Page 1


2

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

JANUARY 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


3


®

Contents

VOL. 9 • ISSUE 5

Feature Story HCSC Crimes Unit

Page 54 C ov e r p h o t o b y S te p h a n i e H u m p h rey

Business Up Front

Trinity Sportsman

Page 10

Ministires

Page 39

Moss Balls & Waterlillies

For The Ones

Page 16

Who Get It Done

Page 41

Tampa Bay Fishing Report

Florida Berry Expo

Page 18

Page 47

Rocking Chair

Recipes

Chatter

Page 50

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Danny Aprile ..............................President Bill Burnett ..........................VicePresident Jemy Hinton ..............................Treasurer

DIRECTORS FOR 2012-2013

Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, James Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker, Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack, Ray Wood

Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813.685.9121

Page 22 Why Trees Fail Farming for Health

Page 52

Page 30 Food Check-Out Week Playing in the Dirt

Page 64

Page 35 2013 Truck Review Lending a Helping Hand

Page 70

Page 36 Champion of

4

Hall Of Fame Inductees

Champions

Page 37

Page 76

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

5


From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

It’s National Nutrition Month! This month is sponsored annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and is a campaign to focus attention on making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. According the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “Food preferences, lifestyles, cultural and ethnic traditions and health concerns all affect our food choices. That is why, as part of National Nutrition Month® 2013, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day." Why is this important to our readers? Because the most nutritious food you can find is Fresh From Florida! The Academy encourages a return to the basics of healthy eating and emphasizes the advantages of a healthful eating plan incorporating individual food choices and preferences. "There can be a misperception that eating healthfully means giving up your favorite foods," said registered dietitian and Academy President Ethan A. Bergman. "Our 'Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day' National Nutrition Month theme encourages consumers to include the foods they love as part of a healthful eating plan that is tailored for their lifestyles, traditions, health needs and, of course, tastes." I’m sure you followed a healthy eating plan during the Florida Strawberry Festival. I know I did. It’s never too late to get on track. Shop locally, support your local farmer and rancher. You will be healthier and happier for it! Be sure to check next months issue of In The Field. It will be full of coverage of the 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival!

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

6

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Lindsey English CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers ABC Pizza................................................................82 Ag Technologies......................................................31 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers .............................20 Allstate Homes........................................................89 Andy Thornal..........................................................79 Antioch Feed and Farm Supply............................85 Aquarius Water Refining.......................................80 Astin Strawberry Exchange...................................74 Badcock....................................................................23 Bill’s Transmissions .................................................40 Bingham...................................................................46 Boots and Buckles...................................................59 Brandon Auto Services, Inc. ..................................82 Brandon Farms .......................................................81 Brandon Region Hospital......................................66 Brewington’s............................................................93 Broke & Poor..........................................................20 Brown’s Jewelers.....................................................74 Cecil Breeding Farm...............................................27 Certis.............................................................38 & 78 CF Industries .........................................................90 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive ................................67

Index of Advertisers Crescent Jewelers ............................................................ 68 Dad’s Towing....................................................................81 Discount Metals...............................................................17 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................79 Driscoll’s............................................................................65 Eshenbaugh Land Company..........................................86 Fancy Farms .....................................................................26 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................77 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................80 Farm Credit.........................................................................9 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fischbach Land Company..............................................63 Fishhawk Sporting Clays ................................................37 Florida Ag in the Classroom...........................................59 Florida Dept. of Agriculture............................................25 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................24 Forbes Road Produce ........................................................7 Fred’s Market.................................................................. 26 Gator Ford........................................................................65 Gladstone..........................................................................42 Grimes Hardware Center ...............................................12 Grove Equipment Service................................................58 Growum ...........................................................................60 Gulf Coast Tractor...........................................................96 Halfacre Construction Company...................................68 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply .............................................3 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................................82 Haught Funeral Home....................................................75 Helena Chemical-Tampa ................................................17 Hillsboro State Bank........................................................92 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau...............................89 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................14 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................62 Jane Baer Realty...............................................................94 Jarrett-Scott Ford................................................................2 Johnson’s Barbeque..........................................................82 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm.................................................74 Ken’s Well Drilling & Pump Service, Inc.......................40 Key Plex ............................................................................21 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................74 Magnolia Hill...................................................................86 Malissa Crawford............................................................45 Mark Smith Excavating ....................................................7 Meryman Environmental, Inc........................................93 Mosaic...............................................................................14 Myers Cleaners.................................................................42 Parkesdale Market .............................................................5 Pathway BioLogic............................................................34 Plant City Chamber of Commerce................................43 Plant City Tire & Auto Service, Inc. ................................7 Platinum Bank..................................................................57 Railroad Credit Union.....................................................69 Ranch Rodeo ...................................................................32 Seedway ............................................................................26 Shrimp & Co Express.....................................................74 Southeastern Trophy Deer Association .........................73 Southside Farm & Pet Supply .............................48 & 49 South Florida Baptist Hospital .......................................88 Stephanine Humphrey.....................................................19 Stingray Chevrolet............................................................95 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................91 The Hay Depot................................................................40 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort................................23 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith .................................................................91 Vertigro .............................................................................45 Walden Lake Car Wash ..................................................69 Walk In BINGO...............................................................84 Wells Memorial................................................................74 Willie’s ...............................................................................82 Woodside Dental..............................................................11

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

InTheField速 Magazine P.O. Box 5377 Plant City, FL 33566-0042

Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

7


100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

A SINCERE ‘THANK YOU” TO MANY And a “No Thank You” to Wal-Mart Dear Readers: I don’t have to go into great detail about this time of year and the many opportunities for families to enjoy annual events such as The Strawberry Festival and State Fair, each a great chance to showcase agriculture and its importance to all of us. However, it is important for me to thank the countless volunteers who give of their time to make these events as enjoyable and informative as they are. We estimate nearly 40,000 visited Ag-Venture at the Florida State Fair this year. That’s a big jump from our 30,000 tally in years past. Thanks to Growums for setting up a display and giving away over 1,000 garden projects. Sun Lion donated 20 boxes of fresh Florida tangerines, while Dun Di Citrus provided visitors with 60 boxes of fresh Florida oranges and T.G. Lee gave us 10 cases of heavy whipping cream for making butter. Our friends with the Iowa Pork Producers donated a learning station for Ag-Venture this year. With this kind of volume we had to have a lot of help, and we did. More than 300 FFA students volunteered. It would have been impossible for us to handle the increased volume without their help. A special thanks to Hillsborough County Farm Board member, Michelle Williamson, for heading up our Food Check-Out Week program. Michelle and her volunteers prepared dinner for residents and their family members at Ronald McDonald House in Tampa. There’s more about the special event in this edition of IN THE FIELD.

I don’t have the final figures for our Strawberry Festival activities, but I am certain it was again another resounding success thanks to our volunteers, supporters and the hard work of our Executive Director, Judi Whitson. Judi and a team of volunteers are getting ready to participate in Greenfest in a few days with a hands on on project for youngsters. Amid all of this sincere appreciation, I must say “no thanks” to Wal-Mart for its sale of Mexican grown strawberries at its Plant City store a short time ago. That was a slap in the face to our strawberry growers and I hope the people in Bentonville, Arkansas got the message and will not repeat that error in the future. It’s hard to believe anyone would sell Mexican grown strawberries at an outlet in the heart of the winter Strawberry Capital of the World. Lastly, let me remind you once again that membership in Farm Bureau is not limited to just farmers and ranchers. Farm Bureau is a low cost, high value grass roots organization comprised of families across the country. Take a few minutes to visit our website: www.hcfb.org or call 813/685-9121. We would be pleased to have your family join us.

Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

Board of Directors

Danny Aprile, President; Bill Burnett, Vice-President; Jemy Hinton Member-at-large; Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker,Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack and Ray Wood, Judi Whitson, Executive Director 8

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M


• Florida was named on Easter 1513 by Ponce de Leon for Pascua Florida – "Flowery Easter" • The 1899 Florida Legislature appropriated funds to preserve Olustee Battlefield, which became Floridaʼs first State Historic Monument in 1909. • On its more than 54,000 acres, Kissimmee Prairie Preserve hosts a permanent colony of endangered whooping cranes. • In 1513, Ponce de León, seeking the mythical “Fountain of Youth,” discovered and named Florida, claiming it for Spain. Later, Florida would be held at different times by Spain and England until Spain finally sold it to the United States in 1819. • Florida Caverns State Park is a Florida's State Park, located in the Florida Panhandle near Marianna. It is home to the only air-filled caves accessible to tourists in Florida. • Alafia River State Park, once the site of a phosphate mine, has unique topography that offers some of the most radical elevation changes in Florida. • During the 19th century, the island, now known as Egmont Key State Park, served as a camp for captured Seminoles at the end of the Third Seminole War and was later occupied by the Union Navy during the Civil War. In 1898, as the Spanish - American War threatened, Fort Dade was built on the island and remained active until 1923. • Fort Foster State Historic Site is part of Hillsborough River State Park and is a reconstructed fort from the Second Seminole War. • Allen David Broussard Catfish Creek is home to numerous rare plants such as scrub morning glory, scrub plum, pygmy fringe tree, and cutthroat grass, as well as several protected animal species including Florida scrub-jays, bald eagles, gopher tortoises, and Florida scrub lizards.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

9


Business Up Front

By Ginny Mink

“SETTLE DOWN” SAYS TOP REAL ESTATE AGENT

A

ccording to the New York Daily News, Tommy Lee Jones (of Men in Black fame) has recently placed his 50 acre polo estate in Wellington (near Palm Beach) on the market for $26.75 million! Obviously he’s not too concerned about the housing market in this great state. This is interesting due to the fact that Florida has one of the highest foreclosure rates in the US. However, according to housingpredictor.com, home values in Tampa should inflate by an average of 4.6% before the year is over. With such mixed reviews on a seemingly fragile and fickle market, one has to wonder how the plethora of realtors is doing. Jo-An Lusk, managing broker of Coldwell Banker brags on one of her associates, Malissa Crawford. She says, “Malissa is one of the most disciplined agents I know. She works full time in her business and by that I mean 10-12 hour days and weekends, too.” What are the results of such steadfast dedication, you might ask? Jo-An continues, “Malissa is the top agent in her market for the last 12 months. She is an award winning Sales Associate with Coldwell Banker earning the recognition of International Diamond Society, which represents about five percent of all agents in the company. In addition to her local market, Malissa is well versed in the

10

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2012

Tampa (south) market and Polk County as well. Malissa is committed to her customers and works hard on their behalf and for their benefit. She is dependable, loyal and tenacious, and she knows real estate.” Given such a glowing review, it seemed prudent to talk to Malissa about her career in this tumultuous industry. She tells us about her difficult beginnings in the field, “I decided to look into becoming a real estate agent, took my classes, passed the exams and received my license in 2006. Another thing happened that year, the real estate bubble burst and the economy started to decline. Struggles pursued, everything changed in how people looked at real estate. Some thought we were the issues to the collapse, some thought agents were all getting rich off their clients, but the truth is, it was a struggle to carve out your niche. I loved houses and what could be done to them. I loved helping people purchase their first home. I believe I just wanted to be around people so I stayed the course and people started to recognize that I was there to help them.” Malissa is not unfamiliar with a vast array of homes and residences. Though she is a Florida native she admits that her family had more address changes than the typical military family (and her family isn’t a mil-

itary one). Here’s the story, “I really didn’t know what I was getting into marrying an Ag operations and produce salesman. Back then we traveled like gypsies from town to town following the Ag crops starting in South Florida throughout the state, Georgia, North Carolina and Michigan only to return by the reversed route. This was before cell phones, iPads and personal devices to keep kids busy so to keep some sanity, I would view each area as an adventure and we would look at the houses, what the area had to offer, talk to people, no one was a stranger. After a few years of the road warrior stuff, my husband had the opportunity to set up a location in a central Florida town: Plant City. I would have to say then I didn’t have a clue where Plant City was, what it had to offer, my only concern was did it have a mall. As usual, my husband would tell me what I wanted to hear, ’why yes it has a mall.’ He would say, now, that produce lies don’t count in heaven. To my surprise, we didn’t have a mall to my definition, but the town was quite interesting and we planted roots over 20 years ago. We have raised four great kids here, have many great friends.” She chuckles a little when she mentions her four great kids. Then she reveals, “I was a stay at home mom, I had four children in four years. I just wanted them to hang out W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


together, be friends and buddies and be involved in the same things and they are; that part was achieved. I didn’t really think that through though because now they’re in college at the same time. So I’ve gotta sell a lot of houses; it’s a great motivator. I have three boys, one daughter. My oldest just graduated from the University of Florida. He’s taking a position with Citi Group in New York. The other three are at the University of Central Florida. I’ve got one that’s an accounting major and the other two are undeclared at the moment.” Malissa recalls that when they were still relatively new to Plant City and the kids were younger, they had some land out in south Plant City. She says, “We had goats and chick-

ens, dogs and cats, that kind of thing. We got our eggs from the chickens and the goats were out in the pasture; they’re great little lawnmowers. Although we weren’t born here, this is my kid’s hometown. I like the small town feel and the close knit community. It’s the perfect place to live, you don’t have to deal with traffic; you can get to Orlando really easily. It’s just the perfect place to live.” Undoubtedly most Plant City residents would agree with that sentiment. However, if you’re looking to relocate perhaps you should give Malissa a call, she’ll happily assist you in locating your new home. You can reach her on her cell: (813) 967 0168. •

Our Services Include: Cosmetic Crown and Bridge Dentures Xrays • Cleanings • Root Canals Whitening • Denture Repairs - while you wait • In-Office BOTOX Now Offering LASER PERIO SURGERY (A more effective way to treat gum disease)

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Open Fridays Most Insurances Accepted

WOODSIDE DENTAL Practicing in Plant City for Over 20 Years

Dr. Pat Almerico, DDS

813.752.5554 704 N. Alexander St., Plant City, FL

Cleaning, Exam and Xray $ New Patients Only. Must present coupon

129

WOODSIDE DENTAL CouponExpires Expires3/15/13 4/15/13 Coupon

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2012

11


12

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Overcome Negatives of Popular Ornamental TWO GENETICALLY STERILE VARIETIES OF LANTANA INTRODUCED By Jim Frankowiak

The lantana plants are very popular among nurserymen and landscapers. “They flower year round in Florida and attract butterflies. They are easy to grow, heat and drought tolerant and soil adaptable here in Florida,” noted Dr. Zhanao Deng. “And there are several dozen varieties currently in production, among them is Lantana camara.” Deng, a plant breeder at the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Gulf Coast Research and Education Center at Balm, is a member of a statewide team of researchers who have spent more than eight years developing genetically sterile varieties of Lantana camara. “Genetic sterilization is very important with regard to ornamental plants introduced to the U.S. market from other countries and continents,” he said. The Lantana camara, for example, was originally from the West Indies. “It is listed as a category #1 invasive plant by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. Deng said that about 50 years ago, researchers reported some 650 varieties of lantana in the world. “Now, in the U.S. there are approximately 100 varieties in commercial production. In addition to their other attributes, they are easy to produce and become saleable plants in four to six weeks compared to almost double or triple the time of other horticultural plants,” he said. Here in Florida, Deng noted a survey conducted about 10 years ago found that nearly 20 percent of the responding nurseries in the state produced lantana “with an economic impact of $40 million annually, making it a major nursery landscape plant.” He said the lantana is also very popular in other states. However, the positive attributes of lantana were overshadowed by its invasiveness, a problem Hugh Gramling, the now retired head of the Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers Association, realized and wanted addressed. “Hugh was a driving force behind our work,” said Dr. Deng. “He helped to secure our initial funding from the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association (FNGLA) and the Southwest Florida Water Management District.” That led to additional funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Non-native lantana such as the Lantana camara, attract butterflies, which in turn pollinate native lantana and this hybridization results in production of hybrid offspring that can contaminate the gene pool of native lantana, even threaten the extinction of the native species. “This negative attribute can be corrected by developing sterilized plant varieties that cannot produce viable pollens or seeds,” said Dr. Deng. That takes time and countless trials. For Deng and his team, it mean the better part of eight years to develop sterilized varieties of Lantana camara that would have only the desired attributes of the plant and work well throughout Florida. In addition to Dr. Deng and his associates at Balm – Technicians Joyce Jones and Gail Bowman, as well as then graduate student David Czarnecki – the team included Dr. Sandy Wilson at Ft. Pierce, Dr. Gary Knox at Quincy and Dr. Rosanna Freyere, Gainesville. Recently, the team released UF-T3 (orange flowers) and UF-T4 (pink flowers), temporary names for the new, sterile varieties of Lantana camara. “These new varieties have been tested throughout Florida,” said Dr. Deng. “They have been stable, consistent and have done well across Florida.” He said 20 more varieties are still being tested and produced. The released varieties are being field tested at Riverview Flower Farm, Riverview, Florida and at Windmill Farms Nurseries, Inc., at Zolfo Springs. Outside of Florida tests are taking place in California and West Chicago with Ball Horticultural Company and in Michigan, New Hampshire and California with Proven Winners. “The technique we have used to produce the new varieties is very similar to the approach taken to produce seedless watermelon,” said Dr. Deng. “We are applying the technique to nandina and ligustrum and hope to produce sterile varieties in the near future,” he said. Work on the nandina has been going on for six years, while ligustrum studies have taken place over the last two years. “Plans also call for work on a sterile eucalyptus variety as that plant has become increasingly popular as a windbreak, paper-pulp source and bio-energy crop,” said Dr. Deng. There are no “quick fixes” when developing sterile varieties. In addition to being excellent scientists, Dr. Deng and his colleagues must have a great deal of patience as problem-solving typically takes years before new varieties are developed and released. For additional information on the work of Dr. Deng and his colleagues, visit: http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ep463. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

