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®

Contents

VOL. 7 • ISSUE 4

Feature Story K-9 Team Set Records

Page 34 Cover photo: Sergeant Tye Thompson’s K-9 “Harris” Photo courtesy of Ann Dinges, PIO

Master Gardener

Page 10 Entreprenurial Genius

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POLK COUNTY

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831-9005 OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Charles Clark (863) 528-8537 cclark@expoco.com Vice President - Dave Tomkow (863) 665-5088 cattlemanslivetock@earthlink.net Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch (863) 425-1121 jbunch@agriumretail.com Al Bellotto - (863) 581-5515 Ray Clark - (863) 683-8196 rclark@tampabay.rr.com L.B. Flanders, DVM - (863) 644-5974 Dewey Fussell - (863) 984-3782

Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

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Mike Fussell - (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@verizon.net David McCullers - (863) 528-1195

Brama Island

Page 16 Polk County Sheriff’s Office

Page 18 Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22 Fire Ants

Page 24 Jessica Kennedy

Page 26 Going for Gold

Moby Persing - (863) 528-4379 Ned Waters - (863) 698-1597 watersn@doacs.state.fl.us J.B. Wynn - (863) 581-3255 jbwynn29@gmail.com Alternate - Mike Facente - (863) 697-9419 Standing Committee Chairs: Membership - J.B. Wynn Events - Kevin Fussell (863) 412-5876 Rodeo - Fred Waters (863) 559-7808 watersf@doacs.state.fl.us Cattlewomen - President Marjorie Wood (863) 660-4137 onnie397@aol.com Extension - Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. - Sgt. Howard Martin

Page 28 Recipes

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in January

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry

Index of Advertisers Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ........................25

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins. Matthew 1:21 Merry Christmas! I hope you have the opportunity to gather with family and loved ones this Christmas. Remember that Christmas is not all about gifts, it is the day we celebrate the birth of Jesus. As you gather around the table for Christmas dinner, please take the time to bless the hands of the farmer and rancher who made it possible for you to have a safe abundant food source. Once you have had your fill of Christmas dinner, it’s time to GET MOVING! For five years the NFL’s PLAY 60 bus has been traveling the country, promoting 60 minutes of play each day for youth to be more happy and healthy. They have joined forces with parents, teachers and community leaders to give kids a chance to play every day! The Youth Obesity Statistics from the American Heart Association and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation are staggering. • One third of children (about 9 million) in America are obese or at risk for obesity. • Over the last two decades, the rate of overweight children has doubled in America. • More than 60 percent of children ages 9 – 13 do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. This should be of concern to everyone! Encourage the youngsters to find some activity they enjoy and get started in the direction of a happier, healthier life. With more activity and food that is Fresh From Florida, we can win this battle. If you know someone you feel may have a heavy heart this Christmas season, reach out to them. Give the gift of giving. In everything I showed you that by working hard in this manner you must help the weak and remember the words of the Lord Jesus, that He Himself said, ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’ Acts 20:35

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Polk County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association & Florida Citrus Mutual. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com, or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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EDITOR Patsy Berry

Arrington Body Shop, Inc ..........41 Art’s Golf Cars, Inc....................30 Ballclover .....................................7 Broke and Poor..........................44 Carlton & Carlton, PA ..............17 Cecil Breeding Farms .................20 Chemical Containers..................21 Darn Grills and Ranch Supply .....7 Discount Metals.........................39

OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens

Ellison RBM Inc. .......................41 Fancy Farms, Inc........................25 Farm Credit ...............................30

SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Calli Jo Parker

Florida Farm & Ranch Supply.............................41 Florida Dept. of Agriculture.........2 Florida Strawberry Festival ..........3 Fred’s Market...............................9 Grove Equipment.......................19 Gulf Coast Turf & Tractor ........48 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply.......39

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson

Helena Chemical-Tampa............21

PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey Lacey Waters

Key Plex.....................................33

Hinton Farms Produce, Inc. .......15 International Market World.......23 Lightsey Cattle Co. ....................18 Martin Law Office.....................41 Mosaic .........................................9 Parkesdale....................................5 Pathway .....................................47

STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Calli Jo Parker Lindsey English

Polk County Cattlemen’s Association ...............4 Polk Equine, PL .........................39 Polk Land Surveying, Inc ...........40 Repair Solutions.........................39 Seedway .....................................15 Southeastern Septic, LLC ...........17 Southwestern Produce................27 Stephanie Humphrey..................23 Stingray Chevrolet .....................43

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

The Bug Man.............................41 Wert’s Welding & Tank Service, Inc ...................44

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You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE DECEMBER 2012

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Since 1977 the environmental footprint of raising beef has declined. This statement is made based on an article in the Journal of Animal Science published by Dr. Jude Capper. Compared to 1977, figures for 2007 show that it currently takes: • 19% less feed • 33% less land • 12% less water • 9% less fossil fuel energy to produce the same amount of beef. The overall carbon footprint has been reduced by more than 16% from 1977 to 2007. We now produce 13% more beef from 30% fewer animals. U.S. producers raise 20% of the worlds beef supply with just 7% of the world’s cattle population. The carbon footprint reduction comes from raising cattle on grass pasture then finishing them on an optimal diet of grasses, grain and other forages in a

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feedyard. It takes 226 more days for a grass-finished animal to reach market weight than a grain-finished animal. Each pound of grain finished beef requires: • 45% less land • 76% less water • 49% less feed While generating: • 51% less manure • 42% fewer carbon emissions when compared to the same pounds of grass fed beef. Remember these facts the next time someone starts telling you that beef cattle production is destroying our environment.

Charles Clark Charles Clark Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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• Most of Santaʼs reindeer have male-sounding names, such as Blitzer, Comet, and Cupid. However, male reindeer shed their antlers around Christmas, so the reindeer pulling Santaʼs sleigh are likely not male, but female or castrati. • All the gifts in the ʻTwelve Days of Christmasʼ song would equal 364 gifts. • According to the Guinness world records, the tallest Christmas tree ever cut was a 221-foot Douglas fir that was displayed in 1950 at the Northgate Shopping Center in Seattle, Washington. • The traditional three colors of Christmas are green, red, and gold. Green has long been a symbol of life and rebirth; red symbolizes the blood of Christ, and gold represents light as well as wealth and royalty. • Mistletoe (Viscum album) is from the Anglo-Saxon word misteltan, which means “little dung twig” because the plant spreads through bird droppings. • Approximately 30-35 million real (living) Christmas trees are sold each year in the U.S. • Recycled trees have been used to make sand and soil erosion barriers and been placed in ponds for fish shelter. • When Hans Greiner first began designing Christmas ornaments, he wanted them to look like the fruits and other natural items that were originally used as Christmas tree ornaments.

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By Debra Howell

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lossy leaves and a broad, colorful palette of intriguing blooms make the Hibiscus a very desirable tropical

shrub.

Introduced from southern Asia about 160 years ago, this rapidly growing shrub is furnished with blossoms up to seven inches wide. These beauties occur as single, partially double or double flowers. Very obvious on most blooms are the stigma and stamens, which rise from the center of the blossom. This genus has herbaceous perennials, as well as woody shrubs, which may be used as a specimen plant or border, as a way to camouflage a wall or fence in a large container. The container option makes it easy to protect your Tropical Hibiscus on an unseasonably cold night. The showy blooms are available in white, yellow, tangerine, lavender and pink, as well as various shades of red. Dwarfs are available in white, red, yellow, pink and double peach varieties. Butterflies and hummingbirds will be attracted to single-petalled cultivars, and I’ve seen the Hummers working a red cultivar in my yard, which has a pup hanging from its center. Tropical Hibiscus occur in three forms: tree, shrub and dwarf. It may interest you to know that the dwarf cultivars will need to be sprayed with a growth retardant in order to maintain the diminutive stature. These plants are actually indicated for Zones 10-11, but that hasn’t inhibited their purchase and growth in Zone 9. In fact, if you opt to containerize them, you may grow Hibiscus in northern climates as well. Hibiscus is susceptible to certain pests such as Pink Hibiscus Mealy bug, scale, spider mites, snails, aphids and whiteflies. I recently noticed that my Carnation Red Hibiscus has been plagued by aphids that are intent on consuming the young buds. Rather than 10

