 9. 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca OCT 3 – 24, NOV 7 – 28 (THURSDAYS) : CREATIVE COLLABORATION Improv

and scripted material, ages 11-14. No experience necessary. 6:30-8:30pm. $180. Theatre Orangeville Rehearsal Hall, 065371 Cty Rd 3 & Hwy 9. 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca OCT 5 : THE MAPLES FALL FESTIVAL

Hay wagon rides, pumpkin decorating, kids’ crafts, paintball, BBQ, rock climbing wall, petting zoo. 9am-4pm. Free. The Maples Independent Country School, 513047 2nd Line, Amaranth. 519-942-3310; themaplesschool.com OCT 5 : ARTS FEST AT CURIOSITY HOUSE BOOKS Easy Thanksgiving and plasticine

crafts, sock monkey beans. 10am-5pm. Fees vary, register. 134 Mill St, Creemore. 705-466-3400; curiosityhousebooks.com OCT 5 : PUMPKIN BLANKET Fun

activities, stories and snack. Ages 3-6 with adult. 11am-12:15pm. Free, register. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-9410610; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 5 : LITTLE SPROUTS SERIES: SPLASH ’N BOOTS Dance with your little one to

infectious melodies. 3:30pm. $17.50. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-8742800; rosetheatre.ca OCT 8 – NOV 14 (TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS) : LEGO CLUB Get creative

with LEGO at the library, 6 & older. 4-5pm. Free, drop in. Tues: 275 Alder St. Thurs: 1 Mill St. Roto-Mill Inc. 519-941-0610 x5232, orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 8 – NOV 13 (TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS) : PAWS TO READ Have

fun, gain confidence reading to a trained therapy dog at the library, 12 & under. 5-6pm. Free, register with Lynne at bratwurst@rogers.com. Tues: 275 Alder St. Wed: 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610 x5232; orangeville.library.on.ca

OCT 9 – NOV 13 (WEDNESDAYS) : PAWS TO READ Have fun, gain confidence

reading to a trained therapy dog, for 12 & under. 4-5pm. Free, register with Lynne at bratwurst@rogers.com. Orangeville Public Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610 x5232; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 10 : GIANT PUMPKIN AND VEGETABLE CONTEST With official

judge Frank Ferragine from Breakfast Television. 7-9pm. Free. Erin Fairgrounds. eringiantpumpkingrowers.weebly.com OCT 22 – DEC 10 (TUESDAYS) : I’M GIRL

Positive personal image, assertiveness, critical thinking, for girls in Grades 6 & 7. 4-5pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610; orangeville.library.on.ca

TO TO PURCHASE PURCH HA ASE TICKETS: TIIC CKET ETTSS: www.creditvalleyca.ca/hauntedforest www w www w.c .cccred reed edit d ttvva leeeyyca.cca/ aa/h /hauunte ntteeddffoor orest reest esst or or 1-800-367-0890 11-800-367 80000-33367 80 6677-0890 0089 08 8890 9900 $13/adult $113/adult $$13 33///ad adult aad du t (13+), (1 ((13 (13+ 33+ +)),, $10/child $10/ 100///ccchhildd (4-12) ((4(4 44--12 112) 2) and aannd senior senni se nioorr (60+) ((60+ 66000+ +) * TO BEE ERMINED DETERMINED ATRE CO. THEATRE

Tickets TTic ickkeetss must mustt be be purchased p rchhassedd in pu i advance. advvance. Terra TTerrrra Cotta Co ta Conservation Con Co C onser servation errvation on Area, Areaa,, Halton AAr H lton Ha on Hills. H Hillss Hill *Additional *Additiona A io all charges Add Ad ch r s for foorr BBQQ fare. ffaare. re. e

OCT 23 – DEC 11 (WEDNESDAYS) : I AM

Tools for successful transition to high school. Co-ed Grades 7 & 8. 4-5pm. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-9410610; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 24 : HALLOWEEN FAMILY FUN NIGHT Crafts, activities, bedtime stories.