13


14

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Microloans can be used for all approved operating expenses of the FSA Operating Loan Program and include but not limited to: • • • • •

Bronwyn Bethea-Myers

New Farm Service Agency “Microloan” Program Keyed to Smaller Farming Operations $35,000 LIMIT, SIMPLIFIED APPLICATION PROCESS

By Jim Frankowiak

H

ere’s some very good news for beginning, niche and the smallest of family farm operations. The United States Department of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency (FSA) has just unveiled a program to better serve the unique financial operating needs of people engaged in these types of agricultural operations. FSA has modified its Operating Loan (OL) application, eligibility and security requirements as part of this Microloan (ML) Program. “The program offers more flexible access to credit and serves as an attractive loan alternative for smaller farming operations like specialty crop producers and operators of community support agriculture,” said FSA Farm Loan Manager, Bronwyn Bethea-Myers, who is based at Plant City. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) consists of a community of individuals who pledge support to a farm operation so that the farmland becomes either legally or spiritually the community’s farm. The growers and consumers provide mutual support and share both the risks and benefits of food production. Typically, members or shareholders of the farm or garden pledge in advance to cover the anticipated costs of the farm operation and farmer’s salary. In return, they receive shares in the farm’s bounty throughout the growing season, as well as satisfaction gained from reconnecting to the land and participating directly in food production. Members also share in the risks of farming, including poor harvests due to unfavorable weather or pests. By direct sales to community members, who have provided the farmer with working capital in advance, growers receive better prices for their crops, gain some financial security and are relieved of much of the burden of marketing.

• • • • •

Initial start-up expenses Annual expenses such as seed, fertilizer, utilities, land rental Marketing and distribution expenses Family living expenses Purchase of livestock, equipment and other materials essential to farm operations Minor farm improvements such as wells and coolers Hoop houses to extend the growing season Essential tools Irrigation Delivery vehicles

“The application process for microloans is simpler requiring less paperwork to be completed and that coincides with the smaller loan amount associated with microloans,” said Bethea-Myers. The maximum microloan amount, she noted, is $35,000. In addition, requirements for managerial experience and loan security have been modified to accommodate smaller farm operations, beginning farmers and those with no farm management experience. “FSA understands that there are applicants for the ML program who want to farm but do not have traditional farm experience or have not been raised on a farm or within a rural community with agriculture-affiliated organizations,” she said. “ML program applicants will need to have some farm experience, however, FSA will consider an applicant’s small business experience as well as any experience with a self-guided apprenticeship as a means to meet the farm management requirement. This will assist applicants who have limited farm skills by providing them with an opportunity to gain farm management experience while working with a mentor during the first production and marketing cycle.” For annual operating purposes, microloans must be secured by a first lien or a farm property or agricultural products having a security value of at least 100 percent of the loan amount and up to 150 percent, when available. Microloans made for purposes other than operating expenses must be secured by a first lien on a farm property or agricultural products purchased with loan funds and having a security value of at least 100 percent of the microloan amount, said Bethea-Myers. With a $35,000 loan ceiling, the ML program repayment term may vary and will not exceed seven years. Annual operating loans are repaid within 12 months or when the agricultural commodities produced are sold. Interest rates are based on the regular OL rates that are in effect at the time of the microloan approval or closing, whichever is less. Those interested in the ML Program in Pinellas, Polk, Hardee, Desoto, Sarasota and Manatee counties are encouraged to contact Bethea-Myers at 813-752-1474, Extension 2. Information about the program can be found on the USDA website: www.fsa.usda.gov. That site also offers information on others agricultural loans available through the FSA. USDA is an equal opportunity lender and employer.

“These smaller farms, including non-traditional farm operations, often face limited financing options,” said Bethea-Myers, an inadequacy that is being addressed by the new ML Program. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

15


Moss Balls and Water Lilies WATERSCAPES AQUATIC PLANT NURSERY By Ginny Mink

A

griculture has recently embraced the aquaculture arena. We are seeing a significant increase in the number of Ag programs within the school system that are setting up tanks and other related fish breeding facilities. Since that door has been opened and has on some levels broadened the perspective of what is deemed agriculture, we thought we might stretch the label even further and introduce our readers to WaterScapes an aquatic plant nursery with a Plant City address (though it seems a lot closer to Dover in reality). Maria and Pierre LePochat are the owners of this rather unique business. Maria started the interview by insisting that neither she nor her husband had agricultural backgrounds, though she revealed, “He worked his way through college doing lawn care and so that was his interest in the outdoors. He was always independent, interested in running his own business. He liked the outdoors and hands-on stuff.” Amusingly, as the conversation continued we discovered, to Maria’s own shock, that she had an even greater agricultural connection than Pierre’s lawn care. She explained, “My parents have a very small, 25 acre farm in Land O’ Lakes where I grew up. It sustained our family but my father was a teacher so it was never for income purposes. We had cows, pigs, chickens, goats. We used to milk the cows, always had our own milk, our own eggs and we would slaughter periodically so we had our own meat and we always had a vegetable garden.” We pointed this revelation out to her, and like so many other people we’ve interviewed, she thought she had to have an FFA history or an Ag degree to attest to having an agricultural background. Once we had determined that both Pierre and Maria have some outdoorsy, Ag-type history, we delved into what led them to the aquatic plant field. She explained that Pierre has a mechanical engineering degree while she has two bachelor’s degrees, one in art and one in math. They met in college at the University of South Florida. She says, “We moved to Albany, Georgia in 1990 when he got his job with Procter & Gamble as a manager at the facility and in the meantime we had five children, hence the stay at home mom. We’ve been married for 23 years and the kids range in age from 17-22.” Georgia was ok for them but their families were in Florida and they started trying to figure out how to return home.

16

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

Maria explains, “In 2002, he (Pierre) purchased The Snailery from a couple who were running an aquatic plant nursery since 1972. The original location was in New Tampa on 6.8 acres, and then in 2006, we bought 16 acres in Plant City and slowly relocated the business. In 2002, when we purchased it, is when we changed the name to WaterScapes. We currently have about 15 employees and about 320 wholesale customers across the US and Canada. We sell live aquatic plants that people use in aquariums and ponds and water gardens. We grow about 60 percent here on site, then we have about 20 percent that are brought in by local collectors and then another 20 percent that are exotic plants that are imported from all over the world.” Maria admits, “We didn’t expect to end up here in any stretch of the imagination, it was just where the path led.” Though aquatic plants were indeed a stretch for them, they seem to have done well in the field. Pierre handles the facilities. Maria elaborates, “We are actively using six acres of the land in Plant City. Currently, there is a large 60 x 40 building that we use for office space, inventory and packing. Then we have ten greenhouses with over 41,000 square feet and another 30,000 square feet of growing space in covered vats. We sell over 200 different types of aquatic plants. Pierre was responsible for putting in all of that infrastructure. His responsibilities are nursery operations and he manages the entire staff.” When we asked about Maria’s responsibilities, she reminded us that she has an art degree, “It was fine art. I paint, watercolor painting, charcoal drawing, it was more of a hobby. I never thought I’d use the degree for anything, but at this point I handle the advertising campaigns and I do the in-house artwork and it helps with the website design.” That website address is: www.waterscapesnursery.com. She adds, “You could say it’s a family run operation. My husband’s sister, Maria Tatum, joined our staff in 2006. She is our sales/office manager.” In closing, we asked Maria which plant she liked best. She told us, “The water lilies; they’re the most showy with all the different color blooms. On the aquarium side there’s some really unique imported items. We have something called moss balls that are imported from Europe and are collected from cold water rivers and pretty much it’s an algae that rolls along the riverbed and forms a ball shape.” We’re not sure why people want to add algae to their aquariums but, to each his own. If you’re interested in seeing pictures of their other plants, check out their site: www.waterscapesnursery.com or if you’d like additional information you can always give Maria a call at: (813) 986 2503. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Cheap!

Thousands of 8 ft & 10 ft sheets in stock. Prices from $6 and up. Custom lengths available.

Metal Roofing we both lose. Florida’s Best Prices

If you buy elsewhere...

Discount Metal Mart Ferris Waller “I’ve got a bad at titude and a rot ten personalit y, so our prices must be good or people wouldn’t buy from me!” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Monday thru Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Located at Plant City Farm & Flea Market One mile north of I-4, corner of SR 39 and Sam Allen , easy access to I-4

813-752-7088 Website: www.metalsystemsinc.com email: atfabcutting@hotmail.com INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

17


by Captain Woody Gore

F

ishing pressure continues to climb throughout Florida and because it’s a wonderful pastime for friends and families, it’s import that we protect the assets that give us such enjoyment.

and Trout. Anglers everywhere, especially throughout Florida, seem hooked (no pun intended) on MirrOlure’s. Located in Largo, Florida, this lure manufacturing company has committed to the highest quality since the beginning.

Most anglers enjoy a good fish dinner, so don’t hesitate to take enough for a meal. However, filling your freezer with fillets is not in the best interest of protecting our assets. If we want a good fresh fish dinner you have an excellent reason to go fishing. “Like we really need one.” Unless properly frozen fish have a short shelf life, usually two to six months depending on fat content and how it’s frozen. Otherwise it quickly becomes freezer burned and destined only for the garbage.

Regardless of how good your freezer is, nothing saves your fish if the package is not void of air with a pressed heat seal. Omega-3 fats are highly unstable and when exposed to air quickly oxidize, leaving that easily recognizable, rancid, fishy smell and taste.

“LET ’S GO FISHING” TAMPA B AY FISHING REPORT - MARCH 2013 Early mornings, light wind and a small ripple on the water are outstanding times to fish top water lures for Snook, Redfish 18

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

They continually improve and create state of the art fishing lures, resulting in millions of fish caught in both fresh and saltwater. From topwater prop baits and surface walkers to slow sinking and diving lures, MirrOlure is the favorite of everyone. One of the favorite topwater techniques used over a shallow broken bottom grass flat is the “walk-the-dog.” Here are some tips on setting the hook when using topwater lures. Snook are much like freshwater bass, they both strike so violently it frequently pushes the lure out of the water without hooking the fish. The key is to always wait until you feel the fish, before setting the hook. Redfish on the other hand, usually swirl at the lure, which almost always pulls or pushes it down and sometimes ahead of the fish. This means they occasionally miss on the first attempt, particularly in shallow water. If you’re “walking the dog” slow it down, but never stop it. If you stop the lure during the attack it usually turns away and loses interest. Again, wait until you feel the fish to set the hook.

Here’s a little something about hook setting. We’ve watched bass professionals wrench back on their rods to set the hook. Some reasons given for this type of hook set is quick reaction times result in good hookups, getting the stretch out of their monofilament line and forcing the hook point (usually rigged weedless by embedding it into a soft plastic lure) out of the plastic lure and into the fish. However, today with many anglers switching to braided line and open J-hooks, aggressive, haul back and set the hook techniques are unnecessary. Braid has little or no stretch and no memory. Just getting the slack out of the line usually forces the hook set. With braided line, when you see or feel a strike, quickly lift the rod to remove any slack line and reel, the hook does the rest. “Slack Line is Not Your Friend” One final point on hook setting involves circle hooks that have been around for centuries. Over the last 10 to 20 years and with a move toward environmentally friendly fishing, “Circle Hooks” increased in popularity with recreational anglers. They’ve proved to be the most fool proof way of hooking fish while producing the least damage. Hook sets normally occur in the outside edge of the mouth and seldom, if ever, throat or gut-hook a fish. Circle hooks are automatic, just lift your rod, take up any slack line, (which should not be there) and it’s a hookup. Try to set the hook yourself before you feel the fish and guess what? The fish wins. SNOOK: If February was any indication our snook bite should be great in March. As the water temperatures keep rising they W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


water’s three to five feet deep you might give MirrOlure’s MirrOdine and MirrOdine (heavy) a try. These are great trout catchers. For diehard live baiters, use live shrimp, greenbacks, or fifty-cent size pinfish under a popping cork, find a deeper broken bottom grass flat and you’ll catch trout. COB IA, MACKEREL, SHARKS: As the bait shows up these should follow. Check markers and cans holding bait and be ready to toss something in the path of a circling Cobia. Not picky about food, Cobia will readily take large shrimp, small crabs and pinfish or toss them an artificial jerkbait or plastic eel. Mackerel will eat greenbacks, threadfins, silver spoons and of course shrimp lures. continue moving into their summertime patterns. Greenbacks begin showing up and live bait anglers will be getting out that dreaded cast net. Look for Snook to pattern along outside edges and points along mangrove islands and shorelines and especially where tidal flows move bait. Our miles of grass flats with sandy potholes also offer excellent ambush locations. Live bait, suspending lures, topwater’s and soft plastics always produce. REDFISH: There’s nothing more exciting to a redfish angler than easing onto a shallow grass flat and seeing fish tails with that ever pronounced black dot waving in the air. The first thing is to identify which direction they are feeding and approach quietly from the other. Nature provided redfish with exceptional eyesight and even better hearing. It’s been said, “They can almost hear you change your mind.” Always presenting a low profile often times a serious angler will slip over the side then slowly and quietly wade to within casting distance. Now comes the tricky

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

part, using a perfectly placed cast they try picking off the outside fish, never casting directly into the school. If you’re scouting for Redfish you might notice that in almost every one of my reports I mention mullet schools. That’s because it bears repeating. When trying to locate feeding redfish, remember they follow schooling mullet eating the baits they stir up. So I guess it stands to reason that fishing mullet schools usually produces reds. Some anglers use the dead stick method with cut ladyfish, mullet or chunks of crabs, others still prefer artificial lures or live bait. SPOTT ED SEA T ROU T: On incoming or outgoing tides, March will continue producing good catches of trout. I cannot emphasize the excitement of using topwater lures on calm early morning trout grass flats. Trout love MirrOlure’s Top Dog Jr. and MirrOMullet. Twitch or “walk-the-dog” and pause the lure momentarily after each series. The anticipation is unnerving. If the

“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

19


IN BUSINESS NOW FOR OVER 15 YEARS

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

NEW, USED and ABUSED!

HOME & MOBILE HOME SUPPLIES • Code Approved Windows • Window Rooms • Screen Rooms • Carports • Awnings • Wood Paneling • Steps • Alcoa® Vinyl Siding • Skirting • Doors (Interior & Exterior) ake We M w Windo s n Scree

20

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

813

752-3378

• Roof Overs • Metal Roofing • Shower Stalls • Complete Line of Plumbing • Trim Moulding • Vanities • Kitchen Cabinets • Antiques • Stepping Stones/Pavers

2670 Hwy. 92 E Plant City, FL (Between Lakeland and Plant City)

OPEN SATURDAYS: 8:30-5:00 www.brokeandpoorpc@aol.com

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


21

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


they all yours?” “Yeah, they are all mine.” Since hearing that question a thousand times before she says, “I say sit down Terry, and they all rush to find their seat.” “Well,” says the social worker, ”I need all their names.” “The oldest one’s name is Terry.” “OK, and who is next?” “Well, this one is Terry, also.” The social worker raises an eyebrow but continues. One by one, through the oldest five, all boys, all named Terry. Then she introduced the eldest girl, named Terri. “All right,” says the caseworker, “I’m seeing a pattern here. Are they all named Terry?”