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deploying the big guns and spraying the whole plant, I took the lazy way out and merely squashed the little creeps. I handled the problem in this manner because of the close proximity of the plant to a large grouping of Pentas that are natural butterfly attractors. Were I to spray the Hibiscus, there’s a chance my butterflies might disappear. Also remember not to use Malathion on Hibiscus because it will defoliate the plant. In my yard are plants with blooms of red, pink, tangerine, white and yellow. The white and yellow cultivars are dwarfs. The lovely bushes will provide you with an array of excellent cut flowers which you may cut and simply place down the center of your dinner table. Cut them in the morning and put them in your refrigerator until you use them in the evening. You should know that your plants will probably get killed to the ground at temperatures below 30°F. Obviously they should be protected in this situation. But take heart! Even if your plant looks dead, there’s a good chance it will come back from the root mass, so don’t discard it prematurely. In order to make your Hibiscus look like a champ, you must fertilize regularly. They are very fond of fertilization, so do this immediately after planting, then again in March, June and October. Use a slow-release mix that contains micronutrients like Iron, Boron, Manganese, Zinc. Do not place fertilizer on or near the stem. With hibiscus, it’s all about the micronutrients.

idea. But as a child, I recall wads of aluminum foil crimped at the ends over the branches of Hibiscus (and Camellias) as my mother encouraged the air layering process to grow new plants. To learn more about air layering, see IFAS Bulletin ENH44. You have plenty of choices with Hibiscus, such as Carnation Red, Seminole Pink, Double Tangerine and Double Ruffle Red, as well as the dwarfs in red, white, yellow, pink and double peach. But don’t forget the Hardy Hibiscus. Close relatives of the Chinese Hibiscus, the Hardy Hibiscus are fast-growing plants with large flowers. Cultivars include Confederate Rose (Flora Plena), Scarlet Rosemallow, and Swamp Rosemellow. Some cultivars are grown for ornamentals, as well as for food and fiber. I have a gorgeous maroon-leafed mallow that bears bright pink edible flowers. One reference book issued the caveat “not cold, drought or deer tolerant.” I suspect that if committed deer hunters knew of the deer’s attraction to this plant, there’d be many lovely Hibiscus lining the trail that leads beneath the tree stand! With the Hibiscus, I can assure you that if you provide your plant with TLC, water and protection when needed, even a non-gardener can make the Hibiscus flourish and bear flowers almost year-round.

You may mulch with an organic product such as pine needles or pine bark, oak leaves or melaleuca mulch, being careful not to pull mulch back from the stems. You don’t want mulch directly against the side of your house either—it’s the termite highway. Propagation involves softwood cuttings which root in about six weeks when kept misted. Rooting hormone is also a great W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Entrepreneurial Genius

MY Ribrag By Ginny Mink

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s much as it may appear that it’s the big conglomerates and corporations that run this world, none of them would exist without the hard work, dedication and entrepreneurial inspiration of the little man. Without the inventor, the dreamer, we’d be lost. Chick-Fil-A started when Truett Cathy opened a restaurant, the Dwarf Grill, in 1946 and in 1964 he came up with their bazillion dollar a year chicken sandwich. We are often told not to despise small beginnings. Truett Cathy certainly didn’t and neither does Mike Yevchak, creator of MY Ribrags.

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Lindsey Alley (a former Mouseketeer) was there doing a documentary and she asked me what it was and I just blurted out, Ribrag, and then I thought, ‘darn, that could be something.’ So I talked to my friend Lisa Hickey who owns a screen-printing company here in Lakeland. She set me up with an attorney to get a patent. It took several months but we got the patent.” The video of Mike being questioned by Lindsey Alley is on his website.

With regards to Mike’s agricultural ties he says, “I used to hunt and stuff when I was young. I had Ag at Kathleen Senior High School,” but that appears to be about it. He continues discussing his background though, “I worked for Publix a number of years and I worked for First United Methodist Church of Lakeland. Now my father and I, we’re pickers, that’s what we do.” So, from hunting to picking and some other things in between, it would appear that Mike has led an interesting life.

He continues explaining the business process, “She (Lisa) had an artist draw up the pig. I looked at several pigs before I picked one. I’ve always kept my costs the same. I met a guy who manufactures towels out of Atlanta, GA and Superior Printing does all my print work.” His towel provider made an agreement not to raise costs; Mike says it was all done with a handshake. Mike utilized Superior Printing because they were more fabric focused whereas Lisa’s company is geared toward signs. He’s hugely thankful for Lisa’s advice though and has benefited greatly from her business knowledge.

He adds, “What we do is, I buy out estate sales and I put stuff on craigslist. Today I just brought in a truckload of glassware from around the world. I spent all day sifting through this stuff and then I’ll put a bunch of it online and then I’ll take it to the flea market. We do very well, we can do anywhere from $400 to $800 just on a Saturday and Sunday.” While that sounds like a lucrative business Mike explains, “For me, I get the pleasure of meeting a lot of different people, I meet people from all over. I like talking to the older people, I learn a lot from them. That’s what I love about the Ribrags; I get to talk to a bunch of different people.”

So, MY Ribrags came to fruition in an offhand remark back in 2009. However, Mike says he didn’t kick off selling until January of 2010. He explains, “I’m a craft vender and Lakeland never really let a lot of craft venders in so I had to find out who runs Lakeland Pig Fest and I found out it was a lady by the name of Elsa Bezanka and her husband is the one who started Lakeland Pig Fest. I met with Elsa at her home in December of ’09 and givin’ her the story like I’m tellin’ you and she said, ‘Ya know what, I’m going to let you come in.’ Lakeland Pig Fest is nothing but cooks!” Obviously this was a big accomplishment for him.

This brings us to the inspiration behind Mike’s patented creation, MY Ribrags. The MY part of the label is representative of his initials and the name Ribrags, well, it kind of just happened. Here’s the story, “It was at Lakeland Pig Fest in 2009. I was walking around with a white towel in my pants. It was covered with barbeque sauce ‘cause that’s what Dad and I used to wipe our hands.

Excitedly he reveals, “We went there with 1200 towels and I sold out. I could have probably gone there with 5000 and sold out because the event brings in 60,000 people every year. That was my debut. I was shocked and so was everyone else. It was a success for me and for Lakeland Pig Fest because they don’t really let crafters like me in. From Lakeland Pig Fest a little bit of word got out and I was able to get in some other events. Sold out in Haines

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City, I sold close to 1000 towels and that’s a one day event so that was like extraordinary! I just stay locally right now. It’s just been fun, I enjoy it. It’s not all about the money. I get to meet a lot of people. It’s very gratifying for me.” Mike’s success in Lakeland and Haines City led him to contact the Plant City Chamber of Commerce about possibly attending the Pig Jam there. His first chance was in 2011. He says the Chamber told him, “Hey, we’d love to have you!” Then he continues to explain his experiences at the Plant City Pig Jam, “Last year in Plant City, I sold out in four hours. I took 550 towels, it was like I couldn’t keep them on the table. This year was a little bit slower. We did about 300 which was good. It’s not about me being Mike the millionaire; it’s about meeting people, that’s what it’s about for me. I just enjoy doing it; it’s fun! I’m getting ready now to do Lakeland Pig Fest which should be another big event!” In closing, Mike reveals his heart’s desire, “I think what I’d like to do in the future, I would love to be able to go out of state. There are huge, big barbeque events all over this country. That’s my ultimate goal, to be able to go out of state. I mean Alabama, Georgia and the Carolina’s have hundreds of barbeque events. It’s just a marketing thing; everybody’s not going to let me in. Some aren’t big on crafts.” Finally, Mike explains the real reason behind his creation and his sales approach, “They give you these little dinky napkins! I get out among the crowd and when I see people eating ribs and they’ve got little napkins in their hands, that’s when I approach them and tell them the story and they usually run over and get one, that’s how I sell ‘em.” To learn more and see some of Mike’s videos check out his website: www.ribrag.wordpress.com

