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Western & Outdoor Wear, Farm, Ranch & Pet Supplies

S. Jim RedmanJuly Pkwy. (Hwy. 39 S) Plant City, FL • www.southsidewesternwear.com I T F M I T F M 2018 23014 N HE IELD

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CONTENTS

JULY 2018 | VOL. 13 • ISSUE 9 JAKE FITZPATRICK BEGINS HIS TERM AS FLORIDA FFA AREA V STATE VICE PRESIDENT

64 Cover Photo by: Karen Berry PAGE 12 HCSWCD

PAGE 36 Jack Payne

PAGE 56

PAGE 16 CARES

PAGE 44 Garden Challenge

PAGE 62

PAGE 46 John Dicks

PAGE 63

PAGE 48 Endangered Species

PAGE 66

PAGE 18 Fishing Hot Spots PAGE 22 Rocking Chair Chatter PAGE28 Photo Archive

PAGE 50 Glazer Children’s Museum

PAGE 32 Trinidad/Tobago PAGE35 Paw Paw

Native Plants

Managing Manure

Food Safety

Artistic Edibles

PAGE 70 Activity PAGE 71 A Closer Look

PAGE 54 Literary Time Machine

PAGE 74 News Briefs

Hey Readers!

Hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker and a FREE In The Field T-Shirt. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on the page you located the logo to the address below

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InTheField® Magazine P.O. Box 5377 • Plant City, Fl. 33566-0042 *Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner!

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Hillsborough County Farm Bureau 305 S. Wheeler St. Plant City, FL. Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Insurance Services: 813-685-5673 Member Services: 813-685-9121

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Kenneth Parker....................President

Dennis Carlton Jr................Vice President

Michelle Williamson..............Treasurer Buddy Coleman..................Secretary DIRECTORS FOR 2017 - 2018

Jake Cremer, Tiffany Dale, Carson Futch, Jim Frankowiak, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Tony Lopez, Rep. Jake Raburn, Emeritus, Sambahv, Marty Tanner, Vincent Tort, Carl Bauman, Will Womack , Melissa Grimes.

Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813-685-9121 Farm Bureau Insurance Special Agents

Valrico Office 813-685-5673

100 S. Mulrennan Rd., Valrico, FL. 33594 Tommy Hale, CLU, ChFC, CASL, CPCU Agency Mgr. Juile Carlson, John McGuire

Plant City Office 813.752.5577

305 S. Wheeler St., Plant City, FL 33563 Jeff Summer Bill Williams

Tampa Office 813.933.5440

6535 Gunn Highway, Tampa, FL.33625 Greg Harrell, Sonia Valladares

AGENCY MANAGER Tommy Hale WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


ININTTHE FFIELD HE IELDM MAGAZINE AGAZINE

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STAFF Publisher/Photography Karen Berry Senior Managing Editor/ Associate Publisher Sarah Holt Left to Right Patsy Berry, Lori DeMello, Kellie Corry, Karen Berry, Al Berry

Remembering Dad “Al Berry” As I write this it’s been exactly three weeks since my father “Al Berry” passed away. You may know him best from his monthly article “Rocking Chair Chatter.” We have gotten many emails, phone calls, and one on one conversations asking, “Will this be the end of Rocking Chair Chatter”? The answer is no. When my Dad would visit their mountain home in Blairsville, Georgia he would go up to the second floor, surrounded by huge windows with mountains views that seem to go on forever. Dad would tell me that is when he would knock out months worth of Rocking Chair Chatter. With that being said we have some that have not yet been published. When those run out we will start pulling them from 2004 and go forward.

Editor-In-Chief Al Berry Editor Patsy Berry Sales Melissa Nichols Chandler Workman Karen Berry Sarah Holt

I want to share a few things more with you about Dad. When I decided to start In The Field Magazine I didn’t know what we were going to call it. Judi Whitson with the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau was my sounding board. I would call her and say what do you think about this name? This went on for at least two weeks until one day, while sitting in my office, I get a phone call from Dad.

Creative Director/Illustrator Juan Alvarez

(Me) Hey Dad whats up? (Dad) I am driving down Highway 39 and looked to my right and noticed a lot of cattle in the field. Then it hit me. What do you think about calling the magazine “in the field”? As soon as I heard it I knew that was it. I quickly called Judi and she agreed. Since November 2004 In The Field Magazine has been a staple in Hillsborough and Polk County with one goal, to promote agriculture.

Staff Writers Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Breanne Williams

The death of a loved one is one of the most difficult things to experience in life. It was painful for my whole family to watch my father slowly go downhill physically. He fought as hard as he could and kept an amazing positive attitude. Dad always had a smile on his face and hardly ever stopped. I never once heard Dad speak ill of anyone and, since his passing; I have learned so many wonderful things he did in the community and to those on a one on one basis. I wish I could share everything because I really feel it could help encourage someone. But what I have learned through all this is Be Kind To People and be the person who can Make A Difference. That was my Dad. He was an amazing father that has left an incredible legacy. I look forward to seeing my Dad again. He and my mom raised me and my sisters to be strong in our faith and with that being said, I know what Gods word says and it brings comfort to me. Thessalonians 4:16-18 “For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. After that, we will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever. Therefore encourage each other with these words.” Thank you to all our readers and advertisers and our farmers and ranchers. It’s because of you that we get to continue every month to publish what we feel is so important. As we sit down to eat remember where your food came from and the hard work that goes in to getting it there. Be kind to one another and go out and make a difference!

Karen Berry Publisher

Photography Karen Berry

Contributing Writers Woody Gore John Dicks

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In the Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc.

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Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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IMPORTANT “HOMEWORK” HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY

- Kenneth Parker - President

Dear Readers: I’m pretty sure the majority of you who are reading this letter have been out of school for some time. However, you have some very important “homework” to do over the near term. It’s not course-related but proper and needed preparation for the upcoming election season. Florida Farm Bureau, our members and our partners, have the wherewithal to make an impact in the Florida legislature and in statewide cabinet races. Supporting and promoting good, quality leaders who will help strengthen and grow Florida agriculture is a priority for our organization and its members

ing a candidate and supporting his or her campaign or beginning the relationship building process, it is important for you to become involved. Your homework is to familiarize yourself with the candidates that are running for election and the issues that will be on the ballot so you can make informed decisions about both. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Florida Farm Bureau’s State Legislative Affairs office in Tallahassee at 850-222-2557. We welcome your participation in those initiatives that will help bring the “Voice of Florida Agriculture” on the campaign trail during this election season.

We want to reward legislators for voting in support of agricultural issues and to support candidates we believe will advocate on behalf of farmers and ranchers in Florida. Our primary election is set for August 28. More than 350 candidates have filed to run for office and that includes the House and Senate as well as all four cabinet positions: Governor, Attorney General, Chief Financial Officer and Commissioner of Agriculture. There is one U.S. Senate seat open, all 27 Congressional seats, one state Supreme Court justice and thirteen constitutional amendments.

If your family does not belong to Farm Bureau, please consider joining so you can help make our voice that much louder. Please remember you don’t have to be a farmer or rancher to join. For more information, visit: hcfarmbureau.org, call us at 813-685-9121.

Given those numbers, it is essential for you to become engaged in the campaigns now. Whether it is choos-

Kenneth Parker - President

Thank you.

Kenneth Parker

305 SOUTH WHEELER STREET • PLANT CITY, FL 33566 • 813-685-9121 Board of Directors

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Kenneth Parker, President; Dennis Carlton, Jr. , Vice-President; Michelle WIlliamson Treasurer; Buddy Coleman, Secretary; Will Womack Member-at-large, Carl Bauman, Jake Cremer, Tiffany Dale, Carson Futch, Melissa Grimes, Jim Frankowiak, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Tony Lopez, Lawrence McClure, Jake Raburn, Member Emeritus, Sambahv, Marty Tanner, Vincent Tort Judi Whitson, Executive Director

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By Jim Frankowiak

DISTRICT INVITES PUBLIC TO ATTEND WORKING GROUP MEETING; AREA YOUTH ENCOURAGED TO ENTER SUMMER POSTER CONTEST

The Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation District (HSWCD) is extending an invitation to all area agricultural producers, partner agencies, associations and the public to attend its Local Working Group meeting July 25 at the Florida Strawberry Growers Association 13138 Lewis Gallagher Road in Dover. The meeting will begin at 3 p.m. and is anticipated to end by 5 p.m. “Our agenda includes presentations on Best Management Practices and available Cost Share Programs,” said HSWCD Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Proctor. Matt Warren, environmental manager with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will discuss Best Management Practices while the Southwest Florida Water Management District will provide attendees with information on the FARMS Cost Share Program.

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“We encourage attendees to present and discuss local issues and concerns that we can address moving forward,” said HSWCD Executive Director Betty Jo Tompkins, who will also present a recap of the 2nd Annual Hillsborough 100, a nine-day showcase of conservation projects

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throughout Hillsborough County coincident with Earth Day and National Stewardship Week. The HSWCD has also announced a new Summer Poster Contest for area youth. This year’s theme is “Our Tremendous Trees” and participants will have until July 31 to submit their entries. The competition consists of junior and senior categories with cash prizes awarded to the top three winners in each category. The Junior Category is comprised of Kindergarten – 1st grade, 2nd and 3rd grade and 4th- 6th grade, while the Senior Categories include 7th–9th grade and 1012th grade. Posters should be ½ poster board size and include the theme on the front. All posters entered into the competition will be on display at the Hillsborough County Fair between October 18-21 and October 25-29. Contest submissions and inquiries should be sent to the HSWCD office at 201 South Collins Street, Suite 202, Plant City, FL 33563. Calls are directed to 813/752-1474, Extension 3, or 813/477-8332. The District’s online address is: soilandwater@ hcflgov.net.

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Prepare Now. Sign up for an On-Farm Readiness Review.

Are you FSMA compliant? The first Food Safety Modernization Act Produce Safety Rule (PSR) compliance dates have arrived. Very large farms with average annual sales exceeding $500,000 in the last three years were required to be compliant with the PSR as of Jan. 26, 2018, with the exception of the water requirements. Sign up now to request a Free On-Farm Readiness Review, offered in partnership by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and University of Florida IFAS. The OFRR is an opportunity to receive on-farm education and technical assistance to help farms align practices with the PSR regulatory requirements.

For more information on FSMA and to sign up for an OFRR, visit FreshFromFlorida.com/FSMA or call (863) 578-1900.

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Speedling Grows the CARE in CARETAKER By Cacee Hilliard, CARES Coordinator

Conservation of natural resources comes in many forms. At Speedling in Bushnell vegetable and ornamental transplants are produced in greenhouses with sustainability at the forefront of the company’s mission. In 2016, Speedling was awarded a County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship (CARES) designation for their long- term commitment to natural resource protection. CARES is a Florida Farm Bureau Federation program that publicly recognizes farmers and ranchers who voluntarily implement Best Management Practices (BMPs) on their farms. The wonderful staff at Speedling not only care about producing a high- quality, sustainable product but also about the people who work within the company. CEO, Greg Davis, explained it best, “When I think of the CARES Program, I instantly think of the word caretaker. Each and every day, whether I am in my office or at one of our locations, I base every decision on what will best serve my staff whose livelihoods depend on our company’s success.” Davis has been the CEO of Speedling for the last 10 years and continues to build upon the success of his predecessors.

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Davis shared the company was founded in 1968 by George Todd and Bud Leisey, both cauliflower growers from upstate New York. Revolutionizing the transplant industry with their inverted pyramid technology, known as “Todd Tray”, Todd and Leisey created a tray where each cell is shaped like an inverted pyramid that houses growing media and a transplant started from seed.

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The open bottom design in each cell of the tray allows for air pruning of the tap root, which creates strong secondary roots. This technique allows the growing product to experience less shock during initial planting, thus, increasing survivability and plant health. Growing consistent, sustainable vegetable and ornamental transplants is a major priority for each of their eight locations that are found throughout Florida, Georgia, Texas and California. The two Florida locations alone produce almost 1 billion transplants each year that include varieties of celery, pepper, watermelon, tobacco and cabbage. Speedling is the world’s largest seed geranium producer with majority of that production taking place at the Bushnell location.