Wear your costume. 5-7pm. Free. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090; cp-cc.org OCT 25 & 26 : HAUNTED FOREST AT “TERROR COTTA” Spooky fun, kids 12 &

under. Wear costume, bring flashlight. 5:30-9pm. $13; child (4-12) and senior (60+) $10, advance. Terra Cotta Conservation Area. 1-800-367-0890; creditvalleyca.ca OCT 26 : HARVESTFEST STORYTIME

Come in costume for a treat and a story in the courtyard. 10:30-11am. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610 x5232; orangeville.library.on.ca OCT 27 : MONO’S CHILDREN’S HALLOWEEN PARTY Haunted house,

crafts, costume parade. 1-3pm. Child & adult $5; under 2 free, register. Mono Community Centre, Mono Centre. 519941-3599 x224; townofmono.com NOV 5 : STORY TRUNK TIME Story with

costumes and activities, ages 3-6 with adult. 11-11:45am. Free. Orangeville Library, 1 Mill St. 519-941-0610 x5232; orangeville.library.on.ca NOV 11 – 16 : CHILDREN’S EARLY LEARNING PROGRAM REGISTRATION

Baby Playtime, Mother Goose, Discovery Time and more. See website. Free. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090 x28; cp-cc.org

Planning a Special Event? Free On-Site Consultations TABLES, CHAIRS, LINENS, DINNERWARE, BBQ’S, CASINO EQUIPMENT, WEDDING ACCESSORIES, TENTS & MORE! IN BRAMPTON 93 Heart Lake Road South (south of Clark) 905-459-5781 IN ORANGEVILLE 400 Townline, Unit 11 (beside Wimpy’s) 519-307-5781

www.mcleansherwood.com

NOV 14 – 17 : BUGSY MALONE JR Kids’

musical with non-violent fighting with Silly String. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. Sun 2pm. $18; students & seniors $15. Grace Tipling Hall, 120 Main St, Shelburne. 519-925-2600 x0; lpstageproductionsinc.com NOV 15 – 17, 22 – 24 : PANTOMIME: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Traditional

English pantomime with song, dance, laughter, audience participation. All ages. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm. Sun 2pm. $12. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com ≈

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013

87


MARKETPLACE CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

ALPACAS

B. A. WOOD MASONRY

EQUESTRIAN SERVICES

www.rawhide-adventures.on.ca

Leasing, Boarding, Cattle Drives, Riding Adventures Come, let the adventures begin.

Specializing in Stone & Restoration Work Brick • Block Brian Wood

519-941-5396

ART & CRAFT

J & M MASONRY

PET Portraits

 

   ! !  !

 by Joan Gray

  

bricks • block • fireplaces chimneys • concrete floor footings

action Satisf ANTEED R A GU

"!   !



FASHION

CONCRETE FORMING CUSTOM CONTRACTORS CONCRETE FORMING CUTTING & CORING For a free estimate, call

Howard Curran 519-942-0171 howard.curran@sympatico.ca

Nellie

of Belfountain

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TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 519-942-8401 OR EMAIL INFO@INTHEHILLS.CA


MARKETPLACE HEALTH & WELL BEING

MUSIC

(cont’d)

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

TONY SCAVETTA, MEDIUM

Part of the Erin Community since 1925

Home • Auto Commercial • Farm Financial Services Life

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519-927-3387

O/B Secure Insurance Solutions Group Inc.

INFO@SCHOOLOFMIRACLES.CA

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LANDSCAPING & GARDENING

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PHONE 905 880 4118

PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES We can help: • Overweight • Frequent paw licking • Hairballs • Dry, flaky or greasy skin • Smelly ears or skin • Excessive shedding • Stiff joints/arthritis • Recurring ear infections Shelburne store now offering equine health & treat products

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LAND SURVEYING P.J. Williams Ontario Land Surveyor

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Open: 8am-4pm weekdays Free Consultation on Weekends by Appointment Phone: 519-925-0057 or 519-941-6231 Fax: 519-941-6231 www.pjwilliams.ca

www.rtapleyphoto.com (519) 939-7116

Creating artistic heirloom portraits for your home


a Puzzling Conclusion

by Ken Weber

Match the Latin In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, editors of local newspapers here in the hills often used common Latin phrases in their reportage and editorials, secure in the knowledge that readers were familiar with their meaning. The Latin phrases below are taken from the Erin Advocate, the Bolton Enterprise and the Orangeville Sun. Match each Latin phrase with its appropriate meaning. (To make it interesting we have added a few “meanings” that have no matching Latin counterpart.) A. vir prudens