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Let’s Go Fishing in December by Captain Woody Gore

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ampa Bay is Florida's largest openwater estuary, covering 400 square miles, with a watershed more than five times that large, encompassing a massive 2,200 square miles. With an average depth of 12 feet, Tampa Bay is considered one of the most exclusive estuaries in Florida with a wide diversity of sea life. For those unfamiliar with what an estuary actually is, it’s a semi-enclosed body of water where freshwater from the rivers and creeks meets and mixes with the saltwater from the ocean or, in the case of Tampa Bay, the Gulf of Mexico. Estuaries are considered one of the most productive environments in the world and are often referred to as a nursery for fish, and shellfishes, and a place where young marine animals can hide from predators. If angling is your recreational pleasure and something you enjoy, then Tampa Bay and the inter-coastal waters of the gulf coast, certainly offer some awesome fishing opportunities especially with www.captainwoodygore.com. While fishing in Florida can be done comfortably year round, fall offers some excellent opportunities on a variety of species. On fishing excursions, some species you’re likely to catch include snook, redfish, cobia, tarpon, trout, grouper, kingfish, and mackerel. As we approach the cool water temperatures of winter, shallow water fishing definitely improves. The fish start feeding fairly aggressively for winter and become more active as they search for food. They’ll take an assortment of baits from live to dead. And since they will have large appetites anglers will have greater success using a wider range of artificial lures.

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SNOOK: Snook are usually tops on the list as the fall transition has started and we are catching Snook on just about every shoreline. They are on the protected list but are still fun to catch and release. The best bite has been at the beginning and end of either incoming or outgoing tides. Snook normally respond to live baits as well as top water lures, jerk baits and shallow diving lures. However, we’ve been have good success on dead baits on the bottom. SPOT TED SEA T ROU T: NO CLOSED SEASON! Sea trout are found inshore and near shore in and around sea grass flats, mangrove shorelines, deep holes and channels and above oyster bars. Free-line live shrimp or small pinfish near the bottom will entice trout out of grass-bed holes. Attaching a float will allow these baits to drift over the grass beds. Casting with softbodied jigs and top-water poppers can also be effective. Trout are very delicate, so returning unwanted or illegal fish promptly to the water is necessary to maintain a healthy population. Spotted sea trout are a good eating fish. Otherwise winter’s a great time for the big gator trout especially as they start working their way into the back-country and deeper grass flats. REDFISH: The reds are still biting and some are still schooled up biting everything tossed in their direction. They should continue to be consistent on the flats and around the mangroves. A variety of artificial lures are catching their share along with live shrimp, sardines, and pinfish. The key to finding redfish, is fishing dark patchy bottoms, especially around schools of larger mullet. Although chumming with live bait works, tossing dead cut bait around the mangroves on flooding tides

DECEMBER 2012

usually brings them out to investigate. Most are holding close to the shoreline but they are also found near docks and pilings, deeper holes and channels during warmest and coolest months and around grass beds and oyster bars. Use live shrimp fished on the bottom or free-lined, use soft-bodied jigs bounced slowly on the bottom, or use small gold spoons. FLOU NDER: They can be found near channel edges on sandy bottoms, near tidal passes and docks. Use live shrimp, small sardines/greenbacks, sand fleas, sardines, pinfish, or jigs bounced along bottom as you drift. INS HOR E GAG GR OU PER: The inshore grouper bite will pick up, especially as the water temperatures cool down. However, you cannot keep any fish caught after October 31. Recreational Gag Grouper season is only open from July 1 through October 31 each year. It seems ridiculous to me but we let them do it to us so it’s hard to complain about it. Fishing should be good when we can avoid the northerly cold fronts and high winds. Lots of fish near shore and Tampa Bay, coming up with a few really nice ones but they’ve got to go back. KINGFISH, SPA NISH MACKEREL, B ONIT O, B LU EFISH: December cold fronts are here and so are the traditionally high winds that follow. As the water temps fall with each passing front the near beach kingfish bite should improve. Tons of bait should bring the kings, Spanish mackerel, bluefish and bonito within a mile or so of the beach or inside the Bay. We’ve been having great success on huge Spanish mackerel inside Tampa Bay. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the areas top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

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DECEMBER 2012

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Bra ma Island F a mi ly Da y F undra i ser Is A S uccess ! By Kristin Nelson

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n Saturday, December 1, under the cover of shade trees and with the sound of airboats and children’s laughter on the breeze, Warner University (Lake Wales, FL) hosted “Brama Island Family Day,” the kick-off event of the capital campaign for their diversified Agricultural Studies program set to launch in Fall 2013. As the title would suggest, the fundraiser was held on Lightsey Cattle Company’s Brama Island in Lake Kissimmee and welcomed over 400 guests. The agenda for the day included airboat and horseback rides, games for kids, safari-like tours of the island, a barbecue lunch, silent and live auctions, and keynote speeches from leaders in the agricultural industry such as Mr. Cary Lightsey and Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, Mr. Adam Putnam. Brama Island boasts 4,000 acres of essentially untouched Florida wildlife, and is home to 28 endangered plant and wildlife species. As the land is part of a conservation easement, for most guests, the exploration of the island truly provided a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

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Doris Gukich, Warner University’s Vice President for Advancement said, “There are so many fundraising events for which children must be left at home. Our goal was that this would be a day about family enjoying the island together while we raise the money needed for the Agriculture Complex.” With horseback rides, tree climbing, and outdoor games led by Warner University students, there was no shortage of fun to be had while on the island, especially for smaller cowboys and cowgirls. With so many leaders and innovators in the agricultural industry in attendance and quick to pledge their support, it was clear that the Ag community is ready to stand behind Warner’s effort to create a program that will meet a need for both students and the future of agriculture in the area. Lauren Lewis, Warner’s Director of Agricultural Studies, describes her vision for the program as one that provides graduates the practical and applied background they will need in agribusiness, production, and science to have a successful career in the agricultural industry.

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In his address from the “treehouse” platform overlooking guests and a cowboy bunkhouse, Commissioner Putnam spoke of the value of the Agricultural Studies program that Warner is developing. “This type of program is what is needed to bridge the gap between high school agriculture involvement and agricultural careers -- that is where young talent is typically lost. I am proud to stand behind and support Warner’s program,” said Putnam. When asked for her thoughts on the event, Lewis went on to say, “Warner University is so thankful to have the support of the ag community in developing our Ag Studies Program. The investment the ag community is making in our program, evident by the support at the Brama Island Family Day fundraiser, is humbling and overwhelming. With the launch of the Ag Studies degree program in Fall 2013, Warner University looks forward to graduating the future leaders of our area’s ag industry.” •

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OUR SERVICES • Social Security Disability • Supplemental Security Income: Children and Adults • Initial Applications Reconsideration • Hearing with Judge

• Wills • Power of Attorney • Estate Planning • Trusts • Guardianships • Adoptions Charles L. Carlton

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE DECEMBER 2012

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K9 For Cops Art Show Winners Chosen

K9s

for Cops, a nonprofit partnership between the Estates at Carpenters and the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, held an art contest for students age 11-18. Submissions were received from several area middle schools. Residents of the Estates at Carpenters narrowed the field from over 50 submissions to 10. Those 10 submissions were then submitted to the Polk County Sheriff Office’s K9 Unit and the entries were narrowed down to the top three. The final decision as the first, second and third place winners, was made by Sheriff Grady Judd. The winners were, first Place – B rooke Hearn (center) from Lakeland Highland Middle School and the second and third Tara Weirather and Courtney place winners (T

Trohn) were both from All Saints Academy. Each winner was presented with an iTunes gift card donated to K9 for Cops by Best Buys in Lakeland. Also in attendance at the awards presentation were Kim Delestany, art instructor from Lakeland Highland Middle School, Evalyn Ver Hey, the art instructor from All Saints Academy, and three officers from the Polk County K9 Unit, Lieutenant Jim Bryan, Sergeant Jon Burcham and Detention Deputy Tom Gilbert. “The purpose of the K9 for Cops Art Contest,” says Michelle Robare, Community Relations Representative of the Estates at Carpenters, “was to acknowledge police dogs as valuable assets to law enforcement and to raise awareness that these dogs require care and training. The artwork we received was fantastic and will be on display at the Estates at Carpenters in January.”