“When our transplants leave our growing facility they head directly to a local farm. It is my goal that every single transplant is consistent in quality so that our farmers yield the greatest return,” said Speedling’s Facility Manager, John Guarino. This year, Speedling celebrates their 50th year in business. This company was founded by farmers for farmers and plays a meaningful role in agriculture and natural resource conservation. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Davis as well as his Facility Managers, John Guarino, Ron Delbridge and Mark Worley, firmly believe that the key to sustainability lies in every resource they harness for production purposes. In 2010, they collaborated together to plan a conservation program that included the long- term implementation of BMPs to recycle water, use nutrients more efficiently, yet produce a better product. Agricultural BMPs are practical, cost-effective actions that agricultural producers can take to conserve water and reduce the amount of pesticides, fertilizers, animal waste and other pollutants entering our water resources. BMPs are designed to benefit water quality and water conservation while maintaining or even enhancing agricultural production. Some of the BMPs implemented include a soil moisture sensor program to prevent over- irrigation for transplants that end up as potted plants as well as an ebb and flow irrigation system.

“Our reasons for implementing BMPs certainly relate back to our company culture. Our company’s success impacts many families and it is important to us that our future generations can carry on our company and the agriculture industry in a sustainable manner,” said Davis. Through the successful implementation of BMPs, Florida’s agricultural businesses, such as Speedling, show an effective commitment to the protection and preservation of natural resources for generations to come. To learn more about Speedling’s environmental stewardship story, check out the highlight video made about the company featured on www.thisfarmcares.org and also on the This Farm CARES Facebook page.

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The ebb and flow irrigation system fills each greenhouse bottom with water and when the trays of transplants are floated on the top of the water they are able uptake just the right amount of water needed for growth. Water never touches the tops of the tray where the leaves emerge in order to reduce disease pressure on the plant.


JuLY Fishing Report Tampa Bay 2018 Capt. Woody Gore Comfort is paramount to all species and water temperature is a major factor because of its governing effect on a fish’s bodily functions. Have you ever questioned why fish congregate in one particular area one day and completely disappear the next? Various circumstances might cause fish to relocate, but probably the most overlooked is water temperature. With fish being cold-blooded, weather and water temperature are controlling factors in finding them one day and not the next. Every species has a comfortable temperature range. They tend to tolerate temperatures within that preferred range or comfort zone. If that preferred temperature range changes too much, the fish may relocate to a more appropriate temperature or become inactive until they find a more suitable temperature zone. Understanding temperature change and its affects is important to your fishing trip. As water temperatures change, either exceeding high or dropping below a species particular comfort range, they become non-responsive and lethargic. But understanding their comfort tolerance goes a long way toward selecting the right location, time of day, bait or lure. For example, water temperature dropping in the low 60s puts spotted sea trout in high spirits, but becomes very disconcerting to snook, redfish, and tarpon. On the other hand, temperatures in the low to mid 80s are fine for snook, redfish and tarpon. When water temperatures reach into the 90s, as is often the case in Tampa Bay, you might begin searching out deeper cooler waters. How fish react to today’s temperature often depends on the temperature it was exposed to yesterday and even some days before. Gradual temperature changes over several days or weeks frequently result in better long-term fishing, while rapid changes now and then stimulate only a strong short-term bite.

Snook, Redfish & Spotted Sea Trout: Clear skies and hot summer days allow the suns thermal energy to quickly penetrate the waters on Tampa Bay’s broken bottom shallow grass flats, allowing the bottoms to become much warmer than the white sandy areas. The difference between dark and white bottoms may only be one or two degrees, but it can make a difference when you’re looking for happy comfortable fish. As water warm and temperatures rise you’ll not likely find snook, redfish or trout in skinny water, except perhaps early in the mornings or late night. Depending on the temperatures they transition between deep and shallow water depending on bait movement. Many times you’ll find them suspending at different levels depending on the thermoclines or chasing bait along a shallow shade line of the mangroves. You will find snook, redfish and trout in Tampa Bay from the southeast shore to the Alafia River, Picnic Island, Simmons Park, Bishop Harbor, Joe Island down into Bradenton and Sarasota. Also, there’s some excellent fishing around Weedon Island, Fourth Street, Cypress Flats, Rocky Point, Double Branch, and Culbreath Isle Flats. This time of year greenbacks seem to be the bait of choice. Other baits that also work are threadfins, pinfish, chunked ladyfish and the old standby live shrimp. For those catching their own greenbacks, they are all over the grass flats and markers. The only drawback is throwing that blasted cast net. During these hot water days when you can see the fish, but they just don’t want to eat, try a slow reel presentation using a nose hooked greenback; often this triggers the fish to strike. It’s worked for me for many years.

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Capt. Woody Gore (www.captainwoodygore.com)

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Check the deeper passes separating the mangrove islands. Early mornings are great times for artificial lures. It seems like I’m constantly talking about artificial lures and folks ask me why. Its actually simple, artificial lures are exhilarating and exciting. Basically it’s the true measure of an angler’s ability to consistently deceive fish into striking a non-natural food WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


source. The key points to artificial lure fishing are patience and proficiency, followed by personal confidence. Soon you’ll find yourself relaxing with a nice artificial lure, while anxiously anticipating the next heart stopping strike of a snook, redfish or trout.

Snook: Found in canals, tidal creeks, and other deep, warm

waters in cool months; near tidal passes, deeper broken bottom grass flats and mangrove fringes at high tide in warmer times of the year. Use live pinfish, small mullet, shrimp, or sardines free-lined or fished with a bobber or use jigs and minnow-like lures. Beware of the razor-sharp gill plates.

Spotted Seatrout: Found in seagrass beds when water temperatures are moderate and in deeper waters adjacent to broken bottom grass beds during both the warmest and coolest months. Use live shrimp, small pinfish, greenbacks or pigfish (grunts) fished near the bottom by free-lining or under a popping bobber, or use soft-bodied and fish like lures. You can also cast with jigs or surface plugs as you drift. Redfish/Red Drum: Found near docks and pilings, schooling on broken bottom grass flats, deeper holes and channels during the warmest and, during the coolest months, around grass beds and oyster bars. Try using sardines, live shrimp, or cut bait fished on the bottom or free-lined, or use soft-bodied jigs bounced slowly along the bottom. There are always the old standby gold spoons. Mackerel fishing in Tampa Bay is strong. There are some giant drag screamers chasing schools of threadfins. These are some of the most exciting fish you’ll ever catch on light tackle with the larger ones averaging from 3 to 5 pounds. They hit hard, rip off 20 to 30 yards of line, and make you wonder what’s on the other end. It’s simple to do, just find some hard bottom or a marker, or just look for birds diving on feeding fish and you’re set. Toss out a bag or two of chum and get ready for some rod bending light tackle action. Try using greenbacks or threadfins with small wire leaders and long shank hooks. I use 50# Seaguar Fluorocarbon leader, long shank hooks. Mackerel are excellent table fare, but it’s important to immediately bleed and eviscerate them. Then put them on ice. Fillet them and place on the grille with lemon juice and garlic salt and in about 10 to 15 minutes they are ready.

Mangrove Snapper It’s that time of the year; they’re here, fairly easy to catch and are found on every rock pile or structure around Tampa Bay. Light line and smaller hooks should produce a nice grey snapper meal. They’re really partial to the new hatch greenies or threadfins but always love shrimp. Use a chum bag or better yet chop up some of the small greenies or threads and toss them in the current and hang on to your rod and reel. Note: This is new this year: All Gulf Reef Fish Anglers are required to sign up for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey. Snapper and Gag Grouper in in Tampa Bay are still considered Reef Fish and must be reported on the gulf survey. http://myfwc.com/ fishing/saltwater/recreational/gulf-reef-fish-survey/ Cobias seems like they are showing up around the bay more often this year than last. We’re finding them holding around markers, especially those with bait, or cruising the grass flats following large rays or manatees. When fishing markers, keep a chum bag over the side, if they’re in the area it should attract them. Toss them a pinfish, greenback or threadfin and hold on. Tarpon fishing might slow a bit in August as many are re-

turning from offshore. However, fishing around the bay area usually continues with resident fish haunting the light-lines around the bridges. The best fishing seems to be at night or early in the mornings and fairly easy to sight cast, but difficult to land.

“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing”

813-477-3814

Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the west central Florida areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Multi-boat Group Charters With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Captain Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give me a call at 813-477-3814 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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• It wasn’t until the Civil War that left and right shoes were made. • There are an average of 216 noodles in a can of Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup. • It’s been estimated that 15% to 20% of people who receive gift cards never redeem them. • An octopus has nine brains, one for each of its arms and one in the head. • In springtime, a wild male turkey’s head can turn a brilliant red, white or blue in a matter of moments. • Play-Doh was originally intended to be wallpaper cleaner. • It’s scientifically proven that the sight of red makes you hungrier than any other color.

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HOPEWELL

Sponsored by:

FUNERAL HOME • MEMORIAL GARDENS

www.HopewellFuneraI.com FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1971

Grandpa I am now at the age and have grandkids that call me Grandpa. Now I realize why Grandpas smile all the time! It’s because we can’t hear a word your saying. Not being able to hear to well can cause some embarrassing moments, like the time when the kids went to church with Grandpa and Grandma. Halfway through the service, the grandpa leans over and whispers in his wife’s ear, “I’ve just let out a silent fart. What do you think I should do?” The Grandma replies, “Put a new battery in your hearing aid.” I love the story of the couple that went out to dinner to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. On the way home, she notices a tear in his eye and asks if he’s getting sentimental because they’re celebrating 50 wonderful years together. He replies, “No I was thinking about the time before we got married. Your father threatened me with a shotgun and said he’d have me thrown in jail for 50 years if I did not marry you. Tomorrow I would have gotten out of jail and would be a free man.”

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Three old men were talking about their aches, pains and bodily functions. One 75 year-old man says, “I have this problem. I wake up every morning at seven and it takes me 20 minutes to pee.”

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The 80 year-old man says, “My case is worse. I get up at eight and I sit there and grunt and groan for half an hour before anything happens.” The 90 year-old man says, “At seven I tinkle like a horse on flat rock, and at eight I poop like a cow.” “So what’s your problem,” the other two ask? “I don’t wake up until nine,” he responded. Life is short, that’s why I eat my dessert first. My childhood punishments have become my adult goals. 1-Going to bed early. 2-Not leaving my house. 3-Not going to a party. You know you really have to stay positive in your golden years. For example, the other day I fell down the stairs…instead of getting upset I just thought, “Goodness, that’s the fastest I’ve moved in years.” How many of these old sayings do you remember your grandfather saying? “Gooder’n snuff and not half as dusty.” “Saints alive!” “Land sakes!” “I’ll tan your hide!” “He’s so cheap, he squeaks when he walks!” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


“Tight as Dick’s hatband!” “When they were handing out the brains, she thought they said trains, and she missed hers!” “When you wallow with the pigs, expect to get dirty.” I went to Winn-Dixie in Plant City the other day and saw a grandfather with his two-year old grandson. It was obvious that grandpa wasn’t having an easy time of it, with the youngster scaling up and down every aisle, and grabbing all the candy his little hands would hold. Grandpa, however, kept his cool, and talked softly to the child. “Jimmy, relax, it won’t be long, and we will be out of here. When the screaming didn’t stop, the grandpa continued. “Jimmy, there is no reason to get angry, it will not take much longer.” The screaming continued and grandpa said, “Jimmy, I promise you we will be out of here in just a few minutes.” When I came out of the store I saw them in the parking lot, the child still screaming and the older man still talking softly and quietly to him. I couldn’t help myself. I walked over to the old man and child. “Sir,” I said, “I must say you are an amazing grandfather, the way you talked to the boy despite all of his screaming, Jimmy is a lucky kid to have a grandpa like you.” “Thanks,” said the grandfather, “but I’m Jimmy! This rotten little boy’s name is Anthony.”