T

he other day I ran into an old friend by the name of Marcus Dragon. We talked about the good times we had as kids. Marcus asked me if had seen Bill Jolly and Earl Bone in the past few years. I told him I had no idea where Jolly was, but I see Earl Bone often. Later that day I got to thinking about all the last names in our conversation. There was me, with the last name of Berry, then Marcus Dragon, Bill Jolly and Earl Bone, all with rather unusual last names. I then did a little search on my computer for funny and unusual last names. First I ran across the story of a lady with a name of Beth and her husband’s name Bud. She said on their 25th wedding anniversary their son gave them a name plate for their house that read, “Bud Beth and Beyond’. They say that 60 percent of all babies born are named for a family member. The remaining 40 percent are named for someone outside the family. Ann Landers once wrote about a couple that had six children who were all given the name of Eugene Jerome Dupuis Junior. The children were referred to as One, Two, Three, Four, Five and Six. Mr. and Mrs. Jones named their first child Tonsillitis. The other three were name Meningitis, Appendicitis and Peritonitis. Mr. and Mrs. Wind of Idaho name their four children North, East, South and West. I like the story of the social work that was working on a case with a lady that had five boys and one girl. “WOW,” she said, “Are

22

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

The mother replied, “Well yes…it makes it easier. When it’s time to get them out of bed and ready for school I yell ‘Terry’ and they all come running. And, if I need to stop the kid who’s running into the street, I just yell ‘Terry’ and all of them stop. It’s the smartest idea I ever had, naming them all Terry.” The social worker thinks this over for a bit then wrinkles her forehead says, “But what if you want ONE kid to come, and not the whole bunch?” She replies, “I call them by their surnames!” Looking through the latest road atlas I noticed a lot of funny named towns. In Arizona there’s the town of “Why.” It’s near the Mexican border and has a population of about 116. The unusual name of the town comes from the fact that the two major highways, State Routes 85 and 86, originally intersected in a Y-intersection. At the time of its naming, Arizona law required all city names to have at least three letters, so the town's founders named the town "Why." Looking further I found the town of Burnt Corn, Alabama. This small town has a rather unusual name that puts us in mind of those afternoons at the office when someone who doesn’t know how to use the microwave decides to make popcorn. Then there’s Possum Grape, Arizona. I have no idea what a possum grape is, but apparently it’s a thing, because someone felt it was necessary to name Possum Grape, AR after it. I checked their Facebook page, and it didn’t help me understand what a possum grape is either. Ever been through Boogertown, North Carolina? Ok, we know what a booger is. This isn’t a possum grape situation. This is Boogertown, NC and we have a pretty good idea of what this town was named after. We just don’t get it. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


If we had to make a choice, it’s possible we would prefer the results of living in Boogertown to what you might find in Fleatown, OH. It just seems like such an itchy place. Itchy or not, it’s an unincorporated community in Licking County. Yes, we didn’t make that up, Fleatown is in Licking County. We’re starting to get frightened about what happens there. I have always heard that everything is bigger in Texas. Let’s add crazier in Texas to that. Why else would they name a town Looneyville, TX? The story goes that the town is named for a storekeeper named John Looney. If you visit Looneyville, make sure you also visit Jot-Em-Down, TX and write all about your Looneyville experiences. If you don’t want to visit any of the above cities, perhaps a trip to Hell would be more to your taste. That’s easy to do since Hell happens to be in Michigan. For the life of me I can’t figure out why they considered a name such that for a town, but it’s certainly not an original. There’s also a Hellhole, Idaho. After all is said and done I’ll stick with my name of Berry and live in Plant City. After all, I can start here and go anywhere. •

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

23


24

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

25


26

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

27


Dry Creek

Remembering By Les McDowell Photos Courtesy of Linda Constant

the palmettos, I was back to Early Florida. It is a storybook setting. White Birds and beautiful landscape no one in Hollywood could outdo. The stories told of people long gone and never written about in a history book fill my mind. They ease onto a piece of paper to tell their stories through Dry Creek. People with heart and grit that endured heat, storms, gators and things western pioneers never even dreamed of. God Bless the Florida Cracker. As you sit and read this article I'd like to take you away from this busy world. Away from the traffic noises and concrete world outside your window, to a place that is really there. Close your eyes and I'll take you to a place time has forgotten and a people that lived there who where strong and loving, to the outskirts of my little town of Dry Creek. Open your eyes. Welcome to Dry Creek 1882 where there is a river that runs just past the edge of the woods of my little town of Dry Creek. If only that river could speak...There would be stories of heartbreak and hurricane. But there would also be stories of spring days that brought the sweet smell of sugar cane syrup being stirred drifting through Dry Creek, then through the woods to the riverbank. Maybe it was the fragrance that also stirred the hearts of young and old alike. If this river could talk, ong before there was a Disney World and Florida was held it would tell the story of Early Florida. together by a chain of 7-Eleven Stores, there was Early Florida. Being the creator of Dry Creek, I see Florida for what it Everybody knows where Dry Creek is... was.....not what it's become. No, I'm not down on progress and I it’s inside each and everyone of us. realize we could never go back. But in my mind I picture a time and place that time forgot. Watch Dry Creek on BlueHighwaysTV, Channel 246 on Verizon Sat nites at 7:30. The nice thing about Dry Creek, and my job, is to bring back by film Go to DryCreekT V.Com what it used to be like. Flying over Florida the other day I peered out for more information. my window and saw so much untouched land still underneath me. Check us out at drycreektv.com Then today as I walked through an oak hammock with the Spanish Moss hanging, birds singing and the warm breeze whistling thru

L

28

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M


T

he 10th annual Florida Agriculture Literacy Day is scheduled for Tuesday April 30, 2013, and the rhyming children's book developed for the event called Florida’s Farm History will commemorate the 500th year anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s discovery of Florida and the role agriculture has played in the state’s history. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and Florida Agriculture in the Classroom (FAITC) invite farmers, growers, ranchers, FFA teachers and students and agriculture industry representatives to read in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms around the state as part of the event. The book and materials provided to volunteer readers is free thanks to the funding Florida Agriculture in the Classroom receives from sales of the agriculture specialty license plate called the ‘Ag Tag.’

Teachers and agriculture industry representatives interested in participating are asked to schedule their classroom readings first before they visit Florida Agriculture in the Classroom's website, www.agtag.org to register for materials. Online registration for materials is now available, and participants are asked to wait two weeks for delivery of their materials.

Readers will receive one book per classroom, one disc with a teacher’s guide and an electronic version of the book per classroom and classroom sets of bookmarks and stickers for students. Readers are asked to leave the book and teacher’s guide disc with teachers after the reading. Florida Agriculture in the Classroom is a non-profit organization that educates Florida teachers and students about where their food, fiber and fuel come from using lessons, materials, grant programs and other projects.

To buy an Ag Tag online, please visit https:/ / www.eztagfl.com/ ag.htm. For more information contact Lisa Gaskalla by calling (352) 846-1391 or emailing gaskalla@ufl.edu.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

29


By Sean Green Photo Credit: April Wietrecki

A Closer Look

Farming for Health (HorsePower for Kids) behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, substance abuse, eating disorders, physical abuse issues, depression, anxiety, relationship problems and communication needs. For those of us that are part of the farming community, it’s easy to take the lifestyle for granted. For others, especially those in the inner city, the farm experience is rare and rewarding. Unfortunately urban sprawl dismantles natural ecosystems and farmland that can provide a connection with plants and animals to maintain emotional and mental health. We are threatened with the closure of county parks and the few remaining small community farms must endure constant financial and political threats to their existence. HorsePower for kids is one such little known oasis nestled between Town & Country and Oldsmar.

C

ommon to every farmer is pride in the fruits of their labor. Some attribute their success to soil maintenance, while others credit a climate that supports variety. “There is no substitute for hard work.” (Thomas Edison) And the volunteer staff at HorsePower for Kids in Tampa have done plenty of it to exemplify the virtues of the farming mentality. This is fruits of their labor, passed along to the least privileged children of our society. This month will mark the beginning of Spring, the season of renewal, re-growth, and resurrection. The timing could not be better to take a closer look at how traditional farming values and animals are providing a bedrock from which marginalized children can grow to reach their potential. Ancient sources portray animals in various roles throughout human history, some serve functional roles while others clearly serve emotional needs. Though farm animals serve the functional role, therapeutic interaction has been documented with the founding of our country. Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the founding fathers of the United States, was among the first medical scientists to record the positive effects horticulture work and farm animals have on mental patients. The phenomenon soon became a scientific study and finally, medical practice. Therapy animals can include turtles, chicks, rabbits, birds, cats, pigs, dogs and horses just to name a few. The success of Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) for humans with mental disorders is well documented. Of the most common farm animals, horses have caught the attention of medical professionals and now have their own niche. The use of Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) is gaining credibility among psychotherapists as an effective means of achieving behavioral change. Therapists use a clients’ reactions to the horses’ behaviors to understand the dynamics of human interaction. Much of the EAP involves the use of non-verbal communication skills and is particularly helpful for empowering patients with spectrum disorders such as autism, to build social skills. According to the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA), a variety of disorders can be treated with EAP including:

30

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

Armando Gort established and founded HorsePower for Kids in 1994 to accomplish a noble mission; To provide an environment for children to benefit from interacting with horses and other farm animals. Of particular interest to Armando is the potential for these activities to make a real connection with inner city and at-risk-youth, especially those that suffer mental, social, or emotional disorders. The programs Gort offers at the farm are designed to expose children to a farming culture that is founded on trust and teamwork, and horses are a big part of the experience. Each year, Horsepower for Kids hosts a Summer Camp program specifically designed for children with Autism Spectrum and their siblings. Partnering with Warriors for Autism, certified staff provide a safe, structured opportunity for children to learn and grow through sensory friendly activities. Step by step the children gain confidence in themselves and the trust of the horses. Other programs on the farm help children learn to form positive, healthy relationships in their lives by practicing empathy, patience, and communication through their interaction with the farm animals. The therapeutic benefits of farming practices are not restricted to exposure to farm animals. Sensory benefits can be gained from garden time, forest hikes, or landscaping work. Riding lessons, field trips, and the petting zoo are also popular activities on the farm. Gort has found working with disadvantaged youth the most rewarding and is in the process of completing a certification process that will allow the farm to offer equine therapeutic services to adolescents in the future. Sponsors and volunteer staff are the backbone of this 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and always needed to maintain the ongoing equestrian programs, field trips, and scholarships that serve the community. I hope you will join us March 23,24 and 30th for Spring Fest, the annual fundraiser. The children will enjoy the pony, hay, and train rides, the petting zoo, a bounce house, face painting and small prizes. Great fun for under $10. For more information call 813-855-8992 or visit http:/ / horsepowerforkids.com/ .

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

31


32


Florida

immune system, cancer prevention, healthy blood circulation and wound healing. Vitamin C acts as a potent antioxidant in the body, neutralizing harmful free radicals and preventing its damaging effects in cells. By fighting cell and tissue damage, Vitamin C protects against cancer and other diseases, such as the common cold. This vitamin also helps the body absorb more iron, and aids in the development of strong bones and teeth.

FIBER

By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

D

uring the winter and spring months in Florida, fresh, juicy citrus is abundant and in peak season. If you’ve bought navel oranges in the past few months, you may have noticed that some have a rosy red interior. On the outside is a smooth, pebbled orange peel, but the inside resembles a ruby red grapefruit in appearance. This special type of navel orange is known as Cara Cara and is available December through early March. Cara Cara means “beloved” in Italian. More complex in taste than other navel oranges, the Cara Cara type is a low acid navel with a sweet taste and notes of cherry and blackberry.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE An excellent source of Vitamin C, a mediumsized Cara Cara orange contains more than 150% of the daily value for this vitamin. Oranges are also an excellent nutritional source of dietary fiber, folate, thiamin, potassium, and Vitamin A. In addition to these vitamins and minerals, oranges contain a wealth of other disease-fighting compounds, such as phytonutrients and antioxidants. These potent chemical fight cancer, lower cholesterol, and control blood sugar levels. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one medium-sized Cara Cara orange (154 g) contains 80 calories, 1 g protein, 0.1g fat, 21 g carbohydrate, and 7 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 150% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for Vitamin C, 14% for folate, 12% for dietary fiber, 8% for potassium, 6% for calcium and 6% for Vitamin A.

VITAMIN C One delicious Cara Cara orange can meet more than your daily requirement for Vitamin C. This nutrient is important for a healthy W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

A single orange provides 12% of your daily fiber requirements, which has been shown to reduce high cholesterol levels, which helps to prevent atherosclerosis. Fiber can also help maintain steady blood sugar levels, as can fructose, the naturally occurring type of fruit sugar found in oranges. Oranges also contain pectin, a water-soluble fiber that helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and aids in satiety. Eating the whole fruit as opposed to drinking the juice helps you feel full longer, partly because of the fiber found in the fruit and membranes. Fiber is well known for assisting with digestion and preventing constipation. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in fiber may decrease the risk of several types of cancer including colon, rectum, breast, and pancreas.

FOLATE Oranges are a good source of folate, a vitamin that can reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spinal cord (neural tube defects) in the fetus. Pregnant women should consume a diet high in folate, and eating an orange or other citrus fruit every day can help. Folate is also essential for growth and development, and plays a key role in DNA formation. Its heart-healthy benefits come from its ability to lower homocysteine levels in the body. Homocysteine is an amino acid in the blood that is correlated with heart disease. Additionally, low levels of folate have been linked with low energy levels, depression and even memory impairments. So it’s an essential vitamin for everyone, in addition to its significant importance for the developing fetus.

POTASSIUM Oranges, like many other fruits and vegetables, are a good source of potassium, which can help lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke and cardiac arrhythmias. One orange contains eight percent of your daily potassium requirements. This mineral is needed for proper electrolyte and fluid balance. Potassium plays an important role in muscle contraction and nerve transmission,

and people with low levels may experience muscle cramping. Potassium may also help prevent or slow down bone loss from highsodium diets.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Choose Cara Cara oranges that have smoothly textured skin and are firm and heavy for their size. The juiciest oranges tend to be smaller, heavy for their size, and thin skinned with a sweet fragrance. Avoid those that have soft spots or traces of mold. Oranges can be stored either at room temperature for up to one week or in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. The juice can be stored in the freezer for up to six months.

HOW TO ENJOY Since oranges come in their own natural packaging, they are a portable, convenient snack. You can simply peel and eat the orange or slice it into wedges and eat. Sweet Cara Cara oranges can also be juiced and cooked into jams, sauces, and baked goods. Use in savory or sweet preparations, pair with avocados, lettuces, nuts, bacon, other citruses, tropical fruits, fresh herbs, strong and aged cheeses, grains, seafood and poultry. Use Cara Cara juice in curds, cocktails, vinaigrette and syrups. Other ways to enjoy Cara Cara oranges include: • Toss orange segments into any fruit or vegetable salad • Squeeze the juice into a pan, allow it to thicken over heat, and use it as a sauce for fish or chicken • Add orange juice to baked goods for a bright refreshing twist. • Slip a few slices of orange into a pitcher of water for a refreshing low-calorie beverage. • Boil orange slices with your teabag or add slices to boiled tea. • Float orange slices in your bath for a citrusy spa treatment. • Use the whole orange, peel and all, to make marmalade. • Serve sliced oranges after a meal for dessert • Pair with cheese and bread for an easy appetizer or meal • Marinate chicken in the juice and add zest for a zip of fresh flavor Enjoy Florida Cara Cara oranges today. With their sweet juicy flavor, oranges are delicious as well as healthy! SELECT ED REFERENCES http:/ / www.growingproduce.com http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ HS381 http:/ / www.whfoods.com

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

33


34

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


over 20 other organic and Natural products from fish emulsion to weed killer. They also offer for sale seasonal veggie seedlings, worm bins with red wrigglers, and books for the home gardener. For a great space saver, they have their 5-teared vertical grow towers. For services, Whitwam Organics offers garden coaching/planning, soil testing and conditioning, as well as micro-irrigation and rain collection design. This year, they are also excited to offer their customers a chance to pick out and plant their own mini veggie garden. Whitwam said this is fun for kids of all ages.

Playing in the Dirt By Libby Hopkins

W

hen David Whitwam of Whitwam Oganics in Tampa, was a kid, he loved playing in the dirt. From a young age, he could remember digging up this parent’s back yard and pulling out plants. His parents weren’t too thrilled with his favorite pastime but he loved it. “I remember what the dirt felt like and I also remember going through my backyard trying to tell what different plants were by the way their roots smelled,” Whitwam said. He eventually started his own little garden as a kid. It wasn’t much, just a few green beans here and there but even then at a young age, a passion for Science and the land was ignited in him. “My first Science project in elementary school was to see which plants could handle salt water the best,” Whitwam said. After high school, he moved to North Carolina to go to college and got into white water rafting. He loved it but the gardener inside him wanted to come out and play in the dirt again like he did when he was a kid. So, Whitwam started another garden, but it wasn’t like the small one he had as a child, this one was 40 ft. x 80 ft. “I figured if I was going to rent a tiller, I was going to make it worth my while,” Whitwam said. He moved back to Tampa, got a job, started a family and bought a house. As you can guess, he planted a garden at his new home but this time, things didn’t grow as planned. “It failed miserably and I fell flat on my face,” Whitwam said. He realized the soil was very different from the soil in North Carolina, where he could grow just about anything. His inner Scientist made him start doing research on ways to improve his garden. He bought gardening books, talked to other gardeners and he found a few scientists along the way to pick their brains on ways to improve his garden. “Over the course of two years, I finally started learning some things and trying some things and then I got it,” Whitwam said. “More than getting it, I realized there was something more to get from gardening.” He decided to start his own gardening and lawn care business even though he was still working a full-time job. Whitwam Organics was born!

Whitwam decided a year ago in November to quit his full time job and make Whitwam Organics his new full-time job. “I have two employees and I started working on getting monthly contracts for garden installations which included follow-up packages,” Whitwam said. He incorporated residential lawn cares that lead to more garden installations. He got in contact with schools that had grant money for garden installations and Whitwam made sure that some of the grant money was allocated for monthly garden upkeep visits. Whitwam Oganics continued to grow and branch out into community farmer’s markets in the Tampa Bay area. This gives Whitwam the chance to share the fruits of his labor with others as well as his knowledge about gardening and organics. “I have been asked some crazy questions when it comes to growing organics,” Whitwam said. “What I tell people, whatever you decide to do, just do it; grow something!” He is also involved with many community organizations and charities like the United Way and Tampa Bay Harvest. He is a member of The Tampa Bay Network to End Hunger. His company is currently working on The Sustainability Living Project. It’s a group project with Whitwam Oganice, JP Morgan Chase Foundation, The Salvation Army, The Boys and Girls Club, Tampa Bay Harvest and The Lowry Park Zoo. Whitwam is helping to install a community garden across the street from the zoo that will help feed those in need in the Bay area. Whitwam feels that his organic business has given him the best things in life. “ I own my own business, I get to play in the dirt and with power tools all day, and I get to go to schools and teach kids about science,” Whitwam said. For more information on the services Whitwam Organics offers or if you would like to know which farmer’s markets they attend, you can visit them on the web at www.whitwamorganics.com or call 813-215-3876.

“I believe that gardening shouldn’t be an intimidating production,” Whitwam said. “What has worked for me might not work for others, however, we can still share our experiences and learn from each other.” Whitwam Organics is a distributor for the Green World Path product line. They stock the Greentek Total, Outbound, Mineralplex, Eco, Naturally Green Lawns, and the Chicgrow, and have access to W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

35


Lending a Helping Hand By Libby Hopkins while they work and gas to get them to the garden,” Bekele said. He understands what it’s like to be a refugee. Bekele came to the United States 26 years ago as a refugee from Ethiopia. “When I came to America I was blessed because the American people lifted me up,” Bekele said. “The economy was not like it is now, so I quickly found a job and become self-sufficient and successful.” Ninety percent of his congregation are refugees and they travel from as far as Ocala to attend a Sunday service. He recently did a baptism for a family who drove to his church from Alabama. “We understand each other and our mission at the church is to welcome all the refugees to the community just like the community welcomed me when I came here,” Bekele said.

C

hristmas has been over for more than three months but the people who work at the Tampa Bay Gardens in Riverview feel like it’s Christmas everyday. They are refugees from Burma and this garden is helping them become self-sufficient thanks to a onetime grant from the Allegany Franciscan Ministries in St. Petersburg, and the recent gift of $300 from Operation Santa Cause Program. “This donation has been good and any donation is good because it will go to a good cause,” said Pastor Joseph Germain, who oversees the garden project along with Father Berhanu Bekele of the St. Mary’s Ethiopian Orthodox Church in Riverview. The garden is located behind the church and refugees come everyday to work in the garden and tend to the chickens that are housed on the property as well. The garden project came together a little over three years ago when Germain and Bekele met at a refugee task force meeting in Tampa. Germain is the International Pastor at the First Baptist Church in Temple Terrace. His church started getting an influx of Burmese refugees and they had difficultly finding jobs in the Bay area, which led to them moving to other states. “I kept asking myself, what could I do so they won’t leave Florida so quickly,” Germain said. “Back in their country, most of the refugees worked in agriculture.” Bekele told Germain that his church had a lot of land behind it that wasn’t being used and suggested the refugees use the land to plant a garden so they could put their agriculture skills to good use and provide for their families. Germain thought this was a wonderful idea and scraped together whatever he could find to get the garden started. “At first we did whatever we could,” Germain said. “ I got some money from my church and some people gave gifts of seed and so fourth, so that’s how we got through the first year.”

Teresa Durdaller is the Sun Coast Region Communications Director for the Department of Children and Families in Tampa. She and Janet Blair, a Community Liaison for DCF, helped Germain and Bekele get connected to DCF’s program, Operation Santa Cause. It’s a campaign that successfully matched community support with more than twodozen specific needs around the state. “We recognized the potential for the Tampa Bay Gardens to give newly arriving refugees a chance to literally put down roots in their community,” Durdaller said. “Working at the garden gives the refugees the opportunity to do something that is familiar to them at a time when they are adjusting to so much that is unfamiliar to them, such as learning the language and adjusting to a new culture.” She hopes that eventually the garden will become a micro-enterprise where refugees can become entrepreneurs by selling the produce they raise at the garden. Germain and Bekele have the same hopes as Durdaller, but they would also like to start a fish farm at the church. There are two ponds on the 10-acre church property and both men would like to put them to good use. “If we develop the fish project, that would be perfect for the refugees and they could use the fish to feed their families or sell to their neighbors as a way to make money,” Bekele said. Both men are very thankful for all the help they have received and they would welcome any additional help from the community. “We would love a big hand extended from the community to shake our little hand,” Bekele said. “It would be a reward for both hands and we can grow together.” If you would like to help with The Tampa Bay Gardens, you can contact Pastor Joseph Germain at 813-309-2244 or Father Berhanu Bekele at 813-679-4982. St. Mary’s Ethiopian Orthodox Church is located at 2424 86th Street South in Riverview.

In the second year, they received a $10,000 grant from the Allegany Franciscan Ministries, which is a non-profit Catholic organization that seeks to improve the overall health of individuals by increasing access to health services and information. “The grant money not only pays for the seeds, it also helps pay for lunches to feed the refugees 36

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame Inducts Four

Daniel A. Botts

Charles H. Bronson

Maitland, Florida

Kissimmee, Florida

For more than three decades, Botts has been a leader in pesticide policy and a vital advocate on behalf of Florida growers and minor crop producers. Through his leadership on national pesticide policy, Botts has ensured the continued availability of critical products, such as methyl bromide, that make growing fresh fruits and vegetables viable in Florida. Botts serves on many important government and agriculture industry committees, including the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Food Safety and Security Advisory Committee.

A fifth generation Floridian, Bronson served as the Florida Commissioner of Agriculture from 2001 to 2010 and is a past Florida Senator and President of the Southern Association of State Departments of Agriculture in 2006. During his tenure as Commissioner of Agriculture, Bronson negotiated the settlement with BP to remedy effects of the Deepwater Horizon Gulf Oil Spill in 2010 and initiated the “Farm to Fuel” effort to position Florida as a leader in the production of alternative energy. Bronson currently owns and operates 1,333 acres of timber and perennial peanut hay in Madison County. Florida.

Paul L. Nicoletti

Eugene E. Trotter

Gainesville, Florida

Gainesville, Florida

Dr. Nicoletti’s field studies on bucellosis, or “Bang’s Disease” led to modifications in the use of brucellosis vaccine, which in turn saved the Florida cattle industry millions of dollars and ultimately led to the eradication of the disease in the state. Dr. Nicoletti continued his positive impact on the industry through education as a professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida for more than 25 year.

The late Dr. Trotter dedicated his life to agriculture education and to increasing the leadership capacity of Florida agriculture. Established the Florida Leadership Program for Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Florida, which became the Wedgworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural resources in 2002. Dr. Trotter raised more than $2 million to ensure the viability of the program.

For complete bios visit http://floridaaghalloffame.org

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

37


38

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Place - Ron Hall Team of Ed Duncan, Will Hall, Matt Duncan, Ron Hall. For Women; Sherrie Cowpill won First Place with Sam B lack receiving a Second Place award. Winners of the Youth Division were; Jace Hardee with First Place, Jackson Hardee received a Second Place and Jacob Garrison in Third Place.

Trinity Sportsman Ministries Promotes Sports and Christian Values By Cheryl Kuck

P

lant City Master Patrolman Dennis Pawlowski founded the non-profit Trinity Sportsman Special Ministries (TSSM) in 2005 as a means of bringing families together through sports and a strong value system and out of situations that may potentially lead to divisiveness and possible imprisonment.

This year’s event was held on February 23 at Sporting Clay’s 77 acres of pristine woodland, lakes and ponds where Plant City produce growers Buzz Hinton with his wife Cammy and their son Ryan are co-owners of the first class facility complete with 16 movable rotating shooting stations, a total of 24 stations with a 5 standing shooting site. “Clay target shooting is the fastest growing sport in the United States. Our facility is sanctioned by National Strength and Conditioning Association and is the only one of its kind in Hillsborough County,” said Buzz.

Through his 18 years on the police force, Pawlowski has seen what can happen when there is no constructive alternative to a life with no real sense of direction or physical outlet to a gang related or criminal lifestyle and so he became committed to sharing the message of Jesus Christ through providing an opportunity to create quality outdoor experiences. “We have people of all ages and varied backgrounds participating in our many programs. Our 3-D archery range (showing different targets in the various archery slips) is located on the 15 acre wooded campus of the First Baptist Church of Durant at 7725 South Turkey Creek Road and provides a camp-like setting where kids and families can interact in sports.” It has been estimated that more than 900 lives have been impacted through this ministry. “I am a volunteer, a facilitator,” says Pawlowski. “We had no land and no money to pursue this calling; however, God is good and over the last five years He has paid for my education, providing me with a degree in Natural Resource Conservation from UF. This degree, along with short courses from the Quality Deer Management Association, has allowed me to manage the land the Lord eventually provided.” All the money that is raised goes right back into the programs connected with sport fishing, archery and youth hunting. Annually Trinity Sportsman holds its primary fundraising event at FishHawk Sporting Clays at 13505 Hobson Simmons Rd. in Lithia, where the public is invited to participate in a Patterson Companies sponsored trophy clay shooting competition with a raffle. The top raffle prizes included a Browning Shotgun and Hoyt Bow. Trophy winners were Jesse Green - First Place, Jim Odle- First Place Team of Jarrett Scott Ford, Michael Knight – First Place Team, David Caudill - First Place Team. Second Place Team B attaglia of John B attaglia, Michael Arrsenault, Justin Hays, Will Wilkerson and Third W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Many corporate and youth events are hosted at FishHawk Sporting Clay’s throughout the year in addition to their members, as well a, the public who come to shoot on a regular basis. There are several instructors available in addition to the services of a gunsmith. Trinity Ministries partnered with Plant City YMCA, Central Florida Buckmasters, East Hillsborough Ducks Unlimited, East Hillsborough Limb Climbers and also work closely with Unity in the Community, Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network, Plant City High School Fishing Federation Club and the Tomlin Middle School Archery program, hosting Youth Archery classes and a Bow Hunter Education Series. For information about Trinity Sportsman Ministries to their Web site at www.trinitysportsman.org or call (813) 389-3678. FishHawk Sporting Clays is open weekly from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, through Sunday and can be reached by calling (813) 689-0490. Or through their Web site: http:/ / www.fishhawksportingclays.com

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

39


40

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


For The Ones Who Get It Done Farm Bureau Members Have A Special “Friend” At Grainger

By Jim Frankowiak

Farm Bureau membership means different things to different people and it also offers all of those people a host of benefits. One of those benefits is a special relationship with Grainger, the leading business-to-business broad line supplier of products needed to maintain, repair or operate a facility.

A

Tampa East Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33619. That location is just off U.S. Highway 301, between SR60 and I-4. Grainger has a second branch in Hillsborough County at 4525 West Hillsborough Avenue, Tampa, FL 33614. Both branches are open daily from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“Grainger’s motto, “For the Ones Who Get it Done,” suggests an immediate kindred spirit,” said Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Membership Chair Ray Wood. But there’s a lot behind that theme.

“We also can provide our customers with a product catalog,” said Clark. Farm Bureau members interested in receiving a catalog at no charge, should visit www.floridafarmbureau.org.

“We help our customers save time and money by providing them the right products, like lighting, safety supplies, pumps, motors and much more, to keep their facilities up and running safely and efficiently,” said Grainger Branch Manager Will Clark. Grainger’s customers are two million businesses and institutions in 157 counties. The company has been part of the Florida business community since 1942 and is an active member in the local community.

“Overall, there are four major ways that we can help our customers,” said Clark. “They cover streamlining the purchasing process, providing inventory management solutions to reduce inventory and improve product availability, helping keep employees safe, and helping customers achieve their sustainability goals. We would be pleased with the opportunity to work with Farm Bureau members interested in exploring ways we can work together in any or all of those areas,” said Clark.

“While each customer has a unique facility to operate and a different problem to solve, our customers all share the same requirement: when they need a problem solved or a product, they often need it right away,” said Clark. “We also provide services in the areas of sustainability, safety and inventory management through our Keepstock program, which helps customers control and organize their maintenance, repair and operating inventory.”

“I encourage Farm Bureau members and those considering membership to take a close look at the varied resources available through our relationship with Grainger,” said Wood. “This is just another significant benefit of belonging to Farm Bureau.” For Farm Bureau membership information, call 813-685-9121 or visit: http:/ / hcfarmbureau.org.

But for Farm Bureau members it gets even better “since Grainger offers members a 10 percent discount off catalog pricing and 35 – 55 percent off select items and there’s no charge for shipping any online order,” said Clark. Grainger customers also have access to more than one million products online at: www.grainger.com. The online capability features comprehensive production information, detailed photos and easy-to-access account management tools on every page. “A recently-added Click to Call/Chat feature layers the helpful service provided to customers on the phone and in our branches into our online presence. Real-Time Product Availability provides answers to commonly asked questions, such as: Do you have it? When can I get it? Where can I get it? This means customers have real-time shipping information and local branch product pickup availability,” noted Clark. Clark said Grainger recently launched a new application and mobile website, accessible from any smartphone, giving customers access to Grainger products and services no matter where they are. That application also details the location and operation of Grainger branches. There are 23 branches in Florida. Clark is based at 1820 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

41


42

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

43


Hillsborough Soil & Water Conservation District

T

he Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation District elicit the active support of landowners on a local level. Soil and water conservation districts were originally organized at a county level to work in partnership with the federal government, for the most part, within county boundaries by landowner petition based on a need for soil and water conservation and in the interest of public health, safety and welfare. The district includes five volunteer supervisors, three county employees and shares an office as partners with USDA-NRCS (Natural Resource Conservation Services) in downtown Plant City. The success of conservation initiatives depends on human behavior. By raising awareness, inspiring concern, building knowledge and skills and creating opportunities for action, education initiatives can prepare local people to fully participate as partners in conservation. One of the main objectives of the District is conservation education among the youth in public and private schools in Hillsborough County to include a yearly Land Judging Contest and Poster Contest. LAND JU DGING CONT EST Soils have always been a basic resource. A knowledge of soil characteristics will help determine the capability of land, the proper use of land, and the conservation practices necessary. Understanding capability classification makes it easier to plan for conservation farming, ranching, or grove management. This competition is for middle and high school 4-H and FFA students. The students judge, as individuals and as a team, the physical properties of the soil, identify improved land management practices for various types of farming, and judge the limitations of the soil for home sites. Winning teams from local contests are eligible to compete at the State Contest, and the state winners compete at the National Contest. The 2012 Land Judging Contest was held on December 5, 2012. Sam Astin provided the soil judging site and the food was prepared by Douglas Holmberg. Mr. Holmberg has been preparing food for the Land Judging Contest faithfully for about 20 years. The lunch and award ceremony were held at the Hinton’s Farm off of Sydney Dover Road. The coordinator of the event was Pam Walden, Supervisor for Agri-Business & Natural Resources with Hillsborough County Schools.

topic for the poster contest each year. The 2013 Theme is “How Does Your Water Shed?” Students from Kindergarten through 8th grade create posters on the NACD selected topic and are judged within designated age groups. Students gained a better understanding of the importance of the water we use daily, where it comes from, and where it goes. Local winners’ posters advance to the state level with the Association of Florida Conservation Districts (AFCD). The winners of the state level compete at the national level. The contest provides students an opportunity to convey their thoughts about soil, water and related natural resource issues through art. It also highlights the educational outreach efforts of conservation districts and their state conservation associations, auxiliaries and agencies. The following Hillsborough County students are winners: K-3rd Grade 1st Place - Jayana, Crestwood Elementary 2nd Place – Hailey, Walden Lake Elementary 3rd Place – Yaneli, Frost Elementary Hon. Mention – Lauren, Walden Lake Elementary 4th – 5th Grade 1st Place Aracely, Gibsonton Elementary 2nd Place Anthony, Crestwood Elementary 3rd Place Jariah, Lockhart Magnet Hon. Mention Thaddeus, Gibsonton Elementary Hon. Mention Dennis, Crestwood Elementary 6th – 8th Grade 1st Place Ariana, Orange Grove Middle Magnet 2nd Place – Carley, Greco Middle 3rd Place Kayla, Greco Middle Hon. Mention Alena, Orange Grove Middle Magnet

The following Hillsborough County public schools participated: 1st Place Middle School– Randall Middle School 1st Place High School – Newsome High School 2nd Place High School – Spoto High School 3rd Place High School - D.W. Waters High School. POST ER CONT EST The National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) selects a 44

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

45


46

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M


Florida Berry Expo Tasting New Varieties and Learning of New Research Findings and More By Jim Frankowiak

he annual Florida Berry Expo is a great opportunity to be brought up-to-date on new research findings, focus on ongoing programs and sample some of the latest strawberry varieties, including those that may be offered commercially in the future. This year’s gathering was no exception as more than 200 attendees assembled to learn of research work designed to keep growers competitive, productive and efficient.

T

government regulations, considerations that do not impact growers in Mexico due to the low cost of labor and North American Free Trade Agreement. Among those areas Guan cited as ways to meet growing industry challenges were improvements to efficiency, risk diversification, better marketing and the utilization of new technologies, including robotic and mechanical harvesting. He also stressed the need for continued investment in research to foster innovation.

Held at the University of Florida’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Wimauma, the Expo was sponsored by the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, Chemtura, Syngenta, Farm Credit, Georgia Organic Solutions and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The gathering began with lunch and dessert that offered diners the opportunity to sample and vote for their top two choices of available varieties of berries with none identified.

One of the ways to reduce production costs and benefit the environment could be the use of a new smartphone irrigation application for strawberry growers, as well as citrus, cotton and urban lawns, developed by Dr. Clyde Fraisse and working with the FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) or its Georgia counterpart, GAWN. Dr. Fraisse is currently seeking growers and Extension agents to help test the new application. He can be reached by phone at 352-392-1864, Extension 217 or via email: cfraisse@ufl.edu.

The top choice with 32 percent of the vote, according to Dr. Vance Whitaker, was a 2009 selection currently in grower trials, while the second pick was a 2010 selection. Whitaker noted other varieties available for dessert sampling included Radiance, Festival and Winter Star, popular varieties currently commercially available. Dr. John Hayes, UF Director of Research, welcomed guests and noted how men “take for granted our remarkable food supply in this country which is available for so little of our disposable income.” He also noted the importance of the agricultural industry to our economy and the value of research to industry efforts. Current research efforts, according to Dr. Kevin Folta, Interim Horticultural Department Chair, are focusing “on how we can best assist our growing program with an emphasis on consumer tastes.” He considers the Expo a great opportunity for interaction between growers and researchers.

Strawberry growers were then given information on nematode management strategies by Dr. Joe Noling, stressing the need to link weed and nematode management for effective results. “This integrated approach must consider the full cycle, not just in season management,” he said. That means management activities before, during and after the season. Field tours followed with hands-on presentations by Assistant Professors Nathan Boyd and Peter Dittmar of the application timing of Stinger™ for broadleaf weed control in strawberry and comparison of freeze protection methods on strawberries and blueberries. Dr. Bielinski Santos and Dr. Craig Stanley conducted an in the field discussion of the use of crop protectants and non-traditional irrigation techniques for strawberry transplant establishment and blueberry production.

GCREC Faculty member Dr. Zhengfei Guan than shared some of the results of his grower survey with focus on threats, challenges and the industry outlook. His findings and suggestions for the future will be detailed in an upcoming edition of IN THE FIELD.

Recent strawberry disease management challenges were covered by Dr. Natalia Peres and Dr. Santos and Dr. Whitaker reviewed their work regarding planting dates, fertilization requirements and Floridaproduced strawberry plug transplants in open fields and high tunnels. Dr. Whitaker also gave tour participants a sneak preview of potential varieties.

Guan’s presentation did note the major increase in Mexican acreage devoted to strawberry production and how that impacts local growers. His study noted industry perceived challenges and member outlooks for the future in terms of profitability. Major challenges, according to survey respondents, include labor shortages and

The field tours ended with Dr. Santos’ presentation on the determination of irrigation requirements for vertical and horizontal soilless systems for strawberry and blueberry cultivars.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

47


www.southsidestores.com 48

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


www.southsidestores.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

49


RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agriculture

Minted Citrus Couscous

Blueberry Breakfast Casserole

2 cups fresh blueberries, rinsed and dried

10 ounces couscous

8 large eggs, beaten

1 cup boiling water

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup olive oil

1 loaf bread (any kind)

1/2 small red onion, finely chopped

1 1/2 cups low-fat milk

2 oranges (one zested and juiced,

4 ounces low-fat cream cheese (cold so it can be cubed) 1/4 cup butter, melted cooking pan spray

PREPARATION Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut bread into 1-inch cubes. Cut cream cheese into small cubes. Lightly spray a 9x9x2-inch baking dish. Place half of the bread cubes in the dish. Evenly place the cream cheese cubes and 1 cup of the blueberries over the bread. Add the remaining bread cubes and blueberries to the top of the casserole. In a mediumsized bowl, combine eggs, milk, maple syrup and butter. Slowly pour egg mixture over bread. Cover casserole with foil and bake for approximately 45 minutes. Insert a tooth pick in the center of the casserole. When the toothpick comes out clean, remove the foil so the casserole can brown on top. Let cool slightly and serve warm with extra maple syrup on the side. 50

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

one sliced for garnish) 2 tablespoons fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped 1 cucumber, seeded and chopped kosher salt to taste freshly ground pepper to taste

PREPARATION In a medium-sized mixing bowl, add couscous and 1 cup of boiling water. Stir couscous and cover tightly with plastic wrap allowing couscous to steam until tender, about 5 minutes. After couscous is tender, fluff with fork and add olive oil. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add remaining ingredients except for the orange slices and mix well. Place couscous mixture in the refrigerator to marinate before serving. To serve, garnish couscous with orange slices and any leftover fresh herbs.


Meet Our Produce Department Rachel, Ron and Omaida

Specialty Meats Ducks, Capons, Fresh Ham, Rabbits, Quail, Fresh & Smoked Turkey Wings and Drumsticks, Beef and Pork Kidneys, Hog Heads, Hog Maws, Pork Skin, Tripe & Honeycomb Tripe, and Alligator Meat. • We Accept TECO Payments • Western Union Money Orders 49¢ each

51


By Susan Haddock, Commercial Horticulture/Integrated Pest Management/Small Farms Agent, UF/IFAS Hillsborough County Extension

I

often receive requests to perform a visual site inspection, as a UF/IFAS Hillsborough County Extension Agent, to determine why trees fail to thrive in landscapes. There are many reasons, but there are only a few common reasons that account for the majority of problems. When a tree is purchased it is very important to perform a visual inspection of the root ball. The top most main root should be at or slightly above the soil surface. If it is not, the soil needs to be removed to expose that root prior to planting. The root ball should also be inspected for circling, plunging or kinked roots. If any of these are present the tree has been in a growing container that does not allow proper root growth for too long. Roots normally grow outward, not in a circle or downward. The tree canopy should also be inspected for even color, even branch spacing and no tip dieback. The branches should not cross or be growing into each other.

52

Why Trees Fail INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

When choosing a planting site always look up and avoid planting near or under anything that will interfere with proper canopy development. Dig a hole that is three times as wide and slightly less than the depth of the root ball. It is not necessary or recommended to add any soil amendments when planting. Remove any synthetic or burlap straps or coverings. The point where the top most roots emerge from the trunk should be exposed and visible after placing the tree in the hole and covering the root ball with backfill soil. Water in the backfill to eliminate any air pockets and avoid soil compaction. Mulch the area, but do not cover the root ball, as this impedes air and water movement. Stake the tree for stability if needed. Staking material should be removed after about six months to prevent bark damage. Tree establishment takes about four months per inch of trunk caliper. For a tree to survive it needs a deep root watering two times per week, however, for vigor the tree will need to be watered daily for two weeks for a two inch caliper tree, daily for one month for a two to four inch caliper tree and daily for six weeks for a four inch or greater caliper tree. Watering then is tapered off to weekly until the tree is established. When a good quality tree is planted correctly few problems arise later. However, we often inherit existing poorly performing trees on property. Often trees planted several years ago will have tip dieback, leaf drop, generalized decline or failure to grow, all signs of a declining tree. On installation, and for several years after installation, trees may appear fairly healthy. Trees are able to store energy needed to support top growth for years. However, a failing root system will eventually cause the tree to decline. There are several contributing factors for decline. Inspection of planting depth often reveals that many trees are planted from four to eight inches too deep. The top main roots of the trees should be at or above the soil grade of the property. Trunk flare should be visible at the soil surface. A tree trunk that appears straight at ground W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


level is evidence of planting too deep. Mulch should always be kept several inches away from the trunk of the tree. Planting too deep restricts air and water flow to the root system and results in eventual tree decline. Many trees are planted in parking lot islands, in narrow strips between sidewalks and streets, and fairly close to building structures. In many projects such as this a layer of top soil is brought in to plant or lay sod. This may benefit plants with root systems that extend only four to six inches into the ground. When trees are planted, the planting hole extends into the compacted construction base. Trees root systems are not able, in most cases, to penetrate that compacted base and may begin to circle around the tree or fail to grow resulting in eventual tree decline. Always remove strapping and burlap from tree root balls as it can cause damage. Poly rope and burlap takes many years to degrade and in the mean time restricts root growth and may even cause roots to circle or grow with rope embedded in roots and results in eventual tree decline. Young trees planted too deep can be excavated and the planting depth raised so that the top most root is at or above soil level. Some circling roots can be carefully cut and the tree can recover by establishing a proper root system. In most cases, a certified arborist will have the skills to address whether or not a declining tree can be saved. For more information on planting and establishing trees contact the UF/IFAS Hillsborough Extension service at (813)744-5519 or view the website at http:/ / hillsborough.ifas.ufl.edu.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

53


HCSO Ag Crimes Unit Emphasizes Education

Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

Focus on Livestock and Farming/Ranching

Equipment Theft T

his may be hard to believe, but in the last two years, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office Agricultural Crimes Unit responded to 2,152 calls for service that resulted in eight misdemeanor arrests and 10 felony arrests. That’s a good bit of work for the unit’s three fulltime detectives and their supervising sergeant and corporal, working throughout the more than 1,000 square miles of the county’s unincorporated area. “It’s important to note that we are on call and respond 24/7,” said Sergeant Ed Raburn of the Ag Crimes Unit. “Our mission is multifaceted. Detectives respond to calls for loose livestock, investigate claims of abuse and neglect of livestock, investigate crimes involving the theft of farming and ranching equipment, and act as liaisons

54

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

between the Sheriff’s Office and the farming and ranching community,” he said. Livestock here refers to cattle, horses and goats. “The majority of calls received and investigated by the unit come from the general public and involve claims of ‘skinny’ livestock. Detectives respond to each call, make contact with the owner of the livestock, explain the nature of the visit and, with the owner’s consent, inspect the livestock for any signs of malnutrition, abuse, neglect or sickness,” said Raburn. “In most cases the livestock are perfectly healthy.” Typically, the volume for these kinds of calls increases in the winter time when pasture grasses are less abundant and most livestock naturally become leaner.

By Jim Frankowiak

The Unit also occasionally gets called upon to deal with animals that are more rare in nature. Just recently, Detective Brown and Sergeant Raburn responded to a residence for an Emu, which had wandered into the back yard after being attacked by dogs. The Emu was carefully caught (they can be very dangerous) and transported to Busch Gardens for treatment. Other examples of “strange” animal calls include having to catch a loose Zebra in Riverview, several instances of loose buffalo and even having to catch a loose Watusi cow. “Watusi are native to Africa and can have horns that are eight-feet from tip to tip,” noted Raburn. “In those cases where the animal is found to be in need of services, the priority of the detective is to work with the owner, making recommendations as to proper animal husW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


bandry practices. Often, feeding recommendations are made and a visit by the owner’s veterinarian of choice is suggested,” he said. “The detective will follow up at an agreed upon time to verify that the livestock are receiving the level of care which is required by Florida State Statute. Overall, the emphasis of our unit is educational in nature and not punitive.” This approach, along with the overall mission of the unit, requires officers with specialized backgrounds and experience working with livestock. “All of us do have such experience and our detectives attend the Livestock Investigation School at the University of Colorado where they receive guidance on body scoring livestock to determine if horses or cows are undernourished,” said Raburn, a 15 year HCSO veteran who grew up on a family-owned cattle operation. In addition to Raburn and Corporal Danny Connell, the unit’s three fulltime detectives include Master Detective Larry Lingo, Master Detective Homer Brown and Master Detective Lowell Cain.

Photo by Stephanie Humphrey

Lingo has served the Sheriff’s Office since 1985 and has spent the last 14 years as an Ag Crimes Unit investigator. Brown has served the Office since 1984 and has been a Unit investigator since 1997 with the exception of a two-year period when he was with the Community Outreach Division. Cain joined the Sheriff’s Office in 1996 and became a member of the Unit in 2002. The Agricultural Crimes Unit has an annual budget of $400,000 and that covers the salaries and benefits of the three detectives plus Unit-related expenses such as feed and vet care for animals whose owners are not found, ongoing training for detectives and equipment and tools needed in carrying out the mission of the Unit. In addition to complaints about the condition of animals, the Unit also responds to calls throughout the year for loose livestock. Those calls come at any hour of the day or night and most anywhere in the county, including the medians or alongside some of the inter-

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

55


state highways. Each detective drives a heavy-duty pickup truck with access to stock trailers and all of the necessary equipment that may be needed from tranquilizer darts and medication to ropes and temporary corral panels. “Our first priority in those cases is to secure the animal for its own safety, as well as that of the public,” said Raburn. “To do this, detectives employ a variety of techniques such as roping, corralling and in some cases the use of tranquilizer darts to safely secure a loose animal. An exhaustive search is then conducted for the owner of the livestock and arrangements are made for its safe return home. When an owner cannot be found, the livestock is impounded and transported to our state-of-the-art impound facility located in southern Hillsborough County.” That facility consists of a main barn with 10 stalls and two smaller barns plus three pastures. Impounded animals are checked, fed and watered a minimum of two times each day. “Upon their arrival at the impound facility, all animals are provided suitable shelter, quality feed and hay, plentiful water and are given a thorough exam by a large animal veterinarian. Owners who are subsequently located are allowed to pick up their livestock after paying a nominal impound fee and a per-day feed charge. If an owner is not located, the livestock are advertised and sold at an auction as provided for in Florida State Statute.” Once the Sheriff’s Office recoups its costs, remaining money goes into the Hillsborough County General Fund. In addition to livestock-related calls, detectives investigate cases of theft involving farm and ranch equipment. “While these incidents are not as frequent as calls involving livestock, they can be a major problem and source of revenue loss for those in the farming and ranching industries,” said Raburn. “One particular problem in the past has been the theft of brass sprinkler heads used to water strawberry fields. Because of this problem and since the strawberry season is now upon us, the detectives’ schedules have been adjusted, as have the schedule of detectives in the environmental unit so that coverage is now provided overnight, as well as during daytime hours. Produce fields are being closely monitored and with the help of farm owners, as well as the community we hope to deter those considering this type of crime. We fully intend to catch those who engage in this type of criminal activity.”

56

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

57


58

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

59


60

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Ease Of Info New Extension Website Offers Visitors Better Navigation By Jim Frankowiak

O

ne of the key elements of the Hillsborough County Extension Service’s mission is the provision of information to residents of the county in a range of subject areas. That aspect has been enhanced through the development and introduction of a new web site. “We strive to reach a number of audiences through our programming and the Internet,” said Extension Program Coordinator Billie Lofland. A cooperative service of Hillsborough County’s Board of County Commissioners and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), Extension provides information and education in family and consumer sciences, horticulture, agriculture, natural resources and youth development. In view of this and the overall commitment to continuously seek ways to enhance achievement of the Extension mission, UF/IFAS recently set out to consolidate and standardize its web sites. Over the years, as County Extension Agents developed their own web sites, the number of different sites for each county office grew. Hillsborough County had 11 sites, each with its own URL. “The UF/IFAS WebTeam took all of our sites and combined it into one. They provided us with drafts to review before posting to the Internet,” said Lofland. “I coordinated the local effort, working with each of the agents to determine the best approach for the overall layout.” “The main benefit of this consolidation has been to make it easier for web site visitors to search the program areas and find what they need,” said Lofland. She also notes that with a standardized layout, it is easier to for people to maneuver through the different program areas. Visitors can access the site by W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

visiting: http:/ / hillsborough.ifas.ufl.edu/ . There is an additional access address via Hillsborough County Government and that site is http:/ / www.hillsboroughcounty.org/ index.as px?nid=96. “Though not part of the overall web site consolidation effort, Hillsborough County Extension has recently installed a computer and printer for public use at our office,” said Lofland. “This is extremely helpful for those residents who do not have access to the Internet or who come to our office and are unable to meet with the agent in charge of the subject area for which they seek information.” It should be noted that the public computer at Extension has access only to the Hillsborough County and UF/IFAS Extension sites. Key links on the new, consolidated web site include an Events Calendar, which not only lists upcoming events for Extension and Hillsborough County, but the ability to register via EventBrite. “That’s a particularly helpful link,” said Lofland, “as registration to any listed event is just one click away.” The site also offers an easy way to contact Extension plus access to a range of departmental areas and information about the staff. “In addition to myriad publications in these many subject areas, the site provides access to videos and blogs,” said Lofland.

System), as well as several apps for iPhones/iPads and Android devices. Lofland notes that it has been exciting to see the way Hillsborough County UF/IFAS Extension has proactively added new technologies and resources to help Hillsborough County residents get the educational resources and opportunities they need. Lofland explained she welcomes comments about Hillsborough County Extension’s web sites. She can be reached at loflandb@hillsboroughcounty.org or you can call her at 813/744-5519 x 54129. For information, visit either of the two web sites providing access to Extension resources and if you are unable to find what you need or have added questions, use the contact capability on the site: http:/ / hillsbor ough.ifas.ufl.edu/ contact.shtml, call: 813/744-5519. You may also visit Extension at 5339 South County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. Keep in mind the public access computer and printer that is available during daily hours at the Extension office.

There is one other UF/IFAS resource that Lofland wants to let people know about and that is the new mobile site, m.ifas.ufl.edu. This site allows smartphone users to more easily access and use UF/IFAS services including EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source), FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network), and DDIS (Distance Diagnostic and Identification INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

61


62

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M


AVAILABLE

SWEAT LOOP 80 ACRE FARM WIMAUMA Offers rectangular and level fields. This parcel has onsite wells and approved water use permit. Bank Owned - Accepting Offers

OLD WELCOME 40 ACRE HORSE FARM LITHIA

BUNKER HILL 45 ACRES PARRISH Great Recreation and Hunting Property. It has a wide variety of habitat! $ 250,000

LITHIA PINECREST 32 ACRES LITHIA

Incredible opportunity to own a turnkey horse farm. Two homes, 50 x 100 horse barn, lighted arena, rolling lush land! $800,000

Beautiful Country Lot with Oaks and Hammocks! Road Frontage on Lithia Pinecrest Road. Excellent Site for Investment! $400,000

POLO CLUB LANE 5 ACRES LITHIA

HOMESITE DADE CITY

Well and septic are on site and property is already fenced and cross fenced. Completely high and dry. Located near the Fishhawk Community $ 150,000

Very private. Gorgeous property with magnificent oak trees and lots of room. $ 65,000

Reed Fischbach, Broker Fischbach Land Company

813.546.1000 P.O. Box 2677 • Brandon, FL 33509 Note: While every attempt is made to provide as accurate information on the property offering as possible, FISCHBACH LAND COMPANY, LLC does not guarantee the accuracy thereof. Buyer shall rely entirely on their own information and inspection of property and records.

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

63


Food Check-Out Week The Affordability and Availability of Food By Jim Frankowiak

once again have this opportunity to be part of this national celebration.” Nationally, the American Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee staffs supermarket demonstration stations for consumers to help them increase their knowledge of how to stay on a budget while purchasing healthy food for their families. The committee also makes cash and food donations to Ronald McDonald Houses. Consumer outreach also includes helpful information on topics such as Tips for Better Nutrition on a Tight Budget, Understanding Food Labels and What MyPlate Means and How Much Should I eat. Better Nutrition on a Tight Budget covers having a plan and shopping smart. It suggests consumers know what their food budget is and plan nutritional meals that are prepared at home, including fruits, vegetables and whole grains. That also covers preparation of a shopping list with an eye to perishable foods and plans for use of leftovers, as well as sensitivity to pricing, special offers and coupons. There is also the admonition to never shop when hungry. Shopping smart advises consumers to stick to their shopping list with an eye to flexibility when special sales take place. Price comparison, preparation time and purchases at farmers’ markets are other suggestions. The information also covers the need to understand food labels so consumers make smart food choices. Grocery shoppers are advised to pay particular attention to serving size, calories, daily diet nutritional recommendations and fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium content. It is also suggested for them to note carbohydrate, fiber, sugars, protein, daily vitamin content and ingredients.

T

here are many things that make our country the greatest country in the world. Some are obvious and some are not. Since the mid-90s, Farm Bureau throughout the U.S. has lead a special celebration each February to make note of one of those attributes: the affordability and availability of nutritious foods. Entitled Food Check-Out Week, February 17 – 23 this year, is an annual celebration commemorated by Farm Bureau members in different ways to draw attention to the food that they grow or the livestock and poultry they raise. Some offer tips to consumers on how to stretch their grocery dollars, while others reach out in other ways.

Volunteers also recommend consumers visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov to find out important information for healthier eating guidance that includes caloric intake, portion sizes, foods to avoid and foods to choose and other suggestions designed to foster healthy eating habits for all family members. The USDA’s MyPlate guide can be very helpful in recommending grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, protein, fats and oils and sweets and treats in portions that are appropriate for daily diets. Materials also cover ideas for balancing calories at every meal and at snack times. Food Check-out Week sets the state for National Nutrition Month, which is now underway. A special thanks to Michelle Williamson for her contributions to Food Check-Out Week and Ronald McDonald House in Tampa.

More than a decade ago, Farm Bureau forged a link with Ronald McDonald House Charities and since that time members have donated more than $3 million in food and monetary contributions to Ronald McDonald House and other charities during this weeklong celebration. Here in Hillsborough County, Board Member Michelle Williamson prepared dinner for residents and guests of Ronald McDonald House in Tampa, something that has been done a number of times in the past. “We prepared enough to feed 25 guest of the Ronald McDonald House this year and our menu included pot roast, succotash and strawberry shortcake, of course,” said Williamson. “I am pleased to 64

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

65


66

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M


Chuck & Austin Struth

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

67


68

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

69


2013 In The Field New Full Size Chevrolet Silverado 1500’s – 40+ to choose from starting at $18,999 Come see Florida’s largest commercial work truck inventory with over 150 work ready trucks to choose from! We have over 40+ fuel saving Silverado 1500 V-6 Work Trucks on the ground and ready to be delivered to your office or shop today. Call us to check on the latest Retail Incentives PLUS any additional NON PUBLISHED incentives that most dealers won’t mention. You also may qualify for GM’s Fleet Program and one phone call can check your eligibility for even greater discounts for you. We have a great assortment of trucks like flatbeds, stakebodys, utility trucks, dumptrucks, in gas or diesel and 4x4 or 4x2 wheel drive. If you are a Business Owner, GM has special programs for you that include

accessories like toolboxes, bedliners, ladder racks at little or NO COST to you. 2 Huge Benefits for Business Owners or Commercial Purchases: · GM’s World Class 5year/100k mile Limited Powertrain Warranty · All New starting Jan 1, 2013 No Charge 2 year 30k Maintenance Plan including Lube, Oil, and Filter, Tire Rotations, and Free 27 Point Vehicle Inspection! Call (813) 359-5420 and ask for any one of our 6 Fleet Managers to find out more information or go to our web-site for additional pictures or information.

www.stingrayfleet.com

11780 Tampa Gateway Blvd. Seffner, FL 33584 Tel: 813-980-3637 www.GatorFord.com

70

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Trucks in Review When Jarrett-Scott Ford unveiled the SVT Raptor on their showroom floor for the first time in 2010, it was an immediate success. The Raptor is now entering the third year of production with higher levels of capability. While the majority of the SVT Raptor remains very similar to the 2012 model, Ford has tweaked it in a few places to make more driver-friendly and more off-road capable. It’s hard to think that there is anything else that Ford could do to make the Raptor more awesome, but apparently it found a few shortcomings in need of fixing. The biggest change for the 2013 model year include the addition of a new set of forged-aluminum conventional wheels that can be upgraded after purchase to extra-capable bead-locks, but there also are a few more functional improvements. Shafter Nave, sales manager for Jarrett-Scott Ford said, “One big difference you will notice on the 2013 model comes at nighttime. When you fire up the headlights to cut through the black of night, you will see things a little more clearly with its all-new optional HID headlights.” The truck has the same color palette to choose from as 2012 - Race Red, Blue Flame Metallic, Tuxedo Black Metallic, Ingot Silver Metallic, and Oxford White. Ford did, however, add in an additional color that is specific to the 2013 SVT Raptor and that is the desert-camouflage-inspired Terrain. The only engine you will find under the hood of the Ford F-150 SVT Raptor is a 6.2-liter V8 engine that delivers a total of 411 HP and a peak torque of 434 lbs-ft.

2000 E. Baker St. • Plant City, FL 33563 Ph: 813-752-4171 www.jarrettscottford.com

Ford F-150 Capability

Buying a full-size pickup? Here are some hard facts to think about: The F-150 can tow a heavier trailer (11,300 lbs.) and haul more cargo (3,120 lbs.) than any of its competitors.* The F-150 has a fully boxed frame that’s the foundation of all this great capability. And it’s engineered and tested to withstand more punishment than you could ever subject it to. The F-150 is Built Ford Tough® to come through with the capability you expect in this full-size pickup from Ford, day in and day out. * When properly equipped. Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR, Non-Hybrid.

Power

Ford responds to high gas prices with the 3.7L Ti-VCT V6. This advanced-design powerplant delivers up to 23 HWY MPG fuel economy* along with responsive 302 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

The engine links up to the same 6-speed automatic transmission that it had last year, which includes a tow/haul mode and SelectShift Automatic functionality.

horsepower. Next in the F-150 engine lineup is the available 5.0L V8. It's not only powerful but delivers excellent highway economy.** Another V8 option is the 6.2L V8 with its best-in-class† horsepower and torque. And there's the available EcoBoost® engine, designed with direct injection technology and twin turbocharging for a combination of torque, efficiency and capability that's unequaled in its class. * EPA-estimated 17 city/23 hwy/19 combined mpg, 3.7L V6 4x2. ** EPA-estimated 15 city/21 hwy, 17 combined mpg, 4x2. † Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR. †† Available EcoBoost® engine. Based on torque, max. towing and payload, and EPA-estimated 16 city/22 hwy mpg, 4x2. Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR, Non-Hybrid vs. comparable competitive engines. EcoBoost vs. 2013 GM 5.3L, Ram and Toyota 5.7L and Nissan 5.6L V8 engines.

Interior

The road might be bad, the weather, too. But inside the quiet and comfortable F-150, you'll experience ride smoothness that's nothing less than outstanding. And there's the assurance that comes with being surrounded by a sturdy steel safety cage and

safety features such as the Safety Canopy® System with side-curtain airbags — features that helped earn the F-150 SuperCrew® models a 2012 Top Safety Pick from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Innovation

F-150 offers class-exclusive* box side and tailgate steps that make it easier to access the bed. There's an LCD productivity screen, also available only in the F-150,* that provides important fuel economy information, towing and off-road data. And, of course, there's the newly available SYNC®** with MyFord™ and MyFord Touch™ and all the ways they help keep you connected and informed with intuitive touch controls or simple voice commands. It's all about innovation, creating ways to help you do things more conveniently, more productively. *Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR vs. 2012/2013 competitors. **Available in Basic SYNC®, SYNC with MyFord, and SYNC with MyFord Touch.

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

71


Naturally Amazing Activities

Marbled Eggs

(Chinese Tea Eggs)

By Sean Green

I was looking for something Irish to present for this month’s activity page simply because St Patrick’s Day is this month and I am Irish, however, in my search I found some really cool ideas that originate from the Far East that can be part of your Easter celebrations (no pun intended). Eggs are a traditional Chinese food, one way in which eggs can be prepared is to boil them and soak the hardboiled egg in a tea of various spices. One of the original recipes, five-spice powder, include a mixture of cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, cloves and Szechuan peppercorns. Eggs are boiled, removed from the water, and the eggshell gently cracked all around. The cracked eggs are then simmered in the tea mixture allowing the spices to soak into the egg. The dark color of the spiced tea gives the egg a marbled appearance that is visible when the egg is peeled.

DYE

THE EGGS

Fill a coffee mug about halfway with enough dyed water to cover the egg (egg will displace water) Place the coffee mug and egg in the refrigerator overnight to soak. When complete, the eggshell will be a solid color, but when the egg is cracked it will have an exciting marble appearance.

A fun and colorful variation of the Chinese tradition can be used to decorate Easter eggs.

Materials: Eggs (5 days old) Water Food Dye Coffee Mugs (for Dye)

BOIL

THE EGGS IN WATER.

Hardboiled eggs are easier to peel if they are several days old. Buy your eggs about five days before boiling them if possible. Bring the eggs to a boil, then remove them from the heat, let simmer in the hot water for two minutes

CRACK

THE SHELL.

When the eggs are cool enough remove them from the water and crack them all around the shell. Smaller cracks produce more marbling. Let the extra water from the boiling seep out of the egg (about 10 minutes). 72

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

73


74

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


INEZ ESTELLE JONES, 85 of Plant City died February 12, 2013, at Palm Terrace of Lakeland. Born April 22, 1927 in Ducktown, Tennessee, she was the daughter of the late Arnold Tarpley and the late Edith Curtis Tarpley. She was the wife of the late Homer Jones. GARY CARL WILKERSON, 56 of Plant City died on February 10, 2013. Born December 4, 1956 in Plant City, he was the son of the late Carl Wilkerson and the late Dollie Miklos Wilkerson. He was the husband of Felicia Wilkerson. ALBERT JAMES POU, 51 of Valrico, Florida died February 10, 2013. Born April 25, 1961, he was the son of Alberto Pou Novoa and Maria Andrea Benitez. He was the beloved husband of Dianne Pou.

Ralph James "Ken" Kendrick, 90 of Plant City, Florida died February 1, 2013. Born September 8, 1922 to the late Claude and Mae Pelham Kendrick. .He was the beloved husband of Betty Hoppes Kendrick.

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

DARYLE WAYNE HALL, 50 of Plant City died January 30, 2013. Born May 14, 1962 in Elkhart, Indiana, he was the son of the late Niles Hall and Yvonne Woodworth Hall.

MARION OTHAL SCHOONOVER, 90 of Plant City died January 30, 2013. Born January 31, 1922 in Adrian, Michigan, he was the son of the late Clyde Schoonover and the late Mary Brown Schoonover. He was the husband of the late Vera Mae Schoonover. LLOYD ALOYSIUS JARBOE, 84 of Plant City and Lupton, Michigan died January 29, 2013, at his home in Plant City. Born May 22, 1928 in Flint, Michigan, he was the son of the late Charles Jarboe and the late Winifred Brockriede Jarboe. He was the husband of Helen Frey Jarboe.

MILLARD FRANKLIN BRUNTY, 85 died on Friday, January 25, 2013 Born Monday, May 21, 1927, he was the son of the late Kennie Brunty and the late Catherine Varney Brunty. He was the husband of the late Patsy Brunty. ATHELEE "LEE" TERRELL went home to be with The Lord January 25, 2013. Born September 3, 1940 in Pocahontas, Arkansas. Preceded in death by his parents, A.C. and Marie Terrell and infant daughter Tami. Survived by his loving wife Carol (married 51 years).

MARIA ALAO HYDE, 65 of Lakeland died January 27, 2013. Born March 12, 1947 in Manila, Philippines, she was the daughter of the late Dale Williams and the late Anita Alao Williams. She was the wife of the late John Hyde.

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

75


MUCH MORE

THAN A

YOUTH ANIMAL EXHIBITION COMPETITION

CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS A PROGRAM BORN

By Jim Frankowiak

W

hen you think of the annual State Fair, whether in Florida or any state, youngsters exhibiting their animals – large and small – are always part and parcel of the proceedings. That’s part of Americana. Florida, however, took that traditional element of state fairs and raised it to a higher level thanks to the efforts of then Florida State Fair Board Chairman, the late George Steinbrenner. He saw an opportunity to take a traditional youth activity and make it even more, much more. With the support of Steinbrenner and his fellow Fair Board members, and in conjunction with the University of Florida Animal Science Department, the State Fair introduced the Champion of Champions program through which Youth Exhibitors not only show their prize winning animals, but can choose to participate in numerous educational activities, as well. This enables competitors to earn animal premiums, and if they choose to participate in the educational activities, earn additional Achievement Premiums. The culmination of this optional program for youth takes place on the final day of the Florida State Fair when the top 32 Senior Champion Youth Exhibitors compete to be the “Best of the Best” in the final Round Robin competition. “The vast majority of our youth competitors opt to participate in this program,” said Vina Jean Banks, Director of Agribusiness for the Florida State Fair Authority. This competi-

AND

B RE D

IN

FLORIDA

tion is only open to Senior Exhibitors, youth aged 14 and up. The top four Senior Exhibitors in each Youth Show are invited to participate in the Champion of Champions competition. Once selected, they compete in a round-robin contest that includes all of the following species of animals: Steer, Sheep, Goat, Beef, Swine, Rabbit, Dairy and Poultry.

The Best of the Best at this year’s fair were:

“What this means is that the participants must be prepared to answer questions not only about the species they exhibited, but others as well,” said Banks. Subject matter is on a four-year rotation and covers: Products and marketing, By-Products, Nutrition and Feeding, Reproduction and Health.

Dani, a junior at New Smyrna Beach High School, has been showing at the Fair since eighth grade with sheep, but showed a Boer goat and dairy calf this year. “Florida State Fair is the best time of year, and studying with my friends for the infamous skillathon has always created great memories,” she said. “When I first started showing I had no clue what the Champion of Champions program was, but by ninth grade year I fortunately placed 4th in my species and my friend, Shelby Adams, helped me study. I watched her make youth ambassador and it set me in drive to try to accomplish what she did.

“Each station in the Round Robin is worth 100 points and each exhibitor is given a score for each station,” said Banks. “Stations consist of skills outlined in the Skilathon Book for each show or actual showing of an animal of that species.” Cash awards ranging from $250 to $1,500 are awarded to the top six finishers, also known as Ambassadors. These awards are in addition to monies they may receive for their class placing ribbon and for the market animals, the sale of their animal. “This is a comprehensive knowledge and skill test that definitely requires a commitment to learning and the ability to quickly recall and respond with articulation and comprehension,” Banks added.

Champion of Champions – Danielle “Dani” Gellermann, Edgewater 2nd Place – Jessica Humphrey, Okeechobee 3rd Place – Erica Curtis, Winter Haven 4th Place – Elizabeth Surface, Lithia 5th Place – Helena Polansky, Wesley Chapel 6th Place - Timothy Hoover, Tampa

“Receiving this award has put me in shock. I am the first person from my high school to place first in this competition. All throughout the week at State Fair my advisor, Beth Harper, kept encouraging me to try my best, you never know! She took me to see all of the plaques with previous winners names as encouragement and I guess it worked! It is hard to put in words how much it means, I may have never gotten Grand Champion ... continued on page 79

76

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

77


78


with my sheep, pig or Boer goat, but it finally feels like my hard work paid off. State Fair has always been my favorite fair because of the educational side incorporated. It really offers so much more to students participating in livestock projects. I have respect for everyone who competed because I know just how hard the contest is.” As to the future, Dani “wants to be a news broadcaster. I will always be an advocate for agriculture because of my passion for speaking has grown. I was not always the best speaker and certainly not the most confident, but through the FFA I have been exposed to experiences that make me realize that not only can I do anything I want, but with a little hard work you can be great at anything you do. The daughter of Chris and Diane Gellermann, Dani has a brother, Nevada, whom she calls “the brainiac of the family” as he is a member of the honors college at the University of Florida. She grew up in Arizona and the extent of “agriculture in my childhood revolved around baby chickens that I brought for bring your pet day and the small garden in our backyard. When I moved to Florida agriculture really flourished in front of my eyes. When I joined FFA my grandpa was ecstatic. He was a past FFA advisor and FFA

member himself in Nebraska. I never knew all this stuff about by Grandpa until I joined the FFA. My grandpa sent me some of his old FFA officer pins and stories, as well. One of my favorite FFA memories will always be flying to see my grandparents after FFA State Convention and my Grandpas asking me to recite the creed. As I recited the five paragraph essay my Grandpa said every word with me. After all of those years he still remembered it! “I owe special thanks to Shelby Adams, a youth ambassador several times, for showing me how to study smart for this competition and Brittany Wolford and Sara Knollinger who both helped me to study. My FFA advisor Beth Harper was especially helpful taking us to grocery stores just a few hours before the contest to learn meat cuts and practically learning the skillathon more than us just to help us grasp concepts better.” A sincere IN THE FIELD congratulations to Dani and the Ambassadors.

Happy Easter

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

79


80

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

81


Auto Services Inc. “We Are A FULL SERVICE Garage” • Body Shop • Used /Reman Transmission • Engine Diagnostic/Tune Up • Brakes • Maintenance/Repairs • AC Repair GUARANTEED USED PARTS • Large selection of Used Tires • New and Used Glass Installed

(813) 689-8131 2 Year Part Replacement & Labor Guarantee!

3159 Hwy. 60 East

3 miles east of Brandon Serving Brandon Since 1971

www.brandonauto.com

82

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


2013 Florida State Fair

CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS Listings “T HE B EST OF T HE B EST ” The Champion of Champions $3000 Savings Bond DANIELLE GELLERMAN from Edgewater 2nd Place Champion of Champions JESSICA HUMPHREY from Okeechobee 3rd Place tie Champion of Champions - ERICA CU RT IS from Winter Haven 4th Place Champion of Champions ELIZABETH SU RFACE from Lithia 5th Place Champion of Champions HELENA POLANSKY from Wesley Chapel 6th Place Champion of Champions T IMOT HY HOOVER from Tampa MOSAIC SCHOLARSHIP WINNER $1,500 Scholarship JESSICA SWIT ZER from Lutz FLORIDA STAT E FAIR FOU NDAT ION SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS The winners of the $1,000 scholarships are: ELIZABETH SU RFACE from Lithia COU RT NEY WINGATE from Myakka City SARA KNOLLINGER from Oak Hill HEATHER HAMBLEN from Ocklawaha ERIN JONES from Trenton CHAMPION YOUT H WINNERS YOU T H DOG Junior Champion SHANNON PIQUET from Pinellas Park Intermediate Champion AB BY VINES from Largo 4th place Senior Champion KIMB ERLY HOLMES from Ocala 3rd place Senior Champion CARISSA RETT ER from Lithia 2nd place Senior Champion SAMANTHA RICHARDS from Pinellas Park Champion Youth for Dog Show – NICOLE SIELING from St. Pete Youth Llama Show Junior Champion SAVANNAH MORGAN from Brandon

Intermediate Champion SKYLAR SPARLING from Sarasota 4th place Senior Champion SHAWNA ESP from North Port 3rd place Senior Champion HAELE LAWLESS from Odessa 2nd place Senior Champion JACQU ELYN FU LLFORD from Sarasota Champion Youth for Llama Show MIRANDA HENDRICKS from North Port YOUT H RABB IT Junior Champion OLIVIA B ONEBRAKE from Lithia Intermediate Champion ABRIELLE ESPOSIT O from Tampa 4th place Senior Champion ERICA CU RTIS from Winter Haven 3rd place Senior Champion T IMOTHY HOOVER from Tampa 2nd place Senior Champion RENEE HOOVER from Tampa Champion Youth for Rabbit Show HELENA POLANSKY from Land O Lakes YOUT H ST EER Intermediate Champion CHRIST IAN RODRIQU EZ from Live Oak 4th place Senior Champion ALEXANDER FERNANDEZ from Plant City 3rd place Senior Champion KACEE LANGFORD from Newberry 2nd place Senior Champion JESSE COLEMAN from Plant City Champion Youth for Steer Show MAT THEW JENNINGS from Dade City  YOUT H DAIRY Junior Champion TAYLOR ADKINS from Bushnell Intermediate Champion CARA ZEVENEY from Parrish 4th place Senior Champion SARA KNOLLINGER from Oak Hill 3rd place Senior Champion MICHAEL GAY from Riverview 2nd place Senior Champion DANIELLE GELLERMANN from Edgewater Champion Youth for Dairy Show MARK (T Y) HAMILT ON from Riverview

YOU T H POU LT RY Junior Champion MADISON SMIT H from Wimauma Intermediate Champion GAB RIELLE SOT O from Cocoa 4th place Senior Champion PAT RICK T HOMPSON from Doral 3rd place Senior Champion T IMOT HY HOOVER from Tampa 2nd place Senior Champion AB B Y MARION from Deltona Champion Youth for Poultry Show ELIZABET H SURFACE from Lithia YOU T H GO AT Junior Champion HARRISON SHARP from Citra Intermediate Champion NICOLE FALK from Edgewater 4th place Senior Champion DEREK SHARP from Citra 3rd place Senior Champion MIRANDA SAVERCOOl from Deland 2nd place Senior Champion DANIELLE GELLERMAN from Edgewater Champion Youth for Goat Show VICT ORIA HARRIS from Dover YOU T H SWINE Junior Champion MADYSON KEIM from Lakeland Intermediate Champion CHRISTIAN RODRIQU EZ from Live Oak 4th place Senior Champion MICHAEL GARY from Lakeland 3rd place Senior Champion TAELER DU PRE from Kathleen 2nd place Senior Champion HALEY STARK from Ormond Beach Champion Youth for Swine Show KYLIE PHILIPPS from Inverness YOU T H B EEF Junior Champion PAYT ON DAVIS from Ocala Intermediate Champion CARA ZEVENEY from Parrish 4th place Senior Champion ELIZABET H SURFACE from Lithia 3rd place Senior Champion MATT HEW STAPLES from Groveland 2nd place Senior Champion SHELBI MCCALL from Mayo Champion Youth for Beef Show JESSICA HUMPHREY, Okeechobee

YOU T H SHEEP Junior Champion MORGANE B LACKWELDER from Deleon Springs Intermediate Champion B AILEY SLOAN from Deland 4th place Senior Champion B RITTANY WOLFORD from Edgewater 3rd place Senior Champion MIRANDA SAVERCOOL from Deland 2nd place Senior Champion T YLER D’ANGELO from Deland Champion Youth for Sheep Show JESSE COLEMAN from Plant City YOU T H ST EER Premier Steer T.J. HU T CHINSON, Wimauma Producer: Hal & Debbi e P hi ll i ps Reserve Premier Steer ARICELY ALVAREZ, Largo, FL, Producer: Wi l li a mson Cattle Compa ny Grand Champion KAYLEE CRAWFORD, Bell Producer: Carl ton & Carlton Mr. Denn i s Carl ton Reserve Grand Champion ANDREW HORVAT H, Live Oak Producer: Hal & Debbi e P hi ll i ps Intermediate Showmanship 1st Place T.J. HU T CHINSON, Wimauma 2nd Place COLTON RUCKER, Old Town 3rd Place PAYT ON DEVINE- RODRIGUEZ, Live Oak 4th Place CODY DONALDSON, Alachua Senior Showmanship 1st Place KACEE LANGFORD, Newberry 2nd Place CHEYENNE CONCIDINE, Inverness 3rd Place CODY NORT ON, Trenton 4th Place CASSIDY HAST ING, Plant City YOU T H SWINE Grand Champion LOGAN LU SE Mayo, FL

Reserve Grand Champion GAUGE WOLFORD, Deland Junior Showmanship 1st Place MALLORY ALB RIT TON, Sarasota 2nd Place SIERRA GRAHAM, Lake City 3rd Place EMILY LYONS, Mayo 4th Place LACY B ENNETT , Chiefland Intermediate Showmanship 1st Place DRAKE T REFFEISEN, Lake Panasoffkee 2nd Place CHEYANNE WHIT E, Summerfield 3rd Place T.J. HUT CHINSON, Riverview 4th Place - Baleigh Oliver, Deland Senior Showmanship 1st Place B RANDON OLIVER, Deland 2nd Place HALEY STARK, Ormond Beach 3rd Place JACOB BU RNET TE, Plant City 4th Place KYLIE PHILIPPS, Inverness Division 1 Champion ANGELINA CLOU TIER, Lakeland Reserve Champion MICHAEL GARY, Lakeland Division 2 Champion LOGAN LUSE, Mayo Reserve Champion GAUGE WOLFORD, Deland Division 3 Champion KENNET H B ROWN, Lake Butler Reserve Champion SHEYANNE NEIDERT , San Antonio Division 4 Champion SHELBY ELDRIDGE, Homeland Reserve Champion COT T ONDALE FFA (MIRANDA SAPP), Cottondale YOUT H SHEEP Junior Showmanship MORGANE B LACKWELDER, DeLeon Springs Intermediate Showmanship T HOMAS SCHROEDEr, Deland

... continued on page 87 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

83


84

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E .C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

85


86

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Intermediate Showmanship B RITTANY WOLFORD, Edgewater Supreme Champion Ewe SHANNA HILLMAN, DeLeon Springs Supreme Champion Ram T REVOR ROSSO, Deland YOUTH EXOTIC - WOO L Grand Champion Ewe B REANNA MAE ST U RGIS, Plant City Reserve Grand Champion Ewe T IGERS OF 4 - H #2, Deleon Springs Grand Champion Ram EMILY LINT ON, Plant City Reserve Grand Champion Ram MAEGANN MELT S, Edgewater YOUTH EXOTIC - HAIRE D Grand Champion Ewe ANASTASIA GAMB LE, New Smyrna Beach Reserve Grand Champion Ewe ASHLYN GAMBLE, New Smyrna Beach Grand Champion Ram ANASTASIA GAMB LE, New Smyrna Beach Reserve Grand Champion Ram ANASTASIA STU RGIS, Orlando YOUTH BLACK FACE Grand Champion Ewe SHANNA HILLMAN, DeLeon Springs Reserve Grand Champion Ewe B RITTANY WOLFORD, Edgewater Grand Champion Ram T REVOR ROSSO, Deland Reserve Grand Champion Ram T REVOR ROSSO, Deland YOUTH WHITE FACE Grand Champion Ewe CASSIDY HAST ING, Plant City Reserve Grand Champion Ewe KENDALL REED, Lithia Grand Champion Ram T IGERS OF 4 - H #2, DeLeon Springs Reserve Grand Champion Ram AU BREY DAVIS, Plant City YOUTH CROSS BRED Grand Champion Ewe T YLER D'ANGELO, Deland Reserve Grand Champion Ewe GRANT PREST, Deland Grand Champion Ram VOLU SIA SHOW PRIDE #2, DeLeon Springs Reserve Grand Champion Ram T U RKEY CREEK FFA #1, Plant City YOU T H BEEF Junior Showmanship ISAB ELLE T ORRENCE, Newberry Intermediate Showmanship ET HAN VAUGH, Plant City Senior Showmanship B RANDALYN B ISHOP, Trenton YOUTH ANGUS Grand Champion Female KENDALL LOCKE, Lakeland, LNL Sweet Sasafrassee 2722 Reserve Grand Champion Female DESTINY MCCAU LEY, Bowling Green, McCauley Queen of Heats Y4 Grand Champion Bull DESTINY MCCAU LEY, Bowling Green, McCauley Major League Z2 Reserve Grand Champion Bull DESTINY MCCAU LEY, Bowling Green, McCauley All Star Z3 YOUTH BRAHMAN Grand Champion Female ARICA LAND, Branford, Lady H Kena Manso 236/1 Reserve Grand Champion Female ARICA LAND, Branford, JDH Lady Manso 846

Grand Champion Bull RACHEL BARTHLE, Dade City, BB Mr Docs Davon 609 Reserve Grand Champion Bull BET HALYN B ISHOP, Trenton, IS Mr Kosciusko 100 YO UTH BRANGUS Grand Champion Female PAIGE EAVES, Lake Butler, JR’s Ms 66X2 Reserve Grand Champion Female QUINN CART ER, Haines City, SK Ms Odyssey 748Y Grand Champion Bull KYLIE LAZO, Hialeah, Marvin Reserve Grand Champion Bull QUINN CART ER, Haines City, L2C Mr Duramax 636Y YO UTH SANTA G ERTRUDIS Grand Champion Female MICHAEL ROY RANK, Orlando, Miss Massive Grizzley D106 Reserve Grand Champion Female MICHAEL ROY RANK, Orlando, Miss Grizzley D269 Grand Champion Bull MICHAEL ROY RANK, Orlando, Amigo Massive Mt D155 Reserve Grand Champion Bull MICHAEL ROY RANK, Orlando, Magnum Grizzley Massive D151 YOUT H DAIRY Junior Showmanship LEXI HELTON, Brooksville Intermediate Showmanship CHAS WALLER, Plant City Intermediate Showmanship GARION PFORR, Gainesville YO UTH BROWN S WISS Grand Champion Female KEEGAN LEE, Plant City, Hug-M-All Coll Buzzin Reserve Grand Champion Female COLB Y QU AT TLEB AUM, Myakka City, ZCQ Pastures Galaxy Reilly YO UTH GUERNSEY Grand Champion Female JOZEF HEIJKOOP, Webster, HTF Lucys Lucinda Reserve Grand Champion Female AUST IN HOLCOMB, Valrico, C&S Caesar Misty YO UTH HOLSTE IN Grand Champion Female BRANDON CAREY, Lakeland, Hobbs Carey Dundee Aida Reserve Grand Champion Female KELSEY AHERN, Moore Haven KCC-Ahern Starlit Snickers YOUT H JERSEY Grand Champion Female CADY MCGEHEE, Okeechobee, GR Sunshine State Winnies Girl Reserve Grand Champion Female LEXI HELTON, Brooksville, IOF Goldenboy Kilo So Sweet YOUT H DAIRY GOAT Junior Showmanship ISAB EL PERDOMO, Wesley Chapel Intermediate Showmanship MONTANA SMIT H, Zephyrhills Senior Showmanship HALIE WEB ER, Groveland BEST DOE IN SHOW RACHAEL JOHNSON, CH Sand Dance SND Belize RECORDED G RADE Grand Champion MIA HERRERA, LaBelle, Mia Earthsong Jus Starstuck Reserve Grand Champion JU STIN FERRELL, Tampa, Tilted Soleil

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

ALP INE Grand Champion RACHAEL JOHNSON, Monticello, Sand Dance Reina Reserve Grand Champion RACHAEL JOHNSON, Monticello, Sand Dance Bacari LaMancha Grand Champion D'AYN SAYRE, Umatilla, Glyn Mythos Hespera Reserve Grand Champion KYLE WEAVER, Crawfordville Tad-Mor Nieve NIG ERIAN DWARF Grand Champion MATT IE WEB ER, Groveland, Hershey Bar Reserve Grand Champion HALIE WEBER, Groveland, Some Day Come Lullaby NUBIAN Grand Champion HARDY MIT CHELL, Altha, Olympus Acres Luna Reserve Grand Champion ELIZABET H LU CAS, High Springs, Bellamy Oaks Catalina TOG GENBURG Grand Champion KYLE WEAVER, Crawfordville, Tad-Mor VP Steel Magnolia Reserve Grand Champion GARRET T CARLEY, Weirsdale, CH Mattie Lil Farm Victoria C Quest ALL OTHER P URE BREDS Grand Champion MIA HERRERA, LaBelle, Devonshire JJF Yvaine Reserve Grand Champion ISABEL PERDOMA, Wesley Chapel, Devonshire VA Tirtzah YOU T H B OER GOAT Junior Showmanship HARRISON SHARP, Citra Intermediate Showmanship ETHAN OHNSTAD, Plant City Senior Showmanship ALYSSA OHNSTAD (Strawberry Crest FFA #5), Plant City P ERCE NTAGE DOE Grand Champion ETHAN OHNSTAD, Plant City, Candy Kiss Reserve Grand Champion MAKAYLA VAUGHN, Edgewater, Stargazer Sprinkling of Dreams P UREBRED/ FULLBLOO D DOE Grand Champion ETHAN OHNSTAD, Plant City, Cayenne Reserve Grand Champion ETHAN OHNSTAD, Plant City, Painted Princess P UREBRED/ FULLBLOO D BUCK Grand Champion HAILEY HUFFMAN, Brooksville, Naturewalk Dante Reserve Grand Champion AU STIN DAVIS, DeLeon Springs, Hopeful Farms Apollo WETHER Grand Champion STRAWBERRY CREST FFA #1, Lily Reserve Grand Champion STRAWBERRY CREST FFA #6, Rudy YOU T H POU LT RY Best Purebred of Show JODEE LAT IMER, Brooksville Reserve Best Purebred of Show T YLER MARGITA, Arcadia Best Commercial of Show MATT HEW O'B RIEN, Wimauma

Junior Showmanship 1st Place T J B OND, Lakeland 2nd Place KEGAN PRU SANSKY, Weirsdale 3rd Place ANTONIO SOT O, Cocoa 4th Place PHILLIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Intermediate Showmanship 1st Place T YLER MARGITA, Arcadia 2nd Place GAB RIELLE SOTO, Cocoa 3rd Place ALEX MONTALVO, Arcadia 4th Place T IFFANY U NDESTAD, Spring Hill Senior Showmanship 1st Place COURT NEY NEWCOMB , Seffner 2nd Place ELIZAB ET H SU RFACE, Lithia 3rd Place GRACE PIPKINS, Tampa 4th Place AB BY MARION, Deltona People’s Choice Winner PAT RICK T HOMPSON, Doral Best Exhibit PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Commercial Female Champion Matthew O'B rien, Wimauma Reserve Champion JONAT HON SANGIORGIO, Brandon Best Overall Dozen Eggs AB IGAIL PARMER, Dover Large Fowl Champion JODEE LAT IMER, Brooksville Reserve Champion -Philip Shaske, Lake Alfred Bantam Champion T YLER MARGITA, Arcadia Reserve Champion ALEX MONTALVO, Arcadia Waterfowl Champion EMILY JENNINGS, Dade City Reserve Champion GRACE PIPKINS, Tampa Turkey Champion ERIC MARGITA, Arcadia Reserve Champion MICHELA PIT ISCI, Tampa Guinea Champion EDWARD MADDOX, Deland American Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Reserve Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Asiatic Champion DAVID SQUITIERI, Brandon Reserve Champion DAVID SQUITIERI, Brandon Continental Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Reserve Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Mediterranean Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred Reserve Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred AOSB Champion JODEE LAT IMER, Brooksville Reserve Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

English Champion HU NTER WAWERS, Odessa Reserve Champion EMILY JENNINGS, Dade City Medium Duck Champion AMB RIA LLAU GER, Tampa Reserve Champion ALLISON ST EVENS, Valrico Light Duck Champion GRACE PIPKINS, Tampa Duck Champion EMILY JENNINGS, Dade City Reserve Champion GRACE PIPKINS, Tampa Goose Champion EDWARD MADDOX, Deland Old English Champion KATELYN WILLIAMS, Lake Wales Reserve Champion T IFFANY UNDESTAD, Spring Hill Modern Game Champion T J B OND, Lakeland Reserve Champion T J B OND, Lakeland SCCL Champion MATT HEW O'B RIEN, Wimauma Reserve Champion PHILIP SHASKE, Lake Alfred RCCL Champion T IFFANY UNDESTAD, Spring Hill Reserve Champion ABIGAIL SOTO, Cocoa AOCCL Champion ALEX MONTALVO, Arcadia Reserve Champion KRIST INA GUCIARDO, Odessa Feather Legged Champion T YLER MARGITA, Arcadia Reserve T YLER MARGITA, Arcadia Bantam Duck Champion EMILY JENNINGS, Dade City Reserve Champion DOLAN SPROU T, Lake Wales YOUT H RAB B IT Best in Show ALLYSON MCKNIGHT, Mini Rex Tampa, FL 1st Reserve Best in Show KELSEY MCTAVISH, Holland Lop Lutz, FL 2nd Reserve Best in Show PIEPER JAEHN, English Lop Valrico, FL Junior Showmanship 1st Place B ENHAMIN HOOVER, Tampa 2nd Place PIEPER JAEHN, Valrico 3rd Place CAYLA HODEL, Riverview 4th Place MICHAELA OSTROM, Lakeland Intermediate Showmanship 1st Place JOSEPH HOOVER, Tampa 2nd Place T IFFANY GERST, Holiday 3rd Place LACEY NAMAKA, Parrish

... continued on page 89 MARCH 2013

87


88

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


4th Place HANNAH HOOVER, Tampa Senior Showmanship 1st Place RENEE HOOVER, Tampa 2nd Place HELENA POLANSKY, Land O' Lakes 3rd Place T IMOT HY HOOVER, Tampa 4th Place OLIVIA COOK, Clearwater Breed Award American Fuzzy Lop Best of Breed SYDNEY COWLES, Brandon Best Opposite of Breed TAMPA B AY T ECH FFA ANMARIE MEADOWS) Tampa (A Californian Best of Breed GREGORY SHOEMAKER, Hernando Best Opposite of Breed GREGORY SHOEMAKER, Hernando Dutch Best of Breed SIDNEY COMFORT, Wesley Chapel Best Opposite of Breed SIDNEY COMFORT, Wesley Chapel English Amgora Best of Breed T RISTIN STASZAK, Riverview Best Opposite of Breed T RISTIN STASZAK, Riverview English Lop Best of Breed PIEPER JAEHN, Valrico Best Opposite of Breed ASHLEIGH DENNEY, Apollo Beach English Spot Best of Breed ALEXIS CARRASCO, Tampa Best Opposite of Breed Laurie Pandis, Odessa Flemish Giant Best of Breed CAT HERINE ELIZABET H HASHEM, St. Petersburg Best Opposite of Breed GIOVANNA JIMENEZ, Miami Florida White Best of Breed WHIT NEY MILLS, Chiefland Best Opposite of Breed T IFFANY U NDESTAD, Spring Hill French Lop Best of Breed GREGORY SHOEMAKER, Hernando Harlequin Best of Breed CHRIST INE PERRELLA, Tampa Best Opposite of Breed FAIT H STEINMEYER, Tampa Havana Best of Breed SEVIN BRIDGMAN, Brandon Best Opposite of Breed ADRIANA PRADO, Tampa Himalayan Best of Breed CAIT LYN GILB ERT , Bradenton Best Opposite of Breed LACEY NAMAKA, Parrish Holland Lop Best of Breed KELSEY MCTAVISH, Lutz Best Opposite of Breed JENNA LATIMER, Brooksville Jersey Wooly

Best of Breed TAMPA BAY T ECH FFA (LAU RA CARLIN), Tampa Lionhead Best of Breed EMILY POZNANIAK, Riverview Best Opposite of Breed EMILY POZNANIAK, Riverview Mini Lop Best of Breed SAM MILLS, Chiefland Best Opposite of Breed SAM MILLS, Chiefland Mini Rex Best of Breed ALLYSON MCKNIGHT , Tampa Best Opposite of Breed EMILY POZNANIAK, Riverview Netherland Dwarf Best of Breed GREGORY SHOEMAKER, Hernando Best Opposite of Breed KALEB MESMER, Polk City New Zealand Best of Breed KALEIGH FERREIRA, Wesley Chapel Best Opposite of Breed KALEIGH FERREIRA, Wesley Chapel

Polish Best of Breed HANNAH HOOVER, Tampa Best Opposite of Breed ASHLEY NICOLLE ST EPHENS, Lutz Rex Best of Breed CHANDLER B URWELL, Clearwater Satin Best of Breed ANT HONY NADAL, Plant City Best Opposite of Breed GINNY LITZLER, Lakeland Standard Chinchilla Best of Breed ABIGAIL LIGOCKI, Land O’ Lakes Tan Best of Breed HU NT ER NICOLE GLISSON, Chiefland Thrianta Best of Breed SIDNEY COMFORT , Wesley Chapel YOUT H LLAMA Junior Showmanship SAVANNAH MORGAN, Brandon Intermediate Showmanship SKYLAR SPARLING, Sarasota Senior Showmanship HALEY WRIGHT , Silver Springs Non-Breeding Llama Champion HALEY WRIGHT , Silver Springs, Cavindish Reserve Champion KAT ELYNN T INDALE, Silver Springs, Cowboy Female Grand Champion KAELE LAWLESS, Odessa, Oakrest's First Snow Reserve Champion JACLYN DEBOLT, Zephyrhills, Meadow Dance's St Nick's Eve Male Champion ALEX RODMAN, Sarasota, Peruvian Edison

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Reserve Champion SAVANNAH MORGAN, Brandon, PKS Beethoven Junior (Age 8 - 10) Youth Performance Champion ANGELA PHILLIPS, Plant City, "Moose" Aladdin's Sneak Preview Reserve Champion SAVANNAH MORGAN, Brandon, PKS Beethoven Int. (Age 11 - 13) Youth Performance Champion SKYLAR SPARLING, Sarasota, Blanca Zafiro Reserve Champion JONAT HAN NESS, Ocklawaha, Legacy Sr. (Age 14 - 18) Youth Performance Champion SHAYNE CHANDLER, Sarasota, HF Spencer Reserve Champion KAELE LAWLESS, Odessa, Yeti HAY B ALE DECORAT ING CONT EST 1st Place B ARN STARS, Weirsdale, FL 2nd Place HILLSBOROU GH COU NTY DAIRY 4-H CLU B, Plant City, FL 3rd Place PU RE COU NT RY 4H, Brooksville, FL 4th Place DOGGONE CRAZY 4-H CLUB , Riverview, FL 5th Place ALONSO FFA, Tampa, FL 4-H/ FFA AGRICU LT U RAL EXHIB IT CONT EST 1st Place KOU NT RY KREWE 4-H CLU B, Thonotosassa, FL 2nd Place B OOT S & BRIDLE 4-H CLUB , Valrico, FL 3rd Place Gadsden County 4-H, Quincy, FL 4th Place Nassau County 4-H, Callahan, FL 5th Place OCOEE MIDDLE FFA, Ocoee, FL 6th Place SOU T H PLANTAT ION HIGH 4-H, Plantation, FL

AllState Homes is Tampa Bay’s most enduring “On Your Lot” Builder

BUILD ON YOUR LOT

• • • • • •

3BR/2BA/2CG home designs from $135,000 Free demolition* $0 down for most owners Designs to suit lot and budget Easy financing Concrete block construction 2-10 Home Buyer Warranty included! Call for Appt: 813-625-2000 Office: 11300 N. Central Ave Tampa, FL 33612 www.allstatehomes.com LIC# CRC026357 Trusted since 1955 * demo up to $5K

4892 Sun City Center Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573

P O Drawer L Plant City, FL 33564

12880 E US Highway 92 Dover, FL 33527

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

89


90

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

91


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

92


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

93


Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909 USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

ANIMALS & NEEDS NUSIANCE HOG PROBLEM? Call 813-703-2330 ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. (813) 752-2230. Call Don Ammerman. www.ammermans.com Swaps July 14, 2013 and December 1, 2013. CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 DOVE HUNTS Lithia area limited number of memberships still available. Call Fish Hawk Sporting Clays. 813-689-0490.

BUILDING SUPPLIES DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378 WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 T1-11 4 X 8 SHEET 5/8-INCH THICK B-grade $22.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378 NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378 MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378 $145.00

SNAPPER PRