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®

Contents

VOL. 6 • ISSUE 9

POLK COUNTY

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831-9005 OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Cover Story Dusty Holley

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President - Charles Clark (863) 412-8349 cclark@expoco.com Vice President - Dave Tomkow (863) 665-5088 cattlemanslivetock@earthlink.net Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch (863) 425-1121 jbunch@agriumretail.com

Dry Creek – My Rose

Page 5 Rain Barrels – An Old-fangled Idea

Page 10 Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

Page 14 Returning The Blessing

Page 16 Grub Station

Page 18 Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22 Party Until The Cows Come Home

Page 28 Ray Crawford

Page 30 Polk County Sheriff’s Office

Page 34 Is Trich Cutting Into Your Profits?

Al Bellotto - (863) 581-5515 Ray Clark - (863) 683-8196 rclark@tampabay.rr.com L.B. Flanders, DVM - (863) 644-5974 Dewey Fussell - (863) 984-3782 Mike Fussell - (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@verizon.net David McCullers - (863) 528-1195 Moby Persing - (863) 528-4379 Ned Waters - (863) 698-1597 watersn@doacs.state.fl.us J.B. Wynn - (863) 581-3255 jbwynn29@gmail.com Alternate - Howard Yates 2501 Arbuckle Lane Frostproof, FL 33843-9647 Standing Committee Chairs: Membership - J.B. Wynn Events - Kevin Fussell (863) 412-5876 Rodeo - Fred Waters (863) 559-7808 watersf@doacs.state.fl.us Cattlewomen - President Marjorie Wood (863) 660-4137 onnie397@aol.com Extension - Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. - Sgt. Howard Martin

Page 38 Recipes

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UPDATE

ON

DRY CREEK

PRODUCTION

My Rose

By Les McDowell Photos courtesy of Linda Constant

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his has been a busy month at Dry Creek. We are in production of our latest episode called, “My Rose.” It is different than any other Dry Creek episode. For one, it is the most dramatic episode. It deals with lost loves in your life. Everyone who has lived life just a little has dealt with losing someone dear to them. Here’s a few more reasons we are so excited about “My Rose.” Danny Shirley and Confederate Railroad wrote the theme song and perform it. Blue Miller, formerly with The Gibson Miller Band, co-wrote it and also penned a new theme for Dry Creek. Blue is an award winning producer and has many movie scores under his belt. We, at Dry Creek, are very honored to have him do this, It has really been a shot in the arm of Dry Creek. Dry Creek airs on national TV on Blue Highways TV Saturday nights at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Eastern. Blue Highways founder

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Stan Hickcock, who started CMT after watching the day-lees of My Rose, is entering this episode in The Cable Awards in N.Y.C in September. We feel very blessed and thankful to be considered for this prestigious award in the industry. Dry Creek has come a long way but we still have a long way to go to bring back family programing with a heart. A program that the whole family can sit down together and watch. We are so thankful for everyone who has given their most valuable gift, their time to make it happen. Go to Face Book and Dry Creek TV to watch a trailer of My Rose or to Drycreektv.com. In today’s busy world, slow down for 30 minutes and hear that little voice inside you - everybody knows where Dry Creek is.....”cause its inside each and everyone of us.”

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt

No Farmers No Food! These words mean so much and many times it seems that the general public takes for granted that all we have to do is go to the grocery and buy food. It’s that simple to most. When they arrive at the grocery or produce stand, they expect the food they want to be available. Please realize, it takes work for this to happen. The farmers and ranchers put in hours that would amaze most 40 hour a week workers. To put food on the shelves for you to buy, the farmer and rancher puts in hours of blood sweat and tears. And please understand, no one takes care of the land like someone who depends on that land for their livelihood. When you are making your trek to buy food for your family, be sure to look for food that is Fresh From Florida! That way, you can rest assured that you are getting the freshest food grown right here in the Sunshine State. One thing in life is certain, change. It is an inevitable part of our existence. In most circumstances, this change is a great thing! Such as the change that just occurred at In The Field magazine. We have moved! While that was a bit painful in more ways then one, we are now doing business from a new, more visible location. We are excited about the move and look forward to doing business as usual. Come visit us at our new office located at 1501 Alexander Street, Suite 102 in Plant City. Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

EDITOR Patsy Berry OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Amie Facente CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ........................29 Alvin Futch ................................41 Andy Thornal Company ............19 Arrington Body Shop, Inc. .........38 Carlton & Carlton, PA ..............45 Cecil Breeding Farms .................48 Chemical Containers..................36 Circle “R”....................................2 Circle Bar J Feed & Tack...........32 Crescent Jewelers .........................3 Discount Metals.........................40 Ellison RBM Inc. .........................7 Farm Credit ...............................41 Fields Equipment Co. Inc...........13 Florida Farm & Ranch Supply.............................31 Florida’s Natural Growers. ..........3 Fred’s Market.............................41 Grove Equipment-JCB ...............29 Grove Equipment-Mahindra ......17 Helena Chemical-Tampa............40 High Yield Industries .................45 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc. .......36 International Market World.........2 Key Plex.....................................20 Lightsey Cattle Co. ......................7 Mosaic .......................................26 Pathway BioLogic ......................42 Peachee Construction.................35 Plant Food Systems ......................9 Polk County Cattlemen’s Association ...............4 Precision Safe & Lock..................9 Rhino Linings ............................35 Ring Power Corporation............26 Roadrunner Veterinary Clinic ......7 Savich & Lee / Stalnaker............33 Seedway .....................................35 Southeastern Septic, LLC ...........32 Southside Farm & Pet Supply ....15 Southwestern Produce................47 Spurlow’s Outdoor Outfitters ....38 Stephanie Humphrey..................13 Stingray Chevrolet .....................21 The Bug Man.............................31 The Catering Company................3 Wishnatzki Farms ......................23

We’ve Moved!

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Polk County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association & Florida Citrus Mutual. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com, or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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We have moved our main office to better serve you. Our new address is: 1501 S. Alexander Street, Suite 102 • Plant City, Florida 33563 Our phone number is still the same - 813.759.6909 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Ellison RBM Inc. Specializing in Secondary Roads

*

*

• Grove, Ranch & Logging Roads • Built & Maintained • Broken Tile, Crushed Tile, Shell Rock • Fill & Rip Rap • Parking Pads, Grading • Excavating Services – Ponds & Ditches ALL MATERIAL AVAILABLE FOR PICK-UP OR WE CAN DELIVER, SPREAD & COMPACT FOR YOU!

Licensed / Insured

5013 State Rd. 60 East Lake Wales, FL 33859-2422

Office Tel: 863.679.5283 • Fax: 863.679.3244

You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE InTheField® T-Shirt. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

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Winners will be notified by phone.

You Too, Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

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The recent incidence of a confirmed case of BSE in the US was quickly reported by all the different media venues. It appeared that the same video used four years ago resurfaced as the finding was released. It was later explained the lone animal in question was a downer cow sent to a rendering plant and was not presented for slaughter. The Florida Cattlemen’s Association and The Florida Beef Council, working in conjunction with The Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, monitored this “crisis” closely to “respond to media and manage the issue with distribution of factual information.” It was explained that the case was an atypical mutant and did not arise from feeding practices. The above groups acted quickly to disseminate accurate information and minimize damage to our export market. While futures retreated for a day or so it looks like export markets will remain strong. This is an example of one of the many benefits of belonging to your local and state Cattlemen’s Association. They act on your behalf to promote and educate the population about your product in a timely manner.

Charles Clark Charles Clark Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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• The heaviest turkey ever raised weighed 86 pounds, about the size of an average third-grader. • Eating about 20 tart cherries a day could reduce inflammatory pain and headache pain. • About 25% of all iceberg lettuce is made into fresh cut salads. • There are over 500 different types of bananas. That means if you ate a different kind of banana everyday, it would take almost a year and a half to eat every one! • Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites! • The peach is a member of the rose family and will have a sweet fragrance when ripe. • Dried chile pepper wreaths are called “Ristras” - a symbol of plenty and hope. • Some examples of items that come from animals are footballs, crayons, cosmetics, soap, perfume, paint and glue! • A rabbitʼs sensitive ears can be turned in any direction to alert them of danger. • The donkeyʼs characteristic “Eee awe” sound is made by an intake of breath followed instantly by exhalation. • Quinophobia is the fear of horses; alektorophobia is the fear of chickens; and taurophobia is the fear of bulls. There is no official term for the fear of cows or pigs. • Because of the way a cowʼs legs bend, they are incapable of walking downstairs. However, they can walk upstairs.

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Master Gardener

Rain Barrels – An Old-fangled Idea

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hen the Rain Barrel program rolled around last month at MacKay Gardens, we wondered if the drought would keep people away from attending a show on this subject. But there they were, our loyal audience, with their interested, optimistic faces. And then the rains came. My rain gauge read slightly over three inches accumulated in two consecutive weather events. This means that if I had six rain barrels connected together, all barrels would have been filled. A typical ½-inch rainfall will fill a 55-gallon food-grade rain barrel. In our Speaker’s Bureau programs, we teach water conservation and waterfront protection on a regular basis. A rain barrel can save a homeowner at least 1,300 gallons of water in the peak summer months. The beauty of this means that you will not only save water, you’ll save money, conserve energy and protect Florida’s water supply. Landscape irriga-

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tion accounts for about 50% of your total household water usage. Can you believe that? So what we’re saying is that half of the potable water, which you could be using for drinking or cooking, is being broadcast out the end of your sprinkler nozzle. With our sandy soils, much of this goes right through or ends up as evaporation.