Alfred “Al” Berry, April 28, 1935 - June 18, 2018 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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J. William Horsey and the Development of the Citrus Industry along West Haines Street in Plant City, Florida Plant City Photo Archives & History Center

William Horsey Corporation, West Haines Street, at the State Farmers Market, 1950-1951. Horsey is the shorter man in the back center, his son, W. Grant Horsey is the taller man to his right, (our left), by the door frame. The headline read: “THREE CITRUS CANNING COMPANIES WITH FIVE PLANTS ARE MERGED BY HORSEY FIRM.” It was Wednesday, October 2, 1946. According to The Tampa Tribune, J. William Horsey, who was born in Buffalo and recently moved to Tampa from Toronto, Canada, merged the Apte Canning Sales Corporation, the Apte Tampa Co., and the Apte Bartow Co. into one firm, the J. William Horsey Corporation. Horsey was president, his son, W. Grant Horsey, was vice president and treasurer. Horsey was adamant about revamping the Florida citrus industry. He recently bought the Citrus Products Co. cannery in Plant City and in 1947 set up a meeting of government and industry officials to focus on the citrus industry—especially in Florida. “Efficient production and distribution of high quality citrus products should be our objective.” He launched a large advertising campaign. “One of the biggest individual brand promotions the citrus industry ever has seen.” Horsey moved his operations to Plant City, acquiring businesses, buildings, and land along West Haines Street and frontage on Alexander Street, near the young State Farmers Market. By 1949 J. William Horsey Corp., canners of “single strength” citrus juice and grapefruit segments, was one of Plant City’s biggest industries. In November 1949 Horsey broke ground for Hillsborough County’s first frozen citrus concentrate plant—the Grant Packing Corp., with J. William Horsey as chairman of the board, and W. Grant Horsey vice president. It was constructed adjacent to the J. William Horsey Corporation.

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By August 1953, newspapers were fraught with praise for Horsey’s productivity. With the service of some 500 workers,

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“the J. William Horsey Corp. has been capable of turning out … 2,500,000 cases of pasteurized citrus juices and citrus sections and about 1,000,000 gallons of frozen concentrate per year—in the Plant City units alone.” In November 1953 Horsey announced the formation of a new company, Orange Crystals, Inc., to be located adjacent to the J. William Horsey Corp. on West Haines Street in Plant City. The new firm was a partnership between Horsey and California-based Vacu-Dry, the largest producer of low-moisture dehydrates in the nation, with Edgar Gallwey, of Oakland, as president. W. Grant Horsey, then having succeeded his father as president of J. William Horsey Corp., was a director and treasurer. Expansion came quickly and in September 1954 Orange Crystals, Inc. took delivery of a 55-foot long orange dehydrator, “the only one of its kind in the world.” The plant was then producing orange and grapefruit crystals from concentrated juice acquired from the adjacent Horsey Corp. Orange Crystals, Inc. became the only plant in the world in citrus crystal production. In December 1955 W. Grant Horsey announced the merger of J. William Horsey Corporation with Shirriff, Ltd., of Toronto, a producer of marmalade, jellies, and flavoring essences. The new Plant City based firm was renamed Shirriff-Horsey Corp., Ltd. With W. Grant Horsey, president. The Miami News, on Tuesday, December 6,1955, wrote: “Under the leadership of W. Grant Horsey, son of the founder and who has been president of the firm since 1950, the Horsey Corporation has become an important factor in the citrus processing industry in Florida.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


J. William Horsey was elected president of Orange Crystals, Inc., in August 1956, Vacu-Dry was bought out, and W. Grant Horsey, president of Shirriff-Horsey Corp., Ltd., became executive vice president. In 1957 Horsey acquired Salada Tea Co. renaming the company the Horsey Division of Salada-Shirriff-Horsey and establishing the tea business on West Haines Street, alongside their other operations. And in 1960 the West Haines Street plant expanded to triple the company’s frozen concentrate evaporation capacity with new equipment for production of an additional 2,200,000 gallons of “high density” frozen citrus concentrate. In addition to Horsey brands, the company produced Sun Pep and Florida Sip. Additionally, the Horsey Division of Salada Foods, Inc., Plant City, produced concentrate for Plant Industries, Inc., Orange Crystals Division, for its instant orange juice. In 1968 Horsey dissolved Orange Crystals, Inc., focusing on the Horsey Division of Salada Foods, and Florida Sip. West Haines Street was continuing to evolve and the early 1960s saw Paradise Fruit move in alongside Salada, Florida Sip, and the Plant City State Farmers Market, a constant enabler of productivity. Salada Foods produced mainly tea products and, after Florida Sip was closed, Horsey sold Salada. By 1987 Tata Corporation had acquired the plant and continues to produce tea there to the present day. J. William Horsey was called a visionary, the man that led the Florida citrus industry into its most prominent position in the world, and much of that was done on West Haines Street in Plant City, Florida.

September 1954. Orange Crystals, Inc. receives its 55-foot long orange dehydrator, “the only one of its kind in the world”

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UF/IFAS EXTENSION HOSTS AG DELEGATION FROM TRINIDAD /TOBAGO By Jim Frankowiak

The University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension Hillsborough County recently hosted a delegation of agriculturalists from the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. The delegation sought to learn about Extension and how it helps Floridians identify and solve community challenges, as well as to identify possible opportunities for collaboration and the strengthening of networking channels between UF/IFAS Extension and the twin island sovereign state. “Extension faculty participate in opportunities to educate delegations from other states and internationally because of the nature of the agriculture business today,” said Brenda Rogers, southwest District Extension Director. “We have to think globally, and it starts with building relationships that often lead to collaborative work associated with crop varieties, disease and pest issues, and marketing Florida based products. Additionally, they often lead to research and/or great opportunities. We are also always recruiting students in our degree programs offered at the University of Florida,” she said. “The government of Trinidad Tobago is looking closely at agriculture as a way to diversify its economy, conserve foreign exchange, increase the country’s food security and provide sustainable employment opportunities,” said Francisco Rivera, a member of the Extension Faculty and Small Farms & Alternative Enterprises Agent, who helped organize the delegation’s program.

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Founded in 1962, the twin island republic is the southernmost nation of the West Indies in the Caribbean. It is situated south

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of Grenada off the northern edge of the South American mainland. Among those in the delegation was Ms. Dhano Sookoo, president of the Agricultural Society of Trinidad & Tobago, an organization founded in 1894, along with society directors, government officials, entrepreneurs and senior educators. The group’s visit included a tour of Extension facilities, the Tropical Aquaculture Lab in Ruskin, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC) at Balm and Citrus Research and Education Center, located at Lake Alfred. Rivera discussed emerging opportunities for small farmers, growing markets and enterprise opportunities in Hillsborough County and other parts of Florida. The county’s Ag Economic Development Manager Simon Bollin described the area’s economy with emphasis on tourism, transportation and agriculture along with efforts underway to improve agriculture through ongoing research initiatives and governmental policies. In addition to learning of the history of land grant universities such as UF, the delegation’s Extension overview included detail on its return-on-investment, which for the most recent reporting period was $14.50 in additional funding and economic benefits to program participants for every dollar of Hillsborough County support. The delegation next visited the Tropical Aquaculture Lab at Ruskin for a tour of the facility and presentation regarding the characteristics and challenges faced by aquaculture farmers WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


in both fresh and saltwater, emerging technologies and detail of more than 25 different species of both ornamentals and food. The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center was the delegation’s next stop where they learned of current research focus, cultural practices designed to conserve water and optimize production of existing and emerging crops such as artichokes and hops, as well as traditional strawberry and tomato production. The Citrus Research and Education Center at Lake Alfred was the delegation’s final stop. The Center‘s major focus currently is citrus greening and ways to resolve that major challenge to the citrus industry in Florida. “At present agriculture contributes less than 0.5 percent to the gross domestic product (GDP) of Trinidad and Tobago and employs four percent of the island population of more than 1.3 million,” Rivera said. “The Ag industry has a history of growing and exporting cocoa, coffee and sugar principally to Europe. The government and agricultural industry have identified emerging opportunities that include cocoa, honey, citrus, pineapple, mango, papaya, tomatoes, cucumber, pumpkin, okra, hot peppers, tilapia, sheep and goats and cattle for beef and dairy,” he said. Currently, Trinidad and Tobago import significant quantities of meats due to low, local production. “Primary issues affecting agriculture in the republic are shortages of water, disposal of agricultural chemicals, forest fires, soil erosion and squatters living on forested hillsides,” he said. Additionally, there is an ongoing need for strengthening food safety, increasing educational opportunities for growers and the development of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that will help increase production, conserve natural resources and improve overall sustainability. “The delegation participated in an assessment of all elements of their visit and were unanimous in wanting to seek the development and execution of a collaborative agreement with UF/ IFAS leading to the design and implementation of an Extension-like program prioritized for the producers and residents of Trinidad and Tobago,” said Rivera.

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St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital Foundation

JULY 1–27 Having to be in a health care setting is often a stressful and frightening experience for children and families. Recreation and play therapy give kids strategies for coping and bring a momentary escape from their illness. Donations to Christmas in July help dramatically alter a child’s hospital experience. Here’s how you can make a difference: n Sponsor an extraordinary child experience n Join our Office Challenge

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n Drop off toys and donations at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital StJosephsChristmas.org

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Florida

Paw Paw By Sandy Sun, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science

The pawpaw fruit (Asimina triloba) is native to the United States and Canada and its main harvest season runs from July to October. Its other names include Kentucky banana, hillybilly mango, Quaker delight, paw paw or paw-paw. As a member of the Annonaceae family, the pawpaw is relatives with the cherimoya, soursop, and custard apple. Pawpaw is known for its low maintenance needs and its spectacular, delicious fruit. The average pawpaw weighs five to 16 ounces and is up to six inches in length. The fruit appears similar to mango, and inside the fruit there are about ten dark brown seeds, which are inedible. They have a smooth, creamy texture and tropical flavor that tastes like a combination of mango, banana, and cantaloupe. The peel is green when unripe and turns yellowbrown when it ripens.

Nutrition Fresh pawpaw is high in many vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. A 100 gram portion of fruit contains 80 calories, 1.2 g protein, 1 g fat, 19 g carbohydrate, and 2.6 g of fiber. Of your daily nutrient requirements, a serving of pawpaw also contains 124% of your daily vitamin C needs, 54% of iron, 32% of magnesium, 11% of vitamin A, and all of the essential amino acids. Pawpaw is also high in potassium, calcium, phosphorus, riboflavin, niacin, and zinc.

Vitamin C Fresh pawpaw contains more than your daily needs of vitamin C in a single serving. Vitamin C has many important functions in the body. It plays a vital role in forming collagen, skin, blood vessels and muscles. Additionally, it helps heal wounds and keeps bones and teeth healthy. The National Institutes of Health recommends regularly consuming foods high in vitamin C content, since it is a water-soluble vitamin that is not stored in the body. You can meet your entire daily needs for vitamin C in just a single pawpaw.

pressure. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance, aids in muscle contraction, and helps transmit nerve impulses. This mineral is also critical in maintaining cell membranes, and balances with other minerals in the blood to regulate heartbeat and blood pressure. Most vegetables and fruits, such as pawpaw, are a rich source of potassium.

How to select and store Choose fresh pawpaw that yields to light pressure and feels heavy for its size. Ripe fruit should be very fragrant. The peel is green when unripe and becomes yellow with black spots when ripe, much like a banana. Pawpaw is best eaten straight out-of-hand. This fruit ripens very quickly, but can be refrigerated for up to two weeks or stored in the freezer for several months.

How to enjoy Fresh pawpaw is delicious eaten raw. The pulp can also be dehydrated or used in jams or jellies. Pawpaw is a good substitute for bananas in many recipes. Other ways to enjoy pawpaw include: • Puree with other fruit into a smoothie • Use in baked desserts such as cakes or pies • Puree and make into a sorbet or ice cream • Sautee the pulp and use as topping for yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal Enjoy fresh pawpaw today. With its creamy texture and tropical flavor, this fruit is not to be missed!

Selected References https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/asimina-species/ http://www.hort.purdue.edu http://www.ohio.edu

Potassium The pawpaw is high in potassium, a mineral which promotes healthy heart functioning and protects against high blood INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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By Jack Payne Twenty years ago, the Florida Automated Weather Network launched on the premise that weather information from the airport isn’t enough for those in distant rural areas whose livelihoods depend on dew points and wind speed. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension has long recognized that perhaps no one relies on this information more than farmers do. So UF/IFAS Extension brought weather stations closer to the farm. Today Extension has 42 weather stations on public lands in rural areas to take the temperature of your region. Then, Extension brought the weather stations right onto your farms. In the past five years, Extension has installed 200 weather stations on private farms, ranches, and groves. That means we can give you readings on rainfall in your neighborhood. For example, there’s one on the Florida Strawberry Growers Association farm in Dover, which serves as a research and demonstration farm for UF/IFAS strawberry scientists. We don’t do this alone. In addition to station hosts such as the FSGA, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the state’s water management districts partner with us. The Farm Bureau has been a valued past financial supporter and continues to testify to FAWN’s importance when it’s time to renew state funding. We’re looking ahead to the prospect of delivering data so local that you can consider your farm its own microclimate. UF/ IFAS forecasts that someday your smartphone will essentially give you a weather map of the row you’re working. The technological challenge is how to harness the growing mountain of data. FAWN measures dozens of weather indicators every 15 minutes 24/7. We’ll need to combine the right pieces of that data with information from other sources such as the National Weather Service to make FAWN even more useful.

