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Contents

VOL. 10 • ISSUE 3

Feature Wish farms

Strawberry picking Challenge

Page

54

Cover Photo by: Karen Berry

FSGA - Award Banquet

Your Super Bowl Party Needs My Mamma’s Bar-B-Q

Page 10

Page 60

Silnet Tecnology

Discovery Garden

Page 15

Page 70

Florida State Fair

Page 17

Goat Lovers Unite

Tampa Bay Fishing Report

Page 18

Page 74

Dan West: New Farm Bureau District 15 State Director

Page 80

Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22

UF-IFAS Extension - Awarded Grant

Page 82

Satsuma Orange

Page 35

Water Wise and Dollar Smart

Page 37

Revised OSHA Hazard Standards

UF-IFAS Extension - Citrus Greening

Page 83

Naturally Amazing - Food Stamp Art

Page 84

Page 38

Tampa’s Berkeley annual Pilgrimage to Wimauma

Page 46

Page 85

Marshall FFA - Awards

Master Gardeners - Enjoy Fruits of their Labors

Recipes

UF - Coral Reef Worth Saving

Page 48 Page 50

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A Closer Look - Insects as Food

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Publisher/Photography Karen Berry

It’s the most wonderful time of the year……no, I’m not late with my holiday message, I’m talking about fair time! I’ve always loved the fair. I used to love it for the rides and games, now I love it as a place to see the FFA and 4-H students show off their hard work! I love seeing the pride on the faces of these competitors as they show people that they know the hard work and responsibility that comes with having projects is paying off. From livestock, to plants, to crafts and more, these youth are to be commended for the hard work they put in to get to the competition. If you have never seen the look on the face of a student just crowned as Grand Champion, you are missing out! In Florida we are blessed with weather that allows us to have fairs much earlier than the rest of the country. First up is the Polk County Youth Fair, held January 25-January 31. The showcase at this fair is all things youth, as the name implies. Beginning February 6 and running 12 days until February 17, the Florida State Fair will host a wide variety of agriculture events for youth and adults. Quickly following on the heels of the Florida State Fair is the Florida Strawberry Festival, February 27 – March 9, an event also full of a variety of agriculture events from dairy and beef cattle, to homemade crafts, and everything in between. These are events you don’t want to miss. While you are there indulging in the obscene fair food, often times food you would never think to make, be sure to let the youth know how much you appreciate their hard work. Also, maybe you can help answer the age old question, “How do you deep fry Pepsi?” Drop by and see us in the Ag Hall of Fame building during the Florida State Fair. See you at the fairs!

Sarah

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Dad’s Towing......................................................43 Dr. Barry Gaffney, O.D. PA...............................11 Dr. Pat Almerico.................................................13 Driscoll’s.............................................................73 Senior Managing Editor/ East Coast Ag Products, Inc...........................42 Associate Publisher Effective Edge Communications, Inc...........103 Sarah Holt Everglades Farm Equipment.........................104 Fnacy Farms......................................................20 Farm Bureau Insurance-Valrico....................90 Editor-In-Chief Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner............47 Al Berry Farm Credit.........................................................71 Felton’s.................................................................51 Editor Fischbach Land Co...........................................45 Pasty Berry Fla Dpt of Ag & Consumer Svcs...................65 Florida Mineral, Salt & Ag Products..........100 Florida State Fair.............................................92 Office Manager Florida Strawberry Growers Asso................44 Bob Hughens Forbes Road Produce........................................14 Fred’s Market Restaurant................................23 Sales Manager Gator Ford.........................................................40 Danny Crampton Grimes Hardware Center.................................14 Grove Equipment Service...............................58 Sales Grove Equipment Service...............................99 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply..............................3 Al Berry Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................93 Tina Richmond Haught Funeral Home......................................72 Danny Crampton Haystack Farms.................................................93 Melissa Nichols Helena Chemical-Tampa.................................69 Highland Corporation.....................................23 Creative Director/Illustrator Hillsboro Bank..................................................24 Juan Alvarez Home Protection Pest Control......................103 Hopewell Funeral Home..................................29 Huff Muffler..........................................................79 Photography Hydraulic Hose & Cylinder, Inc.......................36 Karen Berry Jarrett-Scott Ford..............................................2 Al Berry Johnson’s Barbeque.........................................64 Stephanie Humphrey Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm................................93 Keel & Curley Winery......................................63 Staff Writers Ken’s Well Drilling & Pump Service..............47 Key Plex..............................................................66 Al Berry Loetscher Auto Parts.........................................79 Sandy Kaster Malissa Crawford..............................................52 James Frankowiak Mark Smith Excavating....................................93 Sean Green Meryman Environmental.................................36 Ginny Mink Mosaic..................................................................78 Libby Hopkins Myers Cleaners.................................................68 Napa.....................................................................12 Parkesdale...........................................................14 Contributing Writers Pathway BioLogic..............................................77 Woody Gore Patterson Companies.......................................49 Les McDowell Patterson Companies.......................................49 Plant City Homestyle Buffet.............................5 Plant City Tire & Auto....................................93 ABC Pizza..................................................19 Platinum Bank..................................................62 Ace Air Conditioning & Electric...........93 QLF Nutrients Division....................................43 Ag Technologies......................................31 QLF Specialty Products..................................73 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers............52 Railroad & Industrial Fed Credit Un............40 Antioch Feed & Farm Supply..............101 Savich & Lee Wholesale................................26 Aquarius Water Refining......................103 Savich & Lee Wholesale................................27 Arrowhead Archery................................67 Seafood Dive.....................................................86 Astin Strawberry Exchange.................93 Seedway..............................................................47 Bankers South Group............................76 Shrimp & Co. Express......................................13 Bill’s Transmissions................................96 Silent Technology, Inc......................................45 Bingham...................................................87 South Fl Baptist Hospital..................................7 Brandon Auto Services, Inc..................83 Southside Stores LLC......................................53 Brandon Farms Market.........................12 Southside Stores LLC.......................................91 Brandon Regional Hospital...................59 Stephanie Humphrey.......................................84 Brewington’s Towing & Recovery........44 Strawberry Distanve Challenge.....................17 Broke & Poor..........................................42 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort..............103 Cameron Financial Service..................23 Trinkle,Redman,Swanson,Coton,D................69 Cecil Breeding Farm..............................30 Verti-Gro, Inc....................................................68 Certis USA................................................41 Walden Lake Car Wash & Service..............42 Certis USA................................................97 Wasabi Japanese Steak House.......................9 CF Industries Enterprises, Inc..............81 Willie’s................................................................79 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive..................34 Wishnatzki.........................................................95 Country Village Power Equipment.......21 Country Village Power Equipment......34 WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121 100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

A BUSY TIME FOR YOUR FARM BUREAU

Dear Readers:

LET US HEAR YOU A BUSY TIMEFROM FOR YOUR FARM BUREAU

Dear Readers:

I am humbled and honored to joyful have and beenyou I hope all both of your holiday celebrations were Dear Readers: elected president of YOUR Hillsborough County had an opportunity to give thanks for all that you have. Now thatFarm we areBureau. into 2014All I trust you are acommitted to satisfying of us owe debt of gratitude to all ofoutgoing your Newpresident Year’s resolutions. Danny Aprile for his years of

I am both humbled and honored to have been service to our organization. I promise to do my elected president of good YOUR Hillsborough Now is probably a very time to look at the County challenges best to continue the momentum he carried forth. Farm Bureau. All usthis oweNew a debt gratitude and opportunities youof face Yearof and into the to outgoing AprileCounty for hisFarm yearsBureau of future. I havepresident been yourDanny Hillsborough As a sixth Florida service to our I promise toI know do mythe president for justgeneration aorganization. few months, but I farmer, have been hearing many challenges opportunities all of forth. us have from more and morethe ofand you as time passes. That’s great and best to continue momentum he carried in keep the agriculture industry and that is an industry please it up. is global. Our major challenge to continue Asthat a sixth generation Florida farmer, Iisknow the As the world’s population continues to grow and the acreage to produce the food our growing population must many challenges and opportunities all of us have devoted towhile producing the food neededtotofarming feed the world conhave the lands devoted continue in the agriculture industry and that is an industry tinues to diminish,The it’s important that we know about and to diminish. good thing is that the market that istoglobal. Ourand major challengethat is tocome continue respond opportunities for ourchallenges products continues to expand. Ourbefore task to produce the food our growing population must each of us as members of this great industry. Sometimes is to effectively meet those dual challenges while havechallenges while the devoted to farming continue these arelands nothing more than rumors and have no ourtimes precious environment. Irequire am confident toprotecting diminish. The goodthey thing is that the basis in fact. Other are genuine andmarket our areproducts up to that task andtoIThe look forward helping immediate attention and response. “our” here task istonot just forwe our continues expand. Our us all do our part to assure that so. we do me or my fellow board members, but a very substantial is to effectively meet those dual challenges whileorganization here in precious Hillsborough County, the Istate Florida protecting our environment. am of confident and Let our me nation. also tell you about the other new officers

You should also know that Florida Farm Bureau is seeking the challenges local industry partners face asany to engage countyour organizations such as ours regarding they strive to produce the initiatives high quality economic, legal or regulatory that products need our attention consideration. are tours aware are of any such pending ourand markets demand.If you Those hard work matters, please let us know. Weof will quicklyfrom research these and represent many hours support our the challenges our local industry partners face as situations and determine thethank most appropriate course of industry colleagues. We them and those they strive to produce quality products action. In this instance, the our high state organization is prepared legislators and regulators who take the time to our markets demand. Those tours hard work to provide up to $5,000 in funding for are approved projects. learn first hand about agriculture in our area and and many hoursdeadline of support from our We represent face an early February for applying for this how and why we need their ongoing awareness, industry Welet thank them and those funding,colleagues. so again please us know if there are any pending help andand support. economic, legal or regulatory matters we should legislators regulators who take that the time to be addressing. learn first hand about agriculture in our area and

There’s more. our program for bringing how and why weAg-Venture, need their ongoing awareness, Let me remind you again that you don’t have to beschool a farmer the story of agriculture to children through help and support. or rancher toisbelong addition to supactivities, going to onFarm and Bureau. we will In again be participorting important and helping to assure our pating our in Farm Cityindustry Daysour through which bring There’s Ag-Venture, program for we bringing future, more. Farm Bureau membership for your family brings the story agriculture our friends living in the ofof agriculture toto children through school its story own rewards. Those member benefits are diverse and of Tampa. activities, is going on and we will again be particigenuine value to all of our family members. If you haven’t

pating inout Farm Days through which bringplease checked the City benefits of belonging to Farmwe Bureau, Lastly, ifofyou are not atomember of our Farm do. The modest fee associated with family membership in the story agriculture our friends living in Bureau family, please It isn’t necessary that having you be a Farm Bureau is ajoin greatus. deal. To learn more about Tampa. farmer or join rancher join. membership Please visitin Farm Bureau, your family ours to through please visit: http://hcfarmbureau.org or call 813/685-9121 http:// hcfarmbureau.org or call for for Lastly, if you are not a member of 813/685-9121 our Farm Bureau more information. more information. family, please join us. It isn’t necessary that you be a

we are up to that task and I look forward to helping by your lastthat month. They uselected all do our part board to assure so. are: we do Please keep this multi-faceted organization in mind asWood, you Vice President Will Womack, Treasurer Ray farmer to join. Please visit the corner Februgo about your daily activities. We are here to help and to Lastly, or therancher Florida State Fair is just around Secretary Michelle Williamson andnew Member-AtOncehcfarmbureau.org again, I am honored to be your president http:// Let me also tell you about the other officers or call 813/685-9121 forand get to the bottom of any discussions that are troublesome ary 6-17. Hope you all plan to attend and help us celebrate Large Bill Burnette. My thanks to each of them and my very best to you and your family. your board last To month. They more information. orelected seem toby offer opportunities. that end the are: U.S. Farmers our industry. Until next month, stay well and best of luck our boardAlliance forWill their willingness to serve. Vice President Treasurer Ray Wood, and Ranchers isWomack, interested in hearing from farmers with your New Year’s resolutions. and ranchersMichelle in our area by participating a brief market Secretary Williamson and in Member-AtOnce again, I am honored to be your president and As I survey. am Burnette. sure ofMy you have come to be realize research Theallresult of thanks that survey will creation of Large Bill to each of them and my very best to you and your family. vacation timetheir is over. We areprogram particularly at Thank you, anour effective communications farming boardpublic for willingness to serve.aboutbusy and Farm ranching. Over the we have that some of Bureau. Thisyears month we found are completing the our third toughest challenges were based upon misinformation ourall legislative tourscome during which we take As I amofsure of you have to realize or aelected lack of information about what wetodoseveral and how do and appointed officials ofwe our time is over. We arewhen particularly busy at Thank you, it.vacation Rather than having to respond things reach crisis agricultural businesses inwe this areas so they the can see Kenneth Parker - President Farm Bureau. This month are completing level, the Alliance is creating a pro-active program to serve agriculture at work, some of the best management third of our tours during which we take our industry andlegislative help educate those who are unaware of practices that haveagriculture been put into place and learn elected and appointed officials to several of our the various issues facing locally, nationally and of

Kenneth

Kenneth

globally. You can access thatinsurvey at http://hrgisurvey.com/ agricultural businesses this areas so they can see Kenneth Parker - President survey/html.pro?ID=710. It willoftake 15-minutes and agriculture at work, some theabout best management you will receive $15 honorarium for your time. Board practices thata have been put into place and learn of of Directors

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Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Vice-President; Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board members: Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Greg Lehman, Erin Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, RonBoard Wetherington, and Ray Wood, of Directors Whitson, Executive Director Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Judi Vice-President; Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board members: Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Greg Lehman, Erin Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2013 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M Ron Wetherington, and Ray Wood, Judi Whitson, Executive Director

INTIN FHE IELD MM AGAZINE 2013 2014 IHE N TTHE FFIELD IELD M AGAZINE AGAZINE NOVEMBER JJanuary anuary 2014

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2013

Awards Banquet

The Annual Jam Awards banquet and Scholarship Presentation was held Friday, December 6, 2013, at the Regent facility in Brandon. After the 6pm Social Hour, and dinner at 7pm, Florida Strawberry Growers President, Andy McDonald called the meeting together with the introduction of the FSGA Board and Sponsors. After brief remarks by Executive Director Ted Campbell, the awards were announced.