By Debra Howell and place snugly in the barrel top. The components of a rainwater collection system are: 1. Catchment area 2. Conveyance system 3. Storage tank (rain barrel or cistern) 4. Filtration

You may purchase a 55-gallon rain barrel for a minimal charge, which will pay for itself in no time. The volume of water collected depends on the duration of the rain event and the size of your catchment area or roof. If you have no gutter and downspout, as is the case with our home, you may situate the rain barrel under the valley of the roof. In this manner, it will be necessary to cut out the top of the barrel cover and replace it with window screen. The screen will keep leaves and insects out of the barrel. If you do have a downspout, you will cut a hole in the barrel top of the same configuration as your downspout

5. Water distribution (spigot and/or hose) *Optional - pond pump for use in storage tank

An awesome rainwater catchment system and collection area is in use at Magnify Credit Union in south Lakeland. They have a very large catchment area routed into the largest rain barrel I’ve ever seen, more like a cistern, really. A catchment area is basically any area that sheds or collects rainwater. A roof is the most commonly used rainwater collection area. Other catchment areas might employ W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


driveways, sidewalks, swales and berms, which may be directed to a storage tank. Select only food-grade (or new) barrels. If you buy used, inquire whether it is food-grade or not, so as not to introduce harsh chemicals into your rainwater. A used barrel may swell a bit like pickles, as they are commonly transported in 55-gallon drums. Take time to rinse your barrel to remove any remnants or residue. Next, install a 3/4-inch hose spigot. You'll need a 15/16-inch drill, routing the hole 4 to 6 inches from the bottom of the barrel. This provides for clearance to attach a hose or to fill a bucket or watering can. You'll also wish to elevate the barrel on cinder blocks, bricks or other such items, to provide more clearance and utilize the properties of gravity. If you use more than one layer of blocks, stack them in a crisscross fashion, making sure the blocks are even and level. Connect the downspout to your barrel. You may need to purchase a flexible downspout extender. The extender eliminates the need for exact measurements because it bends and stretches as needed. Once you've completed your downspout connection, place it in the barrel. You will most likely want to connect an overflow pipe to shunt off excess water, or you may link together multiple barrels. You can link together as many barrels as space will allow, but it's still prudent to install overflow pipe on the last barrel. You may use your rain barrel in areas of your yard where spigot access is limited. Or you might locate it in close proximity to your compost pile, in order to keep your compost moist. You can make a delightful compost tea in your rain barrel by filling an old pillowcase with compost and letting it steep overnight in your barrel. This makes a fine natural fertilizer for your landscape plants. My mother fancies what she calls "Beau Tea." This is a lovely concoction which she brews from rainwater and manure from our horse "Beau." It really works! (Of course, everything works for her). By contacting the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program Coordinator, Anne Yasalonis at the Polk County Extension Office, you may find out more about proper construction and connection of your rain barrel or cistern. By using a rain barrel, you can reduce the amount of water which settles around the foundation of your home, reduce the amount of water which you use which shows up on your water bill, conserve energy and protect Florida's water supply. You will also divert rainwater from storm drains, decreasing the impact of storm water runoff to lakes, ponds and other water bodies. Rain barrels and cisterns have been around for a long time -thousands of years! Harvesting rainwater will allow you, the homeowner, to supplement irrigation at a minimal cost. Isn't it time for you to enjoy the benefits of free water for your planting beds, potted plants, vegetable and flower gardens? Perhaps this old-fangled idea whose time has come will act as an inspiration for you to discover other Florida friendly ways to conserve around your home.

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Photo (from Left to right): Breanna Langley, Eduardo Rivera, Kevin Benitez, Diogenes Abreu

Kathleen FFA Takes Top Honors in Aquaculture

management practices. Additionally, the team is presented with a specific situation they must address in a five to seven minute team presentation. Students are given the problem, a reference and 30 minutes to prepare for the presentation. The event requires students to have a ton of scientific knowledge, technical skills, team working skills and they must be able to think on their feet.

A

Kathleen FFA won the 2012 state contest. Team members were Breanna Langley, Diogenes Abreu, Kevin Benitez and Eduardo Rivera, all students in the aquaculture program. Kevin Benitez, a junior, said, “The contest was more challenging than expected. In class we give presenta-

quaculture in Florida generates over $40 million annually for our state’s economy. The principal crop in Florida is tropical fish. Polk County is home to 19 aquaculture farms according to the Polk Farm Bureau web site and the growth opportunity in this industry is unprecedented. Kathleen High School’s agriculture department is preparing students for careers in this growing field by offering Aquaculture courses. The program is in its second year and enrollment is growing.

tions all the time and I think that definitely helped prepare us for the oral presentation.” As part of their preparation, the team toured local aquaculture farms and worked with Crystal Lake Middle School, who finished third in the middle school division. Team members were Luke Tefoe, Cassie Toner, Kaley May and Garrison Russell. The students will be recognized at the Florida FFA State Convention in Orlando in June. •

The Florida FFA Association recognizes this growing agriculture field and has developed a career development event to challenge students’ skills in aquaculture. The Aquaculture CDE was held Saturday April 21, at the University of Florida’s Veterinarian College. The event requires students to learn over 80 fish species, 120 aquatic plants, water quality parameters, diseases and parasites and production techniques, including tank designs and 12

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Amanda Furmage is from Ohio and currently a student at Southeastern University in Lakeland, where she is a senior majoring in Journalism/Public Relations. She serves as the layout editor of the SEU Times, the university’s news magazine. After graduation, she hopes to work as a writer/copyeditor while improving her graphic design skills... plus, she’s getting married this June. Congratulations to Amanda!

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Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

No More Jaw Breakers by Captain Woody Gore

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any fishing conversations end up with anglers discussing proper fish handling techniques. In addition, while everyone has their own opinion, the question still remains what is the best way to hold a fish while removing a hook or getting a photo. I hope that we will gain some new insight into fish handling and the results from the often-abusive treatment. With today’s amplified emphasis on our environment, many are practicing “catch and release.” While this is a good thing, we must remember that when mishandled from the beginning the good intentions may nevertheless result in a fatality. We have all witnessed television tournament bass anglers one handedly lip a large fish, snatch it from the water with the mouth gapped open wide, supporting its entire weight by the lower lip. Almost every angler has used this method at one time or another, especially when getting that memorable photograph. Even saltwater anglers use this method, especially with species like snook or small tarpon. However many briny deep species have unusually large sets of choppers which certainly tends to discourage such practices. Emulation is often the highest form of flattery and young and upcoming, anglers are looking to be like their fishing idols. Therefore, if for no other reason, we need

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to change our methods of handling fish we intend to release. We have lived in the past for too long and it is time we changed the way we handle fish, stop promoting the wrong methods, and start teaching our next generation of anglers the proper methods of catch and release. Some recent studies are finding that holding and supporting fish by the lower lip without other means of support causes serious injuries often resulting in death. When using the jaw as a handle to move or support the fish’s weight in anything other than a horizontal position, you certainly risk serious damage to tissue or can even break the jaw. We have all been here so let us imagine we are at the dentist with your mouth stretched abnormally wide while they take x-rays. Now imagine the dentist doing the same procedure but this time he is supporting your entire weight from your bottom jaw. Afterwards, and provided you had not killed the dentist, you will be eating soft foods or may be not eating at all. Well the same thing applies to fish. While they cannot kill us, they still end up with damaged tissue, broken bones and often starving to death. If you are one of the environmentally conscious anglers practicing catch and release, you have learned that it is vital to avoid

handling the fish whenever possible. A slimy film covers most fish which helps prevent disease and needless netting or handling removes this protective coating.

Holding a fish by the lower lip is in all probability the best way to remove a hook. However, let us remember we do not need to force the jaws open so wide we cause damage, only wide enough to remove the hook. Anglers around the world use various methods of landing fish. Many use their hands, some use nets, while others use gripping devices. Gripping devices are similar to the lower lip method using your thumb. However, it seems somewhat easier on the fish since it lifts them vertically without the urge to force the mouth open. Once lifted, quickly support the fish with your free hand making sure it is wet. Landing nets have been around for centuries but with more emphasis on catch and release, manufacturers are developing W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


fish friendly nets, if there is such a thing. They have begun using smaller mesh nylon nets coated with rubber that seems to work two fold. It is easier on the protective coating and retards hook fowling. All these are effective, but there is a true fish friendly device invented years ago called a de-hooker, that allows you to release fish without actually touching them.

De-hookers are simple to use. When the fish gets along side the boat, grab the leader placing it into the u-shaped portion of the de-hooker, sliding it down and into the throat of the hook, now keeping the leader taut by pulling on the hook and leader, lift the fish above your hand holding the leader and gently shake the de-hooker. The fish will fall off the hook. After long battles, fish sometimes require extra time to compose themselves and regain their breath. If they need resuscitating, do it gently. Dragging a fish through the water with its mouth open only compounds the process by forcing water into the stomach. However, gently allowing water to flow over the gills will quickly re-oxygenate most fish. Hold the fish upright in the water gently moving it in a forward only motion. Aggressive backwards pulling may cause the delicate gills to bend unnaturally becoming bruised or broken. The fish was an unwilling participant to begin with so remember for the best chance of survival make certain it is ready to go before releasing. All this takes time, a realignment of thinking, habits and a willingness to change our attitude on how we treat these creatures that bring us so much joy.

Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing 813-477-3817 If you want to catch fish, have a memorable adventure or perhaps learning some new fishing tips give me a call. I also specialize in group or multi-boat charters. Tell me what you need and leave the rest to me. Fishing Florida for over 50 years I offer professionally guided fishing and teaching charters around Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Bradenton, Sarasota, and Tarpon Springs. If you’re interested in booking a trip, please visit www.CaptainWoodyGore.com send me an email at wgore@ix.netcom.com or call me at: 813-477-3814.

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By Ginny Mink

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n high school, and sometimes in younger years, people start developing affinities for certain career fields. In general, the majority of them end up changing majors once they hit the college years, but there are a select few who take hold of the dreams of their youth. Greg West is a guy who knew what he wanted at a young age and not only that, he pursued it until it was in his grasp. Greg says, “I originally grew up in the state of Iowa, raised in a very rural background with my three sisters and brother. It was an extremely rural area, mainly row crops and livestock, cattle and hogs. Pigs were the main livestock where I grew up. Even though I grew up in a rural town of about 900 people, I didn’t grow up on a farm. My dad was a high school principal and then a superintendent. He was very much involved in education.” While there’s no doubt his father’s career must have had an impact on him, Greg points out another area of influence, “I was very blessed to go to a school where FFA and agriculture was a big part of the school. I would say my high school agriculture teacher was my main inspiration to continue in agriculture and become a teacher. I was blessed to be part of a really good FFA. From the time I was a freshman or sophomore, my dream was to become an FFA advisor and agriculture teacher. It was a very natural transition for me. Iowa State has one of the top agriculture programs in the nation. I got a degree in agricultural education from Iowa State.” Though he had achieved his goal of receiving a degree that would enable him to teach he explains, “When I graduated, the agriculture economy in the Midwest was in dire straits. I ended up following my sister who 16