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Fortunately, that’s just what UF/IFAS research and Extension do. We deliver discovery to you in usable form. Kati Migliaccio of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering uses FAWN data to drive the phone apps she de-

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veloped to help producers of avocados, citrus, cotton, strawberries and turf decide when and how much to irrigate. Before a forecasted freeze, citrus agent Chris Oswalt makes the rounds collecting leaves from groves and feeding the info into FAWN to help growers make freeze protection decisions. Natalia Peres and Clyde Fraisse use FAWN temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation data to estimate the risk of strawberry disease and inform growers on the need to spray fungicide for protecting their crops. The information can be just as valuable after the fact. We had a spike in FAWN use after Hurricane Irma as producers sought to document for relief agencies just what had hit their crops those fateful few days last September. We’ve come around to hurricane season again, when everyone, not just farmers, pays a little more attention to the weather. FAWN pays attention all year. Individual agents occasionally go on vacation, but Extension never does. The future of FAWN includes other parts of UF, not just IFAS, gleaning useful grower data. For example, faculty with the UF College of Law is talking with FAWN director Rick Lusher about how you can use FAWN data to determine how to limit your employees’ vulnerability to heat stress. Extension brings UF to you. Usually it’s IFAS that has your solutions, but Extension finds what you need among UF’s 16 colleges and thousands of faculty members. The spread of UF/IFAS FAWN stations means you can carry us around with you in your hip pocket. Extension meets you where you are. If you’re like most people, that’s increasingly in your smartphone. It’s part of our 24/7 commitment to production agriculture.

Jack Payne is the University of Florida’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources and leader of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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PROF ITABILITY BEGINS IN THE ROOT ZONE Healthy soil is alive, a living ecosystem, and serves as the foundation for agriculture. Sometimes, it doesn’t get the respect it deserves. When treated like dirt, soil is less productive, and the fertility of the land may be diminished. One new technology, called Cool Terra®, provides growers a way to enhance soil vitality for greater yield in strawberry fields like yours. In fact, Cool Terra has shown some of the greatest results in the type of high sand, low organic matter soil common in Florida’s strawberry fields. Just like a coral reef supports sea life by providing structure, resources, and habitat in an otherwise barren ocean floor, Cool Terra can support plant life by: Microbes Inhabiting Cool Terra

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Terms and conditions: If you do not see the financial benefits from using Cool Terra; Cool Planet will reimburse you up to the total cost of the product purchased. Full program details can be found at www.coolplanet.com/cool-terra/grower-assurance/.


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Hear about specials and deliveries in your area. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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LIPMAN FAMILY FARMS 2018 GARDEN CHALLENGE WINNERS ANNOUNCED By Jim Frankowiak

The Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation Districted (HSWCD) has announced the winners in the Lipman Family Farms 2018 Garden Challenge. This was the second consecutive year the Immokalee-based company sponsored the Garden Challenge for middle and high schools in Hillsborough County. Sixteen schools were invited to participate this year, an increase of four schools over the inaugural challenge in 2017. The competition was part of the 2nd Annual Hillsborough 100 Conservation Challenge, an effort of the HSWCD to enlist a total of 100 various groups – schools, businesses, organizations and others – to perform 100 conservation projects within a two-week period in April in tandem with Earth Day, Arbor Day and Soil Stewardship Week. The purpose of the challenge is to help enhance awareness of, and showcase, various projects that support conservation of soil and water.

round fresh produce through an integrated network of research and development, farming, processing and repacking. Farms in Florida, South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, California and Mexico allow Lipman to grow and ship fresh produce throughout the year.

“Our goal is to support student efforts to learn what it takes to be successful in production agriculture,” said Kevin Yue, environmental engineer for Lipman Family Farms. “That includes the challenges that come at every stage of production.” This year’s gardens included four types of tomatoes: round, plum, grape and cherry, as well as cantaloupes and watermelons. Each garden had to be grown in the two 48-x-84-inch boxes provided by Lipman with individual schools selecting soil and nutrients for their gardens.

The school projects were completed by different groups, including Ag students, Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students and science students. Gardens entered in this year’s competition used the same size and number of transplants provided by Lipman.

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America’s largest open-field round tomato producer, Lipman Family Farms, challenged participating schools to grow the best garden using the same plant materials. The company provides dependable year-

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The Lipman Challenge is a STEAM initiative, focusing on science, technology, engineering, agriculture and math. It helps reinforce the fact that today’s agriculture is science-based, incorporating factors such as temperature, water, nutrients and soil playing a major part in achieving the desired outcome associated with each crop. Middle school top honors went to Ben Hill Middle School, while second place was awarded to Randall Middle School and third to Buchanan Middle Schools. Dowdell and Greco middle schools received Honorable Mention recognition. Lipman Farms and the HSWCD held a pizza and cupcake party for Ben Hill Middle School students as first place winners. Students at the school also prepared and served salsa, salad, cantaloupes and watermelon from their garden project, as well as basil and pickles they grew and prepared. Tampa Residential Facility took 1st place honors for the second consecutive year in the high school division. The school is for incarcerated males and is under the auspices of the school district of Hillsborough County. Second place went to Armwood High School and Newsome High School took 3rd place honors. Honorable Mention was awarded to Spoto High School. Tampa Residential Facility students are to hold a watermelon party coincident with their First Place honors. Garden Challenge judging included personal visits to each participating school by HSWCD representatives with personal inspection of each garden, photos of each and in many instances student explanations, a review of photo logs and record books. Riverview High School took 1st place Record Book honors, while 2nd place went to Spoto High School. All winners in the Garden Challenge will receive framed certificates and monetary awards. Organized in 1946 by the residents of Hillsborough County, the HSWCD has as its purpose to provide local grass roots mechanisms to deal with soil, water and other natural resource problems and in preventing such problems within the county. HSWCD programs focus on service to inner-city, urban, suburban and rural communities alike. More information is available at http://hillssoilandwater.org. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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More Than 100 New Florida Laws? by John Dicks Whoa! More than 100 new Florida laws went into effect at the beginning of July. Is it even possible that there were 100 or more things wrong in Florida? Well, granted, most of them were minor in scope, but let’s take a look at some of the major ones of significance. Daylight Saving Time - We addressed this one in an article a few months ago when the Legislature voted nearly unanimously to mandate Daylight Saving Time all year round in Florida. I’m certainly no fan of the idea, and for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that it makes Florida an outlier of sorts and effectively creates a fifth time zone for the USA. There are other issues, too, like forcing kids during the winter to start school in total darkness and not see the light of day until nearly 2nd period! Fortunately, this is one of those situations that still needs Congressional approval before it actually takes effect. The odds of that appear dim, at least for now. Restricting Beach Access - It’s been estimated that about 60 percent of Florida beach property is privately owned. This means that beachfront property owners own the sand all the way down to, essentially, the average high water line. New legislation now specifically recognizes such private property owner’s rights, which may lead to restrictions on people using much of what was considered customary use or public access. Setting up an umbrella on that dry sand at the beach is akin to plopping a cooler and chairs on the lawn of your neighbor’s yard. In order to avoid a possible charge of trespassing, beachgoers are being advised to remember that dry sand is private whereas the sand that gets wet remains public. Controlled Substances - With the astounding recognition that more than 15 million prescriptions for opioids (like Oxycontin and Fentanyl) were given to Floridians between 2016 and 2017, some of which led to addiction, the

Legislature took a step towards curbing the epidemic that has been recognized as killing at least 16 Floridians every day. New legislation will limit most painkiller prescriptions to a 3-day supply. There is an exemption for patients with cancer, terminal illness or traumatic injuries, as well as those receiving palliative care. Child Marriage - It is now illegal for those who are younger than 18 to get married in Florida. Rather surprisingly, minors aged 16 and 17 had been able to marry with parental consent. No longer is that the case, other than for certain narrow exceptions. Public School Safety - Following the terrible tragedy resulting in mass murder at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the Legislature mandated that sworn law enforcement officers be stationed in every school in the state. Moreover, the legislation also requires that active shooter training be conducted in schools once every semester. Further, school boards must establish threat assessment teams to assist and intervene with people whose behavior may pose a threat to the safety of the students and/or the school. Education Assistance - In response to increases in bullying at schools, the Legislature created a voucher-like scholarship for bullied students. It will be used to help pay for private school tuition. There was also a separate scholarship created to assist students with disabilities. Beer Bottles - One piece of legislation effective July 1 had many people scratching their head and wondering why the big fuss. After several years of strenuous debate, Floridians enjoying the growing craft beer industry will now benefit from Legislators who snubbed the big beer lobbyists that wanted to keep Florida as one of the only states in the union to ban 64-ounce containers. Yes, that’s a lot of beer in one bottle. Apparently, it seems that the Legislature was, once again, busy this year with many battles, and even some over bottles.

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John Dicks is both a Lawyer and Businessman, including an interest in farming. He and his family have owned a blueberry farm and have agricultural lands which they lease for cattle operations, as John says, “to someone who knows and handles cattle much better than I do!” John is both a Gator, having received his undergraduate degree from the University of Florida, and a Seminole, with his law degree from Florida State University. He and his wife, Sharon, live in Plant City, where he served nine years as City Commissioner, including three terms as Mayor.

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E n d a n g e r e d S p e c i es

Diving Deeper: Finback Whale By: Ginny Mink

We decided to dive deeper this month in search of an endangered species to illuminate and we arrived at a surprising revelation. On the list of endangered and imperiled species, as it relates to Florida, we discovered the inclusion of the second largest whale in the world. Yes, there’s a whale listed on Florida’s endangered species roster! We are talking about the finback whale, which is only second in size to the blue whale. Depending on what part of the hemisphere these whales reside, there’s a difference of about 10 feet in maximum length. Those hanging out in the northern hemisphere are the smaller variety, only achieving up to 75 feet in length, whereas their southern hemisphere counterparts go the extra 10 feet and get up to 85 feet long.¹ Maybe that’s hard to conjure up in your mind, as it is ours, so imagine that these whales are nearly a third of a football field long, or slightly longer than a semitruck (with trailer). If that doesn’t seem as impressive as you were hoping, go stand next to a semi and then imagine the whale!

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Finback whales are part of the rorquals family, which includes the blue whale, humpback whale, minke whale, sei whale, and Bryde’s whale. These whales all have expandable throat grooves and dorsal fins. What makes the finback whale all the more unique in this category is that is has been referred to as the “greyhound of the sea” due to its ability to go at speed bursts of up to 23 mph. However, it’s most unusual aspect is that its lower jaw includes asymmetrical coloring. The left side is often a mottled black while its right side is a creamy yellow or white.²

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The chances of you seeing one of these is considerably smaller than they are. But, if you are an avid boater, who enjoys temperate or polar waters for your excursions, there are some significant identifiable qualities (beyond the asymmetrical coloring on their lower jaws). They are light gray or brownish black and have lighter colored chevrons behind their blowholes that slant down their sides. Their tongues show the reversed asymmetrical pattern seen on the jaw. Also, their tales (or flukes) are notched in the center and pointed at the tips.³ In 2011, the NOAA shipboard survey suggested that there are 1,618 finback whales in the North Atlantic. However, that number decreases dramatically when a shipboard survey conducted from June to August of 2011 revealed that there are only 23 finback whales located between central Florida and central Virginia. They used two individual teams to calculate this population. The continental shelf break had a higher number of whales than the area regarded as the continental slope.⁴ Female finback whales are larger than their male counterparts. And, those males will reach sexual maturity between the ages of 6 and 10 years. Gestation for whale calves lasts one year and these calves are born in three year intervals. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


They will nurse for six months before being weaned. At birth they are 18 to 21 feet long and weigh nearly 4000 pounds!³ From an agricultural perspective, that’s more than a John Deere A tractor (built between 1934 and 1952) weighs. And, it’s heavier than our Kia Soul! Imagine carrying that baby for a year! During the early whaling years, finback whales enjoyed some level of protection due to the fact that they preferred the open sea and were quite fast as compared to other whales. However, with improved technology and a depletion in the blue whale population, they became the next best thing. Between the years 1935 and 1965 it is estimated that 30,000 finback whales were slaughtered each year. To give you an idea of what we’re looking at over that 30 year period: that means 900,000 whales lost their lives.³ Given that kind of annihilation, it’s no wonder that we are seeing numbers below 2,000 as representative of their population in our area. By 1966, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) had placed them under full protection. But by then, the numbers were already horrifically smaller than initially planned. The thing is, these whales eat small fish and shrimp; they aren’t even “dangerous” as some view danger. They don’t have teeth, they use the baleen method for feeding. They gulp tremendous amounts of water within their expandable throat grooves and then siphon out the water and retain the fish, krill, and shrimp.²

References: ¹Finback Whale: Balaenoptera physalus. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/imperiled/profiles/mammals/finback-whale/ ²Florida Marine Mammals: Whales. Discover Florida Nature. http://www.floridiannature.com/whales.htm ³Fin Whales. Marine Bio. http://marinebio.org/species. asp?id=40 ⁴Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus): Western North Atlantic Stock. (2015). https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/publications/tm/ tm231/39_finwhale_F2014July.pdf Photo Credits: Buelow, Chris (2003). Fin Whale. Top View. Flickr (https://flic. kr/p/5FugbF) Tennakoon, Amila (2014). Fin Whale. Underwater. Flickr (https:// flic.kr/p/pDgaB5) Dallas, Dirk (2017). 80ft Finback Whale. Aerial View. Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/DcgoJH) St. John, James. (2013). Balaenoptera physalus (finback whale) (North Atlantic Ocean) 5. Skull. Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/PkQgQM)

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They come to Florida’s waters to mate and to calve during the winter months. Then, they are off to colder waters to feed during the summer. If we are going to make a difference for these splendid giants, then we’ve got to ensure our coastal waters are safe for them. That means eliminating pollution and disallowing those who would seek to “reel” one in. As we tell you every month, each of these creatures has been designed by God for a specific purpose and we are here to be good stewards of the earth He designed. We are responsible for its creatures.


Farm To Table To The Museum

By Libby Hopkins

“A key part of the GCM mission is to connect little learners with the world that’s around them to make them lifelong learners and leaders.” Thomas Jefferson once said in a letter he wrote to George Washington, “Agriculture is our wisest pursuit because it will, in the end, contribute most to real wealth, good morals and happiness.” Many would agree with our founding fathers and that is why it’s so important for our youth to learn about farming and agriculture. “Research has discovered a disconnect exists between where some children believe food comes from and where it actually does come; from ranches and farms,” said Christopher Johnson, Director of Corporate Development at Glazer Children’s Museum (GCM) in Tampa. “A key part of the GCM mission is to connect little learners with the world that’s around them to make them lifelong learners and leaders.”

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The Glazer Children’s Museum is currently working on the Farm exhibit where guests will engage in hands-on learning and role-playing experiences that explore how food grows and is produced. Located next to the museum’s Publix grocery store, the Farm will literally bring food to the supermarket. Guests will take on the role of farmer to care for plants and animals to nurture their growth. They will harvest oranges, collect (and count) eggs, and pick vegetables and flowers to deliver them to the grocery store. In the barnyard, guests will milk a cow, explore a chicken coop, and learn what farm animals eat. Children will sit on a kid-sized tractor and examine other tools commonly used on a farm. In the garden, guests will plant seeds, water the crops, and harvest vegetables. Through interactive exhibits, children will learn foundational reading, science, and math skills, while promoting curiosity,

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problem solving, organization, socialization, and self-confidence. “One of the really special things about GCM is that all of our exhibits have a literacy component and the Farm will be no exception,” said Pam Hillestad, Glazer Children’s Museum Director of School and Youth Programs. “It will have a number of books tied to it and available regularly. In addition, children will be able to craft their own stories in our puppet theater and through costume play.” Hillestad also said there would be numerical literacy pieces such as the counting of oranges and eggs as well as a number of other items currently being curated. “A big component of the Farm will be teaching science, like the process involved from seed to maturation,” Hillestad said. “Additionally we hope kids will work toward understanding nutrition and where their food actually comes from. Milk doesn’t come in cartons and broccoli doesn’t grow with a rubber band around it.” The impetus behind the Farm exhibit came from ideas derived by GCM President and CEO Jennifer Stancil and research conducted by GCM’s Education Team. “Glazer Children’s Museum has been discussing Farm to Table exhibits for some time,” Stancil said. “We want to be educators around the ideas of agriculture and how our food gets to us. Tampa is such a perfect place to tell these stories to children about food. First, we have a huge anchor in our Publix exhibit. This beloved exhibit is one of the most popular in the Museum. This allowed us to think about how we could extend the idea to how food gets to a Publix grocery store. We physically made a new connection that emphasizes the locally grown aspects WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


of our community.” The imaginative play that happens in the museum becomes the building blocks for not only a healthy way of viewing local food, but appreciating the wonderful products that come from our own Florida backyard. Currently, the Museum is actively seeking to collaborate with leaders who are as passionate about the Farm exhibit’s success. “My dream for the Farm exhibit is to provide children a hands-on and informative experience of what life on a farm is like that is rooted in imaginative play and connects them with experts from an array of agricultural backgrounds,” Johnson said. “As a nonprofit, we rely upon philanthropic support to ensure we can bring critically important exhibits such as the Farm to life. Community partners who have an interest in providing sponsorship support, educational content, or leading demonstrations at the Farm should certainly contact me.” If you would like to learn more about the Farm exhibit at Glazer Children’s Museum or if you’d like be a sponsor of the exhibit, you can contact Christopher Johnson at cjohnson@glazermuseum.org or call 813-443-3816. If you would like to learn more about the Glazer Children’s Museum, you can visit them on the web at www.GlazerMuseum. org. The museum is located at 110 W. Gasparilla Plaza in Tampa.

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It’s In the Rub www.Johnsonbarbeque.com 1407 W Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Plant City, FL 33566

Local Food, Local Folks

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Part 46 By Ginny Mink

Ornamental Gardening in Florida Sit back and relax as we travel through the world of exotic conifers on this months’ literary time machine voyage. It is always a joy to accompany you on our trips back to 1926 where we spend time with Mr. Charles Torrey Simpson, an avid gardener and writer about all things horticulture. Inevitably, we learn something along the way and might even pick up a few ideas for plants to install in our own home landscaping. So, without further ado, let’s see what he has for us this month. Mr. Simpson directs our attention to the cedrus genus. He elaborates, “A genus of three noble species of conifers, all of which are hardy throughout Florida. C. libani, the Cedar of Lebanon, becomes a large tree with wide spreading branches, the leading shoots nodding. C. deodara, Deodar cedar, reaches a height of a hundred and fifty feet and is a native of the Himalayas. There are a number of fine varieties. C. atlantica belongs in North Africa reaching a height of a hundred and twenty feet with upright, leading shoots. All of these need a strong, clayey or loamy, well drained soil and they should be perfectly at home in the hill country at Tallahassee and westward.”¹ Perhaps you are like us and one of those trees stood out to you. Immediately we were taken with the inclusion of the Cedar of Lebanon. Certainly a good number of us have heard mention of that particular conifer on a Sunday morning or Wednesday evening church meeting. Of course, we didn’t know that these trees grew in Florida. And, if we’re honest, aside from the occasional Biblical reference, we don’t really know much about them at all. So, that leaves us a little bit curious. How ‘bout you? In an article on biblicalarchaeology.org we discovered, “In the Biblical world, Lebanese cedar (Cedrus libani) trees were highly sought after as an excellent source of timber for ancient woodworking. The wood’s high quality, pleasant scent and resistance to both rot and insects made it a popular building material for temples, palaces and seagoing vessels…” Recall that Solomon’s famous temple was constructed from the Cedars of Lebanon which obviously had to be imported into ancient Israel.² A quick bit of research landed us on the gardeningknowhow. com site where we discovered valuable information about how to grow a Cedar of Lebanon. We were shocked to discover that, “They are long lived and have a maximum life span of over 1,000 years.” Apparently younger trees resemble a pyramid in shape and as they age, that pointed tip begins to flatten out. Patience is a virtue when it comes to growing these trees since they won’t even flower until they are 25 to 30 years old. The site recommends that you only plant one of these if you have a large yard because they can become 50 foot in width. Also, elevation is key, between 4,200 and 7,000 feet and they need to be in deep soil with lots of light and roughly 40 inches of water a year.³

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As much as we love that cedar smell, and the idea of growing something with significant Biblical reference, that process seems like an awful lot of work for us. But, you are more than welcome to attempt the endeavor and let us know how it turns out for you!

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Another shocking revelation was the inclusion of Ginkgo biloba. That’s a name we’ve heard a great deal about in the last five to ten years. It is interesting to see it on a list of exotic conifers that is almost a hundred years old! Mr. Simpson writes, “A strange coniferous tree native of Japan which, instead of having needle or scale-like leaves, has them shaped like a fan. There is a magnificent avenue of these in the grounds of the Department of Agriculture in Washington and it has been planted in northern Florida.”¹ While he finds them strange, it is obvious that he is unaware of what their future holds. WebMD would have enjoyed the opportunity to teach him a few things, no doubt. According to them, ginkgo biloba can improve the circulation of your blood and might even help slow down Alzheimer’s disease. Admittedly, the seeds could potentially kill fungi and bacteria that infect the body, but then there’s the chance of experiencing loss of consciousness or seizures that can be the side effects from a toxin in those very same seeds. ⁴ Those are risks you’ll have to weigh out for yourself.

While we are sitting here thinking Mr. Simpson didn’t know much about the Ginkgo biloba he mentioned, it remains possible that he did and just wasn’t that much of a risk taker. Are you? Let us know if you have any luck with either of these exotic conifers. Send pics, we’d love to see them! And, until next time, happy travels, and keep gardening! Resources: ¹ Simpson, Charles T. (1926). Ornamental Gardening in Florida. Published by the Author; Little River, FL. Printed by J.J. Little and Ives Company, New York. (p. 162-164). ²Biblical Archaeology Society Staff. (2017). Lebanese Cedar- The Prized Tree of Ancient Woodworking. https://www. biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-artifacts/artifactsand-the-bible/lebanese-cedar%E2%80%94the-prized-tree-ofancient-woodworking/ ³Spengler, T. (2018). Cedar of Lebanon Tree- How to Grow Lebanon Cedar Trees. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/cedar/growing-lebanon-cedar-trees.htm ⁴Ginkgo. (2018). https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-333/ginkgo Photo Credits: rabiem22 (2016). Of Strength and Majesty. The Cedars of Lebanon. Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/KzWGYX) Plant Image Library (2017). Cedrus libani (Cedar of Lebanon). Cone. Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/YoYZvf) Almansa, Juan Carlos Lopez (2011). Ginkgo biloba (6). Leaves. Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/aykzB4) Zanarini, Pietro (2011). Ginkgo biloba. In Fall. Flickr (https://flic. kr/p/aLxz9T) WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Flowering Native Plants that Attract Pollinators

Beach sunflower – Helianthus debilis

Lynn Barber and Lisa Meredith, UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County Attracting wildlife including pollinators is one of the nine principles of the Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM program. It is important that we choose landscape plants which provide fruits or berries, attracting birds and other pollinators. Wildlife can add beauty and interest in your yard, are educational and provide photo and writing opportunities. Pollinators are important because an estimated one third of the food we eat comes from plants pollinated by animals. They help increase fruit (berry) set, quality and size, which also translates to economic impacts. The U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2014 estimated bee pollinated commodities accounted for $20 billion in annual U.S. agricultural production. There are several ways to attract pollinators. You can use feeders and houses, water, consider decreasing the amount of your turfgrass, use vertical layering, native plants, decrease pesticides, manage your pets and increase the size of your habitat (space). Eliminating exotic invasive plants is also a plus. Identify what you think may be a pest because it may be helpful versus harmful. Spot treat for the identified pest, don’t broadcast, because that will kill the good along with the bad. My favorite flowering native plants that attract pollinators include: Firebush, Hamelia patens - can reach a height of 5-20 feet

and spread of 5-8 feet; prefers partial sun, but does well in full or partial sun/shade, is fast growing and attracts butterflies, hummingbirds and birds and produces orange/red year-round flowers. It’s interesting that the foliage is generally more attractive in the shade, but flowers best in the sun. So, try one on each location.

