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From the Editor Contents

I think that no matter how old or infirm I may become, I will always plant a large garden in the spring. Who can resist the feelings of hope and joy that one gets from participating in nature’s rebirth? ~Edward Giobbi

VOL. 6 • ISSUE 7

Cover Story

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pring is here! We are lucky in Florida to be blessed with good weather for most of the year, but I still enjoy this season. The days are lengthening, giving us more time to enjoy all that Florida has to offer. So get out and hike, bike, kayak or whatever you like to do! Visit one of the many state parks, ornamental gardens, or find an event that celebrates spring flowers. What a great fair season! The Polk County Youth Fair was held in January, the results were listed in last months issue, and the Florida State Fair was held in February. Congratulations to all those who competed. You set your goals to help you with your project. By setting goals you know where to concentrate your efforts and what you have to do to reach the goals you set. These events are the culmination of a lot of hard work for these students. They are to be commended for their efforts. As always, thank you to our advertisers. You allow us to continue to Cover What is Growing. We couldn’t do it without you!

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Business Up Front / It’s A Family Thing . . . . . .

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Streamsong Resort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14 A Heart For Student / Paul Webb . . . . . . . . . . .

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Grub Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Rocking Chair Chatter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Cattlemen’s Ranch Rodeo Winners . . . . . . . . . .

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Invasive Exotics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 34 Operation Outdoor Freedom . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Polk Sheriff “Rustle Up” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Family Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 42

Until Next Month,

Sarah

Farm Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 49

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you.

Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 50

PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry

SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry

SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Amie Facente

SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey

STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Mark Cook Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com, or call 813-759-6909

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Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Saturday, February 25 culminated a year of planning, a month of hard work and a day of celebration as the cow camp at Circle B Bar Reserve was dedicated. The camp idea came about as Ned Waters discussed with Myrtice Young, Polk County Historic Preservation Manager, how the Cattlemen’s Association could participate in Polk County’s Sesquicentennial Celebration. The initial idea of a cattle drive down Main Street in Bartow was quickly vetoed. Since the Circle B Bar Reserve had been a cattle ranch for many years, it seemed a good fit to construct a replica of a cow camp and use it as an educational tool to educate the public about the early history of the cattle industry and the struggles of the original cow hunters. A lot of time and effort went into the project from initial concept and construction, to the final celebration and cattle drive at the Reserve. Many thanks go out to the Florida Cattlemen’s Association Foundation, The Polk County Historical Library, Polk County Commissioners, Parks and Natural Resources Division Director, Natural Areas Manager and members of the Imperial Polk County Cattlemen’s Association. These groups and their members stepped forward to supply funding, supplies and labor to complete this very worthwhile endeavor. The cattle drive was enthusiastically received by all the spectators. As always, when cattle, dogs and horses are involved, the day may have a few surprises; a steer that wanted to run off, a dog mistaking a horse for a cow and the same errant steer making its way through the crowd. The cattle drive brought to life the words and pictures on the two kiosks located just North of the camp.

Charles Clark Charles Clark Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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POLK COUNTY

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831-9005 OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Charles Clark (863) 412-8349 cclark@expoco.com Vice President - Dave Tomkow (863) 665-5088 cattlemanslivetock@earthlink.net Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch (863) 425-1121 jbunch@agriumretail.com Al Bellotto - (863) 581-5515 Ray Clark - (863) 683-8196 rclark@tampabay.rr.com L.B. Flanders, DVM - (863) 644-5974 Dewey Fussell - (863) 984-3782 Mike Fussell - (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@verizon.net David McCullers - (863) 528-1195 Moby Persing - (863) 528-4379 Ned Waters - (863) 698-1597 watersn@doacs.state.fl.us J.B. Wynn - (863) 581-3255 jbwynn29@gmail.com Alternate - Howard Yates 2501 Arbuckle Lane Frostproof, FL 33843-9647 Standing Committee Chairs: Membership - J.B. Wynn Events - Kevin Fussell (863) 412-5876 Rodeo - Fred Waters (863) 559-7808 watersf@doacs.state.fl.us Cattlewomen - President Sherry Kitchen (863) 221-0230 skitchen@bcieng.com Extension - Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. - Sgt. Howard Martin

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Florida’s Natural Growers. ....................11

Polk Equine ...........................................44

Fred’s Market ........................................20

Precision Safe & Lock ...........................37

Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers..............13

Groover Exterminating, Inc. ..................48

Red Rose Inn & Suites ..........................28

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Ring Power Corporation .......................27

Index of Advertisers

Beast Feast.............................................35 Carlton & Carlton, PA ..........................51 Cattleman’s Feed & Ranch Supply, Inc. .41 Cecil Breeding Farms .............................56 Chemical Containers .............................47 Circle “R” .............................................21 Circle Bar J Feed & Tack.......................53 Cresent Jewelers ....................................11 Discount Metals ....................................13 Ellison RBM Inc. ...................................44 Fancy Farms ..........................................40 Farm Credit ...........................................26 Fields Equipment Co. Inc. .....................45 Florida Farm & Ranch Supply ..............20

Helena Chemical-Tampa........................47 High Yield Industries.............................48 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc....................50 International Market World ..................45 Key Plex ..................................................2 Lacey Waters .........................................44 Lay’s Western Wear & Feed...................48 Lightsey Cattle Co. ................................44 Mosaic...................................................40 Parkesdale Farms.....................................9 Pathway BioLogic..................................19 Peachee Construction ..............................9 Polk County Cattlemen’s Association ......7

Roadrunner Veterinary Clinic................53 Seedway.................................................37 Sky Powersports of Lakeland ................44 Southeastern Septic, LLC.......................27 Southwestern Produce ...........................55 Sparkman Chevrolet LLC ........................3 Stephanie Humphrey .............................49 Spurlow’s Outdoor Outfitters ..................8 Stingray Chevrolet ...................................5 The Bug Man.........................................20 The Catering Company & Cafe.............11 Union Agricola ......................................51 Werts Welding & Tank Service, Inc. ......41 Wishnatzki Farms ..................................23

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BUSINESS UP FRONT

By Ginny Mink

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egardless of what the number of huge conglomerates and mega-corporations tell us, the truth is, small businesses are the backbone of American society. While the monopolies (which are supposedly not allowed in this country) steadily strive to put these family-based companies out of commission, there are some that stand firm and steadfast and remain successful. So, the Wal-Mart’s and Verizon’s and Microsoft’s of this country should take note. Perhaps all the franchises should refrain from embattling these hardworking American citizens, too. Cattleman’s Feed is a company that’s been around since 1982 and is still going strong after 30 years in business. Sure, there are some franchises that provide lower prices on certain items, but those same corporations fail miserably in the arena of customer service. Anyone having walked into a Lowe’s or a Home Depot can attest to the fact that some of the more intimate family-owned home improvement stores treat you with respect and appreciation for your patronage. Such is the case with Cattleman’s Feed.

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Kaylon Rodriguez runs the store with her husband, Seth, and her brother, Mike Fussell. Kaylon says, “I was born into it, my dad and my mom have always had catINTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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tle. My dad has 6-700 head that he runs. I’ve always been around it, I haven’t known any other way of life. I’ve always lived in little ‘ole Polk City so I wouldn’t know what it’s like to live in the city and I wouldn’t want to.” As a child Kaylon was very active in agriculture, “I showed two steers, and some bulls and some heifers growing up. I showed my first steer when I was ten.” Though she was active in Ag, she also had a love for sports and horses. “I played volleyball, basketball, and softball and I also did high school rodeo in the Florida High School Rodeo Association. I ran barrels, did pole bending and goat tying. So I stayed really busy but I always tried to work at the store whenever I could.” She adds, “After high school, I went to Polk Community College and got a two year accounting degree. After that I prorodeo’ed for a while, traveled a lot, made the Circuit Finals in ’03, ’04, and ’05 and pretty much settled down and started working at the store full time after that.” Kaylon and her husband got married in 2007 and they have a little boy, Kash Clyde Rodriguez. She says, “It’s neat that I get to bring my little boy to work with me. Everybody’s been able to watch him grow. They come in and ask where the boss is at

when he’s not here.” This is a testimony to the nature of their relationships with customers. Kaylon goes on, “I really enjoy each and every person that comes in. There are people that have seen me grow up. We really appreciate them supporting a local business and a local family. We try to meet their needs as best we can and every customer’s important whether it’s someone who has one cow or someone who has five hundred. We try to treat them all the way that we would want to be treated when we go somewhere. Lots of businesses don’t understand the importance of being polite and talking to your customers. I’ve been taught a lot different than that.” The customer service at other businesses is bothersome to Kaylon, as it is to most of us whom have been raised differently. Kaylon sighs and says, “It bothers me that the young generation is how they are. I’m scared that we’re going to lose all the people with ethics. My parents always taught me to have a good work ethic. I didn’t sleep in or go out partying. I always had something to take care of since I was little so getting up and taking care of things was just part of a daily routine.” (continued on page 12)