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was already in Florida. So, in the late ‘80s my wife and I moved to Polk County and I originally taught at Boone Middle School in Haines City. My intention was to teach in a high school program but I found that wide-eyed new look in the middle schoolers and wound up getting attached to that age group and still am 25 years later and I’ll probably continue to work with that age group.” Greg now works at Crystal Lake Middle School, “I’ve been here since the late 90s,” he says. “I’ve been here for 14 years now. My wife and I ended up buying some property near Lakeland. There wasn’t an Ag program here; it had been closed years earlier. The principal asked me if I’d be interested in coming here and opening back up and restarting the program. Crystal Lake is located in more of a non-traditional, urban area. Most of our students are not farm kids. Very few actually live and work on farms. There were certainly some hurdles; it was actually kind of a challenge.” Nothing good is accomplished without hard work and Greg has learned the value of investing in these non-traditional students. He explains, “We started off with an FFA Chapter of 15-20 kids. We’ve built it to a chapter of approximately 60 members. Our biggest emphasis, by far, is our aquaculture program, which is the raising of fish in a controlled environment. We probably have the most unique program of aquaculture, raising several different kinds of fish. We also raise blueberries. We have about three acres of land attached to the school for agriculture use.” Given the focus on aquaculture, they raise both fresh and saltwater fish: redfish, catfish, bass, tilapia and gar. Their largest tank

is 12,000 gallons and designed for their freshwater fish. “Then we have three tanks that are approximately 1200 gallons each and we have ten tanks that are approximately 220 gallons each,” Greg says. The additional tanks are for brackish water and they house about 400 redfish. Greg says that the big tank is new this year and is home to about 100 fish. He explains the small number thusly, “There’s some catfish that are probably 20 pounds. Some of the fish in there are really large!” Certainly Crystal Lake’s aquaculture program is impressive. Greg says, “Our most proud moment is that we’ve had one of the top aquaculture middle school teams in the state for the last two years.” However, there are other admirable aspects. They’ve had the top nursery and landscaping team in Polk County for the last four years in a row, and that team has also been among the top in the state, this year they finished in third place. In 2010, Greg says, “The Polk County Farm Bureau named Crystal Lake Middle School the Ag program of the year!” Greg gives several people credit for his success, “The principal, Chris Canning, is extremely supportive and active and is always in the middle of our projects. I feel very blessed that he’s allowed us to develop a really good program here. The job here is seven days a week. I’m very blessed. I have two sons and I’ve been married for 27 years. They’ve always been very supportive of the fact that I’ve had to be at work at least part of the day, everyday, including holidays and birthdays. They’ve been very understanding!” Indeed, Greg has lived a blessed life and no doubt his students have been blessed by him. •

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Bar & Grill

by Cheryl Kuck

U

pon receiving a phone call from The Greater Brandon Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Tammy Bracewell to recommend a restaurant, I pay attention. When that restaurant happens to be in the far reaches of Polk County, way out of her own county, I start filling up my gas tank. “We go there all the time,” was enough to get me excited enough to investigate. I can honestly remember gas being 29 centsa-gallon (yes, I really am that old) so that translates to around $20 for a round trip in a non-electric car in the spring of 2012. Taking everything into consideration, that must mean my girlfriend is really, sincerely crazy about The Crazy Fish Restaurant in Lake Wales. As my intrepid food photographer and I are intently scrutinizing our map, citing every turn in unfamiliar areas, we completely miss the road that would take us to the unmistakably blue wood building, almost under the over-pass of Highway 60, just on the outskirts of Lake Wales. After a u-turn, we arrive back at a building that looks like it dropped out of a Beach Boys (when they were young) video, looking out-of-place at the edge of a major state road. The restaurant sign is partially obscured by palm fronds and you can’t help wondering where the surrounding sand disappeared and how far the nearest body of water might be. After opening the front door, there may be another attack of déjà vu as you begin to feel you have either entered the twilight zone or a Frankie Avalon-Annette Funicello (circa 1960) beach party movie. The décor, in all of its colorful splendor, could be described as beachy shabby chic. There are sea shells and orchid plants everywhere and oh yes, varieties of crazily painted and mounted fish (both real and replicas). Tropical folk art resides with hanging Tiffany-esque lamps and starfish. Before you realize what is happening, the

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genuineness and warmth of owners Jim and Jean Christensen envelope you as you are greeted and introduced to all the family members and friends who work together making Crazy Fish the 11-year wonder that it is. Daughter Ali is the day manager, while son in-law Steve Maxwell is the chef who cooks up amazing cuisine in a miniscule 11-foot kitchen. Grandkids, Colby and Skye are busy busing and seating customers. If not related, everyone else is a close second family. Jim says, “In this crowd, I can just keep moving, that way no one can give me a job.” The bonds of love, respect and camaraderie are easy to see, reaching out to make strangers feel a welcome part of it all. While being regaled with reminisces of the Christensen’s 18 years of living in Alaska and swapping tall tales with my photographer, another fisherman and globe-trotter, we somehow manage to get down to the business of food. This is when you realize you are sitting at a table in an award-winning restaurant where food is the main event and seafood the star. Anyone can go to the bamboo-fronted bar and see whole fresh fish being filleted with great skill and prepared for serving. The display and varieties of fresh fish can include Yellow Fin Tuna, Atlantic Salmon, Pompano, Swordfish, Chilean Sea Bass, Wahoo, Cobia, Grouper, Red Snapper and Mahi Mahi. Shellfish served daily are shrimp, clams, mussels, soft shell crab. Calamari and octopus are also menu staples. We were served great tender, yet crispy coconut shrimp with a mango salsa. Loved the salsa and was intrigued to discover that there is a secret dedicated saucier (a chef responsible for making sauces and mainstay ingredients) in the house creating some of the most delightfully surprising and unusual accompaniments to each dish. When expressing an interest in the sauces, a signature Key Lime dipping sauce was

brought for sampling. Mayonnaise, Key Lime juice, honey and red pepper flakes meld to make something far superior to any tartar sauce. Tender morsels of sautéed scallops, butterflied shrimp, and calamari adorned my Ultimate Seafood Salad that also had an original lightly spicy sweet and sour sauce that served as a wonderful replacement for the normal red-style shrimp sauce with horseradish. It is always good to know that produce is purchased and personally selected locally guaranteeing quality and freshness. However, when told we were to try some of their specialty vegetable, deep-fried spinach with sea salt, I admittedly looked askance at the crackling dark green stuff on my plate. “Try it you’ll like it,” goaded Jim. “Folks come here just to eat this.” He, surprisingly, made a believer out of me. None of the quality of food could adequately prepare us for their four ounce blue crab cakes with more of that gorgeous lime dipping sauce. If I could give those crab cakes a rating, it would be 10 stars! They are almost completely blue crab, not held together with fillers, just bursting with flavor. A treat I’ve never discovered elsewhere, taking me to a place best described as crab nirvana. They do have food for landlubbers that is undoubtedly very good but, really, why would you want to when the seafood is so superlative? Thanks to Tammy, my new resolution is to always be sure my tank is filled with enough gas to be ready and able to immediately succumb when future over-whelming and irresistible Crazy Fish crab cake urges occur…or if I just need to be in a happy place. • Crazy Fish Bar & Grill Phone: (863) 676-6361 Hours: Open Mon. from 4 - 9 pm. Tues. – Sat. 11:30 am – 9 pm. Closed Sun. www.crazyfishlakewales.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Kathleen FFA Highlight

RLISA

ANGFORD

By Kyle Carlton

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isa Langford is a fourth year agriculture student at Kathleen Sr. She first took my class as a tenth grader and did not appear to fit the traditional agriculture student stereotype. Risa had long, dyed black hair with a pair of intimidating hoop lip rings evenly spaced in her bottom lip. She seldom said a word, seeming content to be left alone, but she had a difficult time hiding the fact that she was very intelligent. Once, I gave a particularly difficult animal science test to both animal science classes and out of about 50 students only one earned an “A.” The one student was Risa. Not only did she earn an “A,” she got 100 percent of the questions correct in addition to acing both bonus questions. I did not fail to notice that we had a talented student on our hands and I tried to get her interested in participating in FFA. When I asked Risa about her exceptional performance on that particular test, she replied, “I am a good guesser.” Soon after “the test,” Ms. Hall, the Kathleen FFA Advisor who coaches the citrus team, needed another talented team member to complete her team that was preparing to compete in the Florida FFA Citrus Career Development Event. I suggested to Risa that she attend a practice and give citrus a shot. She and Ms. Hall hit it off. We both realized that Risa had a dry sense of humor as well as a quiet and competitive nature. She was an integral part of the KHS 2010 state winning citrus team. Risa also excelled with her Hampshire market hog projects at the state fair in both 2011 and 2012. In 2012, she and her hog Orpheus, were awarded the Reserve Grand Champion in the light weight division. The hog performed excellent in showmanship as well, which is evidence of the tireless effort Risa spent training him — she could guide him all over campus with her crop. Recently, Risa became the leader of the first poultry team from Kathleen to participate in the state poultry judging CDE in well over a decade. Team members quit, mostly due to schedule conflicts with the contest date or the intense fear of presenting oral reasons. Risa, also terrified of presenting oral reasons, remained and recruited three other students to join her team. We were not taking an incomplete team all the way to Gainesville on a Saturday. Risa prepared herself and overcame the anxiety of delivering oral reasons to a stranger about a class of laying hens and emerged as the high individual in the 2012, Florida State FFA Poultry CDE and led her team to a third place finish. Risa is extremely interested in marine life and aspires to become a biologist. However, a career as a veterinarian is almost equally alluring to her as she loves and respects animals of all shapes and sizes. Regardless of what career path she eventually chooses, she has the intellect and personality to be successful and have a positive impact on all those in her presence. •

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GM IS PROUD TO PARTNER WITH FARM BUREAU速 TO BRING YOU THIS VALUABLE OFFER1. Farm Bureau members can get a $5001 private offer toward the purchase or lease of most new GM vehicles, including the Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD lineup. Visit fbverify.com for more details. They get tough jobs done with a maximum payload of up to 6,635 lbs.2 and a conventional towing capacity of up to 17,000 lbs.3 And through the GM Business Choice Program4, business owners receive even more when purchasing or leasing an eligible Chevrolet or GMC truck or van for business use. Visit gmbusinesschoice.com for details. 1Offer valid toward the purchase of new 2011 and 2012 Buick, Chevrolet and GMC models, excluding Chevrolet Volt. 2Requires Regular Cab model and gas engine. Maximum payload capacity includes weight of driver, passengers, optional equipment and cargo. 3Requires available 6.6L Duramax速 diesel engine. Maximum trailer ratings assume a properly-equipped base vehicle plus drive. See dealer for details. 4To qualify, vehicles must be used in the day-to-day operation of the business and not solely for transportation purposes. Must provide proof of business. This program may not be compatible with other offers or incentive programs. Consult your local Chevrolet or GMC dealer or visit gmbusinesschoice.com for program compatibility and other restrictions. Take delivery by 9/30/2012. Farm Bureau and the American Farm Bureau Federation速 are registered service marks owned by the American Farm Bureau Federation, and are used herein (or by GM) under license. 息2011 General Motors LLC

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few months back I was sit’n in a rocker on the back porch watch’n the sunset below the Blue Ridge Mountains at our place in Blairsville, Georgia when the phone rang. Patsy, my wife, answered it inside where she was watching Lizard Lick on TV. It was Linda Connell. Linda and Jim have a nice place just outside of Blairsville with a grand view of the mountains, too.

order me a good southern breakfast, but just what in the world is that white mush looking stuff?”