First Flat Award!

Ferris Farms – They picked the first flat on October 17th. They have won this award for the last 6 years. Butch Vance, farm manager, with Ted Campbell 10

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Classic Award!

This award recognizes those who have proven by their actions to be the Berry Best of Friends to the Strawberry Industry. Ken Parker with Bob Wells.

Public Service Award!

Judi Whitson, recipient, with Layla Drawdy, Diamond R Fertilizer, sponsor

Workhorse Award!

(L-R) Amanda West representing RCS, sponsor, Shad Simmons, Andy McDonald

Marty Sewell Memoril Scholarship Award!

Marshal Sewell with Levi Mayo

Ambassador Scholarships

(L-R) Morgan Sistrunk, Alyssa Shepherd, Aly Joyner, Lindsey English

FSGA Scholarship Awards!

Jacob Belisle, Kelsey Bozeman, Dalton Dry, Dalton Dry, Mylie Feaster, Alexander Fernandez, Nicholas Fernandez, Ashley Gallops, Taylor Harrison, Miranda Lane, Mason Smith

(in no particular order)

Osburn Griffin Scholarship!

Darby Hasting with Russell Griffin

Brenda St. Martin Memorial Scholarship Award!

Morgan Boykin/Andy McDonald

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NO FARMERS NO FOOD

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By Ginny Mink

Business Up Front

Zombie apocalypses, government conspiracy theories, wild hogs tearing up your citrus groves or personal protection, whatever your bent, guns are a hot commodity. When your sister gets your parents bullets for Christmas because that’s what they asked for, and a sweet, innocent, little blonde you went to college with celebrates the successful completion of her concealed weapons permit course on her Facebook page, you realize something has definitely changed! That’s when you discover that new gun shops are popping up all over the country and the newest one to hit Plant City is Silent Technology Inc. owned by David Harris. Given the opportunity to chat with him, we discovered his rather interesting background. He shared, “I didn’t do a whole lot of agriculture, my parents weren’t into it, it was my uncles. I grew up in the summers on a dairy farm in North Georgia. As a kid I just helped out with summers. I remember I didn’t care for it too much. Cow poop is no fun! I went to Georgia Tech. Actually, I went to the Navy first when I got out of high school, spent almost 10 years in the Navy, got out, went back to school, finished a degree at Georgia Tech in engineering. I did that up until the last few years when I got into designing silencers for guns and that kind of took off into a small little business, doing gun shows and things like that, and reselling. Then that progressed into enough stuff that I could open a store, so I opened the store next to my engineering office here in Plant City and started specializing in reloading supplies and high-end knives. So far it’s been doing pretty good. We’ve had the store open now about eight weeks.” Designing silencers is a little bit more high-tech than the width and depth of a potato, or the thickness of a down pillow. No doubt David’s engineering experience was beneficial, but we wondered just how someone gets started designing silencers? His explanation wasn’t too in-depth, but the revelations he provided as to his clientele were pretty interesting. He said, “We were playing with pistols and we finally got our first silencer and thought, ‘Well heck, we could try and make it better!’ So we started playing around, playing more and more with them, and it just ended up becoming a lot of fun, so we took off with it and it kind of migrated into a business. We don’t design them anymore because there are so many different designs out there that we can just buy them and resell them. We found that there was a market for a lot of farmers, they like to buy silencers to take out varmints and hogs without alerting the people down the street who hear gunfire and call the cops. It actually works out as a pretty good tool for the local farmers. Sold quite a few in the area! And then you have people that have varmints that get into their stuff, they don’t want to alert the neighbors, you know, they’re trying to be nice.” Perhaps you’ve only considered silencers as necessary murder accoutrements. According to David they’re also common courtesy!

Who does Silent Technology Inc. cater too? Gun shop regulars might not be surprised by David’s description of his typical customers but those new to the industry, those whom have WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Guns, Ammo, Knives, Oh My!

just recently discovered the rage that is turning housewives into gun enthusiasts, might be just as shocked as he was. He told us, “Our clientele is mostly reloaders, precision target shooters, hunters that want better ammunition. It actually spreads the whole spectrum. I can tell you most guns are purchased by females! It is quite the opposite of what I thought it would be. You know, for the longest time I thought some of the extreme people would be the prevalent customers but that’s not been the case, it’s been just normal people! There are some scary people that come in every once in a while but they’re not as prevalent as I thought they’d be. You know preppers, people with all the government conspiracy stuff. It’s not like I thought it would be because when I used to visit gun shops, it’d be everybody and their: ‘the government’s gonna take your guns,’ but we don’t get a lot of that. It’s people that basically use it as tools.” We asked him for clarification on the term reloaders. He explained, “Reloaders are people that load their own ammunition. So they can actually tune their ammunition to their gun. You’ve gotta get the powder and the bullet weight, you’ve gotta get the mixture just perfect. So there’s a lot of science behind it, a lot of math. So, you get a lot of technical type people doing it. It’s comprised of your reloading equipment which would be your presses, things like that, then you have your commodity type stuff, the brass, the gunpowder, the primers and of course then the bullet kits. And then you have ancillary supplies, things that people use.” He plans on starting a reloader class next year in case you’re interested.

What can you find in the Silent Technology Inc. shop? The website reveals a vast array of handguns, supplies, knives, and a large selection of ammo. Specifically David said, “We sell hunting rifles, concealed carry weapons, target guns, guns and silencers, short barrel rifles, shotguns. Anything anybody wants! We stock all that stuff and I do carry a lot of high-end knives like Benchmade, Spyderco, Sog. They are fairly high-end knives, they can get up as far as $400-$500 for a knife and people buy them a lot! These are duty knives, a lot of your EMTs carry them, your state troopers carry them, those are the people to come in and buy the higher-end duty knives. There’s a difference, I mean you can tell the difference between a $50 knife and a $400 knife. These people are getting them as tools.” In case you are wondering about David’s focus on high-end knives, one of the brands he stocks in his shop, Spyderco, offers a unique description on their website, “Our recognizable appearance is a result of designing ergonomic functional tools rather than applying lipstick and nylons to a pocketknife. We may look curious, homely, whatever, but we’ll never be called unusable or undependable.” Obviously David is committed to high quality and durable materials. If you find yourself in need of such tools, please visit the Silent Technology Inc. shop. David says, “We’re next to Walmart over here in Plant City. You know where the Watson clinic is off Alexander? We’re right behind it: 645 East Alexander St.” You can also visit his website: www.silenttechinc.com. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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JJanuary anuary 2014 2014

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PA FR R E The year 2014 marks a historic 110th annual K E Fair, with the theme “1st Place For Fun” reminding IN fairgoers that the Florida State Fair is the first state G fair of the year in the country. Boasting the largest !

INTRODUCING THE 110TH 2014 FLORIDA STATE FAIR The Florida State Fair Authority announces the 2014 Florida State Fair, scheduled to take place from February 6 – 17, 2014 at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa near I-4/I-75. Advance tickets go on sale on Friday, January 3 at Walgreens locations throughout the State and also at participating AAA Tampa Bay area locations (list of locations provided below).

Admission: Advance pricing is $7 for seniors (select senior days only) $9 for adults $5 for children ages 6-11.. Ride armbands - $25 in advance.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: •Walgreens stores

independent midway and highlighting the largest traveling roller coaster in North America, the Fair also offers 110 free things to do; four featured concerts including America, Country Gold, Sister Hazel and Uncle Kracker, amazing animals and livestock, the Mildred W. and Doyle E. Carlton Jr. Cracker Country, bizarre side show spectacles like sword swallowing and fire eating, an exciting FMX Motorcycle Thrill Zone, fantastic fair food and other exciting entertainment throughout the twelve days of Fair fun. “We’ve created expanded daily discounts and promotions to appeal to every group from honoring our heroes on opening day and four senior days to college day and four student days touching nine surrounding counties,” notes Charles Pesano, Executive Director of the Florida State Fair Authority. “This is a great year to experience the fair and the key for having epic fun on a budget will be to buy early and save.” Country Gold concert tickets on Wednesday, February 12 can only be purchased through the Florida State Fair Authority. Shows will be at noon and 4 pm. All tickets available through the Fair box office, website, mail or fax: Call 1-800-345-FAIR (3247) Other significant discounts exist throughout the Fair on ride armbands, themed promotional days and evening hours on select days. Check website for details.

Children 5 and under are FREE

• participating AAA locations throughout Tampa Bay including: AAA Travel Center, Belleair, Bradenton, Brandon, Carrollwood, Clearwater, Lady Lake, Lake Sumter Landing, Lakeland, Lakewood Ranch, New Tampa, Palm Harbor, Port Richey, Quest South in Orlando, Sarasota, Seminole, Spring Hill, St. Petersburg, Sun City Center, Tampa and Trinity.

Florida State Fairgrounds • 4800 US Hwy. 301 North, Tampa 33610

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Drift Fishing When drift fishing, your boat becomes as important as your rod and reel. Theoretically, it develops into part of your total fishing tackle package.

bow first it is important to establish how it behaves under different conditions. Occasionally by altering the steering direction of the outboard motor (starboard or port) you can optimize the angle of drift.

A great method of targeting various inshore game fish is drifting. Like other techniques there are strategies veteran anglers use to increase their success. Conversely drift fishing isn’t difficult, in fact it only involves a location that looks fishy, some long distance casting and sufficient patience. With gusty winds and fast currents drifting in front of a sea anchor or a set of Power-Pole Drift Paddles can be a reliable method for adjusting boat speed and its angle of drift.

For example, if the desired drift is bow to the wind, place the anchor on the windward front quarter of the boat or drifting stern to the wind, it should be placed on the windward stern quarter. For a more sideways drift, place it somewhere close to amidships. Ideally, you want to drift slowly sideways in relation to the wind.

Power-Pole Drift Paddles /Sea Anchors/ Drift Socks … Sea anchors were originally designed as a simple, relatively inexpensive, safety device, that when deployed unfolded like an underwater parachute to keep your bow to the wind in the event you lost power on your vessel. Then like all good things its use propagated and soon became a widely used fishing tool that created pull or drag on the sides, bow or stern respectively to slow a fishing boat in windy conditions. In relation to their size and outstanding boat control sea anchors also fold or roll up nicely for easy storage. When purchasing a sea anchor be certain and match it to your boat length and weight. I have never regretted buying the next larger size for my 24 foot Action Craft. Sea anchors, often referred to as drift socks, play a vital role in safety, recreational, and tournament angling. Unlike drift socks the Drift Paddle concept functions differently from socks, they are attached to a Power-Pole Shallow Water Anchor and the up and down is controlled hydraulically. There is no storage required, the boat and you stay dry, and you’re not pulling in a parachute filled with 200 lbs. of water. Drift Angles - Since boats are unique to their own manufacturer they come in various shapes and sizes. Since most boats drift stern first or

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Here again unlike drift socks, Drift Paddles can add stability in choppy water and are fully adjustable. With only the touch of a button, the Power-Pole Drift Paddle deploys up to 10-ft. and its seven quickchange and locking paddle positions control the angle of your drift, while slowing your forward motion by up to 50%. Drift Speed… Even if the vessel drifts ideally to the wind and current, a sea anchor is helpful to slow the speed of your drift. This can be crucial if strong winds or current is pushing the boat too rapidly. Everything on, in, or attached to, reacts to wind like a sail, so whenever possible remove them and, provided the winds are calm, this may be all that’s required. Drift Fishing … There are two things that control a drift, one is the wind the other is current. Being able to understand and forecast how the boat behaves in these conditions should help you achieve better positioning and a productive drift. Actually Fishing on a Drift… When it comes to actual fishing, it’s a good idea to cast away from the wind or toward the direction you’re drifting. Try not to cast into wind especially with braided line. Fishing in the direction of the drift allows you to cover areas undisturbed by the boat. Then again, it requires your attention to keeping your line taught as you drift towards it. Failure to keep a tight line results in missed strikes or swallowed hooks. Drift sock forward trolling tip… Using two smaller drift socks, one on either side of the bow, keeps your boat straight. Use your forward bow cleat or if you have two forward quarter bow cleats, one on each side, use them. Or by all means use your Power-Pole Drift Paddles, this is a great application for the drift paddles in slowing the boat and keeping it straight.

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Drift Socks

Yellow Tail Jack

COBIA & SHARKS: Last week I saw a few cobia cruising the warm water discharges near power plants and actually found a couple on the flats around the manatees. One was swimming under the big mammal and you could hardly see it. It seems there are always plenty of sharks, jacks, and ladyfish hanging around the warm water discharges at the power plants and they offer some first-class wintertime action. SHEEPSHEAD: If you’re after these tasty fish the key places are bridges, pilings, docks, oysters and rock plies. Rig up with a #1 hook, small weight and a piece of shrimp, oyster or mussel, scrape the pilings and you’re in the game. Be ready, there are some really nice fish coming from around the bridges.