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Picture from left to right Deanna Fussell, Clyde Fussell, Mike Fussell, Kaylon Rodriguez Seth Rodriguez and Kash Rodriguez She gives much credit to her parents for raising her “right.” In fact she says, “I give my mom and dad so much credit. They have blessed me beyond what I deserve. They’ve done a great thing here. They’ve not only been wonderful parents but somebody to look up to. You could ask anyone in the community and I’m sure they’d have nothing but great things to say about my mom and dad.” Kaylon’s parents, Clyde and Deanna Fussell, have been married 34 years. They started the business when Kaylon was just six months old. She explains, “My dad’s great uncle gave him the idea of opening a feed store. His dad, my grandfather, Harris Fussell, was an active member of the Florida Cattleman’s Association and he always had cows and had a large piece of land. My dad and his brothers have always had cattle and there was nowhere in Polk City to buy your cattle feed and 12

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things like that. Since Polk City is such a rural city, my dad thought it would go over well here because just about everyone in Polk City has animals whether it be cows, chickens, a cat or a dog. We try to accommodate everybody.” Indeed they do, Kaylon elaborates, “We sell bagged feed and bulk feed, where you can buy feed by the ton and we sell bulk-feeders. We sell any type of fencing supply, water troughs, hay, pretty much a wide variety of things.” Kaylon adds, “My mom and dad just retired. My mom still comes in if we need her. My dad has another company called Central Florida Pipe and he has his office in the store so he still comes in here. He pretty much just retired from the store but he stays busy with the pipe company so you wouldn’t really call him retired.” You can tell that Kaylon loves what she does and is happy to have been attached

to Cattleman’s Feed. “It’s just kind of a family business. We’ve pretty much worked as a family to keep it running. Hopefully we will make Mom and Dad proud by doing a good job at carrying on what they started. I really enjoy being able to work with my mom and dad and having such a close relationship. They’ve really taught me how to run a business and how important it is to have a good relationship with my customers. I love being able to spend quality time with them while I’m at work!” Certainly the store’s longest-standing customers, Mr. and Mrs. Earli Sullivan can attest to the great job this family is doing for the community! There’s no doubt that Clyde and Deanna are quite proud of Kaylon and Mike. •

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Streamsong

®

Resort Team

Introduced to the Community

Golf Courses to Open by Year’s End, Lodge in Lake 2013

By Jim Frankowiak

E

lected representatives, community leaders and officials from Polk County recently gathered at the site of Mosaic’s Streamsong® Resort near Ft. Meade to meet the world class team that has been brought together to create a resort, golf and conference center destination on approximately 16,000 acres of formerly mined phosphate land. Mosaic termed the gathering a “construction celebration event.” The most recent additions to the team are Interstate Hotels & Resorts as the hotel management company for the resort and KemperSports the management company for the resort’s golf operations. The principal architect for the resort is Alfonso Architects of Tampa. The resort’s two golf courses have been under construction since August 2010 by architects Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw of Coore and Crenshaw and Tom Doak of Renaissance Golf Design. The two golf courses and lakeside golf clubhouse, which will feature 12 guest rooms, a steakhouse restaurant, 4,400square-feet of meeting space, lounge and pro shop, are expected to open in December of this year. The main lodge and other resort amenities are slated to open in the fall of 2013. The general contractor for the resort, PCL Construction Services, Inc., (PCL), was selected in December, and ground was broken at the site in January. Streamsong will feature a main lodge in addition to the nearby golf clubhouse, offering a combined 228-guest rooms, approximately 18,500-square-feet of flexible conference

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and meeting space, a full-service spa, fine and casual dining, several bars, including a rooftop lounge, guided bass fishing on surrounding lakes, hiking and birding trails, a sporting clays range and the two golf courses. Mosaic senior executives present at the event included Board Chairman Robert Lumpkins and President & CEO James Prokopanko, who welcomed the more than 100 attendees and briefly traced the history of the resort’s site, noting that “approximately 100 million tons of phosphate rock had been produced at the location over 83 years and it was now moving to a tourist development that will lead to the creation of 200 fulltime jobs.” Rich Mack, Mosaic’s Executive Vice President and General Counsel, then described the attributes of the site and planned project with terms such as “different, special and unique, as well as tranquil, remote and accessible.” He went on to speak of the “high quality products and services” to be provided at Streamsong including 36 holes of golf, a spa, eco tourism opportunities, biking, hiking and more, “a destination that will gain national and international prominence on a par with the best destination of the U.S.” Mack reported that 31 of the 36 holes on the two golf courses are now grassed and the remaining five holes will be completed this spring. Both golf courses and the golf clubhouse will open in December. He also noted that “the who’s who of the golf world that has visited Streamsong has created a buzz over the wow factor” of the courses that have been designed and are being created.

KemperSports Executive Vice President Ben Blake told those gathered how Mack had early on spoken of his desire to have the two Streamsong golf courses ranked “among the top 50 in the world. That was a very lofty statement, but one that we have come to believe will be attainable give the overall design of the courses and how well they work with the topography of the site.” Architect Albert Alfonso of Alfonso Architects of Tampa has been on the project for the past three years and considers it to be “a once in a lifetime opportunity for an architect. The chance to create the next great resort on an incredibly diverse piece of property,” he said. “We have been given the opportunity to create a unique resort in every dimension. There is simply no cookie-cutting in any aspect of what is being created here. Ours is a collaborative effort that will lead to a guest experience that takes total advantage of what this site has to offer, including the opportunity to see the night sky.” At the conclusion of remarks, attendees were given the opportunity to tour the two golf courses and see for themselves why the 36 holes “have created a genuine buzz in the golf community.” For additional information about Streamsong Resort, visit:

www.streamsongresort.com

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A Heart for Students

Paul Webb

By Ginny Mink

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nybody who endeavors to become an Ag teacher has to understand that this is not your typical teaching role. “Core subject” teachers get the luxury of set hours (although of course they also have the joy of time at home grading papers), whereas the Ag teacher adds in the after school hours attached to FFA and preparations for contests and competitions, not to mention travel time between said events. Thusly, it seems highly unlikely that anyone who, “just wants a paycheck,” chooses to join this elite group of educators. Ag teachers have to desire more than direct-deposit every other week. Paul Webb is definitely not in it for the money! Paul explains his agricultural background. “I really got my start in agriculture classes and FFA at Fort Meade Middle Senior High. Because I was interested in agriculture, and considering a career as a veterinarian, I started a pre-vet program at Berry College in Georgia and I decided in my sophomore year that maybe vet school wasn’t going to be a good place for me (a prevet program is really good at weeding all of us out) so I changed my minor to education and was fortunate enough to come back to Polk County and got a job teaching at Lake Wales High School. At the same time as starting to teach, I was getting my Ag education certification from the University of Florida and worked at Lake Wales for eight years before getting the opportunity to transfer to Frostproof.” He has now been at Frostproof Middle Senior High for 20 years! He says, “Our focus here is production agriculture with livestock, citrus and gardens. I have always enjoyed working with students in FFA and allowing them to learn all the opportunities they have through the FFA program. Of the three-fold FFA mission: leadership development, personal growth and career success, I really feel my favorite is personal growth. I like to see the students, especially those coming in as middle schoolers; they may be shy and quiet and withdrawn and once they’ve been in the Ag program I see them coming out of their shell and