B. sine qua non 1. devil’s advocate

C. casus belli

D. tabula rasa

2. unknown territory

6. essential condition (without which not)

E. advocatus diaboli

3. without a reason

7. source of the conflict

4. wise man

8. in complete agreement

A Rainy Day Challenge

At the Market in Creemore Dolores and Ernie went to the Creemore Market with Mark and Peggy to get what they needed to make this year’s apple sauce. Because Dolores had slept in, they were late getting under way and the market was about to close when they finally arrived, so the four hurriedly bought all the remaining baskets of apples on sale. It turned out the total number of apples they bought was 233 and because each of them had contributed different amounts of money to the total purchase price, they agreed the apples should be divided proportionately. After the count-out Peggy had 20 more apples than Mark, 53 more than Dolores, and 71 more than Ernie (who had eaten one before the count-out started).

F. ab initio

In the fall of 1872, the pupils of Strong’s School (S.S. No.1 Albion) planned to have a picnic but heavy rain almost spoiled the day. Fortunately, because S.S. No.1 had just moved to a new school building on the 3rd Line of Albion Township, there was a brand new blackboard available to the teacher for presenting puzzles like the one below. (With puzzles like this to occupy them, the pupils were quite content to eat their sandwiches inside.) Fill in the maze by entering these symbols into its seventeen sections in this way: 1. Your completed maze will have four suns, four flags, four stars and five clouds.

G. terra incognita

5. blank slate 9. from the beginning

“It’s Never Discussed!” Trent, Reggie and Jim regularly play golf at the Glen Eagle course on Highway 50. Although there is a considerable difference in their ages they never discuss this fact and they never talk about money either, even though their incomes vary considerably. Trent is a bachelor. The eldest of the three men has two daughters in college. Reggie’s annual income is the lowest of the three but he is not the youngest. Although it has never come up in conversation, all three know that the oldest of the trio makes the most money. Who is the oldest of this trio and who is the youngest?

2. The maze will have one symbol per section no matter what the section’s size or shape. 3. No section of the completed maze will touch another section with the same symbol. (We have entered two suggestions to get you started.)

How manyy apples pp did each ach get? A N

I N

T H E

H I L L S

M I N I

M Y S T E R Y

From Melancthon to Mississippi It was obvious they didn’t trust him. Not yet anyway. Which is why, as he brushed his teeth, teeth Gary left the bathroom door wide open to make a kind of I-have-nothing-to-hide statement. Their wariness, of course, was to be expected. The Black Lasers didn’t trust anyone, especially a newcomer. Gary leaned lower over the sink and contemplated the running water for a few seconds, then nonchalantly opened the faucet wider before returning to his brushing. The open door scheme was having an effect – he could see one of the Lasers watching him, making

no attempt to conceal a blatant, most unfriendly stare. Although the stare made Gary edgy, he knew it was a deliberate part of the initiation. Even so, he couldn’t suppress a sudden wave of anxiety. And no wonder, for Gary was a Canadian cop far from home in Jackson, Mississippi, an undercover agent spying on one of the most notorious biker gangs in the U.S. The gang called him “Farm Boy,” but then nobody here had a real first name. Everyone went by the name of a hometown or a variation of it, so instead of Hanks or Phils there were names like Dallas and

Michigan and ’Keepsie, the name for the guy from Poughkeepsie, New York. Gary’s cover story was that as a farmer from an out-of-the-way place up in Canada called Melancthon, he had well-established marijuana grow-op connections. Because the Lasers couldn’t get their tongues around “Melancthon,” he was simply known as Farm Boy. It was neither a compliment nor an insult, just another indication he had a way to go yet before being fully accepted by the gang. If you were a Black Laser why should you doubt Gary’s cover story? solutions on page 86

90

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2013


CHANGING LIVES ONE SMILE AT A TIME Dr. Richard Schmidt practices General Dentistry in Brampton, Ontario. He has been in practice for twenty five years with his wife, Dr. Tamara Sosath. His area of interest has always been Orthodontics and four years ago he introduced Clear Aligner Therapy (Invisalign) as a treatment option for his patients, to establish healthy alignment of teeth. In addition to treating adult and teen malocclusions with Invisalign, he is utilizing it to align teeth for conservative and rehabilitative restorative treatment.