Tampa Bay Fishing Report January 2014 SNOOK: (Season is Closed) Find some greenbacks, net some and there’s a good chance you can find a snook willing to eat them if you fish them slow enough. I’ve been finding them around docks, in deeper water with muddy bottoms. I’ve also had several good days tossing diving or suspending lures in some inshore channels, canals, creeks and rivers. REDFISH: I had several good Redfish days on the north and south end of the Bay. Live or dead bait under a cork and you should get a good bite going. Live shrimp tail hooked and tossed around docks using a light weight jig head is also a good bet. Plus you never know what you might pull out from under a dock using a shrimp. Skipping artificial soft MirrOlure, DOA, Gulp plastic lures on a light weight jig head around docks and structure should produce some good cool weather entertainment.

“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years, he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com

or give him a call at 813-477-3814

SPOTTED SEA TROUT: As usual the trout bites been good and should continue through March. There are some really big fish hanging around shallow water potholes, and on negative winter tide, unfortunately for those who like staying in a boat, it’s wading that is the best bet to load up a Frabill Flow-Troll Bucket with some good size shrimp and get out of the boat. A good incoming or outgoing tide is usually the trick, as they seem to eat better on moving water. Don’t be surprised when trout fishing with jigs if you catch several pompano. We’ve landed several nice fish this winter.

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Make all your events “Berry Special” in 2014.

Happy New Year! Our produce stand is now open.

Located at the corner of Rice and County Line Road. | 813.478.3486 | fancyfarms.com 20 20

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GRITS Last year I went to my wife’s family reunion in Alabama. I decided to do a little “Southern Survey” on grits, since most everyone in attendance were true southerners. I know I have written about “God’s Manna From Heaven” before, but I thought you might be interested in the results of my survey. My first question was, “What Are Grits?” John “Greg” Davidson was a walking encyclopedia on grits. When posed the question he said, “I did an essay in college on the origin of grits. What do you want to know?” “Well, John” I asked, “If a Yankee asked you what grits were, what would you say?” He replied, “First off, Yankees have attempted to create synthetic grits. They call it ”Cream of Wheat.” The main ingredient, as far as I can tell, is Elmer’s Glue mixed with shredded Styrofoam.” I asked Jerry Davidson, Patsy’s uncle, “When they ask how grits are formed, what do you tell them?” “No problem, I just tell them grits are formed deep and underground with intense heat and pressure much like a volcano. Then I give them the full story! I tell them it takes more than a thousand years to form a single Grit. Most of the world’s grit mines are in the south, mainly Alabama and Georgia, and are guarded by armed guards with dogs. Harvesting the grit is a dangerous occupation, and many grit miners lose their lives each year so that grits can continue to be served morning after morning with the correct amount of butter.” I asked Kim Strother, my wife’s cousin, about the best way to cook grits. She said, “There’s nothing to it. You boil a cup and a half of water with salt and a little butter, dump in about five tablespoons of grits. Let the grits soak up all the water, then put the heat to it. When you stick a pencil in the grits and it stands alone, the grits are done.” Aunt Babs jumped into the conversations and said, “Do you know how to tell if the grits are buttered enough to eat?” “What is your answer, Aunt Babs?” I asked. She replied, “You hold an un-pealed ripe banana next to the bowl of grits. If the colors match, the grits are ready to eat.” Those Alabama people know how to cook grits and make red eye gravy. Grits, homemade buttermilk biscuits and red-eyed gravy will beat a T-bone steak and baked potato every time. My mother made the best biscuits in the world, and always said you never ever substitute canned or store bought biscuits for the real thing because they cause rotten teeth and impotence. 22

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Now I have some questions for you to help me answer. Does pushing the elevator button more that once make it arrive faster? If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, then what is baby oil made from? Why doesn’t glue stick to the inside of the bottle? How is it one careless match can start a forest fire, but it takes a whole box to start a campfire? Do illiterate people get the full effect of Alphabet soup? Why is it that now everyone has a cell phone, no one talks about seeing UFOs like they used to? Who decided “Hotpoint” would be a good name for a company that sells refrigerators? Who took the bite out of the Apple logo? Do Victor the Dog’s relatives still receive royalties from RCA Victor when they use his picture on their label? Why isn’t there a period after Dr on the Dr Pepper label? Can you knock the stuffing out of the Pillsbury Dough Boy? Was Betty Crocker ever a flour child? Why do people spend twice as much money on a shirt just because it has popular logo on it? And men, when you’re working on the car and your hands become coated in grease, why is it your nose begins to itch, and you have to tinkle? I am not sure I have a firm grip on the situation we are in today! If you cross the Cuban border illegally you will be thrown into political prison to rot. If you cross the Venezuelan border illegally you will be branded a spy and your fate will be sealed. If you across the Iranian border illegally you are detained indefinitely. If you cross the Afghan border illegally, you get shot. If you cross the Saudi Arabian border illegally you will be jailed. If you cross the Chinese border illegally you may never be heard from again. If you cross the border into the United States you can get a job, drivers license, welfare, food stamps, credit cards, subsidized rent or a loan to buy a house, free cell phone, free education and free health care. I think I change my name and get caught sneaking across the border into the United States. Did you hear the story of the Florida senior citizen that was driving his brand new Corvette convertible on I-75 at 90 miles an hour? He looked in his rear view mirror and saw a FHP Trouper, blue lights flashing and siren blaring. The old sport floored it to 100 mph, then 110, and on to 120. Suddenly he thought, “What am I doing? I am too old for this,” and pulled over to await the trooper’s arrival. Pulling in behind him, the trooper got out of his vehicle and walked up to the Corvette. He looked at his watch, and said, “Sir, my shift ends in 15 minutes. Today is Friday. If you can give me a good reason for speeding---a reason I’ve never heard before, I’ll let you go!” The old gentleman thought for a second and said, “Three years ago, my wife ran off with a Florida State Trooper. I thought you were bringing her back.” “Have a good sir, Sir,” replied the trooper. And in closing, don’t worry about the world coming to an end today. It’s already tomorrow in Australia! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Julia Palaschak Water use Program Coordinator, Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County How-dee! That’s my Pearl Bailey imitation. Does that tell you something about my origins? That’s right, I’m an old country gal and I’m a long way from where I started. And what about the water that cooks your pasta? Is it a long way from where it started? Let’s acknowledge the hydrologic cycle and recognize that water is neither created nor destroyed, but is moved around and on and through the earth’s surface and its atmosphere in various forms. If raindrops could talk about where they’ve been…amazing stuff! Now, let’s zoom in on our peninsula. Recall our last conservation conversation about the water flows between Florida, Georgia and Alabama. A small portion of Florida shares surface and groundwater with the continental United States. We are otherwise isolated. Imagine a line drawn across Florida from Cedar Key on the Gulf to New Smyrna Beach on the Atlantic.1 Hmm, we live on a peninsula that is also an island (hydrologically speaking). Good thing we get a lot of rain! But how many of those raindrops actually make it to the spigot? In urban areas, raindrops are discarded as stormwater. Part of our drinking water comes from these surface freshwaters: the Hillsborough River, the Alafia River, the Tampa Bypass Canal and the C.W. Bill Young Regional Reservoir. Over 1,000 square miles collect and contribute surface water flows that bring water to your home. Some of your tap water comes from our desalination plant, the largest in the US. We are the only people in the US drinking blended water from three different sources: groundwater, surface water and desalinated seawater.2 So chic! I love blended drinks! The most mysterious and amazing water source to me is the Floridan Aquifer, Tampa’s first source of urban drinking water (the first wells date to 1887). The aquifer developed millions of years ago when Florida was underwater. It takes time and undeveloped land for rainfall to percolate to the aquifer, up to 85 years.3 So, by the time you’re 85, some of the tap water you’ve used has finally been replaced in the aquifer. Does that change the way you think about your personal water number4? How many gallons of water are you likely to use by the time you’re 85?

3 steps  to  lower  your  personal  water  number:   1)  a  functional  rain  shutoff  device   2)  verify  your  assigned  watering  days;  set  your  system  accordingly   3)  apply  only  ¾”  each  time  you  water   Schedule  a  free  “in-­‐yard”  consultation:  813-­‐744-­‐5519  x54142;   palaschakj@hillsboroughcounty.org.  

1. http://www.amyhremleyfoundation.org/php/education/impacts/NaturalCycles/Hydrologic.php 2. http://www.tampabaywater.org/water-supply-sources-tampa-bay-region.aspx 3. http://www.lakelandgov.net/Portals/commdev/CompPlan/06%20IF%20Aquifer%20T-10-001.pdf 4. A personal water number is my way of talking about how much water each person uses on an average day at their home. Using the information provided on your water bill, divide your total gallons used by the days in the month, then by the number of people in your home. Share it with everyone in your household! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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All About Trees

Across 3. The environment in which a plant or animal lives.

The first annual fair in the American colonies was held in 1641 in New Amsterdam (now New York City) to showcase farm products of the local area. The USA’s first state fair was held in Syracuse, New York in September of 1841. The first time that fairgoers ate hot dogs and ice cream as they walked along the midway was during the Saint Louis World’s Fair in 1904, thus coining these two foods as the world’s first “fast foods”. The Midway is the main path or street that fairgoers walk along to find sideshows, concession stands, and other amusements. In 1904 the South Florida Fair Association was formed and plans for a new exhibition were proposed. The fair was founded as the South Florida Fair and renamed the Mid-Winter Festival a few years later. The name finally changed to the present Florida State Fair in 1915. The Columbian Exposition, or Chicago World’s Fair of 1893, was conducted to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ landing in the New World. A ticket to the fair cost 50 cents for adults; 25 cents for ages younger than 12 and free for ages younger than 6. State fairs began in the nineteenth century for the purpose of promoting state agriculture, through competitive exhibitions of livestock and display of farm products. Besides the rides and exhibits, other venues during the Fair include the Bob Thomas Equestrian Center, which hosts horse races and other equestrian events; Cracker Country, which demonstrates life in frontier Florida;[7] and exhibitions from most counties of Florida plus various agricultural and other state organizations in the large Expo Hall

4. A kangaroo is sometimes called this for short. 7. There are lots of these found in a forest, and some are good to climb. 8. The crop of trees in a forest is called a _____. 9. In some forests you can set up a tent and _____. 10. The skin-like outer covering of a tree trunk. 11. Most of these are green; they come in all shapes and sizes, and are found on the branches of trees. 12. The indigenous meaning of the name of this forest is ‘Amongst the Trees’.

Down 1. Learning about forests is part of Studies of Society and the _____?

2. The limbs of a tree are called? 5. The top part, or crowns of trees, including branches and foliage. 6. The unit of measurement used to describe the area of forests. 12. Forests provide homes to animals, including _____. 13. In forests there can be two categories of features. One is built and the other is _____. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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America’s First Frontier

By Les McDowell

What a year for Dry Creek, Americas First Frontier. This year BlueHighways TV, the network that carries Dry Creek, went on to Bright House Networks. Not only does Bright House cover Florida, but Bakersfield, CA and many other cities. Last year many more cable providers across America were added. It’s such a great feeling to get emails from new viewers that are watching Dry Creek for the first time. The biggest thrill I got was to share just a small piece of the rich history of the Florida Cow Hunters and the way of life Patrick Smith titled, “A Land Remembered.” One of the highlights of this year, was being invited to go to Washington,DC to appear on The Jim Bohannon Radio Show. The show is coast to coast on over five hundred radio stations. My wife Connie and I climbed on a plane pointed to Our Nations Capital. From the Washington CBS Studios I received a lot of calls from all over America believing in Dry Creek and the need for family programming. Everyone had the same feeling that it was now time to have TV shows that the whole family could watch together. I guess to prove the point, just look at Duck Dynasty and the record ratings it gets. For this Cowboy it was my first trip to our Nations Capital. I was so proud as we saw the sites I’d only seen in pictures. The White House, 28

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Dry Creek Goes To Washington DC looked smaller than I had envisioned. How close it was to the street. I felt a sense of ownership in these places. Going to Arlington and feeling the honor touch my sole, seeing the Viet Nam Wall, but not having the nerve to check to see if a childhood friends name was engraved on it, having tears well up in my eye’s standing eight feet from President Kennedy’s grave on the week of the 50th year anniversary of his death, remembering a day in 1962 I stood eight feet away from him when he walked past me at Point Magoo Navel Base in California where he visited. That day I felt he looked at me and waved. I returned that wave as I stood in front of him this day as a man. As I looked out of the plane window, at the Lincoln Memorial, getting smaller and then disappearing, I closed my eye’s and began dreaming of the place where your word was still your bond, where family and friends would come together to help each other. Where common sense lived. Where that small voice could be heard of what was right or wrong. This kind of place does still exist......I call it Dry Creek. Everybody knows where Dry Creek is......it’s inside of each and every one of us. WWW.IIN NT THE HEFIELD IELDM MAGAZINE.COM AGAZINE.COM WWW.


Lennard

FFA Citrus TEAM

FFA Citrus team placed fourth overall in this state competition. On December 10th, 2013, The Lennard FFA Citrus team participated in the State Citrus Career Development Event. There were 34 teams participating in this competition. This years Lennard team consisted of Tiffany Connard, Rebecca Knowles, Tyler Leonard, and Roger Smith. The Citrus CDE requires

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students to identify different species of pests, diseases, disorders, rootstocks, leaves, citrus varieties, weeds, and nutritional deficiencies of citrus fruits. They must also complete a general knowledge exam on the industry. Lennard placed fourth overall in this state competition.