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maturing. We’re a middle senior so we see these kids a long time. To me that’s one of the rewards of teaching agriculture because we work that closely with our students that we can see those changes in them over time.” This is something “core” teachers don’t get to experience. Returning to thoughts about his school and the program therein, he explains, “We have a small (five head) herd of polled Hereford cattle and we work with them from calving all the way up to breeding and sales and everything in between, all the management aspects of working with a herd of cattle. We also have a small grove of Hamlin oranges. We allow our students to work in the grove, irrigating, harvesting some of the fruit and grading it and preparing it for sale. This year we’ve started doing more work with our vegetable garden and allowing our students to see how the vegetables are planted, grown, harvested and prepared for sale. Mostly we sell those to teachers, parents and people in the community. We sold broccoli, cabbage, greens. This summer we’re going to have peas, green beans, tomatoes and onions.” Of course, growing and raising things isn’t all Paul’s group of kids does. “In addition to production work, we also focus on leadership development through our FFA career development and leadership events. Some of the contests we work on include soils, livestock, forestry, vegetable ID, tool identification, public speaking, tractor operations and parliamentary procedure. We have about 50 members in our middle school chapter and around 65 in our high school chapter.” Immediately Paul returns to his real focus, his students. “I’d put our students up against anybody’s students anywhere,” he says emphatically. “We may not come up first in all the competitions but they know Frostproof has been there! At the Polk County Youth Fair this year we had a young lady who took Grand Champion in the swine division and a young man who took Grand Champion with his steer.” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


No matter where the conversation is steered, inevitably Paul’s passion for the kids he teaches shines through. “I love what I do but the main thing is the kids. I’d do anything for them! We get to deal with the kids, not only in the classroom, but we see them in their home environment, we’re on trips with them, we get to see them in an environment that they really love whether it’s sewing or woodworking or whatever, we get to see the passions come out.” This leads him to add, “We have one of the most active FFA Alumni organizations in the state. The Frostproof FFA Alumni supports our students and all the agricultural students in the Frostproof area. They provide scholarships annually to some of our seniors. They provide leadership trips to Washington, D.C., the Florida Leadership Training Center and also help out towards state convention and our banquet.” Notice that the bragging on the alumni is still geared towards the benefits they provide for his students. Paul adds, “To really see how active our members are, a person should attend our banquet at Frostproof Middle Senior High School on May 4! I think agriculture education is important because it allows students to get hands-on-experience to develop the leadership potential they have in each and every one of them and if not to pursue a career in agriculture to at least develop an appreciation and understanding for an industry that is vital to every one of us.” Paul has been married to his wife, Sara, for 30 years come this April and they have two sons, Jason and Nathan. Obviously a dedicated family man, Paul beams, “Jason is the oldest and he works as a computer technician and Nathan just graduated from Valencia Community College with a live production degree and is working at Disney. I love spending time with my family including my two granddaughters and I hope one day to help both of them raise animals and show at the county fair just like their grandpa and their dads did.” If they’re lucky maybe they’ll get to take Grandpa’s Ag class, too! • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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BUTTERFLY BISTRO by Cheryl Kuck

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y secret food spies are docents from the Polk Museum of Art who, like me, regard food as an art form. Recently they were buzzing about the opening of a new restaurant that actually serves baked brie with fresh fruit as a part of their regular menu… boy, oh boy, did that ever speak directly to my salivating taste buds! When I know something like baked brie is on the menu, my instincts signal that perhaps there may be other interesting fare. The minute I saw the quaint old house with the bright orange awnings and picturesque garden on Florida Avenue, I immediately knew my instincts were “on-pointe.” The term “eat first with your eyes” definitely comes to mind and applies to the cozily, shabby-chic décor (complete with a working fireplace), as well as, to the food presentation. At the Butterfly Bistro the food fits the environment. It’s a place where you feel relaxed and comfortable with the cuisine satisfying the need for comfort food at affordably comfortable prices. Only two entrée’s; Coq Au Vin and Daube de Boef (a beef stew) are at the top price of the small and thoughtful menu at $7.95. Both the décor and the food can be considered borderline country French coupled with American-style touches. For example, you can get a club sandwich but it’s on a fresh croissant with a homemade creamy dill mayo or with basil pesto on a baguette. There is nothing ordinary about a chicken sandwich that includes fresh herbs and lemon caper sauce. 18

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There are no burgers and the kids menu doesn’t feature chicken nuggets and tater tots. Children’s palates are treated to adult fare that is portion-sized, made-to-order and includes the treat de la maison, a freshly baked gourmet cupcake, brownie or cookies. There are several cupcake selections featured with flavors changing on a daily basis. Every one is a gem suitable for winning “Cupcake Wars.” My gourmand for-life does appreciate gourmet food especially when it‘s in the form of cupcakes with flavors like strawberry, sweet potato, peanut butter and red velvet. One can hardly wait to find out what top chef and owner Diana Simmons will come up with next. While the bistro exudes permanence (as though it has been there for ages) it’s amazing to learn that this was only a dream eight months ago when Simmons, a Fortis Institute instructor at the Mulberry campus, saw a notice for a women’s grant program offering $15,000. Coupled with her savings, plus the perfect location and... voila, the Butterfly Bistro became a reality.

choice of vegetarian or adding additional meat to the timeless classic consisting of bacon, Swiss cheese and onions mingled in perfect harmony with eggs and cream. Sauces and dressings are original and the creation of the owner, giving a fresh twist to every dish. “I grew up cooking with my mother. Her passion for great food has transferred to me. Food is universal, it can build relationships and makes people happy. I believe if you create something wonderful, clientele will come,” says Simmons. •

Butterfly Bistro Location: 1212 S. #2 Florida Ave. Phone: (863) 940-4731 Hours: Mon. – Fri. from 10:00 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sat. from 10:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Sunday E-mail: b u t t e r f l y. b i s t r o . l a k e l a n d @ g m a i l . c o m

The spotless, but tiny, kitchen is open for public perusal. There, the aromatic steam, from pots of specialty soups du jour, fills the air. The tomato bisque is a thick, stew-like soup chock-full of herbs and fresh vegetables. The food, while looking like ladies will (and do) love it, is hearty enough for any male appetite. My gourmand proved that real men do like quiche, especially when they have the W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Support Your Local Businesses and Keep Polk County Strong

Head to Cowboy’s Steakhouse (Hwy. 60 - Plant City) on March 31st for great food, murder, mayhem and fun as they host a murder mystery dinner. The dinner for mystery lovers will be held at 7 p.m. and will costs $49.99 per person, which includes dinner, soft drinks or tea. Alcohol will be extra.

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Reserve your seat now for what will be an exciting evening of drama as the mystery unfolds. Match wits with fellow diners to see who can pinpoint the culprit of the first ever Murder at Cowboy’s. Call 813-650-8888 for reservations or for more information.

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No Dr. Doolittle, but a Great Vet Nonetheless –

“Doc” Flanders By Ginny Mink

Dr.