Florida corporation governed by a seven member volunteer board of directors. The Estates is comprised of a continuum of care that includes independent living apartments, an assisted living facility, a skilled nursing facility and a licensed home health agency. This continuum allows The Estates to meet the growing needs of our residents while providing care to the senior population of the Lakeland community. The Manor at Carpenters provides top quality, personalized short-term rehabilitation, as well as longterm skilled nursing care, restorative care, and respite care in a caring atmosphere. For more information visit: eaclakeland.com/ #skilled-nursing/ 4541119046. K9s for Cops is a partnership between The Estates at Carpenters and the Polk County Sherriff’s Office that endeavors to raise funds to purchase canines for the K9 unit and provide for their well being throughout their career.

The Estates at Carpenters is a continuing care retirement community that is currently home to over 450 senior adults. The Estates is located on approximately 30 acres and is a not for profit, 501 (c) (3)

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ELEPHANT CONVERSATION

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ore than 50 students from the Tampa Bay area attended the FFA Animal Care Seminar at the Center for Elephant Conservation in Polk County. The interactive seminar included an opportunity to learn about the Asian elephant and Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s conservation efforts. Students were able to get up close and personal with a couple of the elephants at this 200 acre facility in Polk County.

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I

am so glad the election for President is over. I don’t know about you, but I got tired of all those political ads on TV, radio, newspaper, computer and unsolicited phone calls. Can you imagine, they could have put most of the money spent on advertising on the national debt and most likely have gotten us out of this financial crisis. This world is spinning, and I’m getting dizzy. Some things get under my skin, like all these kids running around with droopy pants. For the life of me I don’t know why they wear their caps side ways…their heads aren’t crooked. Speaking of people, I sometimes think the crazy people have more sense than we do. For example, a farmer in Chattahoochee was driving his wagon with a load of horse manure near the insane asylum. One of the inmates was standing at the fence and called to the farmer, “Hey, what are you going to do with all that manure?” The farmer replied that he was going to put it on his strawberries. The inmate couldn’t believe it and said, “You must be crazy. We put whip cream and sugar on ours.” Do you ever wonder about the sanity of our leaders in Washington, the way they give our money away? I remember a story where the University of Minnesota received a grant for $390,000.00 to work on a three-year program to set an “odor emissions rating system” for regulating the states more than 35,000 feedlots. According to a newspaper in Minneapolis, they hired government officials and judges to go sniff the feedlots since there was currently insufficient due process of law. By now they have developed objective standards on the types of odors and their strength since the program was in 1997. I guess sniffing the nearly 200 chemical components of cow and pig manure in order to categorize them for the formal state stench test was exciting. Can you imagine? Someone asks you what you do for a living, and you tell them, “I’m a sniffer of cow and pig manure.”

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I remember a number of years back when the Plant City Jaycees had a fund-raiser called “Cow-Patty Bingo.” The Jaycees marked a field into squares with a different numbers in each square. Freshly fed cows were released onto the field. They would take bets by selling the numbers for $5.00 each. The $100.00 pot would go to the person who bought the number that a cow pooped on first. This grew old after a few years. Later the Jaycees started holding a rodeo each year on the property just east of the railroad tracks across from the Red Rose Inn. The big attraction, of course, was Alvin and William Futch, along with other local cowboys showing off their skills at bronc and bull riding. Some of you may remember when they would put a Brahma bull called “Big Sid” in front of Barwick’s Drug Store in downtown Plant City to promote the rodeo. If anyone rode “Big Sid” for tenseconds or more they would win $1,000.00. Of course the Futch boys were first in line. No one ever won the jackpot, but I can remember Alvin Futch sailing through the air into the bleachers over a six-foot fence about six seconds into his ride. I think it was Carlos Cone and Chief of Police Bob Spooner that caught him before he hit the spectators in the bleachers. Did you know Ripley’s Believe It Or Not museum has a collection of cow hairballs? The largest, most humongous cow ball comes from a cow in Michigan who produced the top prize in a 2004 nationwide Believe It Or Not contest. The owner of the wining cow ball won $2,000.00. Also on exhibit are more than 235 additional hairballs, making it the largest such assortment in the world. You will find other bovine exhibits of interest at the Ocean City’s Believe It Or Not museum, such as a six-legged, full size cow from Texas. Also is a 22-year old steer that has two extra legs growing out of its front shoulders and throat area. This animal weighed W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


1,500 pounds at death in 1999. If that’s not enough, check out the two-headed, four-legged Siamese twin Holstein calf, born on Mother’s Day, 1986 on a farm in Pennsylvania. In October I sent out an e-mail to a number of my friends asking for reasons to be happy if you burn the Thanksgiving turkey. I wanted to gather this information for my neighbor, Mark Poppell, who always cooks a turkey outside in his smoker. He has been known to forget to check on it while watching a Thanksgiving Day football game. So what do you do with burnt turkey? Sorry to say I did not get back many replies until after Thanksgiving. Since most of my replies were rather humorous I thought I would pass them along now. One said Thanksgiving is a traditional American Holiday where families all over the United States sit down for dinner at the same time—Halftime! David Vick wrote, don’t worry about burning the turkey. Salmonella will not be a concern, no one will overeat and everyone will think its Cajun Blackened. Others noted that your pets will not pester you for scraps. Carving the bird will provide a good cardiovascular workout, and after dinner the guys can take the bird outside and play football. In closing, remember that today is the oldest you’ve ever been, yet the youngest you’ll ever be, so enjoy the day to its fullest. •

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Biological Control Measures Taken To Fight Imported Fire Ants By Bridget Carlisle, UF/IFAS Livestock Extension Agent

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he UF/IFAS Polk County Extension Service, in conjunction with the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services’ Division of Plant Industry, is conducting a biological control program to control imported fire ants in Polk County. The Department of Agriculture produces and distributes phorid flies that decapitate imported fire ants. Phorid fly releases began in north central Florida in 1997. While it is likely that the population of imported fire ants has decreased in release areas, it will take several more years to accurately measure the impact.

goal is to have an arsenal of phorid flies that will attack all size workers of the imported fire ant population. The flies inject their eggs into the fire ants. When an egg hatches, the maggot finds its way into the ant’s head, where it grows for two to three weeks before secreting a chemical which causes the ant’s head to fall off. The maggot eats everything in the head capsule, then uses it as a pupae case. The phorid flies eventually emerge from the decapitated ant heads to seek out their host species, the imported fire ant. The phorid fly presents no threat to people, animals or plants.

In addition to Florida, releases have also been conducted in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Texas and Tennessee.

For the current release in Polk County, imported fire ants are harvested from mounds in pastures and sent to the lab to be infected by the phorid fly. The infected ants are then returned to their mounds to establish the fly population in the colony.

The program is based on research by Sanford Porter, an entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The program introduces South American phorid flies, a natural enemy of the imported fire ant, to the United States. There are five species of phorid flies that are specific only to imported fire ants and have been approved for release. Each species of the phorid fly will only attack a specific size of the worker fire ants. The

Imported fire ants, which differ from a less common native species of fire ant, were accidentally introduced into the United States from South America in the early 1930s and have had a major impact. The ants are capable of multiple stings, which inject venom that raise white pustules on skin. The ants also cause crop and equipment damage, livestock losses and soil erosion problems, and are particularly dangerous on playgrounds,

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lawns, golf courses and pastures. The fire ants’ large numbers and potent sting have resulted in medical, agricultural, and environmental economic impacts that cost the U.S. public billions of dollars each year. Efforts to eradicate these ants have been ongoing for more than 50 years. However, their range continues to expand and they have spread to most southern states. There are poisons available that kill them on contact or by ingestion, but these poisons also kill many non-target ants and other beneficial insects. Unlike poison, using the phorid fly is safe for people, animals and crops. It will take a multi-pronged approach using biological control practices along with other tools and techniques to control the imported fire ant. For more information visit the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services Web site at http:/ / www.doacs.state.fl.us/ ~ pi/ methods/ methods.html or call the toll-free helpline at (888)397-1517.