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NEW COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER APPLICATION CERTIFICATION LICENSURE NOW IN EFFECT Aimed at Improving Florida Water Quality By Jim Frankowiak

Several governmental agencies in Florida have united to improve surface and ground water quality in the state through the regulation of commercial, also referred to as “for hire,” fertilizer applicators. In Hillsborough County, commercial fertilizer applicators have been required since July of 2010 to complete the Green Industry’s Best Management Practices (GI-BMP) training and have a valid Certificate of Completion. The goal of the training is to provide professional fertilizer applicators with the knowledge they need to implement practices that will improve landscape sustainability and reduce offsite movement of Nitrogen and Phosphorous. Nitrogen can move with stormwater or irrigation water and phosphorus can move with soil erosion to water bodies. As of January 1st of this year, Florida Statute 482.1562 states that all commercial fertilizer applicators must have the Limited Commercial Fertilizer Applicator Certificate (LCFAC) license from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) in addition to the GI-BMP certification. It is important to note that a fertilizer applicator with GI-BMP training and/or the LCFA certificate will need the appropriate pesticide license in addition to the fertilizer license to: • Apply pesticides to turf or ornamental plants and that includes weed-n-feed-type products and glyphosate (RoundUp™), and/or • Operate a pest control business The Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and the Uni-

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versity of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/ IFAS), have partnered to provide the required GI-BMP training. This partnership’s official website, http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu, details all scheduled training events under “For Professionals” or “GI-BMP Training.” In addition, the site offers on-line training, however, online training does not provide county specific fertilizer ordinance information. Training classes are available in Spanish and a Spanish training DVD is expected to be released in the near future. The GIBMP certification requires that a person attend the course and pass the course examination with a score of 75 percent or higher. Fees for this training vary by county, but cannot exceed $35 per person. Additionally, some counties, including Hillsborough County, have more strict fertilizer ordinances which require all supervisors of applicators and institutional and governmental applicators to be GIBMP certified. Employees who are making fertilizer applications on property that their employer or a government entity owns, such as apartment complexes, malls, athletic fields, stadiums, parks and schools are not required to obtain a FDACS LCFAC certificate, but here in Hillsborough County they must have successfully completed the GI-BMP training and have a current and valid Certificate of Completion. Any company which contracts with properties such as apartment complexes, malls, athletic fields, stadiums, parks and schools must have the GI-BMP certification and the a FDACS LCFAC certificate. So, one must be a direct employee of the property owner to be exempt from obtaining the FDACS LCFAC certificate.

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To apply for a Limited Commercial Applicator Certificate, one must submit a completed FDACS form 13677, which is available at: http:// forms.freshfromflorida.com/13677.pdf, to FDACS for processing. A copy of the GI-BMP certificate, a passport size photo and a fee of $25 must accompany the completed application. The certificate is valid for four years from its date of issuance and can be renewed if the holder has obtained four hours of Continuing Education Units (CEUs). The four hours of CEUs must include two hours of Core (safety and application practices) and two hours of landscape BMP topics. This proof of training must be included with their renewal application and fee. FDACS requires that the renewal be submitted a minimum of 90 days prior to the license expiration. This differs from pesticide licenses in that there is no grace period on expiration. For more information and answers to your questions contact your local UF/IFAS Extension office. In Hillsborough County contact Susan Haddock at (813)744-5519 ext. 54103. Additional information can be found at the GI-BMP website: http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/professionalls/BMP_overview.htm and at the DEP website: http://www. dep.state.fl.us/water/nonpoint/faq.htm. Individuals may also call FDACS for more information or an application at (850)617-7997. That telephone number is for the FDACS, Division of Agricultural Environmental Services, Bureau of Entomology & Pest Control in Tallahassee.

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FLORIDA

Satsuma Very juicy and sweet

By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science

V

ery juicy and sweet, the Florida Satsuma orange is a type of seedless mandarin orange that is prized for its mild, delicious taste and low acidity. Also called Satsuma tangerine or Satsuma mandarin, the fruit is easily peeled and seedless, making it a convenient, portable, and healthy snack. Satsumas are one of the sweetest citrus varieties available and have a tender, juicy texture. A prominent feature of the Satsuma is its thin, leathery skin loosely wrapped around the fruit, allowing it to be more easily peeled than most other citrus varieties. Originating from Japan, this citrus fruit is grown in the United States, in California, Alabama, Louisiana, Florida, Mississippi, and Texas. Oranges and other citrus are major crops for Florida, which is the second largest citrus producer in the world, behind Brazil. In 200506, Florida accounted for 68 percent of the U.S. citrus production, California for 28 percent, and Texas and Arizona for 4 percent. The majority of Florida’s orange production is for the juice processing industry, but a large number of oranges are produced for the fresh market, and others are shipped both domestically and internationally. Florida leads the country’s production of not only oranges, but also tangerines and grapefruit.

Folate Satsumas and other varieties of oranges are a great source of folate, a vitamin that can reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spinal cord (neural tube defects) in the fetus. Pregnant women should consume a diet high in folate, and eating an orange or other citrus fruit every day can help. Folate is also essential for growth and development, and plays a key role in DNA formation. Its heart-healthy benefits come from its ability to lower homocysteine levels in the body. Homocysteine is an amino acid in the blood that is correlated with heart disease, so lower levels of this compound are desirable. Additionally, low levels of folate have been linked with low energy levels, depression and even memory impairments. So it’s an essential vitamin for everyone, in addition to its significant importance for the developing fetus.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Satsuma oranges are as nutritious as they are delicious. This sweet citrus is also an excellent nutritional source of dietary fiber, folate, thiamin, potassium, and Vitamin A. In addition to these vitamins and minerals, oranges contain a wealth of other disease-fighting compounds, such as phytonutrients and antioxidants. These potent nutrients fight cancer, lower cholesterol, and control blood sugar levels.

Phytonutrients Oranges contain more than 170 phytonutrients, a class of antioxidants that protects against allergies, cancer, heart disease, and the effects of aging. Some research studies have found that people with high intakes of flavonoids have a much lower risk of dying from heart disease. This may be due to its ability to lower high blood pressure and cholesterol, which translates into better cardiovascular health. Polyphenols, another class of phytonutrients found in oranges, may fight against cancer, viruses, allergies, tumors, and inflammation.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one mediumsized Satsuma (109 g) contains 50 calories, 1g protein, no fat, 11 g carbohydrate, and 2 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 110% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for Vitamin C, 8% for folate, 6% for thiamin, 4% for vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, niacin, and calcium, as well as significant amounts of phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, vitamin A, and iron.

How to Select and Store Choose Satsuma oranges that have smoothly textured skin and are slightly soft and heavy for their size. The juiciest, sweetest oranges tend to be thin skinned and larger in size. Avoid those that have soft spots, brown spots, shriveled skin, or feel light for their size. Oranges can be stored either at room temperature if consumed quickly, or in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. The best flavor comes from oranges that are eaten soon after they are picked.

Vitamin C A single Satsuma orange contains more than an entire day’s requirement of vitamin C! Vitamin C is important for a healthy immune system, cancer prevention, healthy blood circulation and wound healing. This vitamin acts as a potent antioxidant in the body, neutralizing harmful free radicals and preventing its damaging effects in cells. By fighting cell and tissue damage, Vitamin C protects against cancer and other diseases, such as the common cold. This vitamin also helps the body absorb more iron, and aids in the development of strong bones and teeth.

How to Enjoy Since Satsuma oranges come in their own natural packaging, they are a portable, convenient snack that can easily be packed for dessert, snack, or part of a lunch box. You can simply peel and eat the fruit or slice it into wedges. The fruit can also be juiced with a juicer or squeezed by hand.

Current research findings support that Vitamin C’s benefits come from consumption of whole fruits and vegetables. A high intake of produce is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes, including heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Taking supplements does not seem to provide the same protective benefits as drinking a glass of orange juice or eating a whole orange. Fiber Oranges and other citrus fruits contain a significant amount of both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, which can help lower cholesterol, assist with digestion, and prevent constipation. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in fiber may decrease the risk of several types of cancer including colon, rectum, breast, and pancreas. A single Satsuma provides almost 10% of the daily value for fiber, which has been shown to reduce high cholesterol levels, which helps to prevent atherosclerosis. Fiber can also help maintain steady blood sugar levels, as can fructose, the naturally occurring type of fruit sugar found in oranges. Oranges also contain pectin, a water-soluble fiber that helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and helps you feel fuller with less calories. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Other ways to enjoy Satsuma oranges include: • Toss orange segments into a leafy green salad. • Boil with sugar and water to make jellies and preserves. • Squeeze the juice into a pan, allow it to thicken over heat, and use it as a sauce for fish or chicken. • Add Satsuma juice to baked goods for a bright refreshing twist. • Slip a few slices of Satsuma orange into a pitcher of water for a refreshing low-calorie beverage. • Boil orange slices with your teabag or add slices to boiled tea. • Float orange slices in your bath for a citrusy spa treatment. • Use the whole fruit, peel and all, to make marmalade. • Serve sliced oranges after a meal for a wholesome dessert. Enjoy fresh Florida Satsuma oranges in their peak season today. With its superb sweetness and low acidity, the Satsuma orange is exceptionally delicious and extremely healthy! SELECTED REFERENCES http://www.citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/satsumas.html http://www.cookinglight.com http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/

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101: Water-Wise and Dollar-Smart

February 15, 2014, Hillsborough Community College, Tampa

Lynn Barber, Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Agent

FFL 101 is an annual educational event dealing with many of the principles of the Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM program. These nine principles include right plant-right place, water efficiently, fertilize appropriately, mulch, recycle, control yard pests responsibly, reduce stormwater runoff, attract wildlife and protect the waterfront.

and three classes, you can earn your FFL 101 Diploma. You will be able to browse displays featuring materials and information for your landscape, speak with UF/IFAS Extension professionals about your Florida-Friendly Landscape and share your favorite water-saving tips for outdoors and indoors. Bring your latest water bill and learn your personal water number.

The event will be presented by UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County agents and staff and is sponsored by the City of Tampa Water Department. There will be nine timely topics to choose from, three presentations simultaneously. If there are two or three presentations you wish you could attend at the same time, you are still in luck. All presentations will be available on our website after the event, so you can view them at your leisure. The presentation topics include: Water-Wise Plants: Our Top Picks; Succulents and Cacti: Sunny Sandy Spotlight; 9 Steps to Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM: Classic; Water-Wise Workshop: So Simple, So Wise; Cisterns for Homeowners: Pennies from Heaven; Embrace Your Irrigation Control Box: No Fear Here; Money-Saving Strategies: Small Cost Big Reward; Recycle Your Yard: It’s All Good and The Fertilizer Ordinance: Can Your Landscape Live With It?

There is Easy Online Registration! http://waterwiseanddollarsmart.eventbrite.com

FFL 101 will be held again this year at the Hillsborough Community College in Tampa from 9 am – 1 pm on February 15, 2014. The event is free, as is the parking. By attending the General Session WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

By attending FFL 101: Water-Wise and Dollar-Smart, you will learn easy and affordable ways to practice Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM principles in your landscape. You will receive several handouts and there will be drawings at the wrap-up session for many, many prizes. We hope you will be able to join us and learn more about plant selection and placement, microirrigation and rainwater harvesting with a cistern, how to work your irrigation control box and much more. For assistance with horticultural questions, call: 813-744-5519 or visit us at the UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County, 5339 County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. More gardening information is available at: http://hillsborough.ifas.ufl.edu and http://edis.ifas. ufl.edu. Remember to reuse, reduce and recycle.

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REVISED

HAZARD

COMMUNICATIONS STANDARD ALIGNS WITH GLOBAL SYSTEM, MANDATES EMPLOYEE TRAINING By Jim Frankowiak

Pesticides Included

The impact of our global marketplace is manifest in many different ways and no industry is unaffected. Most of us are familiar with clothing items, fruits, vegetables, toys, tools and much more that is manufactured or produced offshore and then imported and sold to us here in the U.S. That is also true of chemicals, including pesticides.

quirements will improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals in their workplace regardless of where globally those chemicals were produced. During the period December 1 of last year through June 1, 2016, OHSA is phasing in the specific requirements to help companies comply with the new HCS.

No longer are they produced and sold just here in America. They come from just about anywhere in the world. There are inherent dangers associated with many of these chemical products. “Exposure to hazardous chemicals is one of the most serious threats facing American workers today,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. Given those considerations – the global nature of the marketplace and the potential threat to American workers – the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor has revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to align with the United Nation’s Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

The first compliance requirement, which took place December 1, 2013, mandated that employers train their employees on the new label elements and the SDS format. This training was required early in this transitional process since workers

Two significant changes in the revised standard require the use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), which were formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). Both of these mandatory re38

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were already beginning to see the new labels and SDSs on the chemicals in their workplace. The following represents minimum required topics relative to the labeling elements: • Product identifier, detailing how the hazardous chemical is identified by chemical name, code number or batch number. The same identifier, which is determined by the manufacturer, importer or distributor, must be both on the label and in Section 1 of the SDS. • Signal word, indicating the level of severity of hazard, either “Danger” or “Warning.” Danger is used for the more severe hazards, while Warning is used for less severe hazards. Only one of those two signal words will be used on each label, that reflecting the highest level of potential hazard of that chemical. • Pictogram, one of eight OSHA-designated pictograms under this standard application to a hazard category. • Hazard statement (s), describing the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including the degree of such hazard(s) as appropriate. All applicable hazard statements must appear on the label. Users should always see the same statement for the same hazards, no matter what the chemical is or who produces it. • Precautionary statement, describing recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, improper storage or handling. • Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor or importer. • How label information can be used to ensure proper storage of hazardous chemicals. • How label information can be quickly used to locate information on first aid when needed by employees or emergency personnel. • Fostering an understanding of how label elements work together so that employees can quickly recognize the chemical and related hazard(s)and most protective information. New Safety Data Sheet training is to include, at a minimum: • The standardized format of the sheets and the type of information located within that format so that employees and others can quickly find required information, especially in an emergency. • How the label and SDS information relate to one another.

training must account for those limitations. Employers interested in local resources for this type of training may contact their local county Extension office. Here in Hillsborough County Commercial Horticulture/Integrated Pest Management/Small Farms Extension Agent Susan Haddock offers this type of training on a periodic basis. Once trained, businesses can also offer this type of training in-house. Haddock can be reached at 813/744-5519, Extension 54103 or via email at: haddocks@hillsboroughcounty.org. OSHA’s Hazard Communication website, http://www.osha. gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html, offers the following QuickCards and OSHA Briefs to assist employers with the required training: • • • •

Label QuickCard(English/Spanish) Pictogram QuickCard(English/Spanish) Safety Data Sheet OSHA Brief Label/Pictogram OSHA Brief

OSHA also offers additional information, including Frequently Asked Questions and other information resources on the new HCS by visiting: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/

OSHA has required employers to present this information in a manner and language their employees can understand and that mirrors the way they communicate other workplace information to their employees. Additionally, in those instances when an employee’s vocabulary or literacy is limited, the WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Happy Holidays from Tampa to Wimauma

Students and families from Tampa’s Berkeley Preparatory School made their annual pilgrimage to Wimauma, delivering gifts from the Berkeley student body to the children of low-income farmworkers in south Hillsborough County. The Berkeley visitors brought about 1,000 Christmas gifts to the children of Redlands Christian Migrant Association. The nonprofit RCMA operates eight child-care centers and two charter schools in the area, serving about 1,000 children. “For many of our kids, this day is a highlight of their year,” RCMA’s Mark Haggett told the Berkeley families. “For many of them, this is their Christmas.”