Doolittle, and people like the Dog Whisperer, have a tendency to taint our views of those who dedicate their lives to the wellbeing of the animals they come in contact with. Of course, there are Dr. Doolittle moments, crazy things that happen with wild animals, but generally, that’s not the case. For most veterinarians there’s no secret conversations with the animals, there’s not really a sixth sense that allows them to provide for the creatures under their supervision. Rather it is a deep heart felt desire to heal the hurting and strengthen the weak that leads them into such a field. “Doc” Flanders spent the majority of his adult life bettering the lives of these creatures. Doc says, “I was raised in South Georgia on a farm and I always thought I wanted to be a veterinarian, so when I graduated high school I went to the University of Georgia and studied veterinary medicine, graduated in 1964, paid my way through school measuring land for the ASCS (Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation Service) office. All those crops had to be measured, they did it on foot then, now they use a lot of maps and do it in an office.” Like much of life, technology has changed the methodology used to do a job. In fact, it’s taken the real “work” out of most of our careers. We digress, though, so getting back to the point, Doc continues, “After I graduated vet school I stayed on at the university on a grant studying avian leukosis, air sac disease, it’s a chicken disease.” In fact, according to www.poultrynews.com it’s a disease that naturally occurs in only chickens and can cause tumors, reduced egg production and depression prior to death. Apparently though, scientists have been doing “experiments” to see if other birds can develop the disease. When his stint at the university came to its close he says, “I came to Lakeland, Florida in 1965 and came to work for the USDA mostly doing testing on cattle herds for tuberculosis and brucellosis (Bangs Disease).” The CDC reports that Brucellosis is not very common in the United States with only 100-200 occurrences each year. However, it is quite common in countries with less strict health and safety regulations. It can be a

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problem for humans and is most commonly introduced via ingesting contaminated milk products. The CDC warns that if you’re traveling abroad you should avoid “village cheeses” because they are unpasteurized (www.cdc.gov). Though Doc got his start doing research it is safe to infer that this wasn’t his greatest interest. In fact he explains, “I worked with them (the USDA) two or three years. I was the district veterinarian for Polk and Osceola Counties at the time and got to know the cattlemen. Then I went into practice for myself for 40-45 years. I did mostly beef cattle. My heart was in beef cattle. At this time I started raising my own herd. About four years ago I sold my practice, retired and now I’m living the dream of raising beef cattle, got my own ranch now and that’s what I do.” No doubt he’s enjoying his retirement as he says, “I have about 2000 acres, I guess. I raise probably 6-800 mama cows and about 75 percent are pure bred Angus, the rest are crossbred cattle. I started my herd about 40 years ago with 30 head. I remember I bought 30 heifers and started out on leased land.” Obviously the years have been generous to him as leased land turned into a large quantity of personally owned property. As noted earlier, Doc grew up in South Georgia. He says, “I grew up on a small farm. We grew tobacco, cotton, peanuts

and corn on about 100 acres. We had a few cows and a few hogs. It was a good life, looking back. When I was 12 years old I picked 212 pounds of cotton in one day! I cropped tobacco (that’s where you take it off the stalks to get it ready to cure) and worked peanuts. I did it all before I went off to school. It was nip and tuck, I had two sisters, I was a middle child. I played football and basketball in high school.” Continuing his reminiscing Doc says, “I think my graduating class was 56 students total. I graduated from high school in 1956. I met my wife, Judy, there, we were classmates in high school. My senior year we met and we just kind of hit it off. We’ve been married for 52 years. We have two married daughters and five wonderful grandchildren. They all live in Lakeland and they all love the ranch. My wife’s a retired judge, judicial circuit. She went to Mercer and then later in life she went to Stetson. Her first degree at Mercer was in English then she went to Stetson in St. Pete and got her law degree.” His voice reveals his pride in his wife’s accomplishments and his adoration of his children and grandchildren. He adds, “We are members of First Baptist Church at the Mall.” Doc is on the Board of Directors of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association. “I’ve been on the Board of Directors for six or eight years,” he says. “I’m just an

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active participating member and I help them when I can. We do cooking for the youth fair and annual meetings and anything I can to help.” In addition, he’s a member of the Florida Cattleman’s Association, the Florida Veterinarian’s Association and has been an active Kiwanis member for 46 years. But, he says, “I’m basically in retirement mode. I come to the ranch and spend half the day.” Of course, that’s just what his life looks like these days. His time as a veterinarian was significantly busier. In speaking of his vet practice he says, “I kind of had a unique practice. I did work basically for big ranches all over the state. I might stay at one for a month. I did a lot of traveling as well as working. I’ve been kicked and stomped and butted and crapped on (that’s been many times),” he chuckles, “and anything an animal can do to you. Early in my career when I was trying to make any money at all, I even agreed to castrate two bears. The bear deal was a memorable time.” He pauses and retrieves some additional memories, “I did a caesarian section on a 14 year old Chihuahua, and that’s like working on a 90 year old woman, but I got a live puppy out of her,” he laughs. “Then, one time a guy brought in a mad dog, foaming at the mouth, and we were all scared to work on it (what with rabies and all), but when I examined his mouth what was causing the foaming was a bar of soap stuck in his upper pallet!” INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Still contemplating his career he adds, “I enjoyed it. I enjoyed the small animals too but after a couple of weeks I wanted to be out. I’ve always loved being outdoors.” So, he says he chose to leave the small animals to his colleagues and thusly he spent the majority of his veterinary career working with livestock. For him, the best thing about it all was, “Just dealing with the cattle people and the good people I’ve worked with over the years, the friendships I’ve developed and maintained is the best I can say.” Doc has been around long enough to see lots of changes in the cattle industry. He says, “I’ve seen the quality of cattle grow, bigger carcasses, and more money, not as many horns and not as wild. I’ve seen the cattle industry go from thirty cents a pound to $2.30 a pound in some instances. Of course in the increase we get in the price of cattle now we had to pay more to raise them. Even though we’re getting more money it costs more to raise them.” Doc concludes, “All in all it’s been a good life and I’ve enjoyed it. I’ve lived a pretty mild life.” It doesn’t seem that there’s much that’s mild about castrating bears, being stomped, butted and kicked, but it is safe to assume that just like everything else, it is all in your perspective.

Doc discussed some things in his experiences growing up that Floridians are probably not very familiar with. Tobacco farming is the first one that comes to mind. If you’re interested in learning about it, there’s a great resource located at: http:/ / www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/ ctb/ South_Georgia_Tobacco_Patch.html At this site you’ll discover all the work involved in growing tobacco. Jesse M. Bookhardt, the author, seems to really dislike what he calls, “suckering” because, according to him, “…the tobacco was growing rapidly and producing “tons” of tobacco tar. Though not visible on the plant, the stuff seemed to exude from all parts of the plant. The sticky stuff would build-up on any surface that came in contact with the plant. After working in the fields for a short time, your hands, shirts, arm hairs, and eyebrows would all be covered with a thick film of the dark sticky stuff.” Bookhardt provides a really good read here and the first person style brings the historic farming routine to life. Those interested in other historic aspects of life in Georgia should check out: w w w. g e o r g i a e n c y c l o p e d i a . o r g . Take every opportunity to better educate yourselves, learning can be fun! Doc Flanders and his wife, Judy, are prime examples of the value of a good education. •

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The Premier Showplace for Talent in Florida

Bob Ryman

The Jarmels

MARCH 17 “THE FIDDLER” BOB A ST. PATRICK’S DAY BALLROOM DINNER SHOW

RYMAN

Come celebrate the event! Ryman is a master of the violin and takes you through a magical journey of the classics to country favorites. The Las Vegas Sounds will also perform. Car show in the afternoon and deck party with a St. Patty’s tradition of green beer before the show. Pre-show at 7–Main-show at 8.

MARCH 17 RALPH ALLOCCO & SECOND WIND

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MARCH 23 thru 24 DOO WOP WEEKEND EXTRAVAGANZA VI STARRING - BARBARA HARRIS & THE TOYS THE MYSTICS • THE LEGENDARY TEENAGERS JIMMY GALLAGHER OF THE PASSIONS • DESTINY THE LAS VEGAS SOUNDS • BOB RYMAN The annual event is taking on its sixth year of fun, food, contest and great music from a bygone era. Friday night performances include: The Mystics, Jimmy Gallagher (lead singer of the Passions), Barbara Harris & The Toys and The Las Vegas Sounds. Saturday night performances include: The Mystics, Jimmy Gallagher, The Legendary Teenagers and The Las Vegas Sounds Band will perform in the Ballroom. Bob Ryman will perform in the Dining Room.

MARCH 30 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE

APRIL 13 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

MARCH 31 BOB RYMAN

APRIL 14 THE JARMELS

Bob Ryman is a master of the violin. Ryman plays favorites from Bluegrass to Broadway, from Country to Classics. Destiny before and after the show in the Red Rose Dining Room.

The Jarmels are a Doo Wop/R&B group. Their single, “A Little Bit of Soap,” reached number 12 in America on the Billboard chart. Destiny opens and closes the show in the Red Rose Dining Room.

APRIL 6 BOBBY PALERMO

APRIL 20 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE

Bobby Bobby Palermo has been voted Tampa Bay Entertainer of the Year two years in a row. Enjoy a night of humour, impersonations and fabulously listenable and danceable music. Destiny opens and closes.

APRIL 7 TREY DEES AND

DESTINY

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room.

APRIL 8 EASTER

BUFFET

Our chefs are preparing a fabulous feast for you! The Easter Bunny will stop by for photos. Call for seating times and reservations.

Show Guests stay overnight at special rate!

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

APRIL 21 RALPH ALLOCCO & SECOND WIND

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room.

APRIL 27 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

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Red Rose Inn & Suites I-4 Exit 21 2011 N. Wheeler St. Plant City, FL 33563

Mrs. Evelyn Madonia -Owner GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

Brian Roman

Johnny Alston’s Motown Rock ‘n Roll Revue

APRIL 28 SIMPLY STREISAND A TRIBUTE TO THE ARTISTY OF BARBRA STREISAND Starring Carla DelVillaggio, this AWARD WINNING Tribute Artist has the look and sound of “the Greatest Star,” the incomparable Barbra Streisand. From the hair down to the trademark nails, she is “Simply Streisand” in every way. Destiny performs before and after the show in the Red Rose Dining Room.

The Marcels

MAY 4 BOBBY PALERMO Bobby Bobby Palermo has been voted Tampa Bay Entertainer of the Year two years in a row. Enjoy a night of humour, impersonations and fabulously listenable and danceable music. Destiny performs before and after the show in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MAY 5 THE MARCELS In 1961 their first recording, “Blue Moon” sold over two and a half million copies. “Blue Moon” has been used in at least four major motion pictures and various TV shows, such as: Sha Na Na, Cheers, Moonlighting, Laverne & Shirley and Happy Days. Destiny opens and closes in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MAY 11 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

Bobby Blackmon's career began in a small town not far from the Dallas, Texas area. His Texas blues influence is heard loud ‘n’ proud in his soulful guitar playing. He's worked with the likes of Barbara Lynn, Jimmy Reed, ZZ Hill, Johnny Taylor, Lavelle White and Lou Rawls. Destiny opens and closes in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MAY 19 JOHNNY ALSTON’S MOTOWN ROCK & ROLL REVUE Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room, plus Destiny.

MAY 25

BRIAN ROMAN One of Canada’s finest entertainers! Roman performs the classics – spanning the Golden Era, ranging from Sinatra to Tom Jones. Destiny also performs.

MAY 26 RALPH ALLOCCO & SECOND WIND

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MAY 12 RALPH ALLOCCO & SECOND WIND

Performing in the Red Rose Dining Room.

MAY 18 BEAUTIFUL BOBBY BLACKMON & THE B3 BLUES BAND

Call 813.752.3141 for Reservations Today!


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Truck Review

New Chevy 3500 Regular Cab Chassis 2WD, 12' FLATBED, 11,400lb GVWR, Duramax Diesel (NO UREA TANK), Allison 6 speed automatic, AC, AM/FM Stereo, Locking Differential, Cruise Control, Integrated Trailer Brake Controller, Dual Air Bag, Security Features, Daytime Running Lights, Intermittent Wipers, Power Brakes. Pricing includes all eligible rebates and incentives assigned to dealer. Prices are plus tax, tag, and $99 dealer fee unless you have or are eligible for a GM FAN, call today to see if you are eligible for additional incentives or discounts. This truck is ready to work! Call us today at 813-359-5420.

2012 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

The Chevrolet Silverado is recognized as the most dependable, longest lasting full-size pickup on the road. The Silverado comes in eight different trim levels from the WT base pickup to the luxurious LTZ and seven cab model variations. Available engines include the Vortec 4.3L V6, Vortec 4.8L V8, Vortec 5.3L V8, Vortec 6.0L V8 Hybrid and the powerful Vortec 6.2L V8. Horsepower ranges are from 195 in the V6 to 403 in the largest V8. Chevrolet Silverado shines in the fuel economy ratings with all engine and drive variation versions capable of producing well over 20 MPG. Silverado advanced engine technology refines power, maximizes drive and ads efficiency. Technologies include Active Fuel Management featuring a patented cylinder deactivation system, which shuts down engine cylinders when they are not needed, improving efficiency during light driving. Variable Valve Timing, another multiplier, optimizes both low-revving torque and high-performance horsepower, while also increasing engine efficiency. More multiplying technologies: an available Hydra-Matic 6-speed Automatic Transmission which maximizes acceleration with a steep first gear and provides quiet, low-rpm highway cruising with a tall overdrive. Engine torque ranges from 260 lb-ft to a massive 417 lb-ft. Payloads and trailering ability are at the top of the class. General Motors engineers adapted Intelligent Technology used in heavy-duty work trucks for the Silverado 1500. With the available Max Trailering Pack, Extended Cab models can tow 10,700 lbs. (10,600 lbs. with Crew Cab models). A stout 9.5-Inch Rear Axle handles even the kind of horsepower and torque that the available Vortec 6.2L V8 engine generates. Under certain conditions, the available GM segment-inclusive Automatic Locking Rear Differential directs power to the wheel that has the most traction, propelling the Silverado through loose gravel and slick surfaces. New available Trailer Sway Control works in conjunction with the StabilTrak Electronic Stability Control System to help keep the Silverado on track. When trailering in hill country, available Hill Start Assist holds the truck stationary for about a second after the brake is released, giving the driver time to accelerate before the truck can roll backward. The Chevrolet Silverado has a good, strong backbone. The 2012 Silverado 1500 has a Hydroformed Front Frame and is Fully Boxed for Extra Rigidity. After driving the new Silverado it is easy to see why the Silverado is America’s longest lasting pickup. Call us today at 863-533-0777.

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By Debra Howell

F

lorida's pioneer naturalist of 1920, Charles Torrey Simpson, wrote, "there are the adventive plants, the wanderers, of which we have, as yet comparatively few species; but later, when the country is older and more generally cultivated, there will surely be an army of them." This prediction has been borne out with the announcement that 29 percent of plant species growing in Florida without cultivation are non-native. The term "invasive" has become synonymous with the pythons now wreaking havoc on the Everglades biota. These give new meaning to the term noxious exotic. So in light of such a creepy, crawly menace, we might tend to overlook something as benign by comparison as a frilly-looking climbing fern or a tree which produces pretty red berries loved by animals. Had she lived, these would be sad times for Marjory Stoneman Douglas, author of The Everglades River of Grass, who was also a nature writer, environmental preservationist and the Grand Dame of the Everglades who had no peer. She lived beyond 107 years of age and was an eyewitness to the decimation and drainage of her beloved Everglades. She states, "There are no other Everglades in the world." Native American's called the 'Glades Pahayokee, their word for Grassy Water. In her book, Ms. Stoneman Douglas imparts her love and intimate knowledge of South Florida's flora and fauna, and history as well.

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Now the Everglades are under attack again by at least three imminently threatening species -- the imported snakes, Melaleuca and the Brazilian pepper tree. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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In their native environments, plants have natural controls, which help to keep these plants from overrunning their environments. An example would be the Tropical Soda Apple (TSA), which is naturally controlled by a little beetle. Lacking these biological controls, we may attempt to tip the scales in our favor with a "release" of these beetles, thereby abating the spread of the Tropical Soda Apple upon which it feeds. I know of a small patch of TSA's in a pasture, which hasn't been given a chance to proliferate because they're regularly pulled and bagged for disposal. The small patch is kept under control in part by the TSA beetle, which I've noticed feeding voraciously on them. The foliage begins to resemble Swiss cheese from the assault of the beetles, which obviously have chewing mouth parts. When I mentioned this to our Advisor, he asked if the beetles were having any effect on the TSA. I didn't believe the beetles were impacting the plant enough to kill it, but noticed that the TSAs that had beetle damage and got damaged by the cold did, indeed, succumb to their injuries. We'll never mention snakes again (maybe) but we will re-visit two major threats: Brazilian pepper tree and Melaleuca. Let's throw in Cogon grass for a scary trifecta. The Brazilian pepper tree (Schinus terebinthifolius) was introduced to Florida in the 1840s as a cultivated ornamental plant. The thing is so invasive that it will choke out any other plant, creating a thicket along fence rows, in fallow farm lands, hardwood hammocks, pinelands and mangrove forests. Also called Florida holly, it has plentiful, attractive red berries in winter and is appealing to birds and other animals who enjoy spreading it at will. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


A close second to Brazilian pepper in repugnance is Melaleuca quinquenervia, which we'll call Melaleuca because that's hard enough to spell. We used to call this the Punk tree, and it's also known as Australian paperbark. We introduced this stuff by plane loads to deliberately dry up the Everglades which we once referred as "useless swamps." Of course, that was prior to our acquisition of the knowledge that these delicate, timeless areas have an important, if not necessary, role in the ecosystems which comprise "La Florida." I suppose you've noticed the recurring theme of the introduced species? Natural area weeds are sometimes exotic species brought here in association with European contact, around 1500 A.D. We are all painfully aware that hindsight is 20/20. Non-native plants exist in the landscape, spread by wind, animals, birds and yard trash, have been introduced as landscape ornamentals, agricultural crops, aquarium plants and accidentally. In the case of the water hyacinth and Cogon grass, it was sort of accidentally on purpose. In order to honor their American hosts at the 1884 New Orleans World's Fair, the Japanese (who meant well) gave out these pretty plants to visitors at the Fair. Now they clog locks and waterways and kill fish by oxygen deprivation, doubling in numbers in two weeks time! As for Cogon grass, it was introduced either on purpose or by accident, by this one or that one, depending on which account you choose to believe. But the important thing to remember is it forms dense stands of extremely flammable tall grass and plentiful feathery seeds carried by the wind. Also it's basically unpalatable to wildlife and livestock, who will usually not eat it unless there's nothing else to eat. An easy way to recognize this hateful plant is it's off center leaf midrib. Glimmers of hope in efforts to combat Melaleuca are that there have been found over 200 Australian insects that feed on it, and several are being looked at for possible introduction into South Florida. Bear in mind that surveys are conducted to discover the natural controls in the plant's native environment, which they are quarantined and studied for suppression capabilities and to prove they are plant-specific and won't damage other plants or crops. Some other problem plants you may know are Air potato, Chinese tallow (popcorn tree), Carrotwood and Old World Climbing fern. Your County Cooperative Extension office can assist with plant identification and address herbicide questions you may have. The importance of proper treatment and eradication of noxious exotics lies in the fact that they displace native plants, endangered species and may alter natural processes such as water-flow and fire. In January 1997, Dante Fascell, who represented South Dade in Congress for over 40 years, said, "Maybe in the next 50 years we can strike the balance that will finally enable people here (the Everglades) to co-exist with their environments." That statement is even more relevant today. But we realize where we've erred, as a result of the 20/20 hindsight thing, and have scientists and researchers working on treatments and prevention. We are also more diligent on our policing of plants and animals entering not only Florida, but America in general. And chiefly, we've gained a healthy respect of our natural systems such as the Everglades and our ridge, both of which occur nowhere else on Earth. This in itself should be a matter of great pride to all of us.

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FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTRODUCES

Enables Wounded Warriors to Enjoy Recreational Activities at State Forests By Jim Frankowiak

lorida Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Adam Putnam and Florida State Forest Service Director Jim Karels have launched, “Operation Outdoor Freedom (OOF),” a new program inviting wounded service personnel and veterans to enjoy recreational activities at Florida state forests. The new initiative formalizes a departmental tradition of hosting wounded warriors at Florida forests through a partnership with the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP).

said Ned Waters, an Area Supervisor with the Florida Forest Service and Field Coordinator for Operation Outdoor Freedom.

years ago,” said Pruden. “The formalization of the program through Florida legislative action creates a wealth of opportunities going forward,” he said.

“It has been especially gratifying to see the support of local groups and guides for this program,” said Waters. That help has included cash donations, the use of equipment, guide services and the construction of shooting houses. “Participants do so at no cost and all funds and services for the program are donated,” said Waters.

During the 2011 legislative session, Commissioner Putnam, in partnership with the Florida Legislature, designated areas of the Florida State Forests in honor of and for use by active service members and veterans of the U.S. military who were injured in the line of duty. The legislative measure was sponsored by Senator Alan Hays and Representative Greg Steube.

“Operation Outdoor Freedom is a salute to the selfless service of Americans veterans – the men and women who put their lives on the line for a cause greater than themselves,” said Commissioner Putnam as the program was announced late in 2011.

Groups of Wounded Warrior participants “range in size from three to 12,” said Jonathan Pruden, Manager of Alumni for the Southeast of the Wounded Warrior Project. He also serves as liaison between the Wounded Warrior Project and the Florida Forest Service. “I am involved in the selection of program participants, coordination of their travel to the hunt locations amid Florida’s four forestry districts and ongoing support to help make sure their experience is as beneficial as possible.”

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Under the program, five areas within Florida state forests across the state have been designated as special hunt areas and are fully equipped to accommodate any veteran regardless of his or her injuries. “Nearly 100 wounded warriors have participated in the program thus far with hunts for deer, hog, quail and turkey, as well as some exotics on certain tracts,” 36

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The program had its beginnings in an informal partnership with the Florida Forest Service that began “about three

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Wounded Warrior Project exists to honor and empower Wounded Warriors who incurred service-connected injuries on or after September 11, 2001. With advancement in battlefield medicine and body armor, an unprecedented percentage of service members are surviving severe wounds or injuries. “As a consequence, our initial focus with Operation Outdoor Freedom is wounded service members and veterans who were injured on or after September 1, 2001,” said Pruden. “However, the formalization of this program by the legislature and outpouring of support bodes very well for the future and the opportunity to broaden the involve-

ment of veterans and service personnel injured prior to 9/11,” he said, noting Florida is home to approximately 1.5 million veterans. “Whether participants have a history of hunting or are making their debut in the field, their involvement in Operation Outdoor Freedom is a major step forward as they benefit from sharing stories and experiences with men and women who have been on similar broken paths,” said Pruden. With the mission to honor and empower Wounded Warriors, WWP is the hand

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extended to encourage warriors as they adjust to their new normal and achieve new triumphs. In addition to OOF, WWP offers a variety of programs and services to help warriors with every type of injury from the physical to the invisible wounds of war. For additional information about Operation Outdoor Freedom and/or how to become a part of the Wounded Warrior Project, contact Pruden via email: JPruden@woundedwarriorproject.org.

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Polk County Sheriff’s Office Detectives

“RUSTLE UP” TWO SUSPECTS IN GRAND THEFT OF LIVESTOCK

by Sheriff Grady Judd

olk County Sheriff’s Office Agriculture detectives identified two suspects responsible for the December grand theft of cattle from a pasture in Polk City.

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On December 12, 2011, the owner of the cattle, Ed Harvey Davis of 805 Braddock Road in Auburndale, reported a number of Hereford cattle missing from his pasture located near the intersection of Mt. Olive Road and Berkley Road, near Polk City. As a part of its investigation, the Sheriff’s Office sent out a Crime Stoppers bulletin requesting information about this case. On December 19, 2011, Haines City Officer, and PCSO Reserve Sergeant, Tim Glover forwarded a red light camera violation that occurred at approximately 2:59 a.m., on Hwy 27 and Holly Hill Road in Haines City to PCSO agriculture deputies. The red light camera captured a white 1989 Dodge pick-up truck pulling a Gooseneck livestock trailer. The tag on the truck was registered to the suspect, Andres Trujillo, DOB 6-26-1974, of 914 E. Paris Street in Tampa. The tag on the trailer was registered to Orlando Perez of Tampa. Mr. Perez is an innocent victim whose license plate was stolen by Trujillo. The trailer was carrying cattle with colors and markings of the Hereford breed. It was 38

