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CONTENTS

APRIL 2019 VOL. 12 • ISSUE 8 Polk County Cattlemen’s Association

Grazing New Trails: Florida’s Young Cattlewomen

28 Cover Photo by: Blair Buchanon PAGE 32 PCSO

PAGE 10 Florida AG Crimes Event

PAGE 33 Recipes

PAGE 12 Jack Payne

PAGE 36 John Dicks

PAGE 14 Fishing Hot Spots

PAGE 38 Endangered Species

PAGE 16 Adam Putnam

PAGE 40 Activity

PAGE 18 Polk Tractor

PAGE 41 A Closer Look

PAGE 22 Rocking Chair Chatter PAGE 26 Literary Time Machine

PAGE 42 Water Conservsation

PAGE 30 Ciruela

PAGE 43 Cane Toads PAGE 45

PAGE 31 News Briefs

PCCW

Hey Readers!

Hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker and a FREE In The Field T-Shirt. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on the page you located the logo to the address below

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InTheField® Magazine P.O. Box 5377 • Plant City, Fl. 33566-0042 *Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner!

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P.O. Box 9005 • Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL. 33831-9005 President – Carlton Taylor 9875 Hancock Road Lakeland, FL 33810 (863) 858-1771 L2brangus@aol.com Vice President – Ray Clark 4484 Swindell Road Lakeland, FL 33810 (863) 640-0719 rclark@tampabay.rr.com Secretary/Treasurer - Justin Bunch PO Box 849 Highland City, FL 338460849 (863) 425-1121 justin.bunch@cpsagu.com State Director – David McCullers 1000 Hwy 630 W Frostproof, FL 33843 (863) 635-3821 crookedlakeranch57@ gmail.com Donald Conroy 3882 Wolfolk Rd Fort Meade, FL 33841 (863) 412-0790 Kevin Fussell 4523 Fussell Rd Polk City, FL 33868-9676 (863) 412-5876 Mike Fussell 4520 Barush Rd Bartow, FL 33830-2629 (863) 698-8314 fussell.flafarm@gmail.com Moby Persing 3380 Sam Keen Rd Lake Wales, FL 338989327 (863) 528-4567 Ken Sherrouse 13475 Moore Rd Lakeland, FL 33809-9755 (863) 698-1834 kensherrouse@yahoo.com

Dave Tomkow 3305 US Highway 92 E Lakeland, FL 33801-9623 (863) 665-5088 Dr. Lujean Waters 8750 Shreck Rd Bartow, FL 33830 (863) 537-1495 Lujean.waters@gmail.com Alternate – Standing Committee Chairs: Membership Events- Kevin Fussell Trade Show- Bridget Stice Rodeo- Fred Waters PO Box 463 Alturas, FL 33820-0463 (863) 559-7808 Website – Adam Norman 2115 West Pipkin Rd Lakeland, FL 33811 (863) 944-9293 Adamnorman1977@gmail. com Cattlewomen – President, Missy Raney PO Box 453 Homeland, FL 33847 (863) 205-3977 Raney747@gmail.com Extension – Bridget Stice PO Box 9005, Drawer HS03 Bartow, FL 33831 (863) 519-1048 bccarlis@ufl.edu Sheriff’s Dept. – Sgt. Paul Wright 1891 Jim Keen Blvd. Winter Haven, FL 33880 (863) 557-1741 pw5281@polksheriff.org Warner University –

Scott Shoupe 6130 Allen Lane Lakeland, FL 33811 (863) 581-7593 Scott_shoupe@hotmail. com WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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STAFF Publisher/Photography Karen Berry Senior Managing Editor/ Associate Publisher Sarah Holt Sales Necole Holt Tina Richmond Melissa Nichols

Creative Director/Illustrator Juan Alvarez

Letter from the Editor As I’m writing this it’s a gloomy overcast day. It started with a few light rain showers but they have abated. While I love those sun shiny Florida days that attract so many tourists, I’m happy to see the rain. I know sometimes we grumble when plans are foiled because of a sudden thunderstorm, but the fact of the matter is, we need rain. It seems to be downpour or drought around here. With most of our water coming from the aquifer and the population rapidly increasing, we need to ensure that our water supply stays adequate. According to the website worldpopulationreview.com “If growth continues at roughly the same rate, by the time that the next Census is undertaken in 2020, the population will exceed 22 million. The population could potentially surpass 26 million in 2030, driven by immigration from both Northern US states and other countries.” While there hasn’t been a census since 2016 it is estimated that we are well over 21 million people and the growth isn’t expected to slow down. What can we do? Conserve water! Don’t run sprinklers when it is raining (I see this all the time and wonder why they are wasting water). Don’t leave the hose running, I know this can happen accidently, but just think about conserving water and saving money because that makes for a lovely water bill. Basically, be mindful when using water. It doesn’t matter if you have city water or well water; it all comes from our aquifer or surface water. Surface water, by the way, is a very small percentage of what we use. Check out more water saving tips on page 40. Thanks so much for reading. We appreciate each of you!

Sarah Holt The LORD make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you. - Numbers 6:25

Photography Karen Berry Melissa Nichols Staff Writers Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Breanne Williams Anita Todd Contributing Writers Woody Gore John Dicks

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Polk County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Polk County Catllemen’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In the Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc.

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Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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Dear Cattlemen, Cattlewomen and Friends, The Florida Legislative Session is underway and many of our cattlemen and cattlewomen from Polk County and across the state recently flooded the capitol with boots and cowboys hats during the Florida Cattlemen’s Association Legislative Quarterly Meeting in Tallahassee. The FCA had boots on the ground to advocate for appropriate budget levels for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the UF College of Agriculture, Conservation Easements and other important issues to help our ranchers be able to continue our way of life on the land in our ever-changing and growing state. It is important for you to let your voices be heard, so I encourage you to reach out to our state and local representatives and let them know your thoughts or even invite them out to your place to see your operations.

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The Florida Cow Culture Preservation Committee, headed up by Doyle Conner, Jr. and Lynn Yarborough Hanshew, is working on the “Great Florida Cattle Drive” - a modern day cattle drive celebrating the history of cattle in Florida. This event is schedule for December 2021 and if you have an

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interest, please check out their website at www. GreatFloridaCattleDrive.org. UF IFAS and the Florida Cattlemen’s Association have teamed up to create a series of infographics that highlight facts about our state’s cattle industry, how Florida cattle drive the economy, our best management practices, our role in preserving our natural resources and that Florida is cattle country. These infographics will be great tools for us to help tell our story and give accurate information about our industry. The Archbold Biological Station will release a full length film called “Cowboys & Scientists” on social media on April 15th. I encourage you to check it and share with your friends #showyourpassion. Until next time, enjoy more BEEF!

Carlton Taylor

Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President

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FLORIDA AG CRIMES UNIT AT POLK COUNTY NETWORKING EVENT BY Jim Frankowiak

Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick presents a check to FACIU President Ryan Waters

The Central Florida Ag Alliance recently hosted a networking event providing area cattlemen and farmers the opportunity to meet with representatives of the Florida Agricultural Crimes Intelligence Unit (FACIU) from across the state. The event, which was held at Waters Ranch near Bartow, allowed attendees to network with agriculture law enforcement officers from Polk and surrounding counties “to exchange information and to help law enforcement officers better protect agribusiness and property,” according to the FACIU.

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The FACIU traces its origins to 1978 and a meeting involving sheriff’s offices from within Central and South Florida, working with the State of Florida Department of Agricultural Marks and Brands Unit. This initial gathering led to monthly intelligence meetings and a training seminar in April of 1980 designed to assist deputies within the agricultural field to become specialized in various subject matters. With assistance from the Florida Farm Bureau this initial training session was attended by more than 100 law enforcement officers. The

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Florida Citrus & Cattle Intelligence Unit was formed at that meeting, leading to regular sessions and the election of officers to oversee the unit. In 1992, the Florida Citrus & Cattle Intelligence Unit changed its name to the Florida Agricultural Crimes Intelligence Unit, continuing the mission and dedication to develop solutions to the unique crimes that affect agriculture, livestock, residents and agricultural related businesses in rural and agricultural areas throughout the state, noted in its tagline – “Protecting Florida’s Agriculture and Rural Communities.” The recent meeting in Polk County was the first time FACIU members and Ag producers were invited to gather for networking and information exchange. Simply put, the gathering was designed “to help take care of you all, 24/7 wherever you are,” said Polk County Ag Crimes Officer Jay Scarborough, who is also an FACIU officer. Ranking officers from Polk, Osceola, Highlands, Hardee and Charlotte counties attended the gathering along with representatives from Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


While the focus of the luncheon meeting was on Ag law enforcement, attendees were reminded that Ag officers are not limited to serving only agriculture, but the general public, as well. Magnatronix Corporation and Lightsey Cattle Company were recognized for their support of the event along with the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association, Polk County Sheriff’s Office, Florida Farm Bureau –Polk County, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension and Waters Ranch, the location of the event.

John Hoblick expressed his appreciation

Scarborough noted that many producers have operations in multiple counties and gatherings “such as today’s provide an opportunity for them to meet with Ag officers in those counties should the need arise. It also helps law enforcement learn of special needs that they might have for our help.” “We appreciate what law enforcement does for all of us,” said Polk County Farm Bureau’s Kevin Updike, while Ray Clark, vice president of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association also expressed the appreciation of his members for the work of law enforcement and “thanks to Farm Bureau, too, for its support of this unit.” Clark noted the new drone program introduced by law enforcement officials in Polk County and encouraged other jurisdictions to explore similar efforts due to the program’s “very beneficial time and cost-savings.” Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick also expressed his appreciation to the FACIU, as well as the opportunity for Florida Farm Bureau and the University of Florida to partner with and help foster the certification program developed for Ag law enforcement officers. “Laws and statutes continue to change and this ongoing certification program helps officers remain current,” he said. Hoblick also presented a $2,000 check on behalf of Florida Farm Bureau to current FACIU President Ryan Waters, who is also a member of the Hardee County Sheriff’s Office. “This is our way of helping to recognize the daily benefits you bring to Florida cattlemen and farmers every day, Thank you, ” said Hoblick. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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THE RED TIDE/BLUE-GREEN ALGAE CRISIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR US – SCIENTISTS AND FARMERS --TO DO MORE FOR FLORIDA’S WATER QUALITY.

Dail Laughinghouse, a UF/IFAS applied phycologist who works at the UF/IFAS Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center.

By Jack Payne For starters, we can broaden the conversation beyond farms. We need to include anyone who has a lawn, drives city streets, or flushes a toilet. I think you can see where I’m going here.

Farmers statewide use UF/IFAS science to improve the way they farm. Best management practices are how we translate that science into recommendations.

Even I hadn’t realized how much the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences could contribute to protection of water quality until Karl Havens, director of Florida Sea Grant, helped me inventory our expertise.

But we need BMPs that will work for every farm. To get there, we’ll need to look at a wider variety of crops, more geographic areas, and changing conditions that require us to update established BMPs.

UF/IFAS soil and water scientists can help determine what the most effective mitigation measures are. Our agricultural engineers are developing artificial intelligence, robots, drones, smartphone apps, and other technology to guide the most sparing use of fertilizer and water. Fisheries experts work with our aquaculture farmers to monitor how underwater “crops” are affected. Agriculture and natural resource economists examine the tradeoffs involved in policy choices. Communicators help dispel misperceptions and tell success stories.

Farmers are our partners in discovery. You lend us land to take ideas out of our labs, greenhouses, and research farms and to test them in the real world.

In short, we have one of the largest groups of scientists studying a broad array of water quality issues of any university in the U.S. Not only that, but we have a long history of making a difference by partnering with groups that can help put solutions into practice: water management districts, state and federal agencies, and local governments. There’s another key partner: you. We’ve worked on this together for decades.

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For example, since UF/IFAS began working with growers in the Everglades Agricultural Area south of Lake Okeechobee, the amount of phosphorus – a nutrient on which algae feeds – in agricultural water entering the Everglades has been reduced by nearly 70 percent.

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You also support us in Tallahassee. We’re gratified by the Farm Bureau’s support of state budget requests for resources essential to providing scientific solutions for more of your challenges. Again, this conversation must go beyond the farm, so we’re involved in an emerging coalition of residents, businesses, municipalities, utilities, and others. There are many possible contributors to red tides and harmful algae blooms. We stand ready to work with anyone who’s a possible contributor to the solutions.

Jack Payne is the University of Florida’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources and leader of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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FLIP-FLOPPING FISHING LINE Capt. Woody Gore

On most open-faced spinning reels, we only use the first 100 feet or so of line. The rest is there, but seldom used. When the first 100 feet needs replacement anglers usually un-spool it all and throw it away. Here is a cool way to make your fishing line last twice as long using the extra spool that comes in the box with most spinning reels. And if for some reason you do not have an extra spool ask around to some of your fishing pals; I am certain one of them might have a few lying, around collecting dust. I’m sure they would not mind parting with one or two for a friend in need. What you do is reverse the fishing line and use the bottom unused portion. Let me tell you how. First, remove the spool with the line and mount the second spool. If you are using braid, tie about 25 to 50 yards of backing onto the empty spool. Now tie the braid from your filled spool you took off to the backing on the second spool using a “doubleuni knot.” Now, carefully reel the line from the filled spool onto the second spool. What is happening is the worn part of the line is now going on first, and the newer line will be on the top. Remember to stop when you get to the backing on the first spool. In addition, the best part is if you have more than one reel you now have an extra spool to continue the cycle of re-spooling. There you have it, a new line on your reel without spending any money. This is especially nice if you are using the more expensive super lines. You can save yourself $20 or more. How about baitcaster reels you ask, well on baitcaster’s you might need to un-spool one reel onto a salvaged plastic spool first. Then, because most of us have more than one baitcaster, here is the solution; take the now unspooled baitcaster and tie the line from your second one to the one you just unloaded, now load the old line from the second baitcaster onto the first one. Now the new un-used line is on top and the old line is on the bottom. Ok, so how do you get the line reversed that came off the first reel? Well, here you go, read it, and think about it; you mount your line removal tool in your drill and wind the line from the first plastic spool onto a second plastic spool. Now the old line is on the bottom and the used line is on top. Now tie the line to the baitcaster and wind the line onto the baitcaster. When finished the old line is on the bottom and the new un-used line is on the top. Remember, this works on monofilament as well as braided fishing line. Because the new super lines have a higher price point and most of us are trying to save money, it makes more sense if we can double up and get all the use we can from our fishing line. So why not try reversing your lines and save a few bucks at the same time.

May 2019 Fishing Report Spotted Sea Trout: It seems they are showing up on deeper grass

flats and around rocky bottoms with grass. Other captains are reporting decent catches of sizable trout along the southwest and southeast shores of Tampa Bay. Smaller greenbacks are working fine, but remember a shrimp is always on the top of a trout’s menu of favorite things to eat. It is like a lollipop to a youngster. They cannot seem to resist a juicy live shrimp dangling under a popping cork. The bigger fish around the south end are popping up on the shallow water grass flats. Do not forget about those artificial lures. There is good jerk bait action on shallow water broken bottom grass flats. Artificial lures allow for faster fishing and the ability to cover more area and potholes.

Spanish mackerel: They are back! As it happens each year when the

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Capt. Woody Gore (www.captainwoodygore.com)

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threadfins and sardines move into Tampa Bay, the giant Spanish mackerel follow them wreaking havoc on anglers tackle everywhere. They are showing up throughout the bay and anglers normally targeting this species each year are experiencing the first days of the big fish bite. In addition, these assassins are everywhere there is bait and eating like there’s no tomorrow. I am getting reports of giants topping the scales WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


between two to three pounds and measuring close to 28 inches long. These big fish can practically snatch the fishing rod right out of your hand, especially if you are daydreaming. However, once you recover from the initial shock and awe of the drag pulling strike and look down to discover half your line is gone and the rest is on the way out, if you are lucky enough, before that mouth full of razor sharp teeth cuts you off, you might finally regain enough composure to control the situation and land a giant mac. The teeth on these guys are so brutal that Capt. George Jonah and I finally resorted to steel leaders with long shank hooks. However, when I am out of steel I revert to 60 lb. Seaguar Fluorocarbon and shiny longshank Daiichi hooks and still get cut off; but what great fun or better way to loose tackle. So, if you’re looking for some drag screaming action check out the mackerel fishing in Tampa Bay, you’ll be hooked.

Redfish (Still Catch & Release - According to (myfwc.com) Opens 5/10/19): Redfish are showing up around the bay and on the flats and mangroves. We are seeing some small schools and catches of our favorite shallow water bruisers. We have seen some good action on high water around the mangroves on both greenbacks and cut bait. Often referred to as dead sticking because the rod basically sits in the rod holder until the fish grabs the bait. While it may seem boring sometimes, it does work. Cut pinfish, ladyfish and mullet work equally well on redfish, snook or trout. Put a chunk on a circle hook and toss it way out into a likely travel lane, drop the rod into the rod holder, grab a beverage, sit back and relax, and when the rod bends, grab it and reel. Often times when the rod bends you get a real surprise, there is a giant shook on the other end. Snook, especially the big ones, really like chunky dead bait. On the other hand, if you can find a school of redfish and you have enough greenbacks to start chumming, you can usually peak their interest long enough to snatch a few out of the crowd before they move off. Where are the redfish? They’re out there, it’s a matter of looking until you find them.

Snook (Still Catch & Release): Snook fishing in the summer is almost a given. Almost any mangrove shoreline holds snook provided there is bait and structure. And they are one of our most preferred and targeted species throughout the bay. Terrific ambush feeders they love lying in wait along shady mangrove root systems. Rocky shores and adjacent sand bars are also good places to investigate. Early morning flats produce well using topwater lures, but remember, live greenbacks and cut bait also produce. Your best chance of catching one is during an incoming tide. Years ago, I can remember my dad telling me snook were not good to eat because they tasted like soap. Now I have learned the reasoning for that belief. No one ever skinned their catch they just scaled and filleted them. Hence, folks named snook soap-fish. I never ate one with the skin on it but my dad told me it tasted like Ivory soap; I cannot imagine. However, folks apparently figured out how to clean fish by removing the skin and guess what; today every snook in the 28 inch to 33-inch slot goes home for dinner; too bad. With the added fishing pressure we experience, it is possible if we do not start practicing catch and release we are not going to have any to catch and release. If you’re lucky enough to catch a slot snook let it go and perhaps the next person will do the same. Every angler is looking to catch them and given the amount of fishing pressure, especially on weekends, it is a wonder they bite at all.