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kids who showed rabbits and chickens and hogs at Polk County Youth Fair. We also participated in vegetable judging and aquaculture. We helped with the Tenoroc High School Farm Fair Day. We took a field trip to Aquatica Tropicals, it’s a local fish farm. We helped out at the Beast Feast with Lake Gibson Middle School at the FFA training center, the LTC. We helped do boiled peanuts with them. Over the summer we attended the Florida FFA State Convention and we also attended the Florida Outdoor Adventures Camp at the LTC.” Humility is an impressive quality in someone so young, she starts off by telling us how little has been achieved and yet the list goes on and on!

UP

FOR THE

TASK

Jessica Kennedy By Ginny Mink

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reen thumb people are to be admired. It appears that they have been given a special gift, that which allows them to keep seemingly fragile entities alive. Thusly, anyone in the landscaping business that is actually good at it, not just the people who cut your grass (though we appreciate them as well) should be applauded. In fact, anyone who sees landscaping as his/her career objective is to be respected. Jessica Kennedy set out with that goal in mind, but something along the way changed her direction and now, she’s an Ag teacher, an equally (if not surpassingly) admirable aspiration. Jessica says, “I did not grow up on a farm. I got involved in agriculture when I was in middle school at Kathleen Middle School. Then when I was in high school I kinda just kept pursuing Ag classes and I became a chapter officer. Then, my senior year of high school, I became chapter president. When I was in high school I was on the state winning forestry team and that was at Kathleen High School.” We are always amazed by Ag teachers that didn’t grow up in the agricultural arena but discovered their love for it later in life. She continues, “I graduated in 2005 from high school and went to what was Polk Community College and just got a general AA degree with the plan to become a landscape designer. I transferred to Florida Southern after I graduated. I graduated from Florida Southern in 2009 with a degree in landscaping but I decided I didn’t want to do that. I was going to teach, I just didn’t want to change my major. So, then I had an opportunity to earn my Master’s Degree at the UF Plant City campus so I decided to do that instead of going straight into teaching and that was in Ag education. I graduated from there in 2011 and I was hired at Stambaugh Middle School in fall, August 2011, and last year was my first year teaching Ag.” Six years after graduating high school Jessica has entered the work force and a career oriented future. She is obviously an ambitious and goal centered woman.

Jessica is currently on maternity leave but is looking forward to getting back to her students, though she admits that leaving her wee one will be difficult. Being a teacher is much like being a mother and Jessica is definitely discovering that firsthand having realized that she misses her students. She says, “This is my second year there and we’re still really working on rebuilding the chapter, working on gaining new members. From this year to last year we’ve doubled our chapter membership. The students there are very hardworking and the ones that are members are very dedicated to the chapter and are just extremely excited to go to anything, really. They pretty much go above and beyond to go to events.” Certainly her students are as excited about her return in January as she is. Having already accomplished a good deal in her first year, Jessica explains that she has even wider aspirations. “As a fundraiser last year we sold beef jerky sticks, we sold them at school and the local racetrack one night. This year we’re continuing to sell beef jerky sticks and we’re looking forward to maybe participating in more contests and focusing on the contests the students really like, as well as working closer with our high school that is next door, Auburndale High School. We plan to work with them a lot more this year.” She then explains the beauty of her job, “I like having that impact on the kids, being an Ag teacher is just different than being a regular teacher. You have a lifelong relationship with these kids because you spend so much time with them. I love teaching students about agriculture that maybe haven’t had that opportunity to realize how important it is. My Ag teachers in high school, because of the impact they had on me, it made me want to pursue this career.” In closing, Jessica describes her campus. She says, “It’s very simple. We’re currently in a regular building with other classrooms. We have a greenhouse and a garden and we have a tractor. I guess because of the facility our focus is more geared towards plants and small animals. We have pens for chickens and rabbits but no large animals, those have to be kept at home. Our school, all buildings included, is probably less than three acres so we’ve got a small facility.” Though it seems like Jessica might have a few challenges ahead of her, the enthusiasm that emanates from her voice is enough to make you believe that she’s up for the task. •

Jessica switches gears here and begins to talk about her teaching situation. She explains, “We don’t have any outstanding accomplishments, basically I’m rebuilding a chapter that has struggled for the past few years. The kids there have a lot of potential. Last year we participated in citrus, tool ID, opening and closing. We had several 26

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*** All Items Are 8 lbs. Unless Otherwise Noted.***

GEORGIA PECANS HALVES & PIECES 1 lb bag . . . . . . . . . . . $9 2.5 lbs bag . . . . . $22.25 5 lbs bag . . . . . . . . . $44 10 lbs bag . . . . . . . . $87

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Call – or go on-line to place your order today and we’ll have it ready for you to pick up!

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State FFA Forestry Champions By Ginny Mink

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ccording to Merriam-Webster, forestry is managing forested land, as well as the waters and wasteland associated with them, namely for the purpose of harvesting timber, though recreational and conservatory purposes are included. Historically, planned forest management, or forestry, began in medieval Europe, where they regulated hunting and the amount of timber that could be harvested. By the 19th century Europe established private forestry schools; and in 1891 the U.S. government authorized its first reserves of forested land. During the 20th century many nations have undertaken reforestation or afforestation programs. Now that we are all a little better educated on the topic, the focus of this article is the fact that the Bartow Senior High School FFA Chapter won the State FFA Forestry Contest. The team was comprised of Rachel Locke, Taylor Ross, Brett Wasden and Hunter Westmoreland with Jessica Clark as an alternate. Prior to achieving this great honor though, they had to win the District FFA Forestry Contest which was held at Kissimmee State Park. There were a total of 14 high school teams for the Polk County area. Obviously, Bartow won and Brett Wasden was awarded high individual at the district contest. This allowed the team to advance to the state contest which was held in Perry, the forestry capital of Florida. They competed against 12 winning high school teams. Bartow placed first in general knowledge, dendrology, pest/disorders and compass and pacing. They placed third in tools. Brett Wasden was the overall high individual in the State Forestry Contest, as well. He received first place ribbons in every category except for compass and pacing. The fun part of this article will now ensue; the students that participated in the contest shared their thoughts. Rachel Locke says, “Forestry is a field that I find extremely interesting. It’s not something that you can just pick up in a few days after reading. I have studied forestry for the past four years. It was an every day thing for me that I dedicated myself to. I have spent many hours a day

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reading up and studying for it. Forestry was also very hard for me to learn at the beginning. You had to literally memorize the entire general knowledge book and the differences of all the leaves. Some ways that I learned were by creating power points of all the different specimens. I would also come up with short sayings to help remember which scientific name goes with which common name. My favorite part of the contest is the different areas that you have to learn in. I like knowing things that most people don’t know. At the contest when they started announcing the overall winners was when I became nervous. Once they got to the first place winner and it was our school they called up, I cried. My experience in this contest has been great and I have had many different opportunities and experiences that I will never forget.” Taylor Ross shared, “I started participating in the forestry contest when I was in the 8th grade. My father works for the Florida Forest Services and he encouraged me to try it out. I was always up for trying new things. So, my middle school Ag teacher, Michele Parmer, taught me some forestry. At first, I didn’t really like it all that much. But once I competed, I was hooked. We won districts that year and that was all it took. Every year since then, I have been studying like crazy to try and win at the high school state level. This is my senior year at Bartow High School and I was ecstatic to go out with a bang! My favorite part of the competition would have to be the insects and diseases. Every night I would study my forestry book and highlight whatever I felt might be on the general knowledge test. I am completely stoked about competing at the National Level in Kentucky next October! I know my teammates and myself will try our best to represent Florida well.” No doubt they have already proven that intention. Next, Hunter Westmoreland explains, “I have been learning forestry and going to the state contest for the past four years. What I find most interesting about the forestry contest for me is probably the end of it when you are sitting there with your team waiting for the results and you guys know you did the best you could and you’re just hoping it was enough to put you on top. It felt like such a rush when they called our school for first place! I W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