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determined the suspect was traveling towards the southern livestock markets. Around the same time, the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office was investigating a theft of cattle with the exact description of the suspect truck and trailer. PCSO detectives contacted the Pasco County Sheriff’s Office and learned that a second suspect, Yoinel DeVera-Gutierrez, DOB 6-24-1982, of 388 East 55th Street in Haileah, sold stolen cattle related to a Pasco County investigation. Detectives contacted the Okeechobee Livestock Market Auction and retrieved video that showed seven cows were sold at the auction on December 12, 2011 under the name of Yoinel DeVera for $3,798.21. The victim of the Polk County case, Mr. Davis, reviewed the video of the cattle sold and positively identified them as his cattle. Both suspects, Yoinel DeVera-Gutierrez and Andres Trujillo, were also identified in a bank video surveillance camera cashing the check after the sale. Trujillo was arrested on December 19, 2011 on an outstanding warrant for Violation of Probation (Grand Theft of Livestock—this was a previous case where he also stole livestock) in Tampa. He was

in the Hillsborough County Jail from December 19 through December 27, 2011. Trujillo was released and re-instated on Community Control pending a court hearing scheduled for February 15, 2012 in Marion County. At approximately 3:30 p.m. on January 31, 2012 Trujillo was in the lobby of the Hillsborough County Probation and Parole Office. The Tampa Police Department was contacted by PCSO deputies and Trujillo was arrested for an outstanding warrant for the Polk County Cattle thefts. Yoinel DeVera-Guiterrez was located February 1, 2012, in Columbia County and has been arrested on a warrant for cattle theft. Both Trujillo and DeVera-Guiterrez are currently charged with Grand Theft of Livestock and Dealing in Stolen Property. This investigation is on-going and additional charges are expected.

“We take cattle rustling very seriously in Polk County. Our Ag crimes detectives did an outstanding job running down leads and bringing these two men to justice. These thieves are now in jail, where they belong.” – Sheriff Grady Judd

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NICOLE GREEN

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n November 16, FFA members from across the state met at the FFA’s Leadership Training Center in Haines City to compete in the state Citrus career development event (CDE). Among those students was Nicole Green, a junior at Kathleen High School, representing her school for the first time in the event. The Citrus CDE requires students to learn to identify 35 pests, 38 varieties of fruit, 27 weeds, 28 diseases and disorders and take a 25 question written exam on production practices in Florida. This year Kathleen FFA placed second in the event and Nicole Green was the high individual, placing her higher than every other student participating. For her accomplishment in the citrus CDE, Nicole will be recognized at the state FFA convention in Orlando this June in front of 3,500 fellow FFA members. Nicole is the daughter of Carl and Chris Green and was born in Orlando but raised in the Lakeland area. Nicole has been active in agriculture and FFA since the sixth grade at Kathleen Middle School. She has been very active throughout her career so far, participating in numerous activities, serving in many leadership roles and achieving impressive accomplishments. Nicole says her favorite thing about FFA “is the unlimited opportunities available to students from travel to scholarships.” Nicole has taken every opportunity presented and made the most of it. Among her accolades, Nicole was on the ninth place team in the nation in the Forestry CDE in October. She’s participated on many other CDEs in her career, including Nursery and Landscape CDE, Ornamental Horticulture Demonstration, Agricultural Issues and Creed Speaking. Over the summer the Kathleen FFA Alumni awarded Nicole a scholarship to attend FFA’s Washington Leadership Conference in our nation’s capitol, where she visited many historical sites while focusing on improving community through various service projects. Since the conference, Nicole has headed up Kathleen FFA’s Holiday Angel project, where students donated over 80 gifts for underprivileged young people in our local community. She is leading by example and working to make the Lakeland community better through service. Nicole is active in all parts of agricultural education, including supervised agricultural experience (SAE) projects. This year she decided to raise and show her first market hog project at the Florida State Fair in February. Animal projects require lots of time and effort to be successful and this project has been no different. When asked about her project Nicole said, “I was really nervous about showing a pig for the first time, especially since I really didn’t know what to expect.” Through animal projects, students learn leadership skills, record keeping skills, learn responsibility and many other life skills. Nicole is a well-rounded student, maintaining a 3.9 GPA. In addition to her dedication to the FFA, Nicole races cars in Auburndale in the youth series. She is a very active young lady and a wonderful asset to Kathleen High School and Kathleen FFA. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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By Libby Hopkins

here are more than 1 billion people between the ages of 12-24 and these young people of today are the farmers who will feed the world in 2050. Six and a half million of them are part of a 4-H Club. It is the nation’s largest youth development organization. According to the 4-H Club’s website, www.4-h.org, 4-H has grown to become the nation’s largest youth development organization. The 4-H idea is simple, help young people and their families gain the skills they need to be proactive forces in their communities and develop ideas for a more innovative economy. This idea is what started the club and those values are still being taught today. Julie Barthle is the leader of Country Cousins 4-H in Haines City and she teaches a mixture of the program’s values as well as family values. “Our club got started about 27 years ago and it was just a small group of family, friends and cousins,” Barthle said. “That’s why we named the group Country Cousins.”

“Archery was a new event at the Polk County Fair and members of Country Cousins 4-H Club participated in the event.”

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At one point, the club had 50 members, but with members being involved with other extra curricular activities or moving on to FFA, the club has 15 current members. Even though the club may be smaller, Barthle instills the core principles of the 4-H movement, which are

head, heart, hands and health. Head is for managing or thinking. Heart is for relating or caring. Hands are for giving or working. Health is being or living. Barthle makes sure all of the members take their 4-H pledge seriously. The pledge states that every member must use their head for clearer thinking, their heart for greater loyalty, their hands for larger service, their health for better living. This pledge is to their club, community, country and the world. Country Cousins has a serving heart when it comes to the community. “We collect canned goods for the needy during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays,” Barthle said. The club also takes part in their local Christmas parade each year and during the holidays they visit nursing homes within the community where they sing Christmas Carols or help decorate Christmas trees. Statics have shown that youth involved with 4-H clubs are nearly two times more likely to get better grades in school and plan on attending college after high school. They are 41 percent less likely to engage in risky behaviors and are 25 percent more likely to positively contribute to their families and communities. 4-H members have shown to have a significant lower drug, alcohol and

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cigarette use than their peers. They also have a higher rate to pursue future courses or a career in science, engineering or computer technology. Barthle focuses on teaching Country Cousins leadership skills and responsibility. She only allows the members of the club to miss one meeting. At the meeting, members must discuss different projects they are working on for the group as well as what activity they will be a part of in the club’s next community event. “We had about six of our groups show hogs at this year’s Polk County Fair,” Barthle said. For the members who are not interested in animals, Barthle has them make crafts or bake goods to bring to the events. “We had a few who took pictures and they showed them at the fair,” Barthle said. “We even had a few who did archery this year because it was a new event at the fair.”

Some of the girls from Country Cousins enter the chili cook off at the fair. They were inspired by the T.V. show, “Swamp People,” so they called themselves “Swamp Girls.” They also made their chili with gator meat. “It had a different taste to it, but it was good,” Barthle said. The “Swamp Girls” didn’t win but Barthle said they had a good time and the cutest booth. She said the girls are ready to do the chili cook off again next year at the fair. The next event for Country Cousins is the Florida Strawberry Festival. Barthle said she hopes the one thing members of Country Cousins take away from being a part of the club is how to be a leader. “Country Cousins helps them to become a stronger person who has learned how to communicate with others and have respect for others,” Barthle said. For more information on 4-H clubs you can visit them on the web at www.4-h.org. •

“Some of the girls from the club were inspired by the T.V. show, “Swamp People,” so they called themselves “Swamp Girls” and entered the chili cook off at the fair. Their secret ingredient was gator meat.” “Members of Country Cousins 4-H Club of Haines City showed hogs at this year’s Polk County Fair.”

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The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association highlighted the county’s 150th anniversary with a cattle drive. The event was held at Circle B Bar Reserve near Lakeland on Saturday, February 25. Cattle were driven to a newly constructed corral, pictured in last month’s issue along with a cabin built by volunteers for the event. The cow camp is a representative of the camps that were placed about a days ride apart when cow hunters were working cattle. These shelters and pens were used to gather wild cattle, often accomplished with the help of dogs and whips.

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Photos Courtesy of Lacey Waters

Cattle ranching runs deep in the history of Polk County and the legacy continues today.