Students from Berkeley Preparatory School pile bags of gifts along a corridor at the Academies of RCMA in Wimauma.

Luis Mendoza-Lopez, a kindergartener at RCMA Wimauma Academy, brandishes his new truck-car set, a gift from students at Berkeley Preparatory School. 46 46

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Marshall FFA Marshall FFA has had a very successful

year thus far. The students of Marshall FFA have worked diligently in preparing for the Sub-District CDEs. These career development events help students develop agricultural leadership and promote public speaking and communication. On December 17 numerous Marshall FFA members competed in various contests and brought home a ribbon for their achievements. Opening and Closing Ceremonies team placed first.

Team members included: Destiny Cox, Alexa Diaz, Kenzie Shelby, Serenity Jopek-Miller, Zoe Odom, Reghan Telfer and Sienna Bradberry. Prepared Public Speaking- first place: 48

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Hannah Spivey Extemporaneous Public Speaking- second Place:

Destiny Cox Creed (Public Speaking)- third place:

Kenzie Collins Parliamentary Procedure team placed third.

Team members included: Destiny Cox, Hannah Spivey, Kenzie Collins, Chad Grassel, Michael Merrill, and Alyssa Johnson.

Teams were coached by their Advisor; Alicia Price and also Ms. Valerie Donatiello. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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RECIPES

Single Serve Fruity Pizza

INGREDIENTS 1 9-inch whole-wheat pita bread 1 orange, peeled and sectioned 1/4 cup fresh strawberries, sliced 1/4 cup cantaloupe, sliced 1/4 cup fresh blueberries 1 ounce light cream cheese 1 teaspoon natural vanilla extract

DIRECTIONS Combine cream cheese and vanilla extract in a mixing bowl until well blended. Spread cheese over pitas. Decorate with fruit by creating fun faces and patterns.

Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agriculture

Florida Strawberry Mascarpone Panini INGREDIENTS

1/2 pound fresh strawberries, hulled and sliced thin 8 slices fresh bread (1/2 inch thick) 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese confectioners sugar for dusting 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

DIRECTIONS

Heat a panini press or griddle over medium heat. Spread a thin layer of mascarpone on top of each of the 8 bread slices. Add an even layer of fresh sliced strawberries to 4 of the bread slices. Use the other 4 slices of bread to top the sandwiches. Brush the sandwiches with butter and grill or press until golden, about 5 minutes. Transfer the panini to a cutting board and dust with confectioners sugar. Serve warm.

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Wish Farms

‘FRESHENS’ ANNUAL CHARITABLE EVENT WITH THE BRIGHT HOUSE NETWORKS

TEAM PICKING – RELAY COMPETITION TO BENEFIT REDLANDS CHRISTIAN MIGRANT ASSOCIATION By Jim Frankowiak

Freshness is a very important consideration to Wish Farms, a Plant City-based national produce marketer and broker. But it goes beyond the strawberries, blueberries and vegetables the company markets throughout the year. Wish Farms owner and Head Pixie, Gary Wishnatzki, wanted to assure that his company’s annual benefit retained its freshness and to do so has changed from a highly successful tennis competition at Avila, to a new team strawberry-relay with Bright House Networks as the presenting sponsor and Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) as the beneficiary. “Our tennis competition raised $80,000 last year for RCMA, but I felt we needed to look at ways to assure that this important program continued at the same levels,” said Wishnatzki. “The result of our desire to keep the event fresh is the strawberry picking challenge and I am well pleased with the response we have received. In addition to maintaining the interest and participation in this important benefit, it offers added value, as well.” Bright House Networks is the event’s Presenting Sponsor and as such has event naming rights. The event is slated 54

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for Friday – Saturday, February 7 and 8, and will begin with a kick-off dinner at TPepin’s Hospitality Centre in Tampa. The evening’s activities include a cocktail hour at 6:30 followed by dinner at 7:30 and entertainment after dinner. Entertainment will include Atlanta Rhythm Section Lead Singer Rodney Justo, who will perform with 60’s rock group CooCooCaChoo. Guests will also enjoy a set by comedian Thomas Brown. The picking contest takes place the following day at Futch Farms, 3536 Futch Loop in Plant City. The competition starts with a Contestant Coaching session at 10 a.m. followed by the competition, lunch and a 3 p.m. awards ceremony at which the perpetual challenge trophy will be presented to the winning team. “We hope this award becomes the Plant City version of the Lombardi Trophy,” said Wishnatzki. “This is by no means a u-pick event,” said Wishnatzki. “Corporate teams will compete in a strawberry-picking relay. Each team will consist of three players appointed by the sponsor plus an appointed celebrity and coach.” Additionally, several Bright House Networks news team WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


members will participate in both the kick-off dinner and competition.

by team number. This blind-type judging will assure the integrity of the process.”

Wish Farms will hold a series of separate strawberry u-pick events at Wish Farms/Simmons Farms located at the intersection of Jerry Smith Road and State Road 60. These events will take place on three Saturdays: January 25, February 22 and March 15. Each will be held from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and packing materials will be provided. Pricing of each flat of strawberries is to be determined. More information is available at www.wishfarms.com or via email: info@wishfarms.com.

Tickets for Saturday-only to view the competition are $25 per adult and $8 per child age 12 and under, children under age 3 are free. The admission fee includes lunch and activities for children. Sponsorships are available at levels from $500 to $5,000. All-Access Tickets to both the kick-off dinner and competition are available for $200 each. For additional information on sponsorships, contact Wish Farms’ Director of Marketing Amber Kosinsky at 813-752-5111 or via email at amber@ wishfarms.com. Tickets may be purchased online at www.wishfarms/spc.

“Our coaching staff for the competition will consist of Plant City area strawberry growers and crew leaders.” Each team will be assigned a row of strawberries and each contestant will pick one, two-pound package of berries and then return back to the start and tag the next person on their team until they have completed picking a flat. “Final scores will be determined by the fastest flat picked, best looking flat and cleanest row,” said Wishnatzki. “The highest scoring team from each wave of initial picks will move on to the final round where the Best Harvest Crew will be determined by a panel of judges who will judge WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

In addition to the competition itself, activities at Futch Farms will be geared to family enjoyment with appearances by Wish Farms Misty the Garden Pixie “who watches over the fields and makes everything sweet,” Jammer, the Florida Strawberry Growers Association caricature, face painting, berry sampling and the opportunity to purchase just-picked strawberries. Disney Radio will be on site, too, with its road crew playing music and leading a host of family-friendly activities for kids throughout the day. Continued on pg. 56 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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“We would encourage companies interested in participating among the various sponsorship levels, to call Amber now as there are a limited number of sponsorships available,” said Wishnatzki. Tickets for the Saturday event are limited as well. All proceeds raised will support the Florida RCMA capital campaign. “Specifically, those funds will help us pay for classrooms at our Leadership Academy at Wimauma,” he said. Wishnatzki is a RCMA board member and vice president. The Leadership Academy serves over 130 students in grades 6 – 8. RCMA was born in 1965 with its initial focus on the health and safety of young children, primarily the sons and daughters of impoverished farmworkers in South Florida. That initial concern has broadened to childhood education. From two childcare centers in Homestead, Florida, RCMA has grown today to 71 centers in 21 Florida counties. All serve the rural poor, and most serve the children of Hispanic immigrants. During the 20112012 school year, RCMA’s 7,500 children were 86 percent Hispanic and 11 percent African-American. Government grants comprise 85 percent of RCMA’s $58 million annual budget. The organization’s mission is to open its doors to opportunities through quality child care and education from crib to high school and beyond. Community involvement for Wish Farms and the Wishnatzki family goes beyond its support of RCMA. The University of South Florida (USF) - The Wishnatzki Family Migrant Scholarship was established to assist the funding 56

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of a graduate degree in education at the USF College of Education for a student from a migrant seasonal farm worker family. The purpose of the fellowship is to help develop leaders from the migrant and seasonal farm worker community who are dedicated to improving educational opportunities for children whose families are engaged in farm work. Wish Farms is also the title sponsor of the Florida Strawberry Festival Soundstage which hosts headline acts during the Festival, helping to create a sense of pride among Wish Farms and the strawberry farming community that for generations has made Plant City the winter strawberry capital of the world. At the end of each Florida strawberry season, Wish Farms opens its fields to the public, as well as to local area food banks and other community organizations to pick fruit that would otherwise go to waste. Non-profit affiliated attendees pick for free and the general public is asked to make a minimum donation to a sponsored charity. With respect to added benefits of the new event beyond continued financial support, “our participants will come to understand and appreciate the hard work associated with picking strawberries, a very important commodity for our growers and an important economic consideration for our community and the county. Hopefully, they will realize why there is continuing concern over labor shortages and the impact of strawberries grown in other WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Event sponsors as of press time include:

parts of the world during our season and the effect that has on those of us engaged in growing and marketing strawberries,” said Wishnatzki, who is well qualified to make such comments. He is the third generation of his family-owned company that has become a leader in the industry. In addition to being a year-round strawberry grower, Wish Farms is also a year-round supplier of blueberries and markets vegetables throughout the year. Join Wish Farms and cheer for your favorite team at the inaugural Bright House Networks Strawberry Picking Challenge! Visit: www.wishfamrs.com/spc for tickets.

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• Bright House Networks • Monte Package Co. • Florida Strawberry Growers Association • Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services “Fresh From Florida” • International Paper • C.H. Robinson • Paradise, Inc. • Kaleidoscope Services • Will & Pam Bissett • Financial Guidance Group • Foley & Lardner • RCS Company of Tampa, Inc. • Patterson Trucking • Farm Credit of Central Florida • James Irrigation • Garcia & Ortiz, P.A. • Crop Protection Services of FL, Inc. • Joyce and Reyes Law Firm, P.A. • Debartolo Family Foundation • Red Dog Management, Inc. • Lipman Produce • Publix Supermarkets • Florida Strawberry Festival • Mary & Bob Sierra Family Foundation, Inc. • Eden Design • Southern Graphics • World of Beer Franchise

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Your Super Bowl Party Needs:

My Mamma’s Bar-B-Q By Ginny Mink

Southerners love to eat! We are all about that fried stuff, some of us more so than others. However, fried stuff isn’t the only thing that strikes our fancy, no, we love us some barbeque too! That’s why Plant City has its annual Pig Jam and it’s why there are at least two barbeque joints in the small town. We share this with you to introduce the newest sauce on the block. This stuff is great according to our editor and the testimonials on the website. When it comes to flavorful home-cooked deliciousness, it’s time for My Mamma’s Bar-BQ created by Big Mike Hippard (pronounced Hip’pard).

basically about it when it comes to agriculture. I was born here in Florida and we would go to the orange groves a lot and I helped my dad picking oranges. He would sell them to the different stores. I was born in Tampa and I’ve lived in Tampa my whole life. I went to junior high school at George Washington and I went to Hillsboro High School in Tampa. I graduated in 1981 and I did a business college, it was like a year and a half. Then later on, a few years ago, I did a Christian college online, Liberty University. I’m trying to get a degree in theology.”