don’t know if there is anything else like it. Some of us were crying, laughing and just so excited when we were called. I will admit, we may not have come out on top if we did not test each other’s limits on what we know, where our weaknesses are, and helped each other get stronger. I can remember Brett Wasden always saying, ‘this is our year, it is time we win this,’ before the contest. I am just excited to say I get the chance to go to Louisville, Kentucky next year and compete at Nationals!” Finally we heard from the overall high individual, Brett Wasden. “Forestry is my favorite contest that the FFA offers. I have been doing the contest since 8th grade, a total of five years. My favorite section of the contest is the dendrology portion. I am very excited to be crowned state champions my senior year. We have put a lot of work into this particular CDE. On a usual week, our team has two or three practices. Also this year we had Forestry Practicum on a Saturday, which is a field trip to develop real life forestry skills. The most challenging section of the forestry contest is the timber cruising aspect because it is extremely subjective depending on the judges view, are they a ‘buyer’ or ‘seller?’ Even though the state contest over all was challenging, I feel our team was greatly prepared. In addition, this is a team contest, so it requires four individuals devoted and determined to truly do well. Overall, I am most excited to compete in a national contest next October in Louisville, Kentucky. Competing at Nationals is a prestigious honor that comes second to none.” Given the achievements of these students, it is easy to ascertain how truly thrilled they are. We wish them great success at Nationals! •

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Carrie Facente Agriculture In Her Blood

30th Annual Florida Cattlemen’s Institute Planned

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rowing up in Polk City with a family heavily involved in the beef industry sparked an interest in both agriculture and FFA for Tenoroc FFA member Carrie Facente. Carrie has been around agriculture her entire life and has watched her family members succeed in FFA as well, especially her Uncle Dusty, a former State FFA Officer. Carrie’s friendly personality and agricultural experiences has made her many contacts from all over the state. She’s a leader with much industry familiarity, which she works diligently to bring to the members of Tenoroc FFA. Carrie has been to many FFA conferences and conventions including the Chapter Officer Leadership Training, Forestry Camp, UF’s Livestock Judging Clinic, National FFA Convention, State FFA Convention, and the Tenoroc FFA Officer Retreat in Treasure Island. Livestock Evaluation and cattle exhibition are Carrie’s passion, however she has also participated in contests such as Forestry, Creed, and Ornamental Horticulture Demonstrations. Carrie’s Supervised Agriculture Experience is beef cattle and has earned her both Greenhand and Chapter Degrees. She plans to apply for her State FFA Degree this year. Community service is something in which Carrie loves to participate. She has offered her leadership skills and agricultural knowledge to other chapter members through the chapter’s Leadership Day and to the younger generation through Farm Fair, Agri-Fest, Ag Literacy Day, and mentoring to local middle school members. Carrie, the current chapter secretary, plans and attends all chapter functions including field trips, fundraisers, service projects, the Lakeland Christmas Parade, and Wreaths Across America. She does all this while maintaining a high grade point average and earning several scholarships even before her senior year. Needless to say, Carrie is a role model for Tenoroc FFA members and makes the chapter, her community, and parents, Mike and Amie, very proud! • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

ark your calendar for the upcoming Florida Cattlemen’s Institute and Allied Trade Show to be held January 17th, 2013. As always, the event will be held in the KVLS Pavilion at the Osceola Heritage Park, 1911 Kissimmee Valley Lane, off of Highway 192 East (Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway). The Institute will begin with the trade show opening at 8:00am, followed by the welcome given by Florida Cattlemen’s Association President, Woody Larson. The theme this year is “Herd Health.” Guest speakers for the institute include Tom Overbay of Benchmark Biolabs to discuss the “Effects of Vaccinations.” Dr. Mark Davis of Arcadia will give a local veterinarian’s perspective on the practical application of vaccinations. A producer panel, moderated by Jim Strickland, will include input from seasoned beef cattle operators, George Kempfer of Kempfer Cattle Company, Ken Griner of Usher Land & Timber, Joe Hilliard of Hilliard Brothers, and Max Irsik of Irsik and Doll Feedlot. Recognizing that every operation is unique, panelists will discuss health management practices that have, and perhaps have not, been effective on their respective ranches. Robby Kirkland of Kirkland Feedyard in Vega, TX will provide a feedlot manager’s perspective on herd health management. Lastly, Carrie Thomas, Account Manager of Food Chain Affairs for Merck Animal Health, will discuss the public’s perception on beef cattle health management practices and how we, as members of the industry, can help improve our public. For more information on the 2013 Florida Cattlemen’s Institute and Allied Trade Show, contact your local University of Florida IFAS Extension Office.•

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Make A Christmas Gift Bag By Sean Green

Step 2 If you want to sketch the crease lines before folding or cutting, Creases are at: ½”, 2 ½”, 4 ½”, 12 ¼”, 14 ¼” and 16 ¼” leaving 7 ¾” on the right hand side. Measuring from the folded left edge; make an additional crease at 2” from the folded edge (crease 2). From (crease 2) measure 2” and make another crease (crease 3). From (crease 3) measure 7 ¾” to make the next crease (crease 4). From (crease 4) measure 2” to make the next crease (crease 5). From (crease 5) measure 2” to make one more crease (crease 6). When you’re thinking of gifts this season, remember that those that are handmade are often the most cherished. If there is little time left to make a gift, a fun option may be to make your own gift bag. A gift bag can be made of any sturdy paper such as construction paper or even a good heavy paper grocery bag. Sealing leaves onto the paper with a generous coat of glue and water looks great with brown bags. If you want to really play with color, there are plenty of tutorials online for marbling paper with shaving cream and food dye or ink. The idea of marbled paper was used to illustrate this project and is certainly not the only way to jazz up the gift bag.

The paper should have two mountain folds and 7 ¾” paper remaining as illustrated.

Step 3 Fold the gift bag from the right side to the left side to glue it to the fold that was made with (crease 1)

Step 4 a) Cut the corners of the gift bag along the creases so the flaps can be tucked in to form the bottom of the bag. b) Glue the flaps to each other on the inside of the bag. (cardboard can be glued to the inside bottom if desired)

Step 1 Cut paper to 24 x 14 inch sheet of paper (landscape orientation) for a large gift bag.

Note: The outside of the paper should be facing down if both sides are not decorated. Make a crease ½” in from the left side of the paper. (crease 1) 32

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Step 5 a) Cut a small strip of card stock (4 x 4) and fold it in half to create a folder to glue the handle into. b)Glue the handle material into the inside of the gift bag. c)Repeat step 5(a) and 5(b) for the other side of the bag. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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PHOTOS COURTESY 34

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PHOTO COURTESY

OF

CHERYL KUCK

Chief Womack at November’s Polk County Commission meeting.

esturing to the group of eight K-9 police officers and their dogs entering the Lakeland City Hall Commission Chambers during the monthly meeting on November 19, Lakeland Police Chief Lisa Womack stated, “I brought my backup today.”

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Bruno, won the Top Dog award, as well as first place in criminal apprehension. They were a part of the First Place National Award K-9 Unit that also consisted of Aaron Peterman and K-9 Charief, Cory Bowling and K-9 Riddick and Sgt. Tye Thompson and K-9 Harris.

Polk County Commissioners and Lakeland Mayor Gow Fields, recognized police officers and dog teams for their achievements, winning both regional and national competition awards, they received The United States Police Canine Association (USPCA) ranking as the first and second place fourman K-9 Units in the nation, the top handler and Top Dog in the nation, with four other Lakeland teams scoring in the top 10 of the Top Dog trials against 99 national competing police-and-dog units.

After commission recognition Officer Sealey gave us the opportunity to see him put Bruno through his paces at the police department obstacle course and mentioned they will be receiving a new course next year.

“I am the proudest Police Chief in this nation,” Chief Womack told the audiencepacked commission meeting. “I want to commend the group of dogs and handlers for their dedication, service and recognition as the most professional in this county, state and in the entire country.”

Officer Jose Bosque and his K-9 dog Tiberious were a part of the winning second place national K-9 Unit that included Jeff Barrett and K-9 Echo, Ryan Back and K-9 Remy, Rob Manro and K-9 Quanto.