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enoroc FFA, with the help of the Tenoroc FFA Alumni, Berkley Middle FFA, and Stambaugh Middle FFA, hosted the 4th Annual Farm Fair on February 23, 2012. Approximately 1,200 local pre-school and kindergarten children visited Tenoroc High School’s agriculture land-lab to learn about various aspects of agriculture. The purpose of Farm Fair is to raise agricultural awareness throughout the community by teaching children about production agriculture and conservation, while offering hands-on experience with agricultural products and equipment. This year, children learned about the beef industry from the Polk County Cattlewomen’s Association. Children were able to “saddle-up”, talk with local Cowboy Earlow Costine, and watch his horse and cattle dog at work. Representatives from the Southwest Florida Water Management District, the Department of Forestry, the Haines City Tax Collector, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Polk County Animal Control, and the Mounted Unit of the Polk County Sheriff’s Office discussed their specific professions and demonstrated equipment used. Children enjoyed eating ice cream, donated by Publix, while learning about dairy farming and dairy processing from Publix employees. Volunteers from City of Lakeland’s Lakes Program talked about natural resources while the Polk County School Board’s Solid Waste Management & Recycling Specialist and representatives of Waste Resource Management and Keep Polk County Beautiful taught the importance of recycling. Children also watched a demonstration from a Republic Service’s trash truck and were able to climb in the driver’s seat. Dr. Losey, a local veterinarian, educated children on animal health with samples such as heartworms. Berkley Middle FFA members gave children an insight to the National FFA Organization and discussed different farm animals. The Tenoroc High School Transition Program read children a story about agriculture and helped students complete a farmscene craft. Floppy Eared Farms, Ray’s Rabbit Farm, and several Tenoroc FFA members provided a variety of animals for children to pet and feed while other FFA members hoisted children on the backs of horses for a short ride. Tenoroc FFA members demonstrated their whip popping skills and the use of a cattle chute while others hid candy in a hay pile for children to find, painted their faces, gave tours of the greenhouse and hydroponic garden, and sat children on the seat of a tractor. Children also went on a hay ride and ate a snack provided by the Tenoroc FFA Alumni. Children left with a goodie bag filled with coloring books and information from Dairy Farmers Inc., SWFWMD, Tenoroc FFA, and the Polk County Cattlewomen’s Association. The hope is that Farm Fair will not only be a memorable experience for children who attend, but also that they will become increasingly aware of agriculture and the many products they use and consume. This event would not be possible without the dedication of local agriculturalists. Tenoroc FFA would like to thank the exhibitors who volunteered their time and resources, and to the local schools and daycares that participated. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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HORSERADISH RIB ROAST 4 2 1 8 2 1 1 3

carrots, peeled & cut into 1-inch pieces medium onions, cut into wedges bag bay potatoes, cut in half celery ribs, cut into 1-inch pieces Tbsp. Olive Oil Standing rib roast (4-5 lbs.) tsp. kosher salt springs fresh rosemary, stripped from stem and finely chopped ¾ C. creamy Horseradish Sauce 2 tsp. worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp. pepper

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Preheat oven at 475°. Combine vegetables and olive oil; toss. Transfer to roasting pan. Salt all sides of roast. Place on rack over vegetables or nestle on top of vegetables. Place in oven and immediately reduce heat to 325°. Bake 1 hour. Mix rosemary and remaining

ingredients. Remove roast from oven and coat with sauce. Bake another 1½ to 2 hours or until internal temperature is 145° (rare) or 170° (well). Enjoy! Recipe compliments of Esther Sherrouse-Harvey, Polk County Cattlewomen

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OUR SERVICES • Social Security Disability • Supplemental Security Income: Children and Adults • Initial Applications Reconsideration • Hearing with Judge

• Wills • Power of Attorney • Estate Planning • Trusts • Guardianships • Adoptions Charles L. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. University of South Florida J.D. Florida State University Law School

Geraldyne H. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. Georgia State University J.D. Florida State University Law School

2310 Lakeland Hills Blvd. Lakeland, FL 33805 (1 mile south of I-4, Exit 33 Lakeland - across from Detroit Tigers Baseball Spring Training Stadium)

TOLL FREE 1. 800.315.4590 863. 688.5700 *The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisments. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Classifieds ANIMALS ANIMAL & BIRD CAGES Add living microbes to improve your soil, Equipment serving the fur-bearing and exotic bird industry. Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. 813-752-2230 www.ammermans.com Swap July 15, 2012 and Nov. 25, 2012.

BUILDING SUPPLIES DECKING BRDS. & TILL SIDING Call Ted 813-752-3378. DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378. SURPLUS WINDOWS DOUBLE INSULATED Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378. MOBILE HOME-SIZED WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378. TILL 4 X 8 SHEET B-grade $17.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378. NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378. MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378.

COUPONS SAVICH & LEE/STALNAKER Horse Fence 200’x4’, Sheep & Goat Fence 330’x4’ 1 to 3 rolls - $2.50 off, 4 or more $5 off, 10 piece limit. Field fence 47” 1-8 $2.50 off, 9 or more - $5 off, 10 piece limit. Barbed Wire - 5 or more - $1 off 10 piece limit. Pick up ONLY while supplies last. See our ad on page 81 for pricing.

EQUINE SERVICES HORSE BOARDING Stalls and individual turnout, lighted arena and round pen. Owners on property. $300 full care. Call 813-610-4416.

FARM EQUIPMENT DEUTZ 6275 TRAILER 4X4, 75hp, $7,500 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 KUBOTA B7100 With Loader. 4X4, hst. $5,950 Call Alive (813)759-8722 KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 54

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Tel: 813.759.6909

JOBS

MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTOR 1980 Massey Ferguson 230. 34pto hp, power steering. $4,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 14’ Shop built, heavy duty trailer, 2 axel with ramps. $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722. MASSEY FERGUSON 255 Grove Tractor with 6’ mower $7,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722.

NEW HOLLAND TC29 TRACTOR/LOADER 29 pto hp, 268 hrs, $13,000 (UT6406). Ask for David 813-623-3673

ACCOUNT MANAGER Sales, account management. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Email your resume to info@inthefieldmagazine.com

MASSEY FERGUSON 2003 GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $5,350 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 INTERNATIONAL 3444 Diesel tractor w/loader, 3 point lift, pto, runs & works. $3.750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 1984 MASSEY FERGUSON 240 tractor, 42 pto hp, 2wd, works great! $5,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 TRACTOR WANTED Late 1950’s, 125hp Allis Chalmers for Parts. Tires and seats not important, not running ok. Call (863)287-4724 MAHINDRA 5500 Tractor Loader. 55hp 4x4, shuttle trans. 585 hrs. w/ backhoe. Grapple rake. $16,900 Ask for Alvie (813)759-8722 FERGSON T030 Runs good! $1,350 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 GRAVELY 1740 Zero turn mower 40” cut. $1,650 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 HYDRAULIC CATTLE SHOOT Used hydraulic cattle shoot! Many New parts $5,000. Call (863)696-0110 Or (863)287-1011

FOR SALE TRAILER FOR SALE 44X12 single wide trailer in Winters Mobile Home Park. Zephyrhills 5k or best offer. Call (813)967-4515

FARM SUPERVISOR For UF research center in Balm/Wimauma. FT w/benefits. Responsible for operation & supervision of farm-related activities within budget. Maintain field plots/facilities/equip. & spvr field personnel. Must have pest lic. Info call Craig Stanley (813) 633-4117. Apply on line at https://jobs.ufl.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/welco me_css.jsp for job req. #081061. EOE CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com

KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722.

CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau (863) 439-3232

MARCH 2012

info@inthefieldmagazine.com

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Please call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620. 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019. BLAIRSVILLE, GEORGIA MLS#212769 Private home with 3BR, 2.5 baths, unfinished basement, nice kitchen, Sunroom, back deck for cooking out, nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. $180,000. Call Jane Baer w/ Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829 BLAIRSVILLE, GEORGIA MLS#190298 Beautiful RV lot with cement pad, decking includes the 5th wheel. Less than 2 years old! River’s Edge RV Park offers a large clubhouse, stocked lake for fishing, heated and cooled laundry and shower facilities. $69,000 Call Jane Baer w/ Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Polk In The Field magazine  

Agriculture magazine for Polk County, Florida

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