Cobia, Mangrove Snapper, Flounder, and Sharks:

It is just a matter of time and the cobia will show up around markers, on flats and buoy cans, especially those holding bait. Mangrove snapper should be on fire this year as the water warms early. I am anticipating a good snapper bite all summer. We are also catching some nice southern flounder on the same rocky bottoms as the trout. The sharks are also showing up and if you’re interested it can be lots of fun, but be careful, they are not to be taken lightly if you handle a smaller one.

“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the west central Florida areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Multi-boat Group Charters With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Captain Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

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Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give me a call at 813-477-3814 WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE April


ADAM PUTNAM NAMED CEO OF DUCKS UNLIMITED By Jim Frankowiak

water practices program, through which farmers voluntarily adopt measures to reduce their water use and minimize the use of nutrients that, in high volumes, can negatively impact the environment. More than 7 million acres of agricultural lands in Florida are now enrolled in the program. That equates to 53 percent of all agricultural lands in the state, saving on average 19 million gallons of water daily. In addition to the best management water practices program, Putnam also created more than 40 conservation easements through the Rural and Family Lands Protection Program, preserving more than 50,000 acres of Florida land that is critical to wildlife habitat and water quality. Putnam is also a staunch supporter of veterans and the sacrifices they have made while serving our country. In 2011, he created Operation Outdoor Freedom to honor the selfless sacrifices of our nation’s disable veterans. New Florida state forests dedicated to veterans were opened with special accommodations to meet their needs. More than 4,000 veterans have joined Operation Outdoor Freedom events since its inception. As the new DU CEO Putnam’s vision “is to bring together conservation-minded folks from all walks of life, whether they’re farmers, city-dwellers, veterans, geologists, hunters…anyone who has a connection to landscapes, which is everyone,” he said. “If we are going to fill the skies with waterfowl, we must build a coalition of people who believe waterfowl-filled skies matter. We need to work together to reach a common goal of healthy wetlands and abundant water for wildlife, people and their communities across North America.” Former Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Adam Putnam has been named Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Ducks Unlimited, Inc. (DU). DU’s retiring CEO, Dale Hall, will remain with the organization to aid the transition until his retirement June 30. “I joined Ducks Unlimited when I was 16 and have a lifelong appreciation of the conservation work the organization accomplishes,” said Putnam. “It is humbling to be chosen as DU’s CEO, and as a lifelong hunter, angler and conservationist, I look forward to building on our record of success.” As Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, Putnam was responsible for the management of 1.3 million acres of state forests, running the state Energy Office and directing Florida’s school nutrition programs. “From the outset, the DU CEO search committee wanted to find a unique balance of conservation, policy and agriculture in the background of the new CEO candidate,” said DU President Rogers Hoyt. “In Adam, we feel that we have hit on all three. Not to mention he’s an approachable, passionate and visionary person, so Adam was the perfect fit.”

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While Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, Putnam was a strong advocate for the Sunshine State’s water resources. During his tenure he expanded Florida’s best management

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Before serving as Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, Putnam served five terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. First elected in 2000, he was the youngest member of Congress at the time and the youngest ever from Florida. While in Washington, D.C., he distinguished himself as the leading voice for specialty crop agriculture in the nation’s Farm Bill, international trade and food safety. He also served in the Florida House. Putnam is a fifth generation Floridian and alumnus of the University of Florida where he earned a bachelor’s degree in Food and Resource Economics. He has also been awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree and served as a Rodel Fellow at the Aspen Institute. Putnam and his wife of 20 years, Melissa, are raising their four children in Bartow with plans to move to Memphis, the headquarters location of DU, in the coming months. DU is the world’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to conserving North America’s waterfowl habitats. Established in 1937, DU has conserved more than 14 million acres thanks to contributions from more than one million supporters across the continent. Guided by science and dedicated to program efficiency, DU works toward the vision of wetlands sufficient to fill the skies with waterfowl today, tomorrow and forever. For more information about DU, visit: www.ducks.org. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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*For complete warranty, safety and product information, consult your local Kubota dealer and the product operator’s manual. Power (HP/KW) and other specifications are based on various standards or recommended practices. Optional equipment may be shown.

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© Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2018


Business Up Front

By Anita Todd

POLKTRACTOR

THEN

POLK TRACTOR COMPANY Polk Tractor Company is a family affair. Nearly 70 years ago, Hinton James, Jr. literally opened the doors of the business and figuratively opened the doors of the future for his family. Now, as the only Kubota dealership in Polk County and the oldest Kubota dealer in Florida, the third and fourth generations are continuing the promise of superior customer service, with the best equipment available, started back in 1952. “The brands we carry are exceptional,” said Jay James, President and General Manager of Polk Tractor Company and the grandson of Hinton.

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In addition to Kubota, Polk Tractor Company also carries Stihl and Gravely products. They are a full-service dealer for all three brands; meaning they provide sales, service and parts. Additionally, with Kubota they are a full-line dealer offering every piece of equipment they produce in all five lines: Tractors, Mowers, Utility Vehicles, Construction and Hay/Farm Implements.

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“From a zero-turn mower to a tractor to an excavator to hay equipment,” Jay James said. “We have it all.” According to Kubota’s website, Polk Tractor Company is a “Orange Protection Certified Dealer,” a dealer that is certified to sell and service Kubota’s covered by the extended warranty program. The website also reads Polk Tractor Company is “Service Certified,” a dealership with technicians who have received extensive hands-on training from factory trained instructors. The company sells Stihl handheld equipment like chainsaws, blowers and weedeaters and is considered an Elite Dealer, offering a comprehensive line of Stihl equipment and accessories with superior service. They are also a Gravely Preferred Dealer and, according to Jay James, partnering with them is important because the line is built in the United States and is a family-owned company, as well. Polk Tractor Company’s 17 employees makes it run like a well-oiled machine. Currently, there are four employees with the last name of James: Jay; Jay’s sister, Amy, who works in the office; Jay’s wife, Nikki, who works in parts; and Jay and WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


NOW

Nikki’s son, Clay. But, Jay James is quick to include the rest of the staff of Polk Tractor Company. “By far, it is our employees who keep this business going,” he said. “They are absolutely the most important asset for us.”

retired, Jay’s dad – Bo - took over the business that was originally a Ford tractor dealership. Now, in his 40s, Jay James has spent about 30 years at Polk Tractor Company working in various positions and has been the President and General Manager since 2015.

Over the years, creating the business for Polk Tractor Company were, obviously, the large number of farmers who owned groves in the area. However, because citrus greening has eliminated thousands of acres of Florida’s groves – with no end in sight - Polk Tractor Company has seen a change in the reason for business.

“I’m a young guy who is ready to retire,” he laughed.

“Blueberries contributed to our business for several years,” Jay James said. “But, the last four years, construction has really increased our business.”

The key to success will be continued with Clay doing what the family has done for years.

So much so, that Jay James said they have outgrown their location and are looking to expand. Carrying the full line of Kubota equipment requires a lot of space for display as well as assembly of some of those pieces. When they do expand, they probably won’t go far since the business has been located on Havendale since 1963. At 16-years-old, Jay James started his career at the familyowned business working in the shop. After his grandfather

“We want our customers to feel welcome when they come in that door. We want them to get to know us and vice versa,” Jay James said. “They aren’t just our customers; they are our friends too.” For more information, stop by Polk Tractor Company located at 3450 Havendale Boulevard NW, Winter Haven; call them at 863.967.0651 or visit their website at www.polktractorco.com.

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The plan is to continue the family tradition of passing along the leadership of the business to the next generation. In this case, Clay, 20, who currently works in the parts department, is on tap to take the helm.


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A couple of guys with the “right stuff” participated together in U.S. bombing missions over Korea. Astronaut John Glenn and baseball Hall of Famer Ted Williams were co-pilots. Twitter’s bird logo is named Larry, after Boston Celtics Hall of Famer Larry Bird. When Oreo cookies were first made, they were mound-shaped. The name comes from the Greek work “oreo,” which means “hill.” It cost $1 for admission to Disneyland when it opened in 1955. The first minimum wage, instituted in the U.S. in 1938, was 25 cents an hour. Home plate in baseball was square until 1900 when it was made fivesided to help umpires in calling balls and strikes. Edgar Allan Poe often wrote his works with his cat seated on his shoulder.

As our favorite season ends, we would like to thank those who have supported our industry.

Our stand is now closed, but will reopen this summer when our vegetable crops are ready for harvest. Check back between late May and early June and order your black eyes, conks, zippers and okra. Thank you! Carl, Dee Dee and Dustin Grooms NEW STAND LOCATION: 5212 Drane Field Rd. | 813.478.3486 or 813.754.4852 | FancyFarms.com INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Shopping A while back I took ten days off and spent the time at our place on Moon Shadow in Blairsville, Georgia with my wife, Patsy, and Cynthia Holt, the mother of Sarah Holt, editor of In The Field. The first thing on their agenda after we got settled in was a shopping trip to Home Depot for a 40 watt light bulb and to Wal-Mart for a pair of jeans for Patsy. What I thought would be a brief trip turned out to be an all afternoon excursion. First stop was Home Depot. The girls decided to go in and look around while I made the purchase of the light bulb. In five minutes flat I had found the bulb and checked out. I looked around and they were no where to be found, so I sat down in a chair located next to the exit thinking they would be along shortly. WRONG! Fifteen minutes passed and I decided to go look for them. I walked the entire store. They were nowhere in sight. I decided they were playing hide-and-go-seek with me. Back to the chair to wait! Five, ten, fifteen minutes still no Patsy and Cynthia. Maybe they slipped by me and went to the car. I checked the car and they were not there. Maybe one more round in the store would do it. That was when I made a rare discovery. I ran into a sales person in the electrical department. He said no, he had not seen the two ladies as he had been in the lounge in the back drinking coffee.

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As a last resort I headed back to the chair to wait only to discover that it was occupied by a man in overalls with a dip of snuff under his bottom lip. ‘Been here long?” I asked.

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“Nope,” he replied. Thinking I could pass some time until the girls show up, I tried to strike up a conversation. “Do you live around here,” I asked. “Yep,” he replied. “Have you finished shopping.” “Didn’t come here to shop,” he said. “Well, why are you here?” I asked. “I’m waiting for my wife Bertha. We came in here last week for a few things, and I ain’t seen’er since.” he said. Hearing that made me feel better. I turned around and there they were, leaving the #4 checkout lane. Guess what? Patsy bought the same light bulb I went in for. What took them so long? Who knows? I didn’t ask, as I was just happy to get out of there. Next stop, Wal-Mart. I let them off at the front entrance. Our last conversation was that they would be in the women’s department looking for jeans. I walked directly to that department immediately after parking the car. They were nowhere to be found, so I walked the store like I did at Home Depot, but there was no sign of them. A female sales representative in the women’s department noticed that I was walking back and forth and politely ask, “Sir, may I help you?” I said, “No, I’ve lost my wife.” She looked me directly in the eyes and said, “Mister, I know men who would kill to be in your position!” Like Home Depot, I headed for the chairs between the checkout counters and the exit. Watching the people coming and going, I thought it would be fun to get some of my friends to meet at Wal-Mart on a given day, WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


synchronize our watches, and on a set time we would all shop in slow motion. A woman is capable of shopping in one store for hours. Knowing this I reconciled myself that it may be sometime before we leave. So what can a man do to entertain himself while waiting for his wife? As a kid we would set all of the alarm clocks to ring at the same time at McCrory’s Five and Dime store in Plant City. Can’t do that any more, because times have changed and all the clocks are electric. Maybe I could create some excitement if I went to the sporting goods department, picked up a shotgun and ask the clerk if he knows where the antidepressants are. Or, go into a fitting room, close the door and wait a minute; then yell loudly, “Hey, somebody! I need some toilet paper in here!”

I didn’t score any points when I told them on the way back to the house that the next time they would not have to spend an hour getting all dressed up if they went to the Dollar Store instead of Wal-Mart. I guess men just don’t understand that women like to browse while shopping. Erma Bombeck said it best, “Shopping is a woman thing. It’s a contact sport like football. Women enjoy the scrimmage, the noisy crowds, the danger of being trampled to death, and the ecstasy of the purchase.” As for me, the next time they want to go shopping I’ll hand them the car keys and say, ‘Have fun. Where’s the flipper, it’s almost game time.’

Getting restless, I walked back to the women’s department and there they were. I didn’t ask where they had been because their shopping cart gave the answer. They spent about 30-minutes in the grocery department shopping for potato chips and a few odds and ends. I spent the next 30-minutes waiting for Patsy and Cynthia in the chair by the exit. Out of the corner of my eye I could see them in line emptying the shopping cart. That one pair of jeans turned out to be four pair, a couple of sweaters, three pair of socks, two bras, four slips, and a pair of wool gloves. If that makes her happy that’s fine with me.

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Part 55

By Ginny Mink

Ornamental Gardening in Florida Continuing in our education on exotic vines and creepers, we follow along as Mr. Charles Torrey Simpson takes us on a trip all the way back to 1926 when he penned his book, Ornamental Gardening in Florida. If you’re new to our voyages, rest assured, there is much to learn from a book that has seen better days. We have been traversing its pages for nearly five years now and the book itself is beginning to show its tremendous age, coming in at 93 years old! Though the pages are yellowed with age, and the binding has begun to break, the words are still quite clear, and we are certain there is much more to glean from Mr. Simpson’s plethora of knowledge about plant life in Florida from that time period. So, we will keep trodding along and see what new and interesting information there is to discover this month. We’ll start with the Argyreia. Mr. Simpson explains, “Two or three species of this genus are cultivated here and they are the aristocrats among the morning glories. The vines are great runners, making vigorous growth and blooming profusely during the warm season.”¹ However, he warns, that, “The descriptions in the books do not exactly fit these plants. They are natives of India and tender.”¹ Ever curious, we wanted to know what other writers had said about these plants since it seemed they were in contrast to Mr. Simpson’s own experiences. Sadly, the links to Indian sites left us with a blank screen and therefore, no additional information. We did locate a write up about the Agryreia nervosa, also known as Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, which is apparently kin to the vine he was discussing. It would appear that people use this as a “natural LSD,” which, of course, we would warn against.² Unfortunately, we didn’t find much else about it, but we welcome you to do your own research and share it with us! So, we move on to Bauhinia. Mr. Simpson describes it as “a half climbing shrub that has been cultivated in Lower Florida and should be generally known. It bears fine, brick-red blossoms continuously from spring till cool weather and is a most desirable plant…It climbs to the tops of tall trees and falls to the ground over which it may trail for a long way and then ascend others. Several years ago I introduced this strange vine and it is doing well here in Dade County.”¹

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As you know, if you travel with us much, whenever Mr. Simpson says a plant is strange, we are instantly intrigued. So, what’s so odd about the Bauhinia? We suspect the strangest aspect is that it is commonly known as the “red orchid tree,” due to the shape of the flowers it presents. Butterflies and hummingbirds are quite drawn to the tree and once it is established it is impressively drought resistant. The site we found said that there is also the potential for it to be toxic to humans and/or animals.³ Obviously, the strangeness he was

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referencing is its ability to be considered both a vine and a tree/shrub as well as the unique look of its flowers. For the sake of remaining on odd ornamentals, we shall now introduce the Caesalpinia nuga. Mr. Simpson writes that, “a rampant sprawler was sent out with a great flourish but it seems to be grown mostly for its savage prickles.”¹ Then he elaborates on his own experience, “I have a specimen which has covered a quarter of an acre of ground and if one goes near it he is sure to get hopelessly caught.”¹ And, as an afterthough he adds, “It does bear yellow flowers though.” The sheer size of his specimen gave us pause for consideration. What did this “rampant sprawler” look like, and how serious are the “savage prickles”? We had to know! We can assure you that Mr. Simpson’s description was absolutely accurate. Make sure you take a look at the stalk included in the pictures for this article. There are an insane number of thorns covering the stems of these plants. No wonder people got “hopelessly caught” anytime they went near them! And, the pictures we found also showed us some really cool flowers that bloom on the Caesalpinia nuga, which is the same thing as the Caesalpinia crista, otherwise known as yellow nicker. Which, when you look at that stem, seems quite appropriate! Having come to the end of this excursion, we feel relatively confident that the best plant he suggested is the Bauhinia. We loved the look of the flowers and since hummingbirds are drawn to them, that makes them all the more valuable to us. We’d certainly avoid yellow nicker, especially with kids who like to run around outside barefoot. And, if we’re honest, we’d stay away from Hawaiian Baby Woodrose. We don’t need hallucinogenic plants growing in our yards. Hopefully, you gained some knowledge on this trip as well, so we’ll look forward to seeing you next month. Until then, happy gardening! Resources: ¹ Simpson, Charles T. (1926). Ornamental Gardening in Florida. Published by the Author; Little River, FL. Printed by J.J. Little and Ives Company, New York. (p. 180-182). ²WebMD. Hawaiian Baby Woodrose. https://www.webmd.com/ vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-325/hawaiian-baby-woodrose ³Almost Eden Plants. Bauhinia galpinii. https://www.almostedenplants.com/shopping/products/11012-red-orchid-treepride-of-de-kaap-red-bauhinia-african-plume/ Photo Credits: Keats, Derek. (2012). Bauhinia. (Flickr) https://flic.kr/p/bJQuDe. Valke, Dinesh. (2010). Caesalpiniaceae. (Flickr) https://flic.kr/ p/8ena3n. Valke, Dinesh. (2013). Crested Fever Nut. Caesalpinia crista. (Flickr) https://flic.kr/p/fcB7RT. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


A GROWING JOHN DEERE FAMILY:

Everglades Equipment Group Acquires Landscape Supply Company

ORLANDO

NEW LOCATIONS

ST. CLOUD

117 13th Street, 12049 S Orange Blossom Trail St. Cloud, FL 34769 Orlando, FL 32837 www.EvergladesEquipmentGroup.com

We believe our investment in good people, product availability, quality parts, outstanding service, and our focus on meeting our customers’ needs as efficiently and effectively as possible is the only way to keep you coming back. Our family initially began in farming and continues to operate a farming operation, so we understand what it takes to make a business a success! Mike Schlechter, President BELLE GLADE | BOYNTON BEACH | BROOKSVILLE | CLEARWATER | FORT MYERS | FORT PIERCE | IMMOKALEE | LEESBURG LOXAHATCHEE | NAPLES | ODESSA | OKEECHOBEE | ORLANDO | PALMETTO | PLANT CITY | SARASOTA | ST. CLOUD

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Grazing New Trails: Florida’s Young Cattlewomen By Erica Der Hall Photos by Blair Buchanon Ever since cattle were first introduced to Florida in 1521 by Juan Ponce de Leon, generation after generation have stewarded this important industry and continued to ensure the vitality of Florida cattle. That trend continues as a young generation of cattlemen and cattlewomen are currently rising up to carry on Florida’s cow-calf legacy. Two young ladies from Polk County are a part of Florida’s cattle future and both started at an early age learning and leading in the cattle industry. Carlee Taylor, a fourth grader at Winston Academy of Engineering, raises Brangus cattle and exhibits them at livestock shows throughout the state of Florida and around the country. Her friend, Kylee McMullen, an eighth grader at Lake Gibson Middle School, raises and specializes in Brahman cattle, operating her own breeding program and showing her cattle across the United States. This year’s theme for the Florida Cattleman’s Association is “Showing Your Passion” and both young ladies are certainly examples of passion for the industry.

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Carlee started her herd about four years ago with an Ultrablack heifer named Abby. Carlee’s speciality is the Ultrablack Brangus. According to the International Brangus Breeders Association, “Ultrablack and Ultrared animals are registered composite animals with 3/16 Brahman genetics.” To create ultra cattle, you breed a registered Brangus with a registered Angus. The ultra cattle allows for the introduction of new genetics to produce an animal that has calving ease, excellent marbling and easily adapts to various environments.

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Carlee Taylor Courtesy Photo Carlee has continued to increase her herd by utilizing breeding technologies such as artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization to help produce her show string of cattle which consists of seven animals. Carlee’s bred and owned heifer, CT Something Special 698E, won Grand Champion honors at the 2018 World Brangus Congress in the Ultra Division. Kylee’s first taste of the cattle life was at the age of eight when she purchased and began exhibiting her first Brahman heifer named Star. “American Brahman cattle, the first beef breed developed in the United States, rank number one in hybrid vigor, heat tolerance and efficiency compared to all other beef breeds. With improved growth and performance, Brahman cattle increase profitability and play an important role in crossbreeding programs worldwide. Brahman cattle are the common thread connecting other American breeds developed in the last century,” according to the American Brahman Breeders Association. Kylee’s Star launched her into a WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Carlee Taylor breeding program that now consists of ten to fifteen head in her barn at all times. Kylee incorporates the use of artificial insemination in order to bring the best genetics possible to her herd.

Kylee McMullen Courtesy Photo Carlee and Kylee work with and exhibit two different types of cattle but have forged a friendship over their love for the bovine species. “We became friends by helping each other out at local shows and if one of us needed help showing our animals, the other jumped in and assisted,” Kylee said. Their friendship has blossomed through the years and now they are not only friends but also cheer each other on at the many shows they both participate in each year in Florida and around the country. As members of the Junior Florida Cattlemen’s Association or JFCA, Carlee and Kylee load their trailers and head out to shows throughout the year to participate in the JFCA Points Program which rewards young cattlemen and cattlewomen

who participate in the JFCA beef shows with point earnings for their particular breed. At the end of the show season, points are tallied and the point winner for each area is the champion. Points are awarded based on class placings at each of the shows. Exhibitors also have the opportunity to compete for showmanship points, or how well the exhibitor presents their animal in the ring, and champions for each age division are awarded for showmanship, as well. While the championship announcement will not be made until the summer, Carlee has been one of the leading contenders for the Brahman Influence category and Kylee one of the point leaders for the Brahman category. They have exhibited their animals in Tampa, Okeechobee, Kissimmee, Chiefland and Ocala and received high marks at each show including more grand champions than you can shake a stick at. With such great success in Florida, these young ladies have taken their cattle beyond the borders of the state to exhibit from here to Kansas and everywhere in between, including a run at the Houston Livestock Show. While all the ribbons, titles and accolades are exciting, and certainly validate the hard work that these young cattlewomen are putting in day after day, they are not the most important rewards. “This environment is so different and the people are different. I have made friends from here to Texas and back,” Kylee said. “The confidence, business skills, public speaking abilities and more have all caused me to grow as a person.” The entire process of raising, exhibiting and selling cattle instills a skill set that can often be hard to find. Carlee said, “I have competed in many different competitions with my cattle such as fitting and grooming, salesmanship and public speakContinued on page 34 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Florida

Ciruela By Sandy Sun, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science

Fresh Florida Ciruela is a delicious, sweet fruit also known as the plum, Mexican plum, red or purple mombin, hog plum, or jocote. Ciruela is a popular fruit among the tropics, especially in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Ciruela is yellow to green in color and turns in purple or red when ripe. The skin is thin, waxy, and edible. Inside, the yellow pulp is sweet and juicy when ripe and surrounds a large, inedible pit. The flavor is both sweet and tart. The fruit is highly nutritious and rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. They also contain carotene, B-complex vitamins, and several important amino acids. The University of Florida has recently developed new cultivars of plums adapted to the warm winters and unique growing conditions of the state. Several of these cultivars ripen as early as May, earlier than plums from other regions of the country. According to the University of Florida Extension office, four Japanese-type plum varieties bred for Florida’s climate may become the basis for a new commercial fruit crop in the state.

Nutritional Profile The outer peel of the ciruela is entirely edible and contains most of the fiber in the fruit. One medium piece of fruit contains 30 calories, 0.2 g fat, 7.5 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, and 0.5 g protein. It also provides plentiful amounts of vitamins A and C, potassium, calcium, iron, and several of the B vitamins, as well as quite a few antioxidants.

Antioxidants: Fight off disease Plums are very high in disease-fighting antioxidants, which work to neutralize destructive free radicals in the body. When healthy cells are damaged, they are more susceptible to disease and certain types of cancer, and antioxidants may help slow the progression of conditions like asthma, arthritis, and colon cancer. Diets that contain fruits and vegetables high in vitamin C, including ciruela, are linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Vitamin C: For a strong immune system PAGE

Fresh Florida ciruela is a very good source of vitamin C, which has many important functions in the body. Eating foods con-

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taining vitamin C significantly raises the amount of iron your body absorbs. Adequate intake and absorption of iron is necessary to prevent anemia. Vitamin C also supports the body’s immune system in its ability to fight infections and viruses. Additionally, this vitamin is involved in keeping capillaries, gums, and skin healthy and supple.

Fiber: For regularity and good health Research has shown that dietary fiber has a protective effect against cardiovascular diseases, by lowering blood cholesterol levels and slowing the progression of heart disease in high-risk individuals. Fiber also promotes bowel regularity and increases satiety levels, which can aid in weight control.

How to select and store For optimal taste, choose ripe ciruela that yields slightly to gentle pressure and has a fragrant smell. Look for a richly colored purple to red colored skin that is free of cuts and blemishes. You can also pick firm fruits since they will continue to ripen even after picking. The ripening process can be accelerated by placing the fruit in a paper bag overnight. Once ripe, refrigerate for up to one week. Rinse under cool running water before eating or preparing.

How to enjoy Fresh ripe ciruela is soft, sweet, juicy, and delicious eaten outof-hand. Eat the fruit as you would a plum ---you can eat the peel but discard the stone in the center. Ciruela can also be used to make beverages, boiled to make a syrup or jam, or mashed and made into ice cream. Ciruela can be chopped and added to cereal, oatmeal, salad, or even ice cream. Stewed fruit can be served with oatmeal for breakfast or as a dessert. Enjoy this beautiful, fragrant fruit during Florida’s peak season, and load up on vitamins with every juicy, sweet bite.

Selected References http://www.uga.edu http://www.whfoods.com WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


NEWS BRIEFS Compiled by Jim Frankowiak

Farm Bureau Members Offered Savings on Caterpillar Machines & Attachments

its mission to protect American agriculture and natural resources.

Florida Farm Bureau members have an opportunity to save up to $5,000 on eligible Caterpillar machines, and an additional $250 credit on work tool attachments purchased at the same time. These discounts may combined with other discounts, promotions, rebates that may be available from Caterpillar or local dealers.

Users can search the site by type (plant or animal), keyword (avian, fruit fly, cotton, etc,) or by the specific pest or disease. Access the page at: www.aphis.usda.gov/pests-and-diseases.

Interested Farm Bureau members may contact their county Farm Bureau office or by calling 352-374-1585.

NRCS Provides Technical Assistance at No Cost The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides conservation technical assistance to private landowners, conservation districts, tribes and other organizations at no cost. NRCS delivers this assistance through its voluntary Conservation Technical Assistance Program (CTA) participants interested in conserving natural resources and sustaining agricultural production. Additional information is available by contacting the Plant City Service Center, 201 South Collins Street, Suite 201 or by calling 813-752-1474.

SIXTH ANNUAL STRAWBERRY PICKING CHALENGE RAISES OVER $90,000 FOR R.C.M.A.

UF Blueberry Program has Web-Based Resource for Florida Growers Florida blueberry growers have access to the University of Florida blueberry program’s web-based resource with information and data on 38 different southern highbush cultivars developed at UF, including descriptions of characteristics, best suited growing areas and fruit quality and yield data. The site – blueberrybreeding.com – offers added information on staff members, helpful blogs and other information resources.

Deadline for NRCS Ag Easements April 25 The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is accepting applications to fund agricultural easements in Florida until April 25. NRCS provides financial and technical assistance to conserve working lands and wetlands through two programs: the Agricultural Land Easements (ALE) and Wetlands Reserve Easements (WRE). For more information, contact NRCS District Conservationist Diana Allevant-Echevarria at the NRCS office in Plant City, 201 South Collins Street, Suite 201, by telephone: 813-743-4882 or by email: Diana.Allevanet@fl.usda.gov.