During the USPCA National Trials October 15-19 in Punta Gorda, Lakeland Police Officer Ted Sealey and his K-9, W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

The Peterman-Charief team took home the top award for obedience and the Mr. Pat Cahill Award for top score in a combination of obedience and criminal apprehension.

“This is like the Olympics,” Bosque said. “You can’t just start the day before trials. You are always in training and have to be prepared for obstacles in the streets, in and under buildings, over fences, through windows, searching under scrub brush.”

“Officer Sealey came in first place in both regional and national competition because he was steadfastly determined. He was the right handler and with the right, equally determined dog. Dogs need to be obedient, intelligent, totally focused at all times and able to eliminate peripheral noises and distractions, concentrating only on instructions from the handler. They also need to be in prime physical condition with strong, fully developed hips and elbows with a strong sense of smell. They have one billion times a human’s sense of smell…so important to their work in narcotics. They are our partners and family members who stay with us after they are retired.” Additionally, Lakeland K-9 teams won awards in the categories of Individual Trail Placements, Obedience, Agility, Total Search, Criminal Apprehension and Second Handlers Class. Chief Womack thanked the Lakeland Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association for their continued support to the department. “Because of them and the support of the community, we have not had to buy a single dog. They have raised funds to cover the five to eight thousand dollar cost per animal,” she said.

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Ted Sealey and Bruno

Aat the USPCA Regional Trials

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY 36

OF

CHERYL KUCK, BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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OF

LAKELAND POLICE DEPARTMENT


Lakeland K-9s and their Handlers

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Florida Lettuce Fresh from from Fresh the Earth Earth the

phosphorus, and copper. High levels of health-promoting phytonutrients such as carotenoids and flavonoids also act in beneficial ways in the body. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, two cups of raw fresh Romaine lettuce (94 g) contains 16 calories, 1.2 g protein, 0.3 g fat, 3.1 g carbohydrate, and 1.9 g of dietary fiber. One cup of lettuce also provides 164% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for vitamin A, 120% for vitamin K, 38% for vitamin C, 32% for folate, 8% for fiber, and plenty of other vitamins and minerals. Lettuce is one of the lowest calories foods available and is packed with nutrients!

VITAMIN C By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

T

he weather is cooling down, and fresh Florida greens and lettuces are in their peak season now. Many types of lettuce thrive in Florida, including different types of the most common categories: Romaine, Crisphead, Butterhead, and Loose Leaf. Romaine lettuce has long, green leaves with a crunchy, juicy bite. The crisphead type, which includes iceberg lettuce, has green leaves surrounding inner white leaves and has a very mild flavor. Butterhead has large soft, tender leaves with a sweet flavor and includes Boston lettuce. Loose leaf types, such as green leaf, red leaf, and oak leaf are delicate with a mild flavor and have vibrantly colored leaves. All of these types of lettuce are bursting with vitamins and minerals, such as fiber, iron, and vitamins A and C. Very low in calories, lettuce has a high water content. Eating more of this veggie is surprisingly easy and a great way to help stay hydrated.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Bursting with a variety of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, lettuce is a nutrition standout. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet rich in dark green leafy vegetables, including lettuce, lowers the risk for developing a variety of cancers. In general, the darker colored leaves have more nutrients than their paler counterparts. In addition to cancer-fighting properties, lettuce is considered an excellent source of the vitamins A, C, and K, and a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, manganese, molybdenum, and potassium. Additionally, lettuce contains plentiful amounts of iron, B vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, 38

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Fresh Florida lettuce is high in Vitamin C, which is important for a healthy immune system, cancer prevention, healthy blood circulation and wound healing. This vitamin acts as a potent antioxidant in the body, neutralizing harmful free radicals and preventing its damaging effects in cells. Vitamin C, along with the vitamins A and K found in lettuce, prevents oxidation of cholesterol, which helps to thwart plaque from forming in arteries. By fighting cell and tissue damage, Vitamin C protects against cancer and other diseases, such as the common cold. This vitamin also helps the body absorb more iron and aids in the development of strong bones and teeth. Current research findings support that the benefits of vitamin C derives from consumption of whole fruits and vegetables. A high intake of produce, including lettuce, is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes, including heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Taking supplements does not seem to provide the same protective benefits as eating raw or cooked lettuce.

FIBER Lettuce and other leafy green vegetables contain a significant amount of dietary fiber, which can help lower cholesterol, assist with digestion, and prevent constipation. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in fiber may decrease the risk of several types of cancer including colon, rectum, breast, and pancreas. Dietary fiber decreases cholesterol by binding to bile salts and excreting them from the body. More cholesterol is then broken down to form new bile, which also helps prevent atherosclerosis. A two-cup serving of raw lettuce provides almost 8% of your daily requirement for fiber, which means that a large salad composed of lettuce and other veggies can go a long way in filling your fiber requirements.

Fiber can also help maintain steady blood sugar levels and promote a feeling of satiety.

FOLATE Florida lettuce is a good source of folate, a vitamin that can reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spinal cord (neural tube defects) in the fetus. Pregnant women should consume a diet high in folate, and eating lettuce and other vegetables and fruits every day can help. Folate is also essential for growth and development, and plays a key role in DNA formation. Its heart-healthy benefits come from its ability to lower homocysteine levels in the body. Homocysteine is an amino acid in the blood that is correlated with heart disease. Additionally, low levels of folate have been linked with low energy levels, depression and even memory impairments. So it’s an essential vitamin for everyone, in addition to its significant importance for the developing fetus.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Choose lettuce that looks crisp and deeply colored and is free of wilting, yellowing or dark spots. The leaves and stems should look fresh and tender and feel dry to the touch. To store raw lettuce, pat leaves dry with a paper towel, place in a tightly wrapped plastic bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. The hardier lettuces, such as romaine can be refrigerated for up to six days, while the more delicate leaf lettuces will stay fresh only for a day or two. Do not wash lettuce until immediately before use.

HOW TO ENJOY Wash well before use to remove dirt. Dry leaves well, either with paper towels or with a salad spinner. Several ways to enjoy this vegetable include: • Sautéed lightly with olive oil and herbs • Used as a decorative and edible plate liner under the entrée or a fruit salad • Stir-fried with soy sauce, mushrooms, and baby corn • Chopped as a salad base, taco topper, or sandwich topper • Briefly sautéed and added to pasta • Used as a low-carb bread alternative • Wrapped around meat, tofu, or nuts • Tossed into a stew or soup Fresh Florida lettuces are at their peak today. These festive green and red leaves can be a delicious part of any meal. SELECTED REFERENCES http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu http://www.whfoods.com http://www.ipmcenters.org W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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proud to announce that the Bartow FFA Chapter is now the State Champions in Florida Forestry. Congratulations, and good luck in Kentucky at the National FFA Convention next October! Your State Officer Team, as well as many other members, advisors, and people that have known Clay Sapp over the years, were invited to a reception held in Gainesville to honor and congratulate Clay on his recent appointment as National FFA President. Here in the State of Florida we have produced six National FFA Presidents. Throughout Clay’s FFA Career and leading up to his current office he has worked hard to position and prepare himself as a multifaceted leader. Here in Florida we have much to be very proud of in Clay. Knowing him as we do and experiencing firsthand what he did as our own state president a couple of years ago, I know that we are in for an amazing year under his leadership. Clay has already shared that his mission is to activate change and growth within the National FFA Organization. Hang on members, I know it’s going to be a fabulous ride!! December is stacking up as an incredibly busy time for me with some State Competitions, Conferences, the Sub-District Contests, and my very favorite Chapter Programs. I LOVE the time that I get to spend with you one on one in my visits to your Chapters. I hope that everyone had a blessed Thanksgiving celebration and enjoyed the time spent with your friends and families.

Greetings Area IV, Here we grow again!! October did not disappoint. This month brought so many amazing adventures and chances to spend time with you working to develop competent and assertive Agricultural Leadership.