Getting started:

Big Mike has come a long way. His career history is a unique one. He told us, “In 1986 I was working for an insurance company, I sold insurance, life insurance, annuities and things like that. Then I worked for Humana helping people that were on Medicare. In 2001, I stopped working in insurance to stay home and take care of my mother and she passed, like a year later. Then, in 2006, I worked for American General (AIG) doing life insurance and financial planning and stuff like that. After my mother passed, I started

Big Mike shared, “My mom was a cook for church organizations when I was growing up. Basically I just watched her, being around her, that’s where I learned how to do a lot of stuff. That’s where I learned to serve food, how to put different foods together with different herbs and spices. We had our own little plants and stuff, orange trees, grapefruit trees, mango trees, avocado trees, in our own yard. That’s

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my own business called APO transportation. We were a transportation company. We transported automobiles from car dealerships to auctions and different places like that. I still have that business, my friend helps me with that.” He’s definitely an inventive entrepreneur. He continued, “Since 2010, I’ve been testing out different things, putting different sauces together, different combinations and ingredients trying to come up with a good sauce. I finally came up with something that’s pretty good after about two years of testing in different combinations of herbs and spices. I put together that sauce and called it My Mamma’s Bar-B-Q sauce. My mom is part of a lot of my background, like the Christian stuff I learned from being around her, and the cooking in the kitchen, learning how to put different things together.” The love he had for his mother and her memory inspired the name of his scrumptious sauce. How does one actually start a barbeque sauce business? Big Mike explained, “October was our first, main, big production. Pig Jam was in November. It’s been a long process, doing this, trying to get the right combination, getting them bottled, getting everything set up, finally getting the right taste and stuff. Everything has been working out for us pretty good in that area. October was when we did the first bottling. It was my first actual real big production. They did over 300 gallons for me, the company’s name is Stage Coach that did the botteling. I had to sign a disclosure and give them my recipe. Then they did the bottling and mixed up all my ingredients. It was an interesting process, everything had to be FDA approved. The FDA had to get several bottles. It was very interesting learning how all that actually works. They did all the lab work.” Stage Coach has been in the bottling industry since 1991, but they are most famous for their steak sauce that’s been around since 1839. Big Mike shared that some of this business came as a surprise to him. He said, “I didn’t know so many things you had to go through when you were doing something like that; when you’re trying to sell to the public. One part, I’ll tell you a quick story, when they sent the lab work back to me show

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ing me what was going to be on the nutrition labels, one part said: includes anchovies. And I was like, ‘anchovies? I don’t have any anchovies! Where did this come from?’ So I called them to find out and I found that Worcestershire sauce has anchovies in it and I never knew that; I was like, ‘wow!’ I learned a lot. It was pretty interesting. It’s been a long process but it’s going pay off with the results I get when people taste my sauce, the people smiling. Most of the time people that taste my sauce, enjoy it. I hardly half to really say much, just taste it, and most of the time after they taste it, it just speaks for itself. I’m so glad about that! I have a really good Christian background and I just believe that everything that happens, happens for a good reason and the way it happens, I believe God did it for me!” Summing it all up, Big Mike said, “We sell our bottles for $3.50. That’s a 12 ounce size bottle. People can order online. I have PayPal, or they can call me to order (813) 495-9757. I can send it out to them as well.” If you’d like to try out Big Mike’s Mamma’s sauce you can visit his website: www. mymammasbarbq.com or send an email: Bigg_hh2@yahoo. He’s definitely looking forward to hearing from you. Besides, your Super Bowl party needs some exceptional barbeque!

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FSGA 2013 Awards Banquet

continued from pg. 11

Ronney Hutto Memorial Award!

Steven Hurlburt with Becky Hutto

The Hall of Fame Award!

Candance Harrell, Patterson Produce sponsor, Carl Grooms, DeeDee Grooms, Andy McDonald

The Hall of Fame Award, the Florida Strawberry Growers Association’s most

prestigious award, is presented to a person (or team) in the berry industry that has devoted a lifetime to the support of Florida Strawberries. This recognition is designed to be a gem in the crown of glory extending through decades of service. The 2013 awards is sponsored by Patterson Produce. The first recipient is Carl and DeeDee Grooms. Carl and DeeDee say they have been truly blessed to have a business that allows them so much opportunity to interact and give back to their community. They always support the 4-H each year with a U-pick fundraiser that is one of the most popular events in the area. Carl and DeeDee constantly provide tours, from pre-school to college, as well as tour groups from all over the U.S. and around the world. Carl is one of the founding visionaries and advocates of the FSGA, and his wisdom and leadership have been great assets during his many terms on the Board of Directors.

Edie Jones/ Trenda Gude Memorial Scholarship Award! COLE ELDRUP & ANDY MCDONALD

The Hall of Fame Award!

Candance Harrell, Patterson Produce sponsor, Carl Grooms, DeeDee Grooms, Andy McDonald The second inductee to the Hall of fame relocated to Florida from Oceanside, California in June of 1996 with their 8-yearold daughter, Helen. Their business relationship with the Reiter Brothers in California lead to an introduction to Glenn Williamson, and the opportunity to join his strawberry growing operations in Dover, Florida. they quickly recognized the labor challenges facing Florida growers. They became early pioneers of the guest worker program. With the support of Glenn and the Reiters, Florida Pacific Farms, LLC was created in 1998 to find a way to implement and retain a reliable guest workforce for the entire season. John’s untimely death on July 26, 2012, shocked the local industry, but he left a strong passion for agriculture instilled in his wife, Kim, who carries on the business. Kim stays focused on the administration side while at the same time absorbing, understanding and learning what John was dealing with in his daily activities. Picture L-R: Candance Harrell, Patterson Produce, sponsor, Kim Stickles, Andy McDonald 64

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The “Fresh From Florida” brand is a symbol of quality and the logo is recognized around the globe. Behind the logo is our dedicated team of marketing professionals with a proven track record of increasing sales of Florida agricultural products. Direct benefits* of membership in the program include: • Use of the widely recognized “Fresh From Florida” logo on products, packaging, advertising and promotional materials • Point of purchase materials to display with Florida grown products • Choice of customized FFF business signage 2x3 metal farm gate sign, 3x6 vinyl weatherproof banner or 2x6 vinyl weatherproof banner • Participation in the logo incentive program • Company listing and website link on the “Fresh From Florida” website • Subscription to the “Fresh From Florida” magazine and e-newsletter *Benefits of the program are subject to change.

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Big Eye Ball Shouts Of Joy Moments The Bette S Walker Discovery Gadens By Ginny Mink

Seffner is a pretty small town. It’s one of those, blink-your-eyes-andyou-miss-it locations. Thusly, it’s rather rare to find something intriguing to do in such a limited amount of square footage. Of course, if you live in the area, then chances are, you have driven past the IFAS office on County Road 579. It’s also pretty small and equally blinkably-invisible. However, it plays a big part in Hillsborough County’s soil sampling and landscaping design and maintenance. What’s most interesting, and little discussed though, is the Bette S. Walker Discovery Garden located in the dead center of the square shaped building. As a parent of a three, it is often difficult to find things that are safe and enjoyable for all my lovely darlings. Therefore, I am constantly on the lookout, especially when the oldest one is out of school. So, this Christmas break we decided to check out the gardens, namely because the four-sided building surrounding the gardens seemed wholly capable of containing my sometimes rambunctious two-yearold, Hazel. I also thought she might find the plants and segmented gardens exciting, or at least better than sitting at home. Upon entrance, we were greeted by a smiling face behind the counter who instructed us to sign in and put on our visitor badges. One great thing that parents of wee-ones will appreciate is the fact that this foray in nature is FREE. With stickers on, we then entered the garden area. Keeping in mind of course that we were visiting in the least luscious time of year, I was thrilled to see all the colorful flowers still in bloom! My two year old immediately darted to a beautiful cast-iron (at least I think that’s what it was made of) butterfly shaped bench. If you sit on it just right you can take a picture that makes you look like you’ve got wings! The next obvious attention grabber was the water feature, she was enamored by that, “Look Mommy!” she squealed, “Water!” as if she’d never see anything like it before. There’s a quaint little waterfall and some very interesting fluffy purple flowers growing nearby. She spent a good portion of our visit at the water’s edge looking for turtles and fish. At one point she noted a plaster addition, “An alligator!” she screamed with utter delight. It’s those big-eye-ball-shouts-of-joymoments that we live for as parents and the Bette S. Walker Discovery Garden provided that for my little sprite. The baby, Zeke, was all giggles too and my ten year old, Jaidyn, en70

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joyed the Asian inspired area. He liked it most because the granite stepping stones that led up to a granite bench were, in his mind at least, reminiscent of hopscotch in their layout. Yes, he even attempted to hop his way to the bench. I noted that there was an attention-grabbing bonsai-esque tree surrounded by marvelous black stones across from the area and though I would have loved to have had Hazel take a picture next to it, I wasn’t sure it was something they wanted people walking on so I refrained (it’s cool though for sure). There’s a beautiful gazebo, with a leaf shaped fan and an area designed to create a Bar-B-Q patio feel. While this isn’t a huge space, it’s a nice little stroll (complete with a wooden bridge that Hazel certainly enjoyed running back and forth over) and it’s designed to educate as well. Bette S. Walker was the first Executive Director of the Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers and this is her baby. She wanted to “showcase the horticulture industry and educate the public.” The Discovery Garden accomplishes her dream beautifully and it’s a nice place to take the kids. According to their website, the gardens have six distinct areas: Backyard Bar-B-Q Patio, Sensory Garden, Florida Friendly Style, Water Gardens, Asian Influence Garden and the Wildlife Habitat Area. Each section is designed to educate and enlighten visitors as to methods in which to attain these lovely atmospheres on their own properties. The Sensory Garden includes all kinds of herbs, fruits and flowers while the Wildlife Habitat Area teaches you the three basics to attracting wildlife. If you want to learn those secrets you’re going to have to come visit! In addition to the gardens, sights and sounds, there are plaques throughout that delineate the nine steps to your own attractive and successful garden. Specifically you are told that the single most important aspect is making sure you’ve got the right plant in the right place. That’s probably the area in which you’re most familiar with the Seffner Extension office as they can help you plan and evaluate your planting areas. The remaining steps include: water efficiency, fertilizing as needed, mulching, attracting wildlife, controlling pests responsibly, recycling and reducing storm water runoff. If you’d like to visit the Discovery Gardens they are open Monday thru Friday from 8:15 - 4:45. You can get a guided tour if you plan ahead, otherwise all you have to do is sign in and put on your visitor badge. While you’re there you can attain a number of research based literature on a vast array of horticultural and environmental issues. That’s not to mention, of course, the extensive information throughout the gardens and on their website. Check it out at: 5339 County Road 579 South, Seffner, FL 33584. You can call them for additional information: (813) 744 5519. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Goat Lovers Unite: Please help the Nigerian Dwarf Goat Club of Florida By Ginny Mink

Goat lovers are a breed all their own, but those that breed the Nigerian dwarf dairy goat, well, let’s just say they take the cake (or the cheese?)! For such small animals, they really are causing quite a ruckus in the world of goats. In fact, 2013 saw a most interesting accomplishment. According to the American Dairy Goat Association’s calculations, the Nigerian dwarf showed and registered more goats than any other dairy goat breed, which is a huge feat as the Nubian goat has been the front-runner in the US for quite some time! There is certainly an increased interests in these wee little animals and anyone with agricultural zoning and at least an acre, can readily provide for four or five of them!

What’s so great about Nigerian dwarf dairy goats? According to Tanya Cook, Treasurer for the Nigerian Dwarf GoatClub of Florida, “They are a breed solely on their own and they are considered a dairy goat breed. Meaning their main function is to produce milk. Their bodies are just made to do that versus using them for meat or pack animals. The bucks are less than 24 inches tall and the does are less than 22 inches tall and that makes them perfect for the small breeder or someone that just likes a miniature size animal. Their milk is considered a sweet milk and it’s a totally different flavor than a bigger goat’s milk. It’s a lighter tasting milk and it actually has the highest butterfat so it also makes great cheese and soap.” Tanya and her cohorts are extremely excited about their animals. In fact, they are so devoted to these creatures that they were inspired to start their own Nigerian dwarf specific club. Tanya said, “The Nigerian Dwarf Goat Club of Florida (www.ndgcf.com) was formed by a group of Nigerian breeders who felt the need for a network of Nigerian enthusiasts. They felt they weren’t getting representation from 74

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the big national clubs, or the Dairy Goat Association, so they just started with a group of about five or six people and in six years we’ve grown to 29 members! That’s 29 households. We have members from the Panhandle all the way down to South Beach. We’re spread out, but our main purpose has been to promote the Nigerian dwarf dairy goat. We want to be able to teach people how to breed their animals, care for their animals, use the products that their animals produce, and provide a network for these breeders.” While the club is breed specific, there are other opportunities for the general population of goat enthusiasts to get involved. Tanya explained, “We meet bimonthly. We have a general meeting and we also try to hold a learning/educational type topic. We have veterinarians that come out to our meetings, we have specialists in their groups. We have covered hoof trimming, corrective hoof trimming, how to do your own fecal examinations, we covered general goat maintenance, we covered difficult deliveries and pregnancies. When we hold a clinic, we open the clinic up to the entire state, it doesn’t matter what breed you have, we just ask for a small donation, somewhere usually between $5 and $10 to attend the class for people that are not members of our club. We bring our guest speakers from all over, we’ve had guest speakers like Dr. Tyrell Kahan, who’s a goat specialist; we’ve had Dr. Mara Ricci, she’s also a goat specialist. We had a clinic set up for us by the University of Florida in Gainesville on difficult deliveries and C-sections. They hosted us at the large animal veterinary clinic. We do fun topics: how to make fudge, or how to market your products.” The interests are diverse and the educational topic range wide.

Who joins a dairy goat club? Tanya told us, “We have a vast age group, we have members from 4 WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


years old to 85 years old so the interest is there for these goats! Our club has members that aren’t interested in breeding or showing their animals, just having them as their pets. Then we’ve got people who actually market their products. We have the only Florida Grade A, USDA approved micro-mini dairy for goats. He actually sells all of his products. He has a full working dairy and he sells out of his products every week! So the demand is there for the goat milk products!” While their goals as a club are worthwhile, their desires admirable, they are in need of assistance to keep the dream alive. Tanya shared, “To get together and promote the breed itself, we have to do that with community support. We have one large project a year and it’s a Nigerian dwarf only dairy goat show. That means the only entries can be Nigerian dwarfs. We have brought people from Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina. Breeders have come down just to show their goats in our show. Our show is called March Mini Madness and we do this every year in March in the first week of the month. We are a not-for-profit organization so therefore, the money to put the show on comes basically from member support and businesses and community members. We have grown every year. The upcoming 2014 show is going to be the fifth show. We have a lot of fun; we show bucks and does which is unusual, most dairy goat shows only show the does but this gives the bucks the opportunity to get out there and strut their stuff. We put on this show to promote the breed, but one of our main goals is to get the youth involved. If we don’t have youth in agriculture, we are slowly losing it and we’ve got to reverse that trend and I’d like to see more Ag kids involved in all aspects, whether it be the dairy, or the actual farmers who grow the crops, but we’re starting with the portion we love.”