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Wild coffee - Psychotria nervosa - can reach a height and spread of 4-10 feet, prefers partial sun/shade, but does well in full shade, has dark green, shiny foliage, small white flow-

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ers from spring through summer, attracts butterflies and birds and produces red fruit (berries) that provide food for wildlife. It is very easy to propagate from cuttings. Beach sunflower – Helianthus debilis – is a great groundcov-

er that can reach a height of 1-4 feet and spread of 2-4 feet, is fast growing, prefers full sun, is a perennial that produces yellow/purple flowers year-round and attracts butterfly and birds. Salvia, Sage – Salvia – There are native and non-native va-

rieties, so be sure to check. This fast growing perennial can reach a height of 1-8 feet and spread of 1-10 feet. It prefers full sun, flower colors vary and it attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Native plants are available at native plant and other nurseries. You can join the Suncoast Native Plant Society, http://www. suncoastnps.org/, to learn even more. Their monthly meetings are held at our office. Check out upcoming Extension workshops at our calendar of events, http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/ hillsborough/upcoming-events/. To find more ideas for pollinator attracting plants, you can order your own copy of The Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Guide to Plant Selection and Landscape Design from Southwest Florida Water Management District, http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us, under Resources, Free Publications, Florida- Friendly Landscaping, click apply. The Guide will be mailed to you. For horticultural assistance, contact the UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County, 813-744-5519, or visit us at 5339 County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Giving Hillsborough County soil the respect it deserves.

CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICAN FOR CONGRESS

CONNECT WITH YOUR LOCAL COOL TERRA REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE JORDAN SCHULTHEIS REGIONAL SALES ASSOCIATE, SERVING HILLSBOROUGH AND POLK COUNTIES Jordan.Schultheis@CoolPlanet.com

330.770.1118 consistent way to improve BOTTOM LINE | Aprofitability and sustainability

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I’m running for Congress to support the President, the President’s agenda and to make sure America succeeds. This campaign is going to be about the promise of America. The promise of the American people. And how our great experiment in Democracy and self-governance must not fail. That means protecting and defending the Constitution of the United States- every bit of it. That means making sure only American laws are used inside an American courtroom. That means allowing someone to keep more of what they earn, not less.

DONATE ONLINE AT: NeilCombee.us

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CONSERVATION DISTRICT SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR SUPERVISOR’S POSITION By Jim Frankowiak

The Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation District (HSWCD) is seeking applicants to serve the balance of a two year term of a supervisor who recently resigned. The District will be accepting resumes through the end of July, and the top candidates will be interviewed during an open meeting of the HSWCD August 15. “There is no specific job description or application for the position,” said District Executive Director Betty Jo Tompkins. “The only specific requirement is that applicants be of voting age and a resident of Hillsborough County.” Questions on the position and process may be directed to Tompkins at 813-477-8332. The HSWCD serves conservation needs at a local level and works in partnership with the federal government to serve producers and residents. The affairs of the District are directed by a Board of five supervisors elected in a general election to a four-year term. The office of Soil and Water Conservation District is non-partisan and district wide. Supervisors receive no monetary compensation for their services, but may be reimbursed for travel expenses. District programs are carried out by three, full-time employees.

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Applicant resumes should be mailed or delivered to the HSWCD office at 201 South Collins Street, Suite 202, Plant City, FL 33563. The deadline for applications is July 31, 2018.

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WE’RE PUTTING SCIENCE TO WORK TO PRESERVE NATURE

Every day, Mosaic puts science to work right here in our community. Our team of engineers and other specialists work with regulatory agencies to identify areas of environmental sensitivity that should be preserved and protected. Through its land conservation and reclamation efforts, Mosaic has helped provide over 46,000 acres of natural lands that offer functioning habitats for plant and animal life. Shelley, a senior permitting engineer for Mosaic, works to ensure these preservation areas support a sustainable post-mining landscape that includes wildlife corridors and habitat diversity. To learn more about Mosaic’s preservation techniques, visit Science.MosaicCo.com.

© 2018 The Mosaic Company

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HORSE OWNERS OFFERED COMPOSTING OPTION FOR MANAGING MANURE

By Jim Frankowiak

Horses are “producers” with the average horse generating over 9 tons of manure annually or even more if bedding is included. Bedding is typically wood shavings or sawdust, which is changed frequently as horse stalls are cleaned. Managing such large volumes of manure and possibly shavings can often be a challenge for horse owners, particularly for those who may not have enough land to dispose of stall waste and manure picked from paddocks by spreading on pastures. To help horse owners facing this challenge, a workshop was recently held at the Hillsborough County Fairgrounds to review the option of managing horse manure by composting. The meeting was arranged and implemented by a committee that included University of Florida (UF) Soil Scientist Dr. Mary Lusk; Dr. Carissa Wickens, state equine specialist in the UF Department of Animal Sciences; Jemy Hinton, who has been a member of the UF/IFAS Best Management Practices (BMPs) team in west central Florida and an Extension educator working with agricultural producers, along with Extension 4-H Youth Development Agent Brandi Yancy and Francisco Rivera, also with Extension working with small farms and alternative enterprises. Simon Bollin with Hillsborough County Agriculture Economic Development was an integral part of the committee, providing expertise and assistance in preparing for and implementing the program. The committee is indebted to the Hillsborough County Fairgrounds for supporting and hosting the event and serving as a demonstration site. “We also appreciate the funding for the event provided by Hillsborough County through an Environmental Protection Commission grant.” “The event committee is actually a subcommittee of a statewide manure management team established to address issues that are identified for attention,” said Hinton. “The topic of manure management and options for handling manure on equine operations was identified through a needs assessment involving horse owners in the area. “Horse manure is really a value-packed product, not waste,” said Hinton. “Our committee also has an interest in protecting the watershed from nutrient and bacterial run-off from horse manure and urine-soaked shavings through poor management practices.” Composting is not a disposal method for horse manure, but a way for horse owners to increase the value of manure. The heat generated by microorganisms living in the manure pile will destroy weed seeds and parasite larvae and eggs, making the compost more attractive to gardeners and nurseries as a growing media or soil amendment. Compositing also benefits the environment by stabilizing the nutrients in manure, making them less likely to be potential pollutants to surface or ground water.

While composting can be accomplished with free-standing piles or windrows, most horse owners find they have better control of the process and thus faster composting when manure and stall waste are placed in bins or some type of enclosure. Containment also makes it easier to reduce the risk of water pollution from run off or leaching. Determining the size of compost bins is a multi-step process that requires estimating the amount of manure and bedding produced, how long the materials will remain in the bin and any equipment the bins will have to accommodate. The composting system should be located on a fairly flat site, away from low lying areas and springs, wells or open bodies of water and wetlands. It is also suggested that the pile be out of view and downwind from neighbors, as well as accessible by mechanical equipment and near a water source for adding moisture to the pile when needed. Management of the compost pile should be customized to fit the needs of the horse owner. Devoting time and energy to correct management of the pile will produce better quality compost in faster period of time. Effective management includes monitoring the pile temperature every two to three days to assure active composting is taking place, which means temperatures of 130-150-degrees Fahrenheit for at least 21 days at the center of the pile. Turning and mixing the pile based on temperature is also a requirement and can be done by hand with a pitchfork or mechanically with a small front-end loader. An alternative to turning is “passive aeration” which involves the insertion of PVC pipes that have been pre-drilled with ½-inch holes at six-inch intervals. It should be noted that this method requires more time for compositing to occur than regular pile turning. Composting piles must also be kept moist. Since the manure horse owners compost is often mixed with wood bedding material rich in carbon, the addition of supplemental nitrogen may be necessary to maintain the compositing process. The ideal carbon to nitrogen ratio for successful composting is 2530:1. This can be achieved through the addition of commercial fertilizers into the pile as it is mixed or when introduced initially to the pile. Information regarding the construction and management of compost systems is available at: https://extadmin.ifas.ufl. edu/media/extadminifasufledu/cflag/docs/fl-equine-institute/2005/Composting.pdf or by visiting the Hillsborough County Extension Office, 3559 South County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584.

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Compost can be applied to pastures as a slow-release fertilizer, reducing the risk of parasite re-infection, as well as the need for chemical fertilizers. Composting also reduces the odor and fly problems commonly associated with manure and decreases the volume of waste horse owners will have to dispose of by half.

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Food SafetyWeathering the Storm By Alison Grooms, MPH, CPH, CHES® Nutrition & Health Agent with UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County

As we enter the month of July, hurricane season is now underway. In Florida, this season officially begins on June 1 and ends on November 30. That’s almost six full months of potential hurricane threats that could keep us Floridians on edge. While we were spared from the most devastating impacts of Hurricane Irma in central Florida, many of us were affected by the power outages left behind. The effects of living without our traditional comforts of home, such as electricity and running water, made it nearly impossible to consume foods that we may otherwise be eating. Being pro-active and taking precautions, to keep both ourselves and our food safe, can help eliminate the need to throw out excessive amounts of food, (including the money spent on them), and ensure we will have enough safe foods to eat to weather the storm.

When preparing for a natural disaster, plan far enough in advance and stock up on non-perishable food items, such as ready-to-eat canned foods including meats, fruits, and vegetables. Don’t forget to keep a manual can opener as well. Other non-perishable foods to store include dry cereals, protein or granola bars, dried fruits, peanut butter, non-perishable pasteurized milk, and infant food and formula. Look for high energy food items - specifically ones that provide the most nutrients per calories. Remember that during times of disaster, keeping foods on hand for survival is the key. Also, ensure you have accurate thermometers in place both in the refrigerator and freezer. The refrigerator should be set at 40°F or lower and the freezer at 0°F. You may want to set these temperatures even lower if the likelihood for an electrical outage looks promising within the immediate future. Create an “igloo effect” in your freezer by grouping foods closely together to help keep their temperatures longer if you indeed lose power. When packing these items keep seafood, poultry, and meats on the lower shelf of the freezer packed in that order. This is to prevent cross-contamination onto other foods in the event that they begin to thaw and their juices leak. Fill

Along with damaging winds, hurricanes can also bring storm surges. In the event of flood waters coming in contact with your foods, throw them out. Do not take the chance of consuming food items that could have potentially been infected with contaminated waters. This includes foods that are packaged in non-waterproof containers such as plastic wrap, cardboard, screw-cap items, and those with snap-top, pulltop, or crimped cap lids. This even includes any home canned items and any other foods packaged in materials that are not able to be sanitized. If you have lost power for longer than a couple hours, quickly check the thermometers in your refrigerator and freezers to make sure they are holding their temperature. Typically, frozen items can hold their temperatures for 48 hours in a fully packed freezer and 24 hours in one half-filled. Refrigerated items can stay good for about 4 hours after the power goes out, as long as the doors remain closed for the most part. If the temperature in the refrigerator has already begun to drop below 40°F after 2 hours, throw any perishable items out- including meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, milk, and leftovers. Items in the freezer are still safe to save -even if thawing- if the temperature in the freezer does not reach 40°F for longer than 2 hours. Check these frozen items to see if there are any ice crystals still on them, if so, then they are also safe to refreeze. If you notice the freezer is quickly increasing in temperature, you may want to begin transferring items to a cooler full of ice. Inspect all food items before deciding to save or consume them after a flood or prolonged electrical outage. Do not taste foods to decide if they are safe to eat and do not save any canned items that show damage of any kind. Remember the #1 rule of food safety…”when in doubt, throw it out!” *https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/newsroom/ news-releases-statements-and-transcripts/news-releasearchives-by-year/archive/2017/nr-090517-01 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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quart-size freezer bags, or other freezer-proof storage containers, with water and keep them in the freezer to use for packing around food items. It’s also a good idea to freeze items you may have in your refrigerator that you will not be using immediately- such as leftovers, milk, juices, or meats. Fill any coolers you have available with ice for the potential to transfer food into them if the power will be out for an extended period of time. Keep doors to the refrigerator, freezer, and coolers closed as much as possible. Using dry ice in a freezer can also help to keep contents frozen longer during an electrical outage.