UF Ranked 33rd Among University Ag and Forestry Programs Globally

The 6th Annual Wish Farms Strawberry Picking Challenge presented by Monte Package Company raised more than $90,000 benefitting the children of Redlands Christian Migrant Association, (RCMA). RCMA operates child-care centers and charter schools serving Florida’s low-income rural population, particularly the children of agricultural workers. Since the inaugural event in 2014, the challenge has raised more than $513,000 for RCMA.

USDA LAUNCHES NEW HEALTHY EATING CAMPAIGN The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has begun a new campaign to help simplify the nutrition information reaching Americans daily. The Start Simple with MyPlate campaign provides ideas and inspirations we can Incorporate into our daily lives to help improve our health and well being over time. The USDA recommends visiting www.choosemyplat.gov/ startsimple to get started.

USDA LAUNCHES WEB PAGE FOR PESTS AND DISEASES The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has a new “Pests and Diseases” webpage, listing all programs managed by APHIS as part of

FDACS Encourages Submissions of Material Lists for “Operation Cleansweep” FDACS anticipates allowing a minimum of 1,000 pounds free for pick-up per “Operation Cleansweep” participant of qualifying material. First round pick-up dates have not been announced, but FDACS is encouraging potential participants to submit their material lists as soon as possible. Forms must be filed for each where items are to be picked up. Forms can be secured by contacting Shannon Turner via email: Shannon. Turner@freshfromflorida.com or by calling: 850-617-7853. Items that do not qualify for free pick-up include fertilizer (unless it is pesticide-coated: paint (antifouling paint is acceptable), empty pesticide containers, gas cylinders or sludge. Ag Container Recycling Council (ACRC) recycles plastic containers that are 55-gallons or small and USAg Recycling, Inc., recycles containers larger than 55-gallons. The company can be reached via www.usagrecycling.com or by calling 800654-3145. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) recently released it 2019 World University Ranking by Subject and the University of Florida holds the 33rd position in the Agriculture and Forestry Category. Wageningen University in the Netherlands holds the top global ranking in that category. This is the 7th year the London-based firm has ranked universities around the world in this category to “help prospective students identify the world’s leading schools their chosen field.”


By Grady Judd, Polk County Sheriff

Forming an Alliance

When it comes to solving agriculture crimes, the key component is building an alliance with the farmers and ranchers our deputies serve. PCSO agricultural and environmental deputies recently attended the Central Florida Ag Alliance luncheon, which is important for networking with the community as well as other law enforcement officers. The Florida Agricultural Crimes Intelligence Unit (FACIU,) Polk County Cattlemen’s Association and the Polk County Farm Bureau held the luncheon at Water’s Ranch in Bartow to connect farmers and ranchers with agriculture deputies in one venue. Around 200 people were in attendance including sheriff’s deputies from across the state as well as agents from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agriculture. The luncheon not only serves as a time to meet and greet, it allows everyone to exchange information and to help law enforcement officers better protect agribusiness and property.

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The mission of the Florida Agricultural Crimes Intelligence Unit is to promote and facilitate the exchange of agricultural

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related intelligence to law enforcement officers specializing in agriculture crime investigations in the State of Florida. Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick presented the unit with a check to support FACIU training seminars. The FACIU first formed in 1978 when deputies from various Central and South Florida Sheriff’s Offices met with investigators from the Florida Department of Agricultural Marks and Brands division to discuss the need to form an agriculture intelligence unit. The first training conference was held in 1980 with support from the Florida Farm Bureau Insurance Group. Through training seminars and networking events like the recent luncheon, the FACIU continues its mission to develop and implement solutions to the unique crimes that affect agriculture production and rural communities throughout the State of Florida. Our deputies advise the best opportunity to serve farmers and ranchers begins with communication. If you have an important matter or agricultural-related crime you’d like to discuss with our Ag. Crimes Unit, they can be reached during normal business hours at 863-534-7205, or at any time at 863298-6200.

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s e p i c e R

Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Chef Justin Timineri

Florida Cucumber and Sweet Pepper Salad

q Ingredients q 2 Florida bell peppers (or 12 small sweet peppers), seeds removed and sliced thin (a variety of colored peppers is recommended) 2 Florida cucumbers 1 red onion 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped fine 1 tablespoon fresh herbs (basil, thyme, oregano or mint) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon olive oil Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS Add all ingredients, except the salt and pepper, to a medium-sized mixing bowl. Lightly toss all ingredients to coat. Taste salad and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Keep refrigerated and serve cold.

Florida Tomato Linguine SautĂŠ q Ingredients q

2 pounds ripe Florida tomatoes 1 pound whole-wheat linguine (or your favorite pasta) 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 bunch fresh basil, hand torn (or 1 tablespoon

dried) 1/2 cup olive oil 1 lemon, zested and juiced Freshly grated Parmesan cheese Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS Wash and rinse tomatoes. Dry tomatoes, then core and cut in half. Use a spoon to remove most of the seeds. Chop tomatoes coarsely. Add chopped tomatoes to a colander, sprinkle with a few pinches of salt and let them sit so they can release some of their water (this should only take a half an hour and can be done ahead of time). Combine drained tomatoes, olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest and garlic into a large sautĂŠ pan. Heat tomato mixture over low heat (the idea is to warm the mixture and not cook it). Cook and drain pasta according to package directions. Combine pasta and tomato mixture together in a bowl. Add fresh basil and Parmesan to pasta dish. Taste for seasoning and adjust with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. Serve warm with crusty bread or chill for later. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Continued from page 29

Kylee McMullen

ing, that have allowed me to learn new skills. I have learned how to talk with people, interact with others and how to sell my product.” As you can imagine, young ladies like Carlee and Kylee have a dedicated family behind them, teaching and guiding them each step of the way. Carlee’s parents, Carlton and Laura Lee

Courtesy photo that are highly effective yet cost efficient so that young people can carry out a quality breeding program while still maintaining a profit. Their feed ration, J. McMullen mix, is available to all exhibitors and can be found at Walpole Feed and Supply in Okeechobee and Cattleman’s Feed and Ranch in Polk City. “Even though Kylee and Carlee often have to miss school to participate in these events and programs, they have top academics and understand the importance of performing with excellence both in school and in the show barn,” Jason said. From the Polk County Youth Fair to the Houston Livestock Show, Carlee and Kylee can be found on the road exhibiting their impressive show strings and when they return home, they are fine tuning their program’s genetics to achieve top performing cattle. These two young ladies are examples of working hard, remaining dedicated and committing oneself to excellence. As they continue on to adulthood, we can be confident in their abilities and in the countless young people in our state who are committed to seeing the future of Florida cattle.

Courtesy photo Taylor, own TaylorMade Cattle Company in Lakeland, Florida. Laura Lee served as the President of the International Junior Brangus Association in 1998 and Carlton currently serves as President of the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association. They have instilled a love for the industry in Carlee and their son Truman and truly see the value of being involved with raising, exhibiting and marketing Florida cattle.

The next time you are at a local fair, or find yourself ringside at a livestock show, take a moment to talk with some of the exhibitors you encounter. You are sure to find well spoken, knowledgable, courteous and passionate young people, like Carlee and Kylee, who give great hope for the future of the industry and the world.

“While it is not all about the winning, these opportunities teach young people how to have a healthy keep and cull program, how to manage their operation and life skills that will serve them wherever they go. It starts with simply learning how to show up, be present and ask for help from others,” Laura Lee shared.

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Kylee’s parents, Jason and Jessica McMullen, introduced Kylee to cattle at the age of eight and her interest was immediately sparked. They now work in developing feeding rations

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Adopt A Horse, And Get Paid For It! by John Dicks

Got some land? How about adopting a horse? The federal government will even pay you $1,000 to do so. You can search a database online, too, and pick out one just the right age, gender, color or particular look that you’d like to see roaming around your farm or ranch. Maybe, also, you’d like a burro or two. You’ll get a $1,000 each for them as well. Yes, I know. The idea of it all does seem a bit strange. But the Bureau of Land Management, or BLM, has adopted a new approach to thinning its ever growing herd. It’s estimated that there are more than 66,000 wild horses scattered on 26 million acres of government property, mainly in 10 western states. There’s also some 15,000 burros grazing the lands. The problem is that officials calculate that the ideal level for both populations combined is less than 27,000! Even more problematic is that those numbers are in addition to the estimated 50,000 horses already available for adoption in corrals or in off-range pastures that have been there long-term. So what do you do when you have nearly three times as many animals as the sustainable number needed? Apparently the “deciders” have decided that the solution is to pay people to adopt them! Previously, the policy was to charge people when they wanted to get a horse from the government. Essentially, if you wanted one, you paid $125 to BLM. That seems like a bargain for a horse, but apparently not enough people were plunking down the bucks for the wild mustangs! That all changed just last month when the BLM made the switch from charging people to paying people to adopt and take a horse and/or burro off its hands. Specifically, the new program pays new owners $500 within 60 days of adoption, and another $500 within 60 days of titling the animal, which presumably means about a year later, after they have proved they have owned it responsibly for a year. The folks at the BLM suggest that this saves money for taxpayers. It’s come to that conclusion by calculating that the $1,000 adoption payout actually costs about half of what it does to otherwise keep each animal for a year.