How can you support such an intriguing endeavor? Tanya and those involved in the March Mini Madness Show, as well as the Nigerian Dwarf Goat Club of Florida, have issued a request for help. She said, “We’ve got several FFA members and several 4-H members in our club and they’re on the right path, but we need to get more kids involved. Because of the economy, it has been difficult for us to get the community support behind us and we don’t have any fundraisers during the year because fundraising is very difficult. So, right now our expenses to hold the show have risen to over $3000. We desperately need support! We offer our sponsorships to anyone who donates to the club. They receive recognition at the show. They also are placed on our website and our Facebook page so they get recognized for their donation. Our expenses range so high because it’s the actual bringing the official judges in to judge the show. Our show is American Dairy Goat Association sanctioned which means that the winners of the shows receive points for it toward their championship and you have to have certified judges! You have to fly judges in from out of state only because we have only one judge in Florida. And with one judge, you know, you can’t use him year after year. We fly in two judges, pay their hotels and their expenses and fees. We did get a lot of things donated such as our trophies, our ribbons and prizes in general.” In closing Tanya adds, “We’ve had some wonderful sponsors locally, almost every feed store in the Plant City and Brandon and Dade City area support us. We’ve had businesses, even nonrelated businesses, we have a bakery that supports us, a home decorating company supports us, a rescue group. So, the support doesn’t have to be agriculturally related! We try to work with anybody that sponsors us to recognize continued on pg.78

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March Mini Madness Nigerian Dwarf Goat Show ADGA Sanctioned

SATURDAY- March 9th 2013 2 RINGS, Junior and Senior Does and Bucks Judges: Tricia Ricotta, NY and Gregory Murphy, TN

their business, or their function, the way they want to be recognized. We encourage all members and all goat people in Florida to support them. We tell people no donation is too small, we’ve had kids donate their $5 allowance. I know it’s hard to take that from them but if that’s what they want to do we support them. We have a sponsorship form on our website that can actually be downloaded; we also do PayPal for the person who doesn’t want to write out a check. We’re about $1200 short of the $3000 mark so we’ve done good this year, but we need to be able to pay those bills before the day of the show and the day of our show is March 8, 2014.” This year’s show will be at the Pasco County Fairgrounds. It’s free admission and open to the public. If you can assist Tanya and the Nigerian Dwarf Goat Club of Florida, please do. You can find out more information on their website: www. ndgcf.com.

Sponsored by: Nigerian Dwarf Goat Club of FL March 9th 2013, 9:00 AM (Exhibitor/Goat check in 7:00 am) Pasco County Fairgrounds 36722 State Road 52 Dade City, FL 33525 Information: 813-786-7455 (Sami Ray) samiray@earthlink.net 813-220-3257 (Tanya Cook) tlcfarmsndwarfs@gmail.com www.ndgcf.com

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Representing Hillsborough, Manatee & Pinellas Counties

Dan West

NEW FARM BUREAU DISTRICT 15 STATE DIRECTOR By Jim Frankowiak

Family Picture (L to R): Dan, Jesse, Jonathan, Sam and Tracy

The vital link between county Farm Bureau organizations and the state are the 19 State District Directors. The new Director for District 15, which is comprised of Hillsborough, Manatee and Pinellas counties, is Dan West. West and his fellow directors work with Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick, Vice President Brantley Schirard, Jr., Secretary Mark Byrd and Treasurer Rod Land, plus Women’s Leadership Committee Chair Ginny Paarlberg and Vice Chair Sarah Carte. Young Farmer & Rancher President Reed Hartman and Past President Brad Austin round out the leadership group. “We assure our counties are appropriately represented at the state level and vice versa,” said West, who recently succeeded State Director Ron Wetherington. Wetherington remains a member of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors and a host of other agricultural groups across the state. This leadership group guides the Florida Farm Bureau organization and each district representative is elected by their county delegates in caucus during the annual Florida Farm Bureau state meeting. Directors meet every other month throughout the year. The group’s executive committee meets on those months in which directors do not meet. Directors serve for two year terms. A life-long resident of Manatee County, West is a 1987 graduate of Palmetto High School. He grew up involved in the Manatee County 4-H and Palmetto High School FFA Chapter. Dan is an alumnus of the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agronomy and Ag Extension. He is currently Manager of the Manatee County Fair, a position he has held since 2003 when he was promoted from Assistant Fair Manager. Before joining the fair staff, West was associated with Manatee Fruit Company and was the agriculture teacher and FFA advisor at Palmetto High School for eight years. West has been a director of the Manatee County Farm Bureau since 1998 and is a past president of the board. He is also past president of the Florida Federation of Fairs and serves as a Sunday school teacher at the First Baptist Church of Palmetto. A part-time citrus grower, 80

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West resides in Palmetto with his wife, Tracy, and their three sons Samuel, Jesse and Jonathan. “We are delighted to have Dan as our new District director,” said Manatee County Farm Bureau President and Duette area tomato grower Gary Reeder. “He is an outstanding man, a good friend and a great husband and father. We could not have picked a better representative,” said Reeder. “I love Farm Bureau and the leadership role the organization takes in issues affecting agriculture,” said West. “Community outreach and education on the many challenges facing contemporary agriculture makes us truly the voice of agriculture. Additionally, I and my fellow directors help to assure that Florida Farm Bureau is aware of our local issues and we, in turn, help to apprise our county members of issues impacting other members in the state. We are really the conduit between our counties and the state and the state and our counties,” he said. “I am honored to fill the position held by Mr. Wetherington. I have known him through Farm Bureau and other organizations,” said West. “He is a great man and representative of agriculture.” West sees myriad issues facing agriculture over the near term. “Producing more with less is an ongoing challenge for our industry. And how that is manifest changes almost daily,” he said. “From technology and regulatory issues to sustainability and food safety, as well as our precious natural resources, we at Farm Bureau must quickly adapt and respond to these challenges as they impact our industry and its ability to feed the world. Ultimately we want to assure the longevity and success of those engaged in agriculture. It is exciting for me to meet these demands with colleagues from across Florida and to help serve the agricultural families that comprise our Farm Bureau membership. “ Welcome Dan and our sincerest thanks to Ron for his continuing leadership and service to Farm Bureau and agriculture. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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UF/IFAS researcher wins $300,000 grant to further citrus greening research By Brad Buck

Ariena van Bruggen A University of Florida researcher who helped develop a mathematical model to show how citrus greening spreads within infected trees has received a $300,000 grant from the Esther B. O’Keeffe Foundation to expand the model. Ariena van Bruggen, a UF plant pathology professor, received the award so she can study the best strategies to combat citrus greening from tree to tree. There is no cure for citrus greening, but methods being used to slow the disease include removal of symptomatic trees, insect control and attempts to boost the tree’s immune system, van Bruggen said. “I want to find out with this model which is the more important part of the solution,” she said. “Can we actually boost the immune system of the tree enough so that that would give you proper control? More likely it’s a combination of factors. But perhaps the moving of diseased trees, as it has been done so far, is not going to be as effective.” Removing diseased new growth – called flush, or shoots – solves little, the current model shows. Even without showing symptoms, many shoots may already be infected. That means other tree parts can get infected. The model developed by van Bruggen and colleagues was published in 2012 by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It showed once a tree is infected, insecticides applied early on may only slow, rather than halt, the disease’s progression. Citrus greening was first detected in Florida in 2005, and has cost the state’s citrus industry an estimated $4 billion and 6,000 jobs since 2006. It poses a huge threat to the state’s $9 billion industry. In Florida, because of the disease, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says this year’s orange crop will be off 9 percent from last season. Foundation trustee Brian O’Keeffe said van Bruggen’s research provides crucial information to understand the spread of citrus greening. “Such increased understanding could help develop better techniques in hopefully managing the disease,” O’Keeffe said. The importance of such studies has been underscored in the past month by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s $1 million additional research funding to its emergency response against citrus greening spreading nationwide, he said. “Understanding the transmission of the disease within an infected tree is essential to try to defend the existence of Florida’s and many other states’ citrus industries,” O’Keeffe said. 82 82

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UF/IFAS scientist’s work with Brazilian citrus greening genome could aid Florida industry By Kimberly Moore Wilmoth

greening “necklace” held 1,195,201 beads, or 1,044 genes. A University of Florida researcher has mapped the DNA genome of a new strain of citrus greening that could further threaten Florida’s beleaguered $9 billion citrus industry. Knowing the genetic makeup of the various strains is critical to finding a cure. Dean Gabriel, a plant bacteriology specialist with UF/IFAS, helped sequence and map the genome of the most prevalent form of the disease in Florida, and now he and colleagues have done the same for a new strain of the disease discovered in Brazil. There is no cure for either strain, although researchers believe that knowing the genetic makeup of the disease is critical to finding one. Gabriel said by having that “roadmap” of the bacteria genome, they will be certain there are no surprises in the Brazilian species, which has now been found in Texas. In addition, the mapping should help guide them to improvements in control methods and toward more usable genes and treatments. “What the genome does, it lets you know everything that the organism has and doesn’t have in its artillery for offense and defense—and it lets you design a strategy to control it,” Gabriel said.

To obtain the nucleotide sequence from the purified bacterial DNA, they used state-of-the-art sequencing machines at the UF Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research. The research was funded by the Citrus Research and Development Foundation Inc., an affiliate of UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. In the battle against greening, UF/IFAS researchers have tried everything from working on ways to eradicate the psyllid to grafting trees that show better resistance to greening. Frederick Gmitter, a citrus breeder and faculty member at IFAS’ Citrus REC, said his research team has found new experimental rootstocks that seem to be supporting healthier trees – even ones with citrus greening. In addition, his team is studying “escape trees,” which are trees that remain unscathed, even when surrounded by thousands of infected tress.

Researchers often liken having the genetic sequence for an organism to having its list of parts. “Having all the genetic information is like having a detailed roadmap of the organism,” said Jackie Burns, director of the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred. Citrus greening was first discovered by farmers in China in 1911 and made its first appearance in Florida in 2005. It is spread by a tiny insect called the Asian citrus psyllid that feeds on the trees, leaving bacteria that starve the tree of nutrients. Infected trees produce fruits that are unsuitable for sale as fresh fruit or for juice and most die within a few years. The disease has already affected millions of citrus trees in North America. Gabriel’s team’s work will be outlined in a research paper that will be published in February in the journal Molecular Plant-Microbe Interaction. The genome map is already available online, at GenBank. To map the bacteria’s DNA genome, Gabriel’s Brazilian colleagues first diced up and crushed tissue from the veins of infected citrus trees where the organism was most highly concentrated. They used chemicals to extract DNA and purified it. The team had to separate the tree DNA from that of the bacterium. DNA comprises four nucleotides, which fall into an order to encode genes specific to an organism. Gabriel likened it to examining beads on a necklace: The beads come in only four colors, and the color sequence determines each gene – in this case, the DNA WWW. WWW.IN NTHE HEF FIELD IELDMAGAZINE.COM AGAZINE.COM

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Naturally Amazing Activities

By Sean Green

Food Stamp Art

Nature is filled with interesting patterns that often go unnoticed. Valentine’s day is next month, and using common vegetables as stamps can create some pretty attractive works of art that are simple and inexpensive. Acrylic paint is suggested because it is non

Materials: Various Vegetables Acrylic Paint Paper or Canvass Directions: • Carefully cut a vegetable to reveal the natural pattern examples can include: Okra: (Flower pattern) Celery Bundle (Rose Pattern)

toxic, dries fast, and is pretty easy to clean up, but any coloring will work, including food dye, an ink pad, or other types of paint. If you are very ambitions, custom patterns can be carved out of potatoes with clay sculpting tools.