WHAT IS INVISALIGN? Invisalign is a method of straightening teeth without using traditional braces. It uses a series of custom designed, clear plastic, removable “aligners” that gradually move teeth into their correct position. It has been used to treat millions of patients around the world.

If this orthodontic treatment interests you, it is important that you choose an experienced Invisalign Provider with whom you feel comfortable. Not all dentists and orthodontists have experience with Invisalign, so it is important to find one that has had the training to accurately assess your particular case. Invisalign addresses both simple and complex cases. During the initial consultation, radiographs, photos and impressions of your teeth will be taken. In conjunction with a 3D imaging iTero Scanner, the interpretation of these records will provide you with a preliminary treatment plan. Using the scanner, virtual tooth movements may be tracked to show you the end result. During your consultation, your questions and concerns will be answered. Once your records are collected, your case is sent off to the Laboratory. Using a 3D computer software program, your treatment plan is finalized. A series of clear aligners, made specifically for you, will be sent back to the office. They are worn for approximately twenty two hours per day and removed for

meals, brushing and flossing. Every two weeks or so, you will proceed to a new set of aligners. Your case will be periodically monitored at 2-8 week intervals. With completion of treatment, a retainer is worn to maintain the teeth in their new position. It is very satisfying and fulfilling to achieve striking results using Invisalign. Clear Aligner Therapy has definite advantages over conventional fixed orthodontic treatment. Most adults would feel uncomfortable wearing braces. Invisalign is virtually undetectable when worn. As a result, it provides the patient with the confidence to smile in their daily lives. There is less incidence of soft tissue irritation when compared to conventional braces. Also, the aligners can be removed for daily dental hygiene making the flossing and brushing of teeth much easier. Worried about the effects of aligners on speech? There are none. Our profession provides us with the opportunity to alter our patients’ lives by giving them beautiful smiles, more self-confidence and greatly improving dental health.

For further information, please do not hesitate to call us at 905-454-4703 www.dentistryat8nelson.com | dentistryat8nelson@hotmail.com

“ZERO” NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD $0 Down Down, 0% Interest Interest, 0 Payments until January 1, 2014*

ROCK-BOTTOM PRICING ON MAHINDRA 10 Series 16 Series 25 Series & Model 453 30! Red Tag Salle includes Mod del 5010 Cab

To REDUCE YOUR

CARBON FOOTPRINT

this year, y choose one:

Plant 700 trees OR take 2 cars off the road OR install a WaterFurnace Geothermal System To makke an imm mmed ediate and long-term m commitment to gre reen enho hous use se gass re ga redu ducttion, Wat ater erFu Furn rnac acee is the mos ostt en envi viro ronm nmen e taalllyy fr friend dly l home ho me hea eati ting ng, co cool olin ing g an and d hot ho ot wa wate terr sy syst stem st e ava em vaillab able le. No fos ossi sill fuels requ fu uired! Wate terFur Furnaace Geo e th ther erma mal Te Tech chnology gy rellie i s primar a ily on thee power of the earth h to hea eatt an and d co cool ol you ourr hoome me,, pl plus us it de d live vers hott wa ho wate terr mo more effic ffi ientlyy than anyy ot othe herr sy syst stem em. BONUS! Cut you o r energy cos osts ts up to 60% AND N add dd d res esal alee va valu luee to you ourr ho home me. Pr P ouudl dy awarded Top WaterFurnace Geoth therma mall Sa Sale less inn Ont le ntaario ioo for 201 0 0 andd 20011 1!

ISLANDVIEW FARM EQUIPMENT

633520 Hwy 10 Orangeville 519.941.9098

islandviewfarmequipment.com

*No interest and payments until January 1, 2014. Interest & Payments begin January 1, 2014 (based on contract date). Interest/payment free period is not in addition to contract term. With approved credit. Discounts may vary by model. Program restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.

www.NottawasagaMechanical.com

CANADA’S LEADING GEOTHERMAL BRAND


Autumn In The Hills 2013  

A magazine of country living in the Headwaters region.