JAKE FITZPATRICK BEGINS HIS TERM AS FLORIDA FFA AREA V STATE VICE PRESIDENT “Live in a way that embodies the blue jacket and all that it represents” By Jim Frankowiak

Jacob “Jake” Fitzpatrick was born and raised in the Ft. Lonesome area of southeastern Hillsborough County. Though his family has strong ties to agriculture, it wasn’t until he was beginning 6th grade at Barrington Middle School and Agriculture Foundations came up as one of his electives that Ag became an important part of his life. That elective course marked the start of a journey that has already had many highpoints for the 18-year-old son of Scott and Jerri Fitzpatrick. Most recently, Jake was elected Florida FFA’s Area V State Vice President. Area V includes Hillsborough, Pasco, Pinellas, Lee, Charlotte, Hardee, Sarasota, Manatee, and De Soto counties. Through next June, Jake and his Florida FFA state officer team will be on the road for approximately 300 days, traveling throughout the state, country, and internationally on behalf of FFA. “We will be meeting with chapters throughout the U.S. fostering advances in leadership and the mission of our organization,” he said. “We will be living in a way that embodies the ‘blue jacket” and all that it represents.” FFA, which was organized nationally in 1928, strives to make a positive difference in the lives of student members by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education. The organization’s current membership is comprised of 653,359 student members in grades six through 12, who belong to one of 8,568 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Agricultural educators serve as chapter advisors.

Jake and his brothers, Cade, 16, and Max, 11, live on a 10-acre ranch that’s home for 12 head of cattle along with some sugar cane acreage that’s harvested every winter. His dad also grew up in the Fort Lonesome area, while his mother was originally from Ohio and moved to Riverview at an early age. Scott Fitzpatrick is a co-owner of the Sun City Center-based Owens Law Group where his practice focuses on real estate. Jake’s mother, Jerri, is a paralegal at the firm. Jake’s great grandfather Earl Stanaland “grew many crops in Fort Lonesome area,” said Jake. “The Monday of the week he passed he was in the field working. It was his passion.” Agriculture and participation in FFA has taught Jake many lessons. “I thank God every day for allowing me to get involved in agriculture,” he said. “Perhaps one of the biggest lessons that I have learned is how you can grow through uncomfortable situations such as public speaking.” During his quest for state FFA office, the process required many different activities, including a speech before some 6,000. For his mandatory Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE), Jake created a small, amateur woodworking company called Lone Palm Woodworks, through which he built primarily rustic style tables out of reclaimed barn wood. He promoted the business via a Facebook page, offering his products on a build to suit basis. “That endeavor taught me patience and showed that if you put the hard work in, you will be rewarded.”

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To assure his business would have sufficient wood for his customer orders, Jake took down two, aged barns in the Bloomingdale area that were to be torn down by a developer. He has also foregone the use of power tools, relying solely on hand tools such as chisels and hand saws that he has either rebuilt or made on his own. He also found his woodworking activities to be a stress reliever. “I found that learning to slow down helped to improve the results of the task at hand also enabling me to cool down.” Added lessons to foster leadership skills, Jake also noted. Jake’s FFA activities also included showing four steers and two pigs while a student at Barrington Middle School and Newsome High School. “I enjoyed those activities; I typically placed in the middle of the classes I entered and learned the importance of regular routines and closely following schedules,” he said. His first paying job involved cleaning horse stalls for a relative, a job he considered “tough, but gave me an appreciation for money and the need to always do the best I can.” His most recent position was as a nursing assistant at the Veterinary Center at Fishhawk, where he started as a boarding tech responsible for cleaning cages and caring for animals boarded at the center, advancing to his nursing post after a few months of employment. His election to state FFA office and upcoming year of extensive travel made it necessary for him to resign from the center. While a student at Newsome High School and member of its FFA Chapter, Jake held a variety of leadership positions. As a freshman he was vice president for the junior chapter, becoming Chapter Parliamentarian as a sophomore and Chapter Reporter as a junior. His senior year, Jake was President of the Senior Chapter, President of the Hillsborough County FFA Federation, as well as District 9 President. Jake’s term as a state FFA officer is considered a “gap year” for traditional education. He plans to pursue his undergraduate degree afterwards. He is considering a career path that includes undergraduate studies at the University of Florida or the University of South Florida. “I hope to enroll at UF and possibly pursue a career in agricultural law, maybe even seeking the office of Florida Commissioner of Agriculture in the future,” he said, noting that nothing has been cast in stone, but recalling the lesson he learned about the need for patience while pursuing an outcome and working hard to achieve it. While seeking state FFA office, Jake said, “I learned a lot about myself and that was very beneficial to me throughout the rigorous process.” The path to a state FFA leadership position is similar to a political campaign. The qualification process involved a two day screening process that included personal meetings with each candidate, a presentation of their respective SAE’s, an extemporaneous speech and an FFA and ag test comprised of 100 written questions and an oral questioning segment.

from 30 to 14, including Jake and an FFA member from another county in Area V. Jake then began his campaign for election throughout the nine counties he sought to represent, meeting and talking with members and seeking their support. Jake shares credit for his success with his parents, his grandparents, and his middle school mentors Brittany Coleman and Greg Lehman, along with his high school ag advisors Woody Summerlin, Jyll Highsmith, Kelley Ware, Daniel Cornelius, Kenneth Hisock and Erin Elsberry. “My election also showed that you are not judged solely by where you are from or who your parents are, but by the weight of your heart,” said Jake. “I now have an important outlet to express my ideas and possibly impact younger FFA members in the same way I have been inspired by senior FFA members during my time in the organization.” Congratulations Jake, and the very best to you during your year in office and beyond! We’ll be watching.

“I spent 50 percent of the time preparing for the test, and the other half of the time studying trends in the agriculture industry and examining my personal beliefs,” said Jake. “I used that time to think about life, what I believe in and why, applying what I came to know to any questions posed to me during that interview process.” As a result of that two-day process the candidate list went Photo by Berry Sweet Memories by Dee Dee INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Artistic Edibles By Libby Hopkins

Have you ever seen a food that was too pretty to eat? I have and even though it’s too pretty to eat, I’ll still eat it! Especially cookies. I love cookies! Kerry Williams is the owner of Sugared Owl Custom Cookies and her cookies are works of art that are far too pretty to eat, but many people do. “I’ve always enjoyed baking and saw some decorated cookies online a few days before my daughter’s fifth birthday and went right out and bought the piping bags needed,” Williams said. “I baked my grandmother’s cookie recipe and fell in love with cookie decorating.” Williams learned cookie decorating by watching videos on her computer and figuring things out for herself. “Friends and family loved them and I practiced by making as many cookies as I could,” Williams said. She loved owls and knew she wanted to somehow incorporate an owl into her logo. “I liked the idea of him sitting on a rolling pin so, The Sugared Owl was made. I’m a cottage baker and have baked and hand decorated every single cookie that I’ve posted on my Facebook and Instagram page.” Williams’ cookies take several hours to complete, with the piping, flooding, drying time, and decorating of the fine details on top. “I work full time and come home to bake and decorate after my children head to bed. Sometimes, not even starting until after 9p.m.,” Williams said. The Swiss originated cookie decorating. According to the Blogspot website for cookie decorating (www.decoratedcookies.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-history-of-cookie-decorating.html), “We can thank the Swiss for bringing the cookie decorating tradition to life. Their now famous springerle cook-

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ies were the very first decorated cookies. These sweet, but hard, cookies are pressed into molds and pop out featuring the most intricately designed cookies you have ever seen. The first molds were discovered from the 14th century and are now considered national treasures and held in Swiss museums.”

ing a few kids classes that sell out quickly.” She posts all open classes on her Facebook page. “This is a fun evening and one of my favorite things to do,” Williams said.

The website also said the Swiss used rolling pins cleverly carved with designs to roll out highly ornate cookies. The images on these cookies rival the finest artwork of the master painters and sculptors. Decorators soon realized that they could combine egg yolks and food dyes to paint these cookies. Some even paint the cookies for decoration only with paint. “I don’t sell copyrighted designs but love making them for friends and family,” Williams said. “Those are my hardest to make and I like practicing some of the more intricate designs.”

Williams is grateful for those who shop and support her small, local business. “As per the Florida Cottage Food Laws, I am unable to ship my cookies,” Williams said. “All orders must be picked up at my residence. This makes every customer very important to me as they come to me instead of shopping online or out of state. Sales from my orders go directly back to my children and our family’s needs. I appreciate each and every single one of my customers and value their support.” If you would like to learn more about Sugar Owl Custom Cookie Company or take one of Williams’ cookie decorating classes, you can visit her Facebook page at www.facebook. com/sugaredowl or call 908-328-2311.

Williams loves to share her cookies as well. “I donate a dozen or two to different organizations each month,” she said. “I’ve been donating to A Kids Place in Brandon for a few Christmas’ now and love sending over some sweet treats to the children.” This past Valentine’s Day Williams hosted a twohour open cookie sale at her home for friends and neighbors. “The feedback was so positive that I did this again for Easter,” Williams said. “I posted on social media three-nights of open sales and sold out after the second night. I’ll continue to do this for each upcoming holiday, as I am available.” Her customers loved picking what designs they wanted and didn’t have to worry about getting their orders in early. “My customers come back time and time again for my soft sugar cookie, with a vanilla/orange flavor and a soft-bite royal icing. Each cookie is always individually wrapped.” Williams offers a “Make and Take” class which has been a huge success. “Participants come and decorate their own cookies with me guiding them each step,” Williams said. “I have all the cookies baked and ready to be iced. The icing is bagged and laid out across the table.” Her adult class typically lasts two hours. “They head home with their own decorated designs and customers come back each holiday to decorate more,” Williams said. “I’ve hosted many classes at Cool Beans Coffee shop in Fishhawk and Kraftology in Brandon. Lately, I’ve been hosting a lot of summer classes at my home, offerINTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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A Closer LookAmazing Activities Naturally

by Sean Green | Photos by April Green

Plaster Casting Foliage If you have never done plaster casting before, you are in for a treat this month. Plaster casting is simply making a mold of an object and filling the mold with plaster. The possibilities are endless, but can include sea shells, seeds, fruit, animal track imprints, and foliage just to name a few. This month we are making a mold by creating imprints of plant foliage in clay and casting it with plaster. The results are a casted piece that can be painted, stained, even refined by carving. I have tried several types of modern “modeling material� and personally, I find natural clay works the best for this project for molding foliage. Some of the modern modeling material tends to stick to the plants too much and does not separate well. The sky is the limit for possibilities with this project, there is no way all possibilities could be covered, but we would love to see your creations if you are willing to share pictures with us.

Materials: Foliage clipping Toothpicks Rolling Pin Clay (natural clay suggested) Plaster White Glue (optional) Wax Paper

The Mold: (do this first)

The Plaster:

Roll the clay out onto a flat plane about twice as thick as you want your final plater piece to be. Arrange foliage on the clay to create a nice composition. Gently press the foliage into the clay, use a rolling pin. Gently remove the foliage leaving the impression in the clay (use a toothpick if necessary) Create a basin structure around the composition to give shape to your cast piece. Build wall or use cookie cutter shapes or any other object to trap the plaster while it dries.

Plaster is designed to dry quickly. Thin mixture will not take long at all, but may be more fragile. To strengthen plaster, rather than mix with water only, we mixed white glue with it.

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Mold Leather July 2018

Mix White Glue and Water at a ratio of about 1:4 Sprinkle plaster into the water slowly while stirring to the consistency of pancake batter. (thinner for more detail) Pour the plaster into the mold and let it dry completely. The plaster will be a lighter shade and cold to the touch. Gently remove the casting from the clay by peeling the clay from the bottom of the cast like you would a banana.