W

OW, can you believe November is over?! This year is flying by, and this past month certainly provided some exciting times. It really got started on November 12, 2012 with the County Citrus and Tool Identification Contest. The students had the opportunity to participate in a mock contest set up to simulate the same format as the upcoming State Contest. It was great practice for every member and the competitive vibe was alive and well. I so enjoyed the time that I spent with members. We had a great time, it’s such a treat seeing everyone, assisting where I can and in the end announcing the winners of the events. Best wishes and good luck to all the Teams that will be competing at the State Contest in December. Later on that same week, we had a several teams from Area 4 compete in the State Forestry Contest held in Perry, FL. Area 4 was well represented by every team that participated. I am very

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Even though this time of year is very busy with finishing out the semester in school strong, the coming holidays, family might be coming into town, as well as all of the exciting FFA activities coming up, remember why you are here, remember your purpose, and remember you goals. Focus on your goals and go after what you want. Don’t ever let anyone hold you back from your dreams. As always, I believe in you and know that you can do anything that you set your mind to and are willing to work for. Until the next time. Sincerely,

Katie

KATIE HUTCHINSON AREA 4 STATE VICE PRESIDENT

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

Florida Strawberry Tiramisu

INGREDIENTS

Florida Strawberry Mascarpone Panini

1 1/2 pounds fresh strawberries 1 1/4 cups strawberry preserves 1/3 cup plus 4 tablespoons orange liqueur 1/3 cup orange juice 1 pound Italian mascarpone cheese, room temperature 1 1/3 cups heavy whipping cream, chilled 1/3 cup natural sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 52 ladyfinger cookies

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1/2 pound fresh strawberries, hulled and sliced thin 8 slices fresh bread (1/2 inch thick) 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese confectioners sugar for dusting 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

PREPARATION Heat a panini press or griddle over medium heat. Spread a thin layer of mascarpone on top of each of the eight bread slices. Add an even layer of fresh sliced strawberries to four of the bread slices. Use the other four slices of bread to top the sandwiches. Brush the sandwiches with butter and grill or press until golden, about five minutes. Transfer the panini to a cutting board and dust with confectioners sugar. Serve warm.

Whisk preserves, 1/3 cup orange liqueur and orange juice together. Place mascarpone cheese and two tablespoons orange liqueur in large bowl; fold just to blend. Using a whisk, beat cream, sugar, vanilla and remaining two tablespoons orange liqueur in another large bowl to soft peaks. Stir 1/4 of whipped cream mixture into mascarpone mixture to lighten. Fold in remaining whipped cream a small amount at a time. Slice half of the strawberries. Spread 1/2 cup preserves mixture over the bottom of a 3-quart serving dish or a 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Arrange enough ladyfingers over strawberry mixture to cover bottom of dish. Spoon 3/4 cup preserves mixture over ladyfingers, then spread 2 1/2 cups mascarpone mixture on top. Arrange two cups sliced strawberries over mascarpone mixture. Repeat layering with remaining lady fingers, preserves mixture and mascarpone mixture. Cover with plastic and chill at least 8 hours or overnight. Slice remaining strawberries. Arrange over tiramisu and serve.

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W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Photos courtesy of April Wietrecki

Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) On a recent hiking adventure, 10yr old Hannah called out to us with elation that she had found a blue frog and began tracking it for a chance to get a good picture. Hiking is a regular family event for us and Hannah’s participation in the observation and identification of wildlife has empowered her to correctly identify an impressive variety of wildlife. When we asked her what kind of frog she was tracking, she replied she thought it was a tree frog but it was in a palmetto bush and moved away too fast for her to be sure. My initial thoughts excluded the possibility of a blue frog and favored alternatives such as the Tiger Beetle, which can have an iridescent blue coloration and they too are very fast. I also considered the possibility that young Hannah had seen a blue morph of a large jumping spider but neither the beetle nor the spider are large enough to be mistaken for a frog. We proceeded with an open mind trekking through knee high palmetto looking for a blue tree frog in the middle of the day. When we finally spotted this elusive creature, we were all fascinated; Hannah had actually found a blue frog. This experience is evidence that sometimes, our adult reasoning is shadowed by a child’s natural willingness to accept possibilities. A closer look at nature through the eyes of a child demonstrates that there is still plenty of enchantment in the forest for child and adult alike to admire. The Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla squirella) is a common southeastern frog that ranges as far west as Texas and as far North as Virginia. Of all the treefrogs of North America, the Squirrel Tree Frog (Hyla

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

squirella) is thought to have the greatest capacity for quick color change making a positive identification difficult. The most common coloration is a pale green which makes them resemble the American Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea). The American Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) however, is one of the larger of the Hyla genus growing up to 5/8” larger than the Squirrel Tree Frog and is characterized by a prominent white stripe, often outlined in black running down their sides. Like other treefrogs, this species has enlarged sticky toe pads that help it cling to trees. Squirrel Treefrogs are distinguished from other similar species by process of elimination. One sure fire way of distinguishing this frog from others is to listen to its call. The Squirrel Treefrog gets its name from its distinctive squirrel-like call. Squirrel Treefrogs have smooth skin to distinguish them from the much larger Barking Treefrogs (Hyla gratiosa) that have rougher skin. Squirrel Treefrogs may have a light stripe running from under its eye along its jaw, the upper lip is often yellowish or bright green or may even have a white line along upper jaw. Some Squirrel Treefrogs have dark bars between their eyes and can either be spotted or plain. Squirrel Treefrogs do not have spots on the inner thighs, this feature distinguishes the Squirrel Treefrogs from the Gray (Hylachrysoscelis/versicolor) and Pine-woods Treefrogs (Hyla femoralis). Squirrel Treefrogs have a poorly developed yellowish stripe on each side if they have one at all distinguishing it from the American Treefrog.

Squirrel Treefrogs breed from March to October, usually mating after it rains. Those of us that have lived in Florida for any length of time can attest to the inseparable ducklike chorus that follow a rain shower, it’s because of this chorus that the Squirrel Treefrogs are often called “rain frogs.” Squirrel Treefrogs have external fertilization and lay about 1,000 eggs attached to underwater vegetation in shallow water. After hatching, these frogs remain in their tadpole stage for about 45 days before completing their metamorphosis into adult frogs. In the wild, squirrel treefrogs occur in a wide variety of habitats, including hardwood hammocks, bottomland and floodplain forests and swamps, pine-oak forests, and pine flatwoods. During the day, they can be found resting anywhere that provides a cool, moist and shady escape such as the underside of palm leaves or small chambers of old trees. This species has become well adapted to civilization and often found in urban backyards or around porch lights where an abundance of food insects can be found. Garden shrubs are a particularly favored hideout and frequently attract overwintering groups of frogs. Though Squirrel Treefrogs prefer open wetlands, drainage ditches in Florida are usually a pretty good place to find these frogs and the assortment of wildlife that make up the food chain in which it exists. If an adventure is on your calendar this month, take a child along and let them lead, encourage them to share their perspective and the enchantment of nature is sure to follow. •

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909

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CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 DOVE HUNTS Lithia area limited number of memberships still available. Call Fish Hawk Sporting Clays. 813-689-0490.

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FOR SALE

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JOBS KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722 KUBOTA M7500 72hp on 48 inch centers $5950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In The Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378

info@inthefieldmagazine.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com DECEMBER 2012

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REAL ESTATE FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 FOR LEASE 32 acre strawberry farm. Ready for spring crop or 60 acres for sale with 3 mobil homes. Call (334)355-1945 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 FOR SALE 18 acres, Plant City, Main house 2300 Sq. Ft. 3 bedroom 2 bath built in 1999. 2 rental houses and steel shed. Call (813)752-3327 or (813)514-3418 LAKELAND 20+ACRES Illness forces sale. Was 900K now 325K. Potential income 54K annually. Call for details. Estate Brokers USA. Lee 813-986-9141 MOUNTAIN HOME Located in Blairsville Georgia! Private home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, unfurnished basement, nice kitchen, sunroom, back deck for cooking out. Nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! MLS#212679, $180,000. 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. Call Jane Baer with Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829

Look for great gift ideas in the classifieds!

Happy Holidays W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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In The Field Polk edition  

agricluture magazine covering Polk County, FL

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