“Patsy,” Linda said, “Would you and Al like to meet us around 8:30 tomorrow morning for breakfast at the Hole-In-TheWall restaurant around the square in downtown Blairsville?” Patsy replied, “Sounds like fun, we’ll see you there!”

“Do you live up here?” she asked.

A

We pulled up about the same time and went inside. There was only one table left. This is a very popular restaurant for locals. I learned a long time ago if you want good food – eat where the locals eat. We placed our orders and sipped on good mountain made coffee served by a sweet little lady that had to be from Blairsville, as her accent was a dead give away. “Ya’ll enjoy your coffee while they cook up every thing good’n fresh, ya hear? I’ll be back in a jiffy to give you a refill.” Seated at the next table were two nicely dressed couples. I figured right away they were Yankees down here to check out the south. One lady had a fluffy hairdo that ended up with a bun on the top that was fit for a ten-day tent revival, and the other with enough makeup up on to put Tammy Faye Baker to shame. The waitress brought them their order and said, “Now if there’s anything else ya’ll need just give me a hollar, ya-hear?” The lady with the cup-cake makeup looked at her plate and then jumped her husband. “Now Robert, I told you to 22

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“Honey, that’s what the southerners call grits. Try it, you might like it,” he said. Being neighborly, I spoke up and introduced myself, Patsy, Jim and Linda. “Nice to meet you people.”

“Yes, we are southerners from Florida, but we have a home here in Blairsville, too. You know, I couldn’t help from over hearing your husband’s comment on the grits. (I figured this would be a good time to give them an education on grits) He’s right! Grits are the next best thing to gourmet dining in the south.” Jim picked on what I was doing and said, “Grits are known as manna from Heaven. Some Southern Baptist’s believes grits are what God fed the Israelites during their time in the Sinai desert.” Patsy and Linda encouraged her to give it a try with a little salt and butter. Being nice she said, “I think I could learn to cultivate a taste for it. Tell me, what are grits made of?” she said. Knowing I would most likely never see them again I poured it on. “The truth of the matter is, grits come from a plant similar to a tomato. You can buy some grit plants at the local Ace Hardware just a few miles down the road. They sell’m by the dozen – complete with grits fertilizer, stakes, string and plastic.” “Stakes, string and plastic. What’s that for?” She asked. “You take the stakes and put them next to the growing grit plant, then run the string from one end of plants to the other, loop-

ing it around each stake. Then when the grit is ready to harvest you put the plastic on the ground below the plant and jerk the string. The grits fall on the plastic and you scoop them up! Another way to pick grits is to buy a grits picker. Ace Hardware has them to, but they are expensive. You’ll find them in the fertilizer section of the store. Grits grow pretty fast, and you’ll have fun watch’n ‘em grow! Real simple. Anybody can do it,” I said. They seemed okay with my story and left the Hole In The Wall restaurant with a full stomach and a smile on their face. “You should be ashamed,” Patsy said. “Not really,” I replied. “There are too many northerners walking around in a daze not knowing anything about grits and how great it is to be a southerner. If they are moving south they need to get an education on southern living. You know, I could have told her about archeologists finding, in an ancient city in Greece, the diary of a woman named Madamusiculin Herousis (Paula Dean to her friends) who wrote about serving grits to King Tut.” I was brought up on grits, and still love’m today. Mama could work miracles with left over grits. She would take the leftover grits, spread them into the bottom of dish, cover them up, and place them in the refrigerator over night. The next morning she would cut the grits into small one inch squares. Dump them into cooking oil and let them cook until they were golden brown. Talk about something good. Man, McDonald’s McNuggets can’t hold a candle to them. Give me grits, some big homemade cat head biscuits, red eye gravy and sugar cured ham, and I’m as happy as a kid with an RC Cola and moon pie at the country store. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Let me close with my continuing education for northerners with the TEN COMMANDMENTS OF GRITS: 1. THOU SHALT NOT EAT THY GRITS WITH A SPOON. 2. THOU SHALT NOT PUT SYRUP ON THY GRITS. 3. THOU SHALT NEVER PUT SUGAR ON THY GRITS. 4. THOU SHALT NEVER EAT CREAM OF WHEAT AND CALL IT GRITS. 5. THOU SHALT USE ONLY BUTTER AND CHEESE AS TOPPINGS FOR THY GRITS. 6. THOU SHALT NOT EAT INSTANT GRITS. 7. THOU SHALT NOT EAT INSTANT GRITS. 8. THOU SHALT NOT EAT INSTANT GRITS. 9. THOU SHALT NOT EAT INSTANT GRITS. 10. THOU SHALT NOT EAT INSTANT GRITS.

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Ambition’s Portrait Dusty Holley

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he Florida Cattlemen’s Association is a well known entity among those involved in agriculture. Recently though, they have added a new member to their ever-impressive team. Dusty Holley is the new Field Services Director and he’s a man with quite an interesting story. In a state where native is loosely applied due to the number of transplants, it’s unusual to find someone with a long history herein. Dusty explains, “I’m actually a seventh generation Floridian on both sides of my family. My mother’s family has been here since the 1820s. They came down during the First Seminole War with Andrew Jackson and didn’t really leave. They homesteaded up in North Florida and we had cattle all over the state. They had a homestead in Osceola County by the 1860s, but also one still in North Florida. During the battle of Olustee, the only significant land battle, the Yankees took over the family’s plantation and used it as their hospital. From then on, most of the men in the family were serving in the cow cavalry and their job was to drive the cattle and supply the Confederate army with beef.” After the loss of the plantation, Dusty adds, “Some of the family that was still in

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North Florida came down to the place we have in Central Florida and that side of the family has been in Florida ever since. We have a pretty colorful history. That’s my mom’s side of the family. My dad’s side has been in Central Florida for a long, long time, at least seven generations, but I don’t know as much about them. Obviously my family’s been very involved in the cattle business in Florida for a long, long time.” Flash forward about a hundred years and we find, according to Dusty’s recollection, “In the ‘60s is when my grandfather bought our place in Polk and moved from Osceola to what I consider the home ranch. My generation is the first to grow up our whole lives with the Polk City ranch being our home. That tradition continues. I have nieces and nephews who are eighth generation Floridians.” Having already pointed out the fact that his family has been involved in the cattle business for quite some time, he elaborates, “I was pretty lucky, my grandfather Holley, on my dad’s side, was a very respected herdsman in the purebred side, Brahman’s and Santa Gertrudis (it’s a breed developed by King Ranch in Texas). My granddaddy Sullivan, on my mom’s

By Ginny Mink side, is a very well respected commercial cattleman and was a highly respected gamewarden for years. I got to see both sides growing up, the purebred and commercial.” When questioned about his family’s current operations he says, “Asking a cattleman how much land or how many cows he has is like asking him how much money he’s got in the bank,” he laughs and then reveals, “We own the ranch in Polk City and we own a farm in Georgia where we grow cotton and peanuts. We also lease a lot of land that we put cattle on.” Given his family lineage, it is no surprise that Dusty was actively involved in both FFA and 4H as a young man. He says, “I showed purebred cattle across the Southeast and was in 4H and then when I was in middle school and high school I got very involved in FFA. I was always an officer, so eighth grade through my senior year I was an officer in my chapter. From eighth grade through my senior year I was also Sub-district Chairman.” As if all those achievements aren’t impressive enough, he continues, “My sophomore, junior and senior year I was a Polk County Federation Officer and either W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


District Secretary or District President. My junior year and senior year, I was a National Delegate and then right after I graduated I was Area IV State Vice President and State Secretary. That year I was Chairman of the Public Relations Committee at the National level. I was an area winner for State Star Greenhand, a finalist for State Star Farmer. I won a bunch of chapter and county awards. I was on a whole bunch of teams, pretty much everything you can do. I was very active in all the judging teams and speaking contests.”

“Asking a cattleman how much land or how many cows he has is like asking him how much money he’s got in the bank.” He spent a year after high school serving as a State FFA Officer and when that time was over he says, “I started at Polk Community College, which is now Polk State. At that time I planned on majoring in Ag education. So my A.A. is in education. I stayed at Polk Community College longer that you’re supposed to. I took a full load, I never failed a class, I never dropped a class. I didn’t want to leave my granddaddy on the ranch alone so I kept taking classes, but eventually they told me I had to graduate,” he chuckles and adds, “so I left a 60 credit institution with 100 credits.” Incredibly, while helping his granddaddy on the ranch and taking a full load of college courses, he says, “During that time I also day-worked for cattle ranches across the state. I’ve always thought it was important to experience how people do different things on their ranches.” This is a man driven to work hard and excel in the midst of trying times. Eventually though, he had to move on. Thusly he went to the University of Florida. He explains, “When I started at UF I was still Ag Ed, but that lasted just a few weeks. I walked in my advisor’s office and he knew it before I did, that I was going to switch to animal science. He had the paperwork ready so I just signed my name and changed majors. That started my studies in animal science. I rushed and was initiated into Alpha Gamma Rho, that’s a social, professional fraternity. You have to be involved in agriculture to be a brother in Alpha Gamma Rho.” He then lists some other members, Adam Putnam, Doyle Conner and Charlie Bronson. His fraternal dedication is obvious, “I was an officer in AGR for two years.” AGR is certainly an important aspect of his college experience, but there’s oh so much more. He continues, “I was on the University of Florida’s Livestock and Meat Evaluation Team. I was also involved in Block and Bridle cattlemen’s. I worked in the University of Florida’s meat lab, which is the USDA inspected livestock processing facility, for a year. Then the rest of the time I worked for Dr. Roger West, who is a native of Homeland, and a retired animal science professor and he has a cattle ranch. He’s also a past Florida Cattlemen’s Association President.” Dusty got his BS in animal science with a beef industry option and a minor in food and resource economics, which he explains, is basically Ag economics. He excelled at UF too, graduating Summa Cum Laude and then he started graduate school. He says, “I studied ruminant nutrition which is nutrition of cattle, but really anything with a four chamber stomach: goats, deer, sheep, camels and elephants,” he laughs. “But really I studied cows.” ... continue on page 27 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Holley at the Central Florida Fair Ranch Rodeo