Trim Leather

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A Closer Look

A Closer Look

by Sean Green | Photos by April Green

American Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis) Florida’s tropical environment is like an amusement park to entomologists, herpetologists, and the adventurous in spirit. If you have children that routinely bring home lizards, snakes, and a variety of insects, you have first-hand evidence of a primal fascination with the world around us. I was that boy and never outgrew my fascination. Our paradise is an ideal habitat for a diverse population of critters. Of the many pets a child may bring home, lizards are usually among the first. This month we will take a closer look at a strikingly attractive native lizard known as the Carolina green anole, and how, despite pressure from the invasive brown anole, it is moving up in the world. Anoles belong to a family of lizards known as the Dactyloidae which include over 400 species worldwide. Their native range includes the tropical and subtropical habitats in South America, Central America, Mexico, and through the West Indies and several East Pacific islands as well as the southeastern United States. In the United States however, our only native anole is the Green anole or Carolina anole. In 2011, our little friend gained the distinction of being the first reptile to have its complete genome published. What was learned in the process is interesting. Based on the most recent DNA sequences and morphology studies, some authorities now consider Dactyloidae a subfamily of Iguanidae, making the tiny lizard a distant relative of a modern dragon (Iguana). What’s more fascinating however, is the evolutionary superpowers this little guy has. Anole lizards have become the best examples of adaptive radiation, which is, in layman’s terms, the ability to quickly evolve into new forms to survive environmental change, threats, or new resources. It’s natural selection at its finest. A recent example of this amazing ability can be found right here in the United States by watching the interaction of our native Carolina green anole and its response to the introduced Cuban brown anole. For a long time, what appeared to be diminishing populations of our Carolina anole was blamed on the Brown anole. It wasn’t until a formal study was done that we discovered our native anole is not becoming extinct, but rather, moving up in the world. Our Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis) has a natural range that is limited to the southeast. We have two significant introduced species. The Cuban green anole (Anolis portcatus) which is nearly indistinguishable from our native species and the Brown anoles (Ano-

In October of 2014, a research report was published in the journal Science that illustrates adaptive evolution, which can result from an interaction of closely related species enabling one or both species to quickly evolve to survive the competition for resources without causing local extinction. Dr. Yoel Stuart of University of Texas and Dr. Todd Campbell of University of Tampa led a group of researchers in experiments designed to explore the notion that the brown anoles are forcing green anoles to higher ground. Dr Campbell conducted the experiments among the dozens of tiny one-acre manmade islands in the Mosquito Lagoon near Titusville. These small islands of debris are the result of dredging operations that took place in the 1950s and were an ideal environment for the study. Campbell found six islands that had existing populations of the green anole but no brown anole population, so he got permission from federal authorities to introduce brown anoles to three of the islands. The migration of the green anoles to shrubs and trees was recorded as was a population decline of green anoles soon after the brown anoles were introduced. A Decade after finishing his research, Dr. Stuart proposed revisiting the islands to further

the investigation and discovered that the green anoles that were thought to have diminishing populations were not becoming extinct at all but rather, had moved to higher levels in the trees and developed bigger toe pads than those of which were on islands isolated from the brown anoles. The toe pads of the green anoles that were displaced also had more lamellae, which are adhesive scales that allow them to cling to a variety of surfaces like a gecko does. Surveys of reptile and amphibian abundance were repeated by Cassani et al. 15 years apart and confirmed a continual a drop in green anole populations corresponding to an increase in brown anole populations. But both Campbell and Cassani et al. acknowledge the possibility that may simply have shifted upwards, out of sight, pointing out that the green anole has been seen shifting upwards a bit in the presence of a brown anole and the morphological changes that were documented earlier would be a competitive advantage for climbers. They suggested that the green anoles were not becoming extinct, but rather, living higher on the tree and were invisible to researchers. Stuart suggested that green anoles default may be life in bushes and branches and perhaps ancient relatives of the Cuban green anole, which were also tree and shrub dwellers, found their way to Florida and in the absence of brown anoles, began filling the ground niche. When brown anoles eventually arrived in Florida, the green anoles reverted to the ancestral niche higher in the bush that they kept for millions of years. Throughout the Caribbean are examples of high perching species, all have larger toepads and more lamellae than ground dwelling species. There was no evidence that this change caused by the presence of the Brown anoles (Anolis sagrei). The team then reared hatchlings from both groups of anoles, and sequenced masses of genetic variation confirming the two groups were not closely related to each other. With detailed surveys of each island, they ruled out environmental differences that could have caused the morphology. Their work successfully isolated the interaction between the Brown anoles (Anolis sagrei) and the Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis) as the primary influence in the adaptive radiation of the Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis). So when you get out to your garden this month and see one of our native green anole, take a closer look, you are watching evolution in real time. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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lis sagrei), a species that has become the fall guy for seemingly diminishing populations of the Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis). The brown anoles (Anolis sagrei) are a successful and dominant group of ground dwelling anole and was first known in Florida in 1887 (Garman 1887) These lizards have been coming into our Florida seaports since the 1940s and are now well established, in fact, they are thought to be the most abundant species of anole in the southern half of Florida (Campbell 2003). There has been recent concern that the Brown anoles (Anolis sagrei) are pushing our native Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis) into extinction.


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NEWS BRIEFS

Compiled by Jim Frankowiak

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR 2018 AG WOMAN OF THE YEAR

USDA AND FDA ADVANCE COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO STREAMLINE PRODUCE SAFETY

Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam is now accepting nominations for the 2018 “Woman of the Year in Agriculture” Award which recognizes women in all industry areas who have made outstanding contributions to agriculture in Florida. July 31 is the nomination deadline.

The USDA and FDA have announced alignment of the USDA Harmonized Good Agricultural Practices Audit Program (USDA H-GAP) with the requirements of the FDA Food Save Modernization Act’s (FSMA’s) Produce Safety Rule. This is part of an ongoing effort to make the oversight of food safety stronger and the process more efficient.

More information about the award, past recipients and the award application can be accessed at FreshFromFlorida.com.

HYDRAULIC FLUID WARNING The Petroleum Quality Institute of America is reminding buyers of Tractor Hydraulic Fluid (THF) used in farm and industrial tractors and construction that the”303” THF specification was discontinued in the 1970s. It has been replaced by JDM-J20C or D specifications. Georgia and Missouri have issued stop sale orders on “303” THF. There are no specifications available for 303 THF and such products making “303” claims cannot be tested to assure compliance with any known specifications. The cost for “303”may be less, but the consequence may be more costly for equipment repairs. More information is available at: https://pqiablog.com/2018/03/16/303-gone-but-not-forgotten/.

USDA RESUMES CONTINUOUS CRP ENROLLMENT The USDA has resumed accepting applications for the voluntary Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and eligible farmers, ranchers and landowners can sign up at their local Farm Service Agency office now through August 17, 2018. In return for enrolling land in the CRP for contracts between 10 and 15 years, the USDA through FSA on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) provides participants with annual rental payments and cost-share assistance. CRP pays producers who remove sensitive lands from production and plant certain grasses, shrubs and trees that improve water quality, prevent soil erosion and increased wildlife habitat.

USDA SEEKING FSA COUNTY COMMITTEE NOMINATIONS The USDA is encouraging farmers and ranchers to nominate candidates to lead, serve and represent their community on their local county committee for three-year terms. Nominations will be accepted by the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA).

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To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, producers must participate or cooperate in an FSA program and reside in the area where the election is being held. The nomination form and other information can be accessed at www.fsa. usda.gov/elections. The deadline is August 1.

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Farmers interested in learning more about this alignment and compliance with the Produce Safety Rule are encouraged to contact their regional representative of the Produce Safety Network or visit: FDA.gov.

CERTIFICATION COST SHARE FOR FLORIDA ORGANIC GROWERS Florida Organic Growers (FOG) in cooperation with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) have announced an Organic Certification Cost Share Program for certified organic operators in Florida. Certified growers can now apply for reimbursement of up to 75 percent of certification costs incurred during the period October 1, 2017 to September 30, 2018. The application deadline is October 31. More information, including a downloadable application form, is available at: www.foginfo.org.

GUIDANCE AVAILABLE ON ELD RULES The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) excludes those transporting agricultural commodities within 150 air miles from obtaining an electronic logging device (ELD). Motor carriers utilizing the agricultural commodities exemption are excluded from electronic logging device (ELD) requirements if they do not operate outside the 150-mile radius more than eight of every 30 days. Added detail and other points of clarity are available at: www. fmcsa.dot.gov/ag.

NRCS OFFERS ONLINE CLIENT LINK The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) want to remind farmers, ranchers and landowners that many of the matters they may need to take care of with NRCS can be done online. NORCS offers a secure online portal called Conservation Client Gateway, accessible at: nrcs.usda.gov. NRCS can request technical and financial assistance, review and sign conservation plans and practice schedules, request and track payments for conservation programs and more – all without having to drive to a local USDA service center.

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Cole Hanson, Feeder Steer Proficiency Award, also received the Turfgrass Management Proficiency Award

Abby Davis, Sheep Production Proficiency Award

2018 FFA State Convention Leadership Development Event High School Agricultural Issues Forum 1st – Plant City High School Conduct of Chapter Meetings 3rd – Strawberry Crest High School Employment Skills 2nd – Strawberry Crest, Anna Ress 4th – JF St. Martin (Durant), Carter Howell High School Extemporaneous Public Speaking 1st – Strawberry Crest, JP Prescott Middle School Extemporaneous Public Speaking 1st – Turkey Creek MS, Austin Holcomb High School Parliamentary Procedure 4th – Durant Middle School Parliamentary Procedure 1st Tomlin MS High School Prepared Public Speaking 4th – Durant, Cole Hanson

Proficiency Award Agricultural Communications Austin Tyler Holcomb Turkey Creek MS Beef Production – Placement Madilyn Conrad Plant City SR Dairy Production Nicholas Luis Hammer Sickles Equine Science – Entrepreneurship Hannah Ashley Wears Lennard Feeder Steer Cole Hanson Durant Landscape Management Tyler James Hewett Durant Sheep Production Abby Davis Durant Turfgrass Management Cole Hanson Durant

„ Providing a Consistent Conservative Vote to the Florida Cabinet „ Defending Your 2nd Amendment Rights „ Restoring and Preserving Our Water Resources „ Protecting and Growing Florida Agricultural Jobs

www.VoteCaldwell.org

MattCaldwellFL

@MattCaldwellFL

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Political advertisement paid for and approved by Matt Caldwell, Republican, for Commissioner of Agriculture

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909

ANIMALS & NEEDS

Info@inthefieldmagazine.com

2005 MAHINDRA 6500

4X4, 65 hp with loader. ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES 1,000 hours. $15,900 Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & Call Alvie 813-759-8722 exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire MAHINDRA 4530 by roll or foot. (813)752-2230. Call Don Tractor with loader. 4X4, Ammerman. www.ammermans.com 44hp. $15,000 Call Alvie July 15, 2018, Nov. 25, 2018 813-759-8722

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4X5 round bales of herbicided and fertilized Pangola Hay. Call Dale 863-229-9876 or John 407-448-5608

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Thousands of 8ft. & 10ft. sheets. In Stock. Prices from $6 and up. Custom lengths available. 813-752-7088 ask for Ferris.

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We have all your aluminum needs! Screen Room, carports & awnings. Call Blake (813) 752-3378

Used Lawn Trailer with aluminum plate tool box. 5ft tongue & heavy duty gate. $1,000 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

FOR RENT

Millcreek Pine Bark Row Mulcher. For blueberry farms, six yard, PTO drive need at least a 30hp tractor. Call 863-604-2526 for rental details.

All wood kitchen cabinets. All wood vanities. Granite counter tops. Custom made to your size. DOORS & WINDOWS SPECIAL ORDER Call Blake 813-752-3378 No upcharge. House & Mobile Home. Many standard sizes in stock. VINYL SIDDING Ask for Blake. (813) 752-3378 Many colors and styles to choose from. Ask for Ted. KITCHEN CABINETS & VANITIES 813-752-3378 Get quality all wood cabinets for less than the BIG Box STORES! Call Today! MOBILE HOME SUPPLIES Ask for Blake. (813) 752-3378 Everything you need under ONE roof! Call Blake 813-752-3378

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Forbes Road Produce. Open everyday from 7:30am - 8pm. Forbes Rd. & I-4 @ exit 17. Come out and see us!

REAL ESTATE NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS

Have you ever considered moving to beautiful Blairsville, Georgia or just need a getaway home? Blairsville is a desirable community & great location. Call Jane Baer Realty and ask for Jane. 706-745-2261 www.janebaerrealty.com

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MECHANIC NEEDED Agricultural equipment. Pay with benefits based on experience. Call David 863-537-1345

Now Hiring Experienced Barn Builders 813-754-1766

JOHN DEERE

Looking for your new tractor? Come see us at Everglades Farm Equipment. evergladesfarmequipment.com 2805 SR 60 West, Plant City 813-737-1660

MASSEY FERFUSON 40

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Late 60’s model industrial diesel grading tractor. $3,750.00 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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Try it

CRAVE IT TOMORROW.

The Boneless Wings Meal With Spicy Honey BBQ Sauce. Enjoy the sweet taste of honey with a little bit of kick. It’s two great flavors on one plate of wings. Served with Crinkle Fries and a Small Beverage. Try them today! 2901 1/2 James Redman Pkwy. Plant City • 813.752.1971 1060-1390 cal.

© 2016 Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. “Zaxby’s” is a registered trademark of Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. Each Zaxby’s restaurant is independently owned and operated under a license agreement with Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. DR PEPPER is a registered trademark of Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc.

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In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida. Crops, livestock, cattle, horticulture, horses, swine, FFA, 4-H and more

In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida. Crops, livestock, cattle, horticulture, horses, swine, FFA, 4-H and more

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