So, now the BLM has morphed its animal reduction program into what it calls the Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Incentive Program. Its stated goal is to encourage more adopters to give a wild horse or burro a good home. The program is the first such incentive offered by the BLM in its nearly 50 years of management responsibility brought about by the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which detailed the agency’s duties as the legal custodian of wild horses and burros in the United States. The details and all the info you might need to get involved are found at a website specifically put together for the program by the BLM. You can find it at: https://www.blm.gov/ programs/wild-horse-and-burro/adoptions-and-sales/ adoption-incentive-program To makes things more “pet” friendly, BLM has even established a website with headshots of horses and burros for you to choose from. You can sort through at random, or get search for specifics, including gender, age, color, height and even disposition! Here’s the website: wildhorsesonline.blm. gov/Animals If the prospect of adopting some horses and burros sounds appealing, but you can’t bear the burden and hassle, much less the cost of travel and transporting the animals back home from out west, fear not, for the government has worked wonders to make delivery a bit less painless than you would imagine. As part of the process, the BLM has established optional satellite pick up locations around the country, including one in Ocala. The dates change, seemingly at random, thus you are best advised to check the website for details. Since it seems that every government program has some strange, if not quirky kinks to its operation, the BLM has decided that regardless of its initiative to give away $1,000 for your adopting a horse and/or burro, you still must pay a $25 “adoption fee,” presumably to cover its costs of administration. Can you just opt to collect $975 instead? Nope. You must, in essence, exchange checks with the BLM as some sort of administrative fee to participate. At least the government has not disappointed us by failing to enact some arcane and inane rule to what hopefully and ultimately will be good for the horses and burros!

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John Dicks is both a Lawyer and Businessman, including an interest in farming. He and his family have owned a blueberry farm and have agricultural lands which they lease for cattle operations, as John says, “to someone who knows and handles cattle much better than I do!” John is both a Gator, having received his undergraduate degree from the University of Florida, and a Seminole, with his law degree from Florida State University. He and his wife, Sharon, live in Plant City, where he served nine years as City Commissioner, including three terms as Mayor.

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E n d a n g e r e d S p e c i es

The Dead Leaf Disguise: Florida Leafwing Endangered

By Ginny Mink

If we are honest, many of us really enjoy the beauty of butterflies flitting around the yard. We are enamored by their colors and the vibrancy with which they live their very short lives. While the Florida Leafwing would not initially grab our attention, the fact that this poor creature is on the way out of this world if we don’t do something, makes it worthy of further consideration. At first glance, this butterfly, with wings in the up position, looks very much like a dead leaf. However, its almost obnoxious orange or red top color, which is only visible when wings are down, makes it hard to miss.¹ Its camouflage is impressive, especially when its true colors come out. The basis for its dead leaf look is the fact that it resides in the pine rockland habitats located in South Florida. The pineland there is home to what scientists believe is its only host plant, the pineland croton. These butterflies are visible year round if you get lucky enough to see them, but their colors will change with the seasons getting brightest during the summer months.² If you are serious about butterfly watching, then some additional information about the Florida Leafwing’s appearance could be useful. Interestingly enough, their top wing curves into a slight hook where as their hindwings include a pointed tail. These wings don’t surpass 3 ½ inches in span.³ Thankfully, with wings outspread you will have a better chance of recognizing these seriously endangered butterflies. In time past, the Florida Leafwing spanned across Monroe and Miami-Dade counties. However, their populations have severely declined and now their distribution is quite limited. In fact, no one has seen the Florida Leafwing outside of the Everglades National Park since 2007. Today, scientists believe that these unique creatures don’t live anywhere else in the world.¹ The Florida Leafwing is an example of sexual dimorphism, meaning that the males and females have different bodies. For this species, the females are slightly bigger than their male counterparts.² The males wait for females by perching on twigs way up high, about 10 feet off the ground. Eggs are then laid, individually, on the leaves of the pineland croton. The caterpillars eat the leaves, then they make their perches from a vein of a leaf. Ultimately, they will create a rolled-up shelter out of leaves prior to turning into butterflies. The adults will live off of rotting fruit and dung.³ Due to the fact that the Florida Leafwing only has one host plant, their survival is dependent upon the health of the pineland crotons. These plants, like many others in the pine rockland habitats, are dependent upon periodic fires. Since the Everglades National Park is the only place these butterflies can be found, it is a good thing they practice prescribed burns to help maintain the health of all the inhabitants of the pine rockland habitat.¹

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Sadly, scientists are still not certain what has caused the serious demise of these gentle creatures. However, like so many other species we find on the endangered list, it is believed that the introduction of nonnative species, habitat destruction, use of insecticides, and butterfly collecting, are the prime culprits. Another, potential issue is that the pine rocklands they call home are threatened by the dangers of rising sea levels.²

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The Florida Leafwing is critically imperiled globally because of the extreme rarity of its existence. There are very few remaining individuals. So, it is imperative that we work to conserve the remaining habitat found in the Everglades National Park to ensure that we do not lose these unique butterflies entirely.³ The first step, of course, was getting the Florida Leafwing included in the Endangered Species Act. This happened in the fall of 2014. Sadly, it took a lawsuit to get this to occur. But now that they are included, it is illegal to capture or harm either the caterpillars or the butterflies themselves. The lawsuit helped enable the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to designate nearly 12000 acres, dispersed over 7 pieces of land, as critical habitat for them.⁴ With this added protection offered to them, it is our hope that they will be able to sustain their own existence. We are hopeful that the protected habitat, along with the prescribed burns, will enable the pineland croton to remain a stable plant because the Florida Leafwing cannot continue without its assistance. It is always amazing to us how things are created to benefit one another. And, as we tell you each time, we are supposed to be stewards of this planet and that means part of our job is to benefit the wellbeing and overall existence of all those creatures and plant life that God put here. Let’s keep doing what we can to make a difference to that end. Resources: ¹National Park Service. Florida Leafwing. https://www.nps. gov/ever/learn/nature/floridaleafwing.htm ²Center for Biological Diversity. Saving the Florida Leafwing Butterfly. https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/invertebrates/Florida_leafwing_butterfly/ ³Butterflies and Moths of North America. Florida Leafwing. Anaea troglodyte floridalis. https://www.butterfliesandmoths. org/species/Anaea-troglodyta-floridalis ⁴Liston, B. (2014). Endangered Florida butterflies to get federal protection. Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usaflorida-butterflies-idUSKBN0GB1UX20140811 Photo Credits: Reago, A. & McClarren, C. (2014). Goatweed Leafwing Butterfly. (Flickr) https://flic.kr/p/nebdYy. – Not a Florida leafwing but as close as we could get. Schmierer, A. (2014). Leafwing Tropical. (Flickr) https://flic.kr/p/ pJJT8t. – Also, not a Florida leafwing, the wings would have a more pronounced hook and there would be a pointed tail. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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A Closer LookAmazing Activities Naturally

by Sean Green

Leaf Skeleton

Simplicity can be beautiful and does not have to be expensive. Twig art is a popular theme for home dĂŠcor and could cost hundreds if purchased from a retail store. This month we will make our own twig shadow box for the cost of a can of paint and a glue gun, even less if you already have these items at home. The shadow box itself is a repurposed cardboard box that my cats got tired of playing in. I had a partial can of stone texture paint that I needed to get rid of and used trimmings from the hedges to create a unique piece of art to hang on the wall. I even found some Bromeliads to add to the shadow box to make it a living addition to the home.

Materials: Cardboard Box Paint or Wood Stain Hot Glue Gun & Glue Sticks

Pruning Shears Twigs Air Plants (Bromeliads) (optional)

Production:

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Trim twigs to size and roughly compose within the box Paint or stain the carboard box Using hot glue, fasten the twigs to the inside of the cardboard box Attach air plants with a small dab of hot glue, ** Let the glue cool for 5 – 10 seconds to avoid burning the plant **

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A Closer Look

by Sean Green Photos courtesy of April Green

Horned spanworm moth (Nematocampa resistaria)

Happy April everyone. April Fool’s Day has always been a lot of fun for me and frequently involves insects. In Celebration April Fool’s Day, we will take a closer look at an insect that is a master of mimicry. The Geometridae (inchworms, loopers, and spanworms) is the second largest family of North American Lepidoptera with more than 1,400 described species. Geometer moths (Geometridae) are known for mimicry in both their adult and larval form. The curved toothed geometer moth (Eutrapela clemataria) for example, resembles a dead leaf as an adult and the leaf stalk (petiole) as a caterpillar. On a recent hiking trip, my wife and I came across a caterpillar that at first appearance seemed parasitized. We have featured articles in the past about fungal parasitism that results in the zombification of insects that end in tiny mushrooms growing out of the insect’s body. We thought this is what we were seeing at first glance, however, when we took a closer look, we realized we had been duped by this caterpillar. What we actually found was a perfectly healthy caterpillar of a moth commonly known as the horned spanworm moth (Nematocampa resistaria).

them grow to more than twice their resting length. The function of the horns is still a bit of a mystery and a popular research topic. Andrei Sourakov, collections coordinator at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville suggested the tentacles white tips direct attention away from the main body of the caterpillar, functioning to divert the attention of a potential predator to a non-critical body part. Others propose the function of the filaments are sensory. The horned spanworm (Nematocampa resistaria) specifically has hair like structures (setae) at the tip of the filaments that are proposed to detect the vibration of wasps, bumble bees or other potential predators (Herrich-Schaffer 1856). Recent studies have confirmed that caterpillars with long filament structures such as the horned spanworm moth (Nematocampa resistaria) and even the Monarch (Danaus plexippus) are more reactive to sounds and vibration than caterpillar that lack the filament. For the horned spanworm moth and other geometer moths that mimic twigs, the reaction of the caterpillar is to freeze in a twig like position when danger is detected (Rothchild and Bergstrom 1997).