Graduate school didn’t hinder Dusty’s extracurricular endeavors a bit. He says, “While in grad school I was the President of the Animal Science Graduate Student Association. I was an assistant coach of the livestock and meat evaluation teams. I was a T.A. in some of the animal science classes. I gave some lectures, helped teach some classes. I was also inducted into Florida Blue Key, which is the highest leadership honor at the University of Florida.” Upon graduation, Dusty says he moved to South Georgia where he lived on the family farm there. While there he says, “I helped a former professor of mine who’s the Dean at ABAC (Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College) facilitate a bio-fuels grant for the University of Georgia and ABAC.” Somehow, in the midst of the bio-fuels grant work, Dusty traveled down a different road, one that led him into the political arena. He explains, “I got the opportunity to go to work in Washington, DC as a senior legislative assistant for Congressman Tim Mahoney. I did all of his agriculture committee work. He was defeated at the end of the 110th Congress. I decided to find more employment in DC. It was the first time since the 70s that there was not a member of Congress from Florida on the agriculture committee, so I went to work for Congressman Larry Kissell from North Carolina’s 8th District. I handled all his Ag committee work. I eventually rose to the position of senior policy advisor up until February of this year. All in all I spent four years working in DC for members of Congress/House Representatives.”

WRCA Ranch Rodeo

Thankfully, Dusty understood the ramifications of this venture. He adds, “When I moved to DC I wanted to stay two to five years. I thought it’d take at least two years to get in the swing, to become a player in the game. I didn’t want to stay more than five because then I’d just have to make a career out of it.” Politics is definitely a controversial career choice. Incredibly he explains, “The Florida Cattlemen’s came up with this position and I went to interviews and they hired me to come back home.” This brings us full circle back to Dusty’s current position. “I started March 5. My title is Field Services Director. I’m Jim Handley’s understudy. I’m here to do anything and everything that needs to be done. I handle things around the office. I travel the countryside meeting with our members, helping them with anything they need whether it’s at the county association level or individual level. Part of my job is member development, facilitating our quarterly meetings, the annual convention, helping out the Board of Directors and Executive Board. I help secure money for the Cattlemen’s Association and the Cattlemen’s Foundation. I help advocate for cattlemen at the state level in Tallahassee and in Washington, DC.”

Marking Ears

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While it seems Dusty is a very career oriented man, he also takes time out for fun. He concludes, “I like to hunt and fish. I’m still very heavily involved in my family’s operations. We do ranch rodeos, Sullivan Ranch Family Team. We just won the Central Florida Fair’s Invitational Ranch Rodeo in Orlando, which qualifies us for the state rodeos. We were 3rd Place in the Florida Qualifier for the Working Ranch Cowboy’s Association (WRCA). They host the world finals in Amarillo.” Dusty reveals that he’s single. He says, “I haven’t found anyone to put up with me long enough yet,” he laughs and adds, “I’m pretty picky though too.” Given his ambition and long list of achievements, it’s only a matter of time before some lucky woman snatches him up. • INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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By Libby Hopkins

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hen you think of the word, “agriculture,” you don’t associate it with art or high fashion. You envision farms, gardens, livestock and chickens. Platform Art of Lakeland is determined to change how we envision agriculture. They see it as one big art party. Art in AgriCulture was the theme of their 19th art party held April 28 of this year. The party was held in downtown Lakeland and went from the Orange Street Bridge to St. Joseph’s Catholic Church on 210 West Lemon St., which is about five blocks. The event was a progressive art party of visual art, short films, fashion, sound and performance with a focus on Polk County’s agriculture heritage. There is a belief that agriculture cannot exist in urban areas, but the event changed many of the attendee’s minds. The party was a celebration in conjunction with the unveiling of a ceramic tile mural that was installed on the Orange Street Bridge connecting the Lakeland Center with downtown Lakeland. The mural serves as a celebration of the county’s agricultural history. In addition to the mural, a community garden on the corner of New York Avenue and Orange Street was dedicated as well. After the dedication, Lady Godiva led the crowd back to St. Joseph’s Catholic Church pavilion to party until the cows came home. Partygoers were entertained by square dancers and live music. They were treated to a “Green Acres” themed fashion show. Platform Art was founded in 2003 after former executive director, Ann Wilson, took a trip to San Francisco and attend a

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similar type of art party. She thought it was fabulous and decided to start her own art parties in Lakeland. The elements of art, film, fashion, sound and performance are present at every party. The parties are never held in the same place and they are usually held in urban areas that are vacant. They fill these unused buildings with life for a few days. Bev Hendricks, program coordinator for Platform Art, said that’s the fun part of the parties, you never know where they will be held. “We started having parties anywhere we could find, any place we could get rent free and available for a few days, so we could move in and move out,” Hendricks said. The goal of the parties is to get people to experience art. “A lot of people are not interested in going to a museum or a symphony,” Hendricks said, “It’s a way to get people to see art in a fun way.” Cynthia Haffey, Executive Director of Platform Art, put together a focus group to talk about urban agriculture. The City of Lakeland approached Haffey about joining forces with the art group to create a work of art that represents Polk County. “We live in Polk County and agriculture has an impact on the county and our heritage,” Haffey said. The focus group came up with the idea to create the mural and garden, as well as having the art party to celebrate the whole event. They commissioned Charlie Parker, a ceramic artist from St. Petersburg, to create the mural. Parker enlisted artist, Beate Marston, to help him. “In planning the design for the bridge mural, I wanted it to

be something that the people of Lakeland could recognize and relate to but that would also entice visitors to explore the city and its surrounding,” Martston said. Platform Art put out a call to artists in late January of this year to get them to submit agriculture themed pieces. One of the artists who answered this call was Kelly Sturhahn. She is an art professor at Florida Southern College and she submitted multiple pieces. Although her work was not inspired by agriculture, it was inspired by nature. “Nature and the cycles of life seem to be at the heart of agriculture,” Sturhahn said. “As a theme, agriculture is quite interesting in that it can really tie into a lot of ideas that may be artistically expressed in any number of mediums.” The art group continues to evolve and take on new community projects. “We do this basically because we have a passion for the cultural arts and the community,” Haffey said. “We are now getting to the point where we can leave something behind.” For more information about Platform Art, you can visit them on the web at

www.platformart.org Pictured Above: Art Party Flyer: “Platform Art Party #19 is a progressive art party of visual art, short film, sound and performance with a focus on Polk County’s agricultural heritage.” Cow Head Art: “Artist Beate Marston created a series of masks, this one makes reference to a quote attributed to Mahatma Gandhi, that the cow is second mother to millions of mankind because not only does she give milk but she also makes agriculture possible.” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Ray was initially an Ag teacher his first seven years out of college. “I taught at DeLand Senior High School and was chairman of the five-teacher Ag Department,” he said. Though he enjoyed his work at the high school, he recalls meeting Farm Bureau Field Staffer Dennis Emerson and “was really impressed with his enthusiasm for Agriculture and doing positive things to help the industry. I think if given the opportunity, I’d like to do that,” he recalls. Ray’s good friend Joe Kight, who headed up the Young Farmer and Rancher program for Farm Bureau, called Ray some time later and suggested that Ray apply for a field director position opening. He did and was hired by then Field Services Director Whit Goolsby and he moved to south Florida. Ray and Lynn missed north central Florida and Ray told the Field Services Director Al French, if there was a chance to move back north, he would like to be considered and he was, two years after joining Farm Bureau. The Crawford’s moved to a 20-acre home near Bushnell and he began his initial run with District 5 until 2002 when he became Field Services Director. The Crawford’s have two grown children, Jennifer Lynn and Chad.

“Time is Right for Another to Have This Wonderful Opportunity” By Jim Frankowiak

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lorida Farm Bureau Senior Assistant Director of Field Services Ray Crawford is retiring after almost 34 years of dedicated service to the federation and its members. “Ray’s retirement is a tremendous loss for our organization,” said Farm Bureau President John Hoblick who has known and worked with Ray since 1986. “We have eight districts in Florida and each has a field man serving as an important link between Gainesville and county Farm Bureaus,” said Hoblick. “Each field man has his own unique strengths. Ray has always been a valued Farm Bureau employee. I will miss his service. He has given many good years to the organization and the people it represents.” “Ray has continually exhibited the ability to effectively communicate our state programs to the county level, securing their enthusiastic involvement and support,” said Hoblick. “He has also been an excellent link between the counties in his district and Gainesville, helping us to understand the local Farm Bureau issues, concerns and what we must do to help.” “I know that I speak on behalf of all of us at the Federation who wish Ray and Lynn a great retirement that will allow them to do the things they weren’t able to do because of Ray’s dedication to his work.” For the last five years, Ray has served District 5, which comprises Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk and Sumter counties. For the five years prior to that he was statewide Director of Field Services, overseeing the field men across Florida. Before the statewide position he was assigned to District 5. His initial assignment with Farm Bureau was District 8 along the southeastern coast of the state often referred to as the Gold Coast.

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“I have loved my job and honestly feel I could work forever, but it’s time for someone younger to have the opportunity to do this,” he said. “I do plan to stay involved with the Sumter County Farm Bureau and would like to serve on the board if given the opportunity,” said Crawford. “I also will continue to work with the Sumter County Ag Alliance. That’s a group formed by Dale McClellan and Larry Rooks several years ago. It presents the different aspects of agriculture in the area and presents a unified voice,” he said. “I also intend to continue serving the Extension Advisory Council.” Ray’s departure is not without some regrets. “I heard somewhere that an estimated 80 percent of the people don’t have fun with their jobs. That’s really too bad. I have thoroughly enjoyed my work and have been blessed to have fun all of these years,” he said. “I am going to truly miss the interaction I have had with people working on projects that impact Agriculture in a positive way,” he said. “I have enjoyed working with our elected officials and helping them understand the importance of agriculture so they can make truly informed decisions. And I am going to miss those special people in each of the counties I served who gladly and continually stepped up to do the important things that had to get done to help Agriculture. There are a ton of them.” Ray’s fans are legion. One of them is Ron O’Connor, Director of Marketing and Governmental Affairs for Farm Credit of Central Florida. “Ray and I have been friends and colleagues for about 20 years. He is a tireless promoter of Farm Bureau and Florida agriculture. In fact, he attends so many meetings I am certain he has been cloned! But truthfully, if you need something done, Ray Crawford will not only accomplish the task, he will do it with a smile and you can rest assured it will be done right.” “It has been said, everyone makes a positive impression; some when they enter a room, others when they leave. Ray Crawford is one of those people who illuminates a room with his positive attitude, warm, friendly demeanor, and the ability to make strangers friends in the blink of an eye. He will be sorely missed, but deserves to have a long and happy retirement.” State Farm Bureau Director Ron Wetherington, who represents Hillsborough, Manatee and Pinellas counties, echoed those comments. “I admire Ray’s skills as a field man and the mentoring has W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


provided for his younger colleagues,” said Wetherington. “I will miss him, but he truly deserves his retirement. I have known Ray for more than 25 years and count him as a great friend. He has always gone beyond the call of duty and he has done that with a smile and excellent rapport with everyone he comes in contact with.” “Many people don’t know that Ray has nominated at least five, if not more, winners of the Outstanding Agriculturist of the Year honors at the Southeast Ag Expo. He knows his business and he knows it very well,” said Wetherington. ROY DAVIS

WITH

RAY

“Ray has been a great inspiration to me and many others,” said Hillsborough County Farm Bureau President Danny Aprile. “He is the person that influenced me the most to take the president’s position here in Hillsborough County. He has been a great friend and the best field man ever, always doing his job to the fullest.” “To put it simply, it doesn’t get any better than Ray. His shoes are going to be hard to fill. I wish Ray and Lynn the best years of their lives in retirement,” said Aprile. Judi Whitson, Executive Director of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, readily attests to Ray’s mentoring skills. “When I started with Farm Bureau many years ago, I don’t know what I would have done without Ray,” she said. “He basically took me under his wing and taught me what I needed to know about the organization

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RAY

WITH

FRIENDS

and the industry. Ray gave me the tools to succeed. He has always been an inspiration for me and a shingling light for agriculture.” “Ray has been a tremendous supporter of our Youth Programs here at the Florida State Fair,” noted Vina Jean Banks, Director of Agribusiness for the Florida State Fair Authority. “He has served on our Youth Steer Committee for many, many years and he is a true asset to the committee. From helping to work the steers at our steer work day in the heat of August to assisting at the Fair during the show, Ray is always willing to help in any capacity we may ask. Even though he is retiring from Florida Farm Bureau we sincerely hope he is not retiring from the Florida State Fair! We wish him a wonderful retirement,” said Banks. In addition to continued involvement with agriculture, there are a number of other plans Ray has for his retirement. “There’s quite a bit of farm equipment at my place that needs some TLC. I have a 1988 Mustang that I am restoring and if I do a good enough job on it, I will get to work on totally rebuilding my 1950 Chevrolet pickup,” said Crawford. Ray also organizes monthly horseback rides and will continue to do so. “We get anywhere from 15 to 27 riders and have a good time. I also plan to work my horses, raise calves and spend time with my 10-year-old grandson,

Evan Bass, plus some hunting and other outdoor activities.” Ray has been known to have some secrets over the years and one of them involves a motorcycle which we believe will become part of his increased outdoor activities. One other consideration that has been of the utmost importance over the years has been the support of Ray’s wife. “Lynn has supported me throughout my entire career. None of what I have been able to do would have happened without her backing,” said Crawford. “When I decided to return to the field after working in Gainesville for five years, that was a big decision with some serious financial considerations. Lynn told me the move would make her one happy person. She has always understood my passion and fully supported me and for that I am most grateful.” Thanks Ray for a great run and the very best to you and Lynn in the future. •

DR. MARSHALL

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GALVANIZING

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he American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) has established classes of zinc coating for steel wire. There are four types of galvanizing on most common field, horse, goat and chain link fence that we stock. Commerical or regular galvanizing is the least protected. It is not a good fit in the state of Florida (We do not stock this wire) Class I has a light zinc coating. It can be a good fit in some parts of the country or where long term use is not the purpose. Class 3 wire has two and a half times more zinc coating than Class I. It is the preferred coating in most installments because of the extended life. Class 4 is most common in chain link fence. Wire gauge is also a determining factor in wire corrosion. The chart below shows wire size, climate conditions, gauge size and the number of years of service for Class I and Class 3 wire.

CLIMATIC CONDITION Wire Size

9 11 12 1/2 14 1/2

Dry 1 15 11 11 7

3 30 30 30 23

Humid Class 1 3 8 13 6 13 6 13 5 10

Coastal and Industrial 1 3 3 6 2 6 2 6 11/2 41/2

The S Knot design uses a separate piece of wire to attach the line wire to solid stay wire. Our non-climb and sheep and goat wire use this knot. The Fixed knot (Staylock) adds a third knot wire that is twisted around the vertical and horizontal wires under pressure, locking them tight. This knot provides far greater vertical and horizontal holding strength. In the future we will stock fixed joint field fence. The advantage of this wire is that it keeps the same shape after intense hitting by animals. It also will have a class 3 coating for longer life. Fixed knot fencing is more expensive than standard field fence, but with post spacing 20 – 25 feet on center (instead of 8 – 10 feet) the installed price runs about 20 percent less versus a conventional field fence and you’ve got a superior fence that is easier to install and maintain for less money. We will have this wire in inventory after July 4. When buying farm fence always look at the tag to see if you are getting Class I or Class 3 wire, and what is the tensile strength of the wire. If the tag is missing, it might have been pulled. Sometimes wire is purchased because of the manufacture. Look at the tag-make sure it is Class 3 wire high tensile is even better. Painting the top of wire does not give the wire more galvanizing. You might be surprised at what you’ve been buying.

WIRE FENCE

TENSILE STRENGTH There are three tensile strengths in ranch wire stocked in most stores, low tensile (low carbon) with a 60,000 pound PSI, medium tensile has a 125,000 PSI. High ensile wire has a 175,000 PSI. When installed properly, high tensile wire will stay tight for years, using fewer posts and less labor. We stock all three tensile strengths.

KNOTS There are basically three types of knots in farm fence. Hinge joint is the most common in farm fencing. The knot is formed by wrapping the vertical stay wire around the line wire at each intersection. The hinge joint is the most economical knot. All of the field fence that we stock has a hinge joint.

1047-330’ Field Fence 14ga CL3.............$115.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL1............139.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL3 LOW CARBON ............$139.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL3 HIGH TENSILE ............$155.00 Barb Wire 15½ CL3 Gauge .......................$35.00 Barb Wire 12½ GA CL3 ............................$65.00 Barb Wire 15½ GA 3” spacing .................$49.00 100’x4’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$125.00 100’x5’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$149.00 200’x4’ CL1 no climb horse wire ............$199.00 200’x4’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$229.00 100’x4’ CL1 4 X 4 goat wire ....................$75.00 330’x4’ CL1 4 X 4 goat wire ..................$239.00 5’x16’ Horse Panel 6GA 2x4....................$59.00 50”x16’ 10 Line Panel 4GA .....................$22.00 39” Field Fence 12½ga 330’...................$112.00 Barbless Wire 12½ga 1320’.....................$54.00 Barbless Wire 14ga 1320’ ........................$35.00 Smooth Wire 9ga 140’ .............................$11.95 Smooth Wire 12½ga 210’ ........................$12.50 Fence Stays 100 pair 42” ........................$46.00 Staples 1¼-1½-1¾ 50# ............................$49.00 In the future, please continue to follow us on the web and look for our specials on Facebook.

Ph: (813) 620-3006 • 6902 Causeway Blvd, Tampa • www.Fencing-Farm-Ranch.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Polk County Sheriff’s Office Special Operations

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n Thursday, April 26, 2012, Polk County Sheriff’s Office Special Operation deputies were recognized by the Polk County Farm Bureau and its members for the agency’s dedication to Polk County’s Agricultural community. The annual event is an opportunity for Farm Bureau members to interact with the deputies who respond to calls for service on their ranches and farms. The Polk County Farm Bureau is “one of the largest county federations in the state, with well over 4,500 members.” Polk County’s agriculture industries includes citrus, blueberries, honey, sod, forage crops, aquaculture, and both beef and dairy cattle. And PCSO deputies have responded to calls for service at each type of farm, grove or ranch. The Polk County Sheriff’s Office Special Operations Division includes Agricultural, Environmental, Marine and Aviation deputies. These specialized units provide law enforcement services throughout the county and most frequently, on agricultural properties. Agricultural continues to be one of the largest industries in Polk County.

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by Sheriff Grady Judd

According to the Polk County Farm Bureau, there are 626,634 acres of agricultural land in Polk County, with 3,114 farms; which is 52 per cent of Polk’s approximately 2000 square miles. Polk agriculture has an estimated $2.8 billion annual economic impact. Keeping that investment safe is a priority for PCSO Agricultural deputies. During 2011, deputies responded to 2,681 calls for service; over seven calls each day of the year. Calls for service range from trespassing, theft, to missing persons, and animal cruelty cases. Utilizing boats, aircraft, or all-terrain vehicles, Special Ops deputies provide additional support to criminal investigations when searches of large property or bodies of water is necessary The partnerships we’ve created within the agricultural community enable deputies to work one-on-one with farmers and ranchers providing proactive law enforcement services. We know how critical it is to protect a nearly $3 billion industry and we work hard every day to do just that!

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Beautiful and Nutritious By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

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lorida dragonfruit is stunningly beautiful and deliciously sweet and creamy. This fruit has either pink or yellow skin and either a pink or white flesh. Both are similar in taste, although the white variety can be sweeter. Dragon fruit, also known as pitaya, pitahya, or strawberry pear, is actually the fruit of a fragrant night-blooming cactus. Pitaya are produced in tropical and subtropical climates around the world, including Florida, Hawaii, Caribbean, Asia, Vietnam and Australia. According to the University of Florida Extension Office, pitaya plants live for an average of 20 years and established plants may produce over 200 pounds of fruit in a year.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Dragon fruit is an excellent nutritional source of dietary fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, and is naturally free of fat, sodium, and cholesterol. One average 3.5” dragon fruit (100 g) contains 52 calories, 0.5 g of protein, 0.1 g of fat, 13g of carbohydrate, and 0.3 g of fiber. It also provides 19 mg of phosphorus, 6 mg of calcium, 25 mg of vitamin C, as well as many other nutrients. Pitaya is high in riboflavin, vitamin A, calcium, iron, and niacin, as well as powerful health-boosting antioxidants. The seeds are high in polyunsaturated fats, the beneficial type of fat for a healthy heart. VITAMIN C Dragon fruit are high in several antioxidants, including vitamins A and C. Vitamin C supports the body’s immune system in fighting infections and viruses. Additionally, this vitamin helps keep capillaries, gums, and skin healthy and supple. The vitamin C in pitaya also enhances iron

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absorption from other foods, which reduces the risk of anemia. It even plays a role in preventing cardiovascular disease and eye disease.

VITAMIN A Vitamin A is essential for optimal eye health and can help prevent night-blindness. It also plays a role in immunity by supporting the white blood cells in fighting infections. Vitamin A is also involved in hearing, taste, and normal fetal development.

FIBER Research has shown that dietary fiber has a protective effect against cardiovascular diseases, by lowering blood cholesterol levels and slowing the progression of heart disease in high-risk individuals. Fiber also promotes bowel regularity and increases satiety levels, which can aid in weight control.

PHOSPHORUS Florida dragon fruit is notably high in phosphorus, which plays a crucial role in the formation of bones and teeth. Phosphorus is also involved in the protein synthesis of repair of tissues, as well as growth and maintenance. It is also important in the way the body uses the nutrients we consume from food. Additionally, it plays an important role in maintaining a regular heartbeat and assisting in muscle contraction and nerve conduction.

weeks in the refrigerator. Dragon fruit can also be frozen, but since the texture will be altered, reserve it for sorbet or sauce.

HOW

TO ENJOY Dragon fruit is delicious eaten out-of –hand. Peel the outer skin and slice the fruit, or cut the fruit in half and scoop out the creamy flesh with a spoon. The seeds are edible. Other ways to enjoy dragon fruit include: • Freeze the pulp to make sorbet or ice cream • Mash the pulp to make jelly, yogurt, juice, or sauce • Slice and toss into a fruit or vegetable salad • Use the pulp in baked cakes or pastries • Blend with other fruits for a refreshing smoothie Enjoy this beautiful, fragrant fruit during Florida’s peak pitaya season. Eat it out of hand and enjoy the creamy sweetness of one of the world’s most beautiful fruits. Selected References http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs303 http://www.tropcialfruitgrowers.com

HOW

TO SELECT AND STORE Look for pitaya that is deeply colored, free of bruises and discoloration. Choose one that feels heavy for its weight, without soft spots. The fruit can be stored for up to five days at room temperature or for several

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Is Trich Cutting Into Your Profits? By Bridget Carlisle

T

richomoniasis, or “trich,” is a sexually transmitted disease of cattle caused by a protozoan parasite, Tritichomonas foetus. It is estimated that the economic losses to the U.S. beef industry from reduced conception rates, lowered weaning weights and increased culling due to this disease exceed $100 million annually. Bulls infected by T. foetus show no outward signs of infection. Bulls act as a reservoir for this organism and are the primary transmitter of the disease. The trich organism interferes with an infected cow or heifer’s ability to stay bred and, therefore, is responsible for varying degrees of reproductive inefficiency. Because there are no outward signs of the illness, it often goes undetected for a great length of time resulting in further spread of the infection. The effects of the disease are seen in devastating losses due to poor calf crops and prolonged calving seasons. For example, in infected herds with a short defined breeding season, the calf crop can be decreased by 50%. Herds with longer breeding seasons will experience even longer calving seasons resulting in a reduced calf crop and reduced weaning weights. T. foetus lives in the reproductive tract of the cow and in the sheath of the bull’s penis. The typical means of transmission is an infected bull exposing unexposed cows. But the disease can also spread through the purchase of infected, open cows and mixing of clean herds with infected cattle through broken fences. The infection does not interfere with conception but rather results in death of the embryo in the first half of gestation (15 to 80 days). Cows may remain infertile and may build up immunity (for two to six months) but immunity is usually short lived. While rare, some cows that are infected may carry the fetus to full term and deliver a normal calf. These cows are of concern because they can serve as a source of infection to bulls during subsequent breeding seasons. Typically the only detectable symptom of trich in the herd is an increase in open or “late” cows at pregnancy checking. Other signs are reduced calving rates and a calf crop that is extended over three to six months. Bulls will not show symptoms. Diagnosis is made through sampling of the preputial fluid taken from the sheath of the bull’s penis or uterine/vaginal fluid from the

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cow. The organism may be observed by direct microscopic examination of the fresh samples, by examination of culture media inoculated with infected material, or by the detection of T. foetus DNA through the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test method. Microscopic examination and culture tests are only mildly to moderately accurate. The PCR test is considered to be the most accurate and is required by some states as the method of testing. At this time, there is not an approved treatment or vaccination to use on bulls. Identification of infected bulls is critical. Control and prevention involves testing and then culling and replacing infected bulls. A vaccine is available to help cows clean up faster from an infection and rebreed, but it doesn’t prevent trich from infecting the herd. Often it’s the open and late cows that are carrying the disease, so they, too, need to be culled and replaced. The most effective way to control Trich is to prevent the introduction of the organism into a herd. Prevention is essential in managing trichomoniasis infections. Measures include: • Testing all new bulls prior to entry into the herd. • Preventing unwanted bulls from entering through damaged fence lines. • Keeping young bulls rather than older ones. • Testing all bulls prior to each breeding season. • Purchase only virgin bulls. • Do not share or lease bulls. • Do not purchase older cows and add them to your herd without the necessary precautions. • Cull open cows. • Maintain a defined breeding season to identify reproductive problems. • Pregnancy test all cows and heifers 120 days after the breeding season and cull open females. • Vaccination, but vaccine alone will not prevent the disease from getting into the herd. • If you are shipping bulls out-of-state contact your veterinarian to find out the policy for shipping bulls to the particular state. As many states have changed or adopted new rules on the movement of bulls into their state due to Trichomoniasis. This is necessary even if the bulls are to be used on your females residing, or operations belonging to you, in another state. The cost of prevention is far more affordable than the losses caused by this devastating disease. Contact your veterinarian or Extension office for more information. •

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A Closer Look

Brown Marmorated

Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)

By Sean Green

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nvasive species have become the subject of growing concern as environmental awareness is awakened through the media. While some invasive species, such as the Mediterranean Fruit fly, have become eradicated throughout Florida, a great deal of effort is necessary to keep the threat at bay. Most will agree that the best measure of protection is to understand the threat before it becomes a crisis, only then can we respond with a spirit of reason and a tactile solution. Fortunately, our own University of Florida Institute of Food and Agriculture Science (IFAS) is participating in the observation and trials of a species that has already made its way into the top ten threats to the United States Agriculture Industry. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) is a native of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan and has already established itself as a yearlong pest in United States orchards. This insect was first confirmed in Allentown, PA in 1998 and as of November of 2011 has spread to 34 states. Though not yet established in Florida, this invasive insect has already cost the US Agriculture Industry billions. As with any invasive species, the problem is that this stink bug has no natural enemies in the United States. The obvious solution at first glance would be to attract natural enemies, however, a natural enemy is no more indigenous than the invasive species we are trying to suppress in the first place and it too could have a negative impact on Florida’s beneficial insects. Although pesticides are a popular quick fix for the control of native species, the option is problematic when it comes to invasive species. In Florida, registered pesticides are

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regulated by both Federal and State laws. It is not likely that a new invasive species would be specified on a pesticide label without prior field testing from a qualified source. Furthermore, stink bugs in general have a high resistance to most pesticides and alternative management practices are necessary to protect Florida crops. Fortunately, with this species, Florida is taking the initiative to understand the threat before danger is at hand. A new field guide entitled “Identifying Stink Bugs and Other True Bugs of Florida” is in the works, headed up by University of Florida’s Dr. Amanda Hodges and graduate student Ashley Poplin. The guide will include information on emerging invasive species such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) as well as beneficial species that are indigenous to Florida. The guide is expected to be available online at no charge this Fall. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) belongs to the insect family Pentatomidae, meaning five sections. This family of insects is commonly referenced as a shield bug because its shape and wing structure resembles that of a medieval shield. Several native stink bugs and shield bugs are sometimes misidentified as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, our native brown stink bug (Euschistus servus) looks nearly identical. Some of the distinctions to look for in an adult Brown Marmorated Stink bug are white stripes on the antenna, our native brown stink bug has solid brown antenna. The abdomen of BMSB extends beyond the wings and has a distinctive black and white triangular pattern of bands. Look for smooth shoulders

on their thorax and a series of dots right behind the head of this species and you’re really close to a positive identification. In its native range, adults emerge in late April and May, mate, and deposit yellowish spined eggs on the underside of leaves in clusters of 20 to 30 through August. Its long list of host plants seems to grow with more research but common host plants include apples, peaches, figs, and citrus as well as seeds. In its native environment, farmers manage the pest by planting sunflowers and carrots as a trap crop bordering the crop they want to protect. In addition, pheromones of a closely related species, the brown-winged green bug (Plautia stali) are the foundation of Japanese commercial traps. Entomologists at the USDA Agriculture Research Services (ARS) are developing a similar pheromone based trap. USDA- Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) on the other hand is evaluating primary predators of the Marmorated Stink Bug. The four parasitic species are harmless to humans but devastate the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. Currently, these predators are being evaluated in quarantined labs to determine if they would present a danger to beneficial insects. Some experts claim that these species are too specialized to be a threat, however, field studies will be needed to provide a more accurate model of their effectiveness in the field. So far, lab results indicate more than 80% parasitism of Brown Marmolated Stink Bug eggs. Wasps can be released as early as 2013 if scientists demonstrate that it can be done without harm to beneficial insects. •

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4-H Pride for Over 50 Years

By Libby Hopkins

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merican cultural anthropologist, Margaret Mead, once said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” The Polk County Dairy Club may have not changed the world, but they have made a difference in their community. They have been a 4-H club for over 50 years. At one time, it had the most members over all because there were 35 dairies in the county when the club started. Most kids back then belonged to the neighborhood 4-H club and then teamed up with the county 4-H to do events at the Florida State Fair and the 4-H Dairy Show. Over time and economic difficulties, there is only one dairy left in Polk County and the Dairy Club has fewer members. Only three families involved with the club show dairy animals. These set backs have not stopped the club from being an active part of their community, nor have they lost any of their 4-H pride. Freda Pirkle-Carey is the leader of the Polk County Dairy Club and she knows she is preparing the members of her club to make a positive impact in their community, as well as the world. She grew up in 4-H and was a member of the club when she was younger. “My favorite part of the club was showing animals at events,” Pirkle-Carey said. She said she’s also pretty good at judging the events and she shares her knowledge with her club so they can excel when showing their animals or doing other events at 4-H competitions. She said a lot of the members sell their animals at the shows and put the money away for college. The members who don’t show animals compete in the Quiz Bowl. They have to have a strong knowledge of the dairy industry to answer numerous questions during the bowl. Her caring support helps to inspire the members of her club work collaboratively and take the lead on their own projects. They learn to achieve their goals with confidence and stand up for themselves. “Some of the community service projects we participate in is giving guided tours at the dairy and helping with the Farm Day event at the local high school,” Pirkle-Carey said. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

The Farm Day event is an FFA event at the high school but the club takes part in the event so they can show some of their dairy calves. Studies have shown that teens that are involved in 4-H are nearly two times more likely to get better grades in school and attend college. They are 41 percent less likely to engage in risky behaviors and 25 percent of the teens positively contribute to their families and communities. Doing well in school is something that is very important to Pirkle-Carey. The majority of the members in her club excel in their studies and some are even taking college courses while still in high school. “I want to see them continue on with their education and become successful,” Pirkle-Carey said. She also enjoys seeing the leadership skills and self-confidence develop in the members of her club. “They can handle their animal and talk to the public at the same time,” Pirkle-Carey said. “They have an incredible work ethic and they learn time management.” She said they also learn how to support each other and value teamwork. Another value PirkleCarey instills in her members is to support the local business in the Polk community. She said that the kids buy their feed from local suppliers and use local veterinarians for their animals. They are forming relationships with them and they want to put money back in their community. Pirkle-Carey believes that 4-H makes its members well rounded and offers them experiences like no other. “The average person in the club is 3-4 generations removed from the farm and these kids get a farm experience even though they may have never lived on a farm,” Pirkle-Carey said. 4-H reaches everywhere in our country, it can be found in urban neighborhoods or rural farming communities. With a network of more than six million youth, 540,00 volunteers, 3,500 professionals, and more than 60 million alumni, 4-H has helped shape youth to move our county and world forward in ways like no other youth organization. • For more information on 4-H, you can visit them on the web at

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RECIPES

PREPARATION Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut bread into 1-inch cubes. Cut cream cheese into small cubes. Lightly spray a 9x9x2-inch baking dish. Place half of the bread cubes in the dish. Evenly place the cream cheese cubes and 1 cup of the blueberries over the bread. Add the remaining bread cubes and blueberries to the top of the casserole. In a medium-sized bowl, combine eggs, milk, maple syrup and butter. Slowly pour egg mixture over bread. Cover casserole with foil and bake for approximately 45 minutes. Insert a tooth pick in the center of the casserole. When the toothpick comes out clean, remove the foil so the casserole can brown on top. Let cool slightly and serve warm with extra maple syrup on the side.

Blueberry Breakfast Casserole

Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

INGREDIENTS 2 cups fresh blueberries, rinsed and dried 8 largeeggs, beaten 1/4 cup maple syrup 1 loaf bread (any kind) 1 1/2 cups low-fat milk 4 ounces low-fat cream cheese (cold so it can be cubed) 1/4 cup butter, melted cooking pan spray

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MAY 2012

Florida Fruit Parfait INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup vanilla nonfat yogurt 1/2 mango 1/4 cup blueberries 1 teaspoon roasted pecans

PREPARATION Put yogurt into a shallow glass or tumbler. Add fruit and pecans on top. Freeze for 5-10 minutes and serve very cold. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


OUR SERVICES • Social Security Disability • Supplemental Security Income: Children and Adults • Initial Applications Reconsideration • Hearing with Judge

• Wills • Power of Attorney • Estate Planning • Trusts • Guardianships • Adoptions Charles L. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. University of South Florida J.D. Florida State University Law School

Geraldyne H. Carlton

Florida Native B.A. Georgia State University J.D. Florida State University Law School

2310 Lakeland Hills Blvd. Lakeland, FL 33805 (1 mile south of I-4, Exit 33 Lakeland - across from Detroit Tigers Baseball Spring Training Stadium)

TOLL FREE 1. 800.315.4590 863. 688.5700 *The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisments. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909

BUILDING SUPPLIES DECKING BRDS. & TILL SIDING Call Ted 813-752-3378 DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378

MASSEY FERGUSON 255 Grove Tractor with 6’ mower $7,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722. KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722

SURPLUS WINDOWS DOUBLE INSULATED Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378

NEW HOLLAND TC29 TRACTOR/LOADER 29 pto hp, 268 hrs, $13,000 (UT6406). Ask for David 813-623-3673

MOBILE HOME-SIZED WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378

2005 MASSEY FERGUSON 5465 Farm Tractor. 100 hp, 3 mec hyd remotes. Ecab with air. 1583 hours. Call Mike 813-478-0723

TILL 4 X 8 SHEET B-grade $17.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378

2006 MASSEY FERGUSON 5460 Farm Tractor. 95 hp, 18.4-30 rear tires. 13.6-24 front tires, ecab w/air, 1050 hrs. Call Mike 813-478-0723

NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378 MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378

COUPONS SAVICH & LEE/STALNAKER Horse Fence 200’x4’, Sheep & Goat Fence 330’x4’ 1 to 3 rolls - $2.50 off, 4 or more $5 off, 10 piece limit. Field fence 47” 1-8 $2.50 off, 9 or more - $5 off, 10 piece limit. Barbed Wire - 5 or more - $1 off 10 piece limit. Pick up ONLY while supplies last. See our ad on page 81 for pricing.

EQUINE SERVICES HORSE BOARDING Stalls and individual turnout, lighted arena and round pen. Owners on property. $300 full care. Call 813-610-4416

FARM EQUIPMENT 2008 MASSEY FERGUSON 1533LC, 33hp with loader, cab, ac, 1367hrs. $16,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 1984 MASSEY FERGUSON 240 tractor, 42 pto hp, 2wd, works great! $5,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 GRAVELY 1740 Zero turn mower 40” cut. $1,650 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 BUSH HOG HS 1736 Zero turn mower. Approx. 2 years old. 36" cut $1,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MAHINDRA 4530 W/ loader, 4x4, skid steer bucket. Shuttle shift, 44hp. $14,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

FOR SALE WESTERN SADDLE FOR SALE Barely used. Saddle, bridle and blanket. $600 or b/o. Call 813-363-5967 CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 TRAILER FOR SALE 44x12 single wide trailer in Winters Mobile Home Park. Zephyrhills 5k or best offer. Call (813)967-4515

MASSEY FERGUSON 245 Diesel tractor. Good condition. $5,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES

MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTOR 1980 Massey Ferguson 230. 34pto hp, power steering. $4,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 14’ Shop built, heavy duty trailer, 2 axel with ramps. $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

NEW HUSTLER SPORT ZERO TURN 48" cut, 16hp. Honda engine. Special Price! $3,500 with 3yr. warranty. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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info@inthefieldmagazine.com TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

REAL ESTATE BEAUTIFUL PLANT CITY 1 ACRE LOT With well. Private one street subdivision frontage 290 x 145 depth. 4521 Highland Creek Drive. $45,900. Call Today! 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Please call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 BLAIRSVILLE, GEORGIA MLS#212769 Private home with 3BR, 2.5 baths, unfinished basement, nice kitchen, Sunroom, back deck for cooking out, nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. $180,000. Call Jane Baer w/ Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829 BLAIRSVILLE, GEORGIA MLS#190298 Beautiful RV lot with cement pad, decking includes the 5th wheel. Less than 2 years old! River’s Edge RV Park offers a large clubhouse, stocked lake for fishing, heated and cooled laundry and shower facilities. $69,000 Call Jane Baer w/ Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829 A SLICE OF HEAVEN 2.03 acres lot on Hare Mtn. Estates in Franklin NC. Breath-taking views. Purchased 10/08 for $73,400. Yours today for $32,900 GREAT INVESTMENT! Call 813-655-6769

WANTED SNAKEBITE?? Your Help needed for a medical project. I need Coral Snakes for a venom project supplying a major Pharmaceutical Company producing antivenom for North American Coral Snake bite victims. There is currently no antivenom being produced. This is not a request for you to capture or handle a coral snake. This is a request for you to call me if you encounter one in a spot that will allow me to come and collect it. They are showing up in pool skimmers, in garages, in barns, under wood debris, on patios and porches. They are active early morning and late evening throughout the summer. If you encounter one keep all Children and pets away from the snake. Thank you for your consideration. Jack Facente/ AGRITOXINS Labs. 407-922-1160 email: jfacente@embarqmail.com

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Fordhooks..........................................$22 Baby Butter Beans ............................$14 Green Beans.......................................$14 Pole Beans .........................................$14 Speckled Butter Beans.....................$14 Blackeye Peas....................................$14 Butter Peas ........................................$14 Conk Peas .........................................$22 Crowder Peas ....................................$14 Pinkeye Peas......................................$14 White Acre Peas................................$14 Sugar Snap Peas ...............................$15 Zipper Peas........................................$14

PECANS HALVES or PIECES 1 lb bag..............................$10 2.5 lbs bag........................$25 5 lbs bag ..........................$49 10 lbs bag.........................$97

White Corn .........................................$13 Yellow Corn ........................................$13 Cream White Corn 4#........................$6 Cream Yellow Corn 4#.......................$6 Collard Greens ...................................$13 Mustard Greens..................................$13 Turnip Greens ....................................$13 Spinach ...............................................$13

Cut Okra .............................................$13 Breaded Okra.....................................$13 Whole Okra ........................................$13 Sliced Yellow Squash........................$13 Sliced Zucchini ..................................$13 Brussel Sprouts..................................$13 Baby Carrots ......................................$13 Broccoli...............................................$13 Cauliflower .........................................$13 Mixed Vegetables..............................$13 Soup Blend.........................................$13 Blueberries 5# ...................................$15 Blackberries 5# .................................$15 Cranberries 5#...................................$15 Mango Chunks 5# .............................$15 Pineapple Chunks 5#........................$15 Whole Strawberries 5# ....................$15 Rhubarb 5# ........................................$13 Green Peanuts ...................................$15

WALK-INS WELCOME Call – or go on-line to place your order today and we’ll have it ready for you to pick up! www.SouthwesternProduce.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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MAY 2012

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In The Field magazine Polk edition  

Agriculture magazine for Polk County, FL

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