Bell Pepper (Clover Pattern) • Dip the vegetable into the paint and dap onto paper or canvas Experiment with different patterns and color combinations. Acrylic paint dries fast and new colors can be layered on top of dried colors for interesting effects. Real plant stalks added to the composition also make a nice touch. if you would like to share your creation with us, you can upload pictures of your artwork on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/InTheFieldMagazine

813-767-4703 301 South Collins Street, Suite 101, Plant City, Florida 33563

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A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Insects as Food (Entomophagy)

Photo Credit: (AP Photo/Thomas Calame, FAO, ho) http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/53635-eat-more-insects-un-food-agency-says/

It is generally acknowledged that the worlds increasing population cannot be sustained by current agriculture yields. Industrialized agriculture is critically dependent on fossil fuel energy for nearly every stage of production. The technology boom of the “Green Revolution” has certainly increased agricultural production, but at a cost of reduced efficiency. Agriculture efficiency is the ratio of energy inputs to energy outputs (not counting the sun). As the costs associated with nonrenewable resources become more volatile, they becomes a less reliable variable, thus clouding the horizons of an economically viable future in agriculture. There is little doubt that a sustainable food solution is vital, we can’t escape the ominous warnings. Of the parade of solutions soliciting our approval, the idea of achieving agricultural efficiency has the most momentum, however, it will come at the cost of increased acceptance. Not surprisingly, experts reiterate the notion that the solution to agricultural shortages has been at our feet for a very long time. A closer look at the changing agricultural horizon may surprise you. Entomophagy, the human consumption of insects, has been a hominid experience for millions of years. America is one of the few world cultures that view entomophagy through the lens of political and cultural taboo rather than through science and anthropology. For many Americans, entertaining the idea will not see the light of day, for others, it will be an intriguing pursuit. Consuming insects (Entomophagy) is common in most of the world’s nations, not necessarily because food is scarce, but rather because the practice has been engrained in the worlds diversity of cultures. Our American culture has programmed us to accept the possibility of ingesting pesticides more readily than swallowing an insect. Ironically, many Americans are aware that our food supply is already peppered with insect parts and the average American consumes over three pounds of them per year. The FDA maintains and publishes The Food Defect Action Levels, which is a list of acceptable occurrences of insect parts in our food sources but curiously, does not yet regulate the whole insects as a food source. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is an intergovernmental organization with a mission to meet the demands of global trends in agricultural development. The organization began considering the potential of Entomophagy ten years ago, and with recent population projections, have stepped up research efforts to determine the feasibility of insect livestock. There are currently 1,900 insect species recognized as a human food source alone and countless others with potential as livestock feed, raw material production, sanitation labor, or environmental management. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

In terms of comparative nutritional value, researchers confirm insects are an equivalent, and often healthier source of protein than conventional livestock like beef and chicken. According to the Entomological Society of America insects pack more protein and less fat than traditional meat and the FAO specifically reports Iron levels are higher in Locus (8-20mg) than they are in Beef (6mg). There are even some species of Locust that are “Kosher” and permitted as a food source under the laws of Kashrut (Jewish dietary laws). From an economic perspective, acceptance of insects as a food source could mean great opportunities for farmers. Locusts are a valuable favorite worldwide and when they swarm, are often gathered to sell at the marketplace as food. A 5kg bag (11 Lbs) sells at the market for 400 Saudi Ryal (SR) which is about $106 USD. Most insects have several times the agricultural efficiency of cattle. In general, insects use two pounds of feed input to produce one pound of meat output, conversely, Cattle average eight pounds of feed input to produce one pound of meat. Insects do not require a fraction of the space needed for larger livestock, nor do they require tractors, butchering operations, or veterinary expenses. Supplementing the American diet with insects could reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizers over the long run and would certainly not contribute to global warming as insects do not produce greenhouse gases, in fact, some species such as the dung beetle are believed to reduce greenhouse gas levels. The cultural taboo driving America’s perception of Entomophagy is the greatest factor limiting our participation in the changing agriculture horizon. Governments acknowledge the benefits that entomophagy can provide as an efficient, environmentally responsible, renewable source of food protein. NASA and the Chinese Space Agency have conducted plausibility experiments to determine the potential for farming insects for food in space. Likewise, the governments of Australia, UK, European Union and the United Nations are interested in the potential for insects as a food source. Millions of years have demonstrated that Entomophagy is not only safe, but in many aspects, a healthier option for human nutrition. Perhaps in the new year, some will explore these alternatives. To contact the author, email green.sean.d@gmail.com.

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MAS TER GARDENERS

Enjoy Fruits of Their Labors By Cheryl Kuck

Husband and wife Master Gardeners Jim & Sally Lee show off one of the Starfruit trees with ripe fruit on their Lake Thonotosassa property.

On a hot, humid, mosquito-prone day, Master Gardeners Jim and Sally Lee took me out of the ho-hums of daily life into their magical forest of over 100 varieties of tropical plants and fruit trees (ornamentals and edibles) on their property overlooking Lake Thonotosassa. While showing me various species of trees and plantings they talked about how the long journey from their roots in China culminated in the pursuit of their passion for cultivating rare fruit and vegetables.Listening to their story, I remembered the greatest thing about being a reporter is the opportunity meet interesting people and learn about things you might never have known.

“We want what we do to benefit or become a pattern for the entire world, to make the world greener and to make oxygen. Individuals can make a difference,” says Lee. It is another world. One where abundant vegetation hides the sound of road traffic, birds constantly chirp in the forest and there is a sweet smell of fruit permeating the air. Far Eastern exotic Starfruit dangles from branches, avocado trees from Mexico, Guatemala and the West Indies are interspersed with ancient Chinese (Himalayan strain) plump Pomelo’s and its Barbados 18th century developed hybrid (pared with sweet orange) cousin known as Ruby Red Grapefruit. Sally hands me an avocado and tells me, “You need to have it for dinner since it’s ripe and ready right now. Avocado is my favorite because it has the most uses, it’s the easiest to grow, the highest in protein and potassium, offering nearly 20 vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients.”

The Lee’s were both born in China and migrated (approximately 9,183 miles) to Trinidad and Tobago where they met and discovered the joy of tropical fruits and each other. After marriage, they moved another 2,600 miles to Canada. “There, we did what most Chinese people do. We went into the family Chinese restaurant business then after two The “Most useful” Avocado Tree. On the other moves to Michigan and Ohio, I decided Lee property; varieties whose origins in20 years as a restaurateur was enough. It was clude Mexico, Guatemala and W. Indian. The couple grows two varieties of Papaya, time to pursue our hobby and passion for Yellow Papaya with South African origins growing edible delicacies, so we moved an(referred to as “Honey Gold”) and Red other thousand or so miles to Florida’s farming heartland.” Lady. Both are an excellent source of vitamin’s C, A, and Foliate. Before the 1950s, the papaya industry was declining because fruits “It took us three years to find this property. We wanted arable land were affected by disease and would become bitter tasting. “Califlora” and water to grow stuff. Although Hillsborough County can get cold Papaya (a disease-resistant cultivar) was developed at the University (even to 18 degrees or below), because we are near the lake there is of Florida and now thrives throughout south Florida. some humidity but we still have to grow everything closely together The Java Plum Tree or Jamun Tree, native to India and its bordering so it’s like a rain forest. countries like Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Indonesia, 88

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Ruby Red Grapefruit

Jim Lee shows climbing skills needed for selecting the over 100 varieties of prime fruit he grows on this Thonotosassa property.

Senegal Date and Cabbage Palm trees seem to touch the sky and act as a towering shelter for more exotic varieties of fruit trees and plants.

Java Plum Tree or Jamun tree is native to India and its bordering countries like Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Indonesia. *Introduced in Florida by the USDA in 1911.

was introduced in Florida by the USDA in 1911 and is among the Lee’s many varieties that come from far-away places. In an effort to learn more the couple began taking Master Gardener courses at the University of Florida Extension Services Hillsborough County Extension Office located at 5339 County Road 579 in Seffner. For information about classes, call: (813) 744-5519. In 1914 Congress established the Extension Service in order to provide a means for spreading and implementing research-based information from land-grant universities. The classes enable the public to gain expertise in various fields, in this case, agricultural training for certification and to assist retiree’s. “Every year there are regional exams to take and more classes. You must always be current in new methods, including disease control, in order to retain your “master” status. As Master Gardeners, we give lectures, and training to schools and other organizations about rare and tropical fruits, WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

A perfect Chinese (Himalayan strain) Pomelo.

Two varieties of Papaya; Yellow Papaya and Red Lady are grown on the Lee property. * “Califlora” Papaya (a disease-resistant cultivar) was developed at the University of Florida. Prior to this, in the 1950s, the papaya industry was declining because fruits were affected by disease and would become bitter tasting. This strain of papaya now thrives throughout south Florida. Shown here is ripening yellow papaya with South African origins referred to as “Honey Gold.”

including coordinating the USF Botanical Gardens Annual Tropical Plant Fair, and teaching workshops,” says Lee. As experts on Asian fruits and vegetables, they are in demand as guest speakers. Jim is a four-term president of the 300 member Rare Fruit Council and has held the offices of vice-president and program chairman for 12 years. He says his wife does all the “hard work” by organizing and keeping track of scheduling. Sometimes your passion over-takes your life. It this case it is for a good cause. “I urge you to plant something, especially something edible, and you will make a valuable contribution to society,” says Sally Lee.

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DISCOVER THE PAST. DISCOVER THE FUTURE. DISCOVER THE FUN!

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IIN NT HEF IELD M AGAZINE N OVEMBER 2013 THE FIELD MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2013 N HE IELD AGAZINE OVEMBER N HE IELD AGAZINE OVEMBER IN JJanuary INTTHE HEFFIELD IELDM MAGAZINE AGAZINE anuary 2014 2014

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UF research shows coral reefs worth saving By Brad Buck

Kathleen McConnell dives at the Great Wall West in Bloody Bay Marine Park, off little Cayman Island. University of Florida researchers conducted a 14-year study of a reef off Little Cayman Island and found even damaged reefs can recover. Photo courtesy of Neil van Niekerk.

Although some scientists suggest that coral reefs are headed for certain doom, a new study by University of Florida and Caribbean researchers indicates even damaged reefs can recover. In a 13-year study in the Cayman Islands, warm ocean temperatures led to bleaching and infectious disease that reduced live coral cover by more than 40 percent between 1999 and 2004. But seven years later, the amount of live coral on the reefs, the density of young colonies critical to the reefs’ future health, and the overall size of corals all had returned to the 1999 state, the study showed. Much of the reef surrounding Little Cayman Island is protected, so damage from fishing, anchoring and some other human activities is minimized, said UF researcher Chuck Jacoby, who helped with the study. “Nevertheless, all coral reefs, even those that are well-protected, suffer damage,” Jacoby said. “Little Cayman is an example of what can happen, because it is essentially free from local stresses due to its isolation, small human population and generally healthy ecology.” Tom Frazer, a professor of aquatic ecology, and Jacoby, a courtesy faculty member in UF’s Soil and Water Science Department, said the study shows reasons to protect coral reefs, even though some scientists believe there’s little point in putting more resources into reef management. “There’s a debate over how resilient coral reefs are,” said Frazer, director of UF’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, part of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. “Some say it’s a lost cause. We believe there’s value in making sure coral reefs don’t die.” Despite occupying less than 0.01 percent of the marine environment, coral reefs harbor up to 25 percent of the different species of marine organisms, yield about 25 percent of the fish caught in developing nations 94 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE January 2014

and generate up to 30 percent of the export earnings in countries that promote reef-related tourism, the study said. Overfishing, runoff containing sediments and nutrients, coral mining, tourism and coastal development have long threatened coral reefs. Now, scientists say, global warming is accelerating the destruction. Despite these travails, the new UF study offers hope for coral reefs if humans pay more attention to protecting them. “In addition to saving the living organisms that make coral reefs their homes, safeguarding the habitats could ensure millions of dollars for the fishing and tourism industries, not to mention maintaining barriers that protect coastal areas and their human inhabitants from tropical storms,” Frazer said. The study, published in the November online publication Public Library of Science, was later highlighted in the “Editor’s Choice” section of last month’s issue of the journal Science. From 1999-2012, scientists, including Frazer and Jacoby, studied reefs around Little Cayman Island, an area known for its healthy reefs. Researchers wanted to see how well the reefs stood up over time under a variety of stresses that included, for example, increased sea surface temperatures. Researchers attributed the reef’s ability to recover to its relative isolation, limited human disturbance and relatively healthy fish populations, including young herbivorous fish that help keep competing seaweed at bay. Other co-authors included Carrie Manfrino and Emma Camp, scientists at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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ANIMALS & NEEDS

MASSEY FERGUSON 210 2wd., diesel tractor. $3,750 Call Alvie. 813-759-8722

CECIL BREEDING FARM Full service thoroughbred farm from foaling to the track. Broodmare care. Investment opportunities. 863-899-9620

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ANIMAL CONTROL Complete Nuisance/Destructive Wildlife Removal & Management! Wild hogs, coyotes, raccoons, opossum, armadillo, squirrels, bobcats, etc. (licensed & insured professional Services) 863-287-2311 ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. (813) 752-2230. Call Don Ammerman. www.ammermans.com Swaps July 13, 2014 and November 30, 2014 CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232

B UILDING S UP P LIES WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 T1-11 4 X 8 SHEET 5/ 8-INCH THICK B-grade $22.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378

DOORS AND WINDOWS SPECIAL ORDER No upcharge. House & mobile home. Many standard sizes in stock. Call 813-752-3378 Ask for Blake

J OB S CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com

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BRAND NEW HUSTLER RAPTOR Zero Turn Mower. 52" cut, 23 hp. Kawasaki engine, 3 year warranty. $2,999 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

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2012 MASSEY FERGUSON 2615-4L 4X4, shuttle shift, loader with skid, steer bucket. 94.5 hours, warranty. $22,900 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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MAHINDRA 8560 40 actual hrs., 2wd, diesel, 83hp, shuttle shift, warranty. $22,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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MASSEY HARRIS FERGUSON NO. 16 PACER With belly mower $1950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 BAD BOY CZT50 Zero turn 26hp Kawasaki. 138 hrs., Warranty. $4,995 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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info @inthe fie ld m a g a z ine .c o m REAL ES TATE LAND WANTED 10 to 100 acres, no improvements, Hillsborough, Polk or East Pasco. Call Lee 813-986-9141 WANTED TO BUY Problem real estate mortgages. Will consider any situation, defaults, delinquencies. Hillsborough, Pasco and Polk County. CASH OUT! Call H. Lee 813-986-9141 FOR SALE 2.66 acres, Pless Road, Paved Road by owner. 65K, 10% down, owner financing. 813-986-9141 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 JANE BAER REALTY Looking for that mountain getaway home? We have what you are looking for. Check out our website at www.janebaerrealty.com or call us toll free 800-820-7829. We are located in Blairsville GA, North Georgia Mountains! OLDER MOBIL HOME 2 bedroom located in a 55+ community. Harry’s Harbor on Lake Rosalie, Lake Wales. $7,500. 813-310-6042

S ERVICES CALLER ON HOLD A low cost service that enables you to communicate important information about your business to customers while they are on hold. No monthly payments or annual payments. Call today and ask for Al 813-763-2220 NEW & USED TIRES Plant City. 813-752-6173 TOTAL OIL Service for most cars & trucks. 813-752-6173

USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722 KUBOTA B6100E Tractor with 48" woods belly mower. $1,750. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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MORE BANG FOR THE NOTHING RUNS LIKE A DEERE!

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In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida

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