The horned spanworm moth was first described as a type species in 1855 (Herrich-Schaffer) but literature for this species dates to 1809 (Haworth) and include drawings from John Abbot, the American naturalist and artist that is regarded for illustrating the earliest series of insect drawings in the New World. Abbot served in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and was granted land in Georgia. It is likely that the earliest illustrations for this species were from specimens he found in Georgia. Nematocampa resistaria became widely recognized for the caterpillar’s distinctive filament bearing tentacles from which the common name Filament Bearer originated, today it is also commonly known as the Horned spanworm moth. This Nearctic species has a southern range in Florida to about Hillsborough or Manatee county. In the Northeast and Canada, it’s single brooded but produces multiple generations in the southern states including Florida. In March we began to see emerging adults in Hillsborough County and can expect to see emergence through July.

Adult moths of this widespread nearctic species are small with a wingspan of less than an inch. Males and females are generally distinguished by physical characteristics (sexually dimorphic). With rare exception, males have yellow hues and females tend towards beige ground color. Both sexes have dark brown markings on the outer edges of the wing. Females typically have angular wings, males are more rounded. If you want to see these cool cats in the wild, look for their host plants which include oak, elm, dogwood, hawthorn, ironwood, hickory and willow. The horned spanworm (Nematocampa resistaria), like most geometroids, is abundant, but also some of the best camouflaged, finding them will not be easy. When you are hiking, look for freshly damaged leaves, geometroids prefer the tender young shoots and will usually be found on the underside of leaves near the new shoots. If the leaves have turned brown where caterpillars have fed, the caterpillars are long gone, and you should keep looking. Collecting may be regulated at some parks and nature centers, please check with the ranger to clarify if there are any restrictions. If you are looking for a variety of geometer moths, birch and oak should be your first stop. Look closely, we think you will be surprised with how easily these insects can fool us with mimicry.

This month we will still be able to see the larval stage (caterpillar) of the moth, the “filaments” will easily distinguish it from other caterpillars. When disturbed, the caterpillar can pump hemplymph (insect blood) into the filaments making

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SAVING WATER TIPS FROM “SWIFTMUD”

By Jim Frankowiak

This time of year is typically the driest and that means peak demand for public water suppliers. The Southwest Water Management District has some tips – for both indoor and outdoor application -- to help save water and lower monthly water bills: INDOORS * Only operate your dishwasher and washing machine when they have full loads * Use the shortest washing cycle for lightly soiled clothes (normal and permanent-press cycles use more water) * Thaw frozen food in the refrigerator or microwave, not under running water * Scrape, don’t rinse, your dishes before loading the dishwasher * Consider installing high-efficiency showerheads, faucets and toilets OUTDOORS • Check your irrigation system for leaks • Turn the irrigation system off, only watering as needed • Don’t leave sprinklers unattended, and use a timer as a reminder to turn them off • Use a hose with a shut-off nozzle when washing vehicles • Consider installing a rain barrel with a drip irrigation system for watering your landscaping. Rainwater is free and contains NO hard minerals The District says leaks are the biggest wasters of water, both inside and outside your home. You can use your water meter to check for leaks. Turn off all faucets and water-using appliances and make sure no one uses any of them while you are testing for leaks. Also, wait for the hot water heater and any ice cube makers to refill and for regeneration of water softeners. Note the meter reading at the start of the test and read it again 30 minutes later. If the reading has changed, you have a leak.

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UF EXPERT: HELP PREVENT CANE TOADS FROM POISONING YOUR PET By Brad Buck Cane toads can put your pet in peril, and they’re more abundant this time of year. But you can take steps to keep your dog or cat safe, says a University of Florida researcher. Although cane toads are more abundant in the spring and summer months, when there’s more rainfall, they can be found just about any time of the year in South Florida, said Steve Johnson, an associate professor of wildlife ecology and conservation at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. “Cane Toad toxin can irritate humans’ skin and eyes,” said Johnson, who’s also a UF/IFAS state wildlife Extension specialist. “If your pet bites or swallows a Cane Toad, it will become sick and may die, so take it to the veterinarian right away.” Symptoms of Cane Toad poisoning in pets include excessive drooling and extremely red gums, head-shaking, crying, loss of coordination and sometimes convulsions. Johnson gets frequent emails and phone calls from residents wanting to know whether the toad in their yard is a Cane Toad, and if so, what they can do to keep their yard and pet safe. Cane toads are tan to reddish-brown, and their backs are marked with dark spots. Adults are 3 to 6 inches long, and their skin is warty.

lieve today’s cane toads came to Florida after escaping from a pet importer in the 1950s. The toads live in Florida, south of Interstate 4, from Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco, Polk and Hendry counties over to the east coast, from Indian River south to Miami-Dade counties. They also hop around in Lee and Collier counties. They’re mainly found in areas where there are people: suburban neighborhoods, school yards, golf courses and similar places, Johnson said. Cane toads roam around mostly at night, when they forage for food. They breed in canals, ditches and retention ponds. If you suspect your pet has been poisoned by a Cane Toad, Johnson has these tips: • Wipe your dog or cat’s mouth thoroughly with a wet rag. • Using a hose, rinse you pet’s mouth for about 10 minutes, keeping its head pointed down so water runs out of the mouth. • Call your veterinarian for more advice. The vet will probably suggest bringing the pet to the office. Go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw432 to learn more about the Cane Toad.

Johnson makes these suggestions to prevent your dog from getting poisoned by a Cane Toad: • Be aware of your pet’s location. • Walk your dog on a short leash, especially at dusk and after dark. • Don’t let your dog sniff under bushes. • Trim shrubs so limbs don’t touch the ground, and remove debris and clutter in your yard. These two measures will make your yard less attractive for toads to hide. • Turn off outside lights, which attract insects and toads. • Don’t leave pet food out at night. Cane toads are native to extreme southern Texas, Central America and northern South America, Johnson said. They were introduced to Florida several times between the 1930s and 1950s, as a form of biological pest control, at least in the early years. But that didn’t work, Johnson said. Scientists beINTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Polk County Cattle Women

Spring is officially here, and so brings life and color to beautiful flowers and blooms, green grass, and baby calves, along with mosquitos, insects and allergies. Allergies can be caused by many things, and not only affect humans; be mindful of your pets, and livestock, as these irritants can cause havoc. Be sure to have them treated accordingly. Thank you to all who participated and volunteered for the Polk County Agri-Fest. We had a great turnout of 4th grade students and teachers from all over Polk County visit the Polk County Extension office to learn about all aspects of the local agriculture industry. This is an annual event, if you are interested in participating for next year, please contact Lori Kuehl at 863-533-0561. PCCW are currently accepting applications for our Academic Scholarship, the deadline for this is April 15, 2019. This scholarship is for Polk County High School seniors who plan on pursuing education in the Agricultural field. Please contact your FFA advisor, Ag teacher, 4-H leader, or Homeschool Director for more info. Applications should be mailed to P. O. Box 1212, Bartow, FL 33831. In addition, Polk County Farm Bureau is accepting applications for the 2019 Will Putnam YF&R Scholarship. Applications will be accepted thru 5:00pm on Friday, May 10, 2019. The application process is open to Polk

Upcoming Events include: June 18 -20, 2019 - Florida Cattlemen’s Association Annual Convention and Trade Show at the Marco Island Marriott, if you plan to attend, it is best to secure your reservations early. July 11, 2019 – Polk County Cattlemen’s meeting and Summer Dinner and Cake Auction. PCCW will award the recipients of our scholarships at the dinner. As always, we welcome new members. If you are interested in joining, our next meeting will be at the Ag Complex in Bartow, Tuesday, May 7, 2019 at 6:30Pm. We would love to see new faces. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me, #863-205-3977.

Missy McLaughlin-Raney Polk County Cattlewomen President

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high school seniors who will pursue a degree in an agriculture related field. Contact Lori Kuehl at 863-5330561 for more information.


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CROP INSURANCE: IT PAYS TO MANAGE YOUR RISK When you purchase risk management coverage with Farm Credit of Central Florida, we return a portion of our commission as patronage dividends to eligible stockholders. Patronage dividends could help lower the cost of insurance premiums, saving you money as you manage your risk. Farm Credit of Central Florida is glad to discuss how we can save you money on your crop insurance with patronage dividends. Feel free to contact our crop insurance specialist, Regina Thomas, at 407.721.4687 or rthomas@farmcreditcfl.com. Patronage dividend distribution is subject to eligibility. Certain limitations, conditions, and exclusions apply for crop insurance. Please refer to the policy for more details.

Important Sales Closing Dates Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) . . . . . . .Feb. 28 Citrus Fruit & Citrus Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .April 15 Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 1 Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 15

86 6 . 245 . 3637 farmcreditcfl.com

Apiary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 15 Blueberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 20

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

April

2019

47

PAGE

WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


PAGE

48

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

April

2019

WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Profile for Berry Publications, Inc

In The Field magazine Polk edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Polk County in Florida

In The Field magazine Polk edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Polk County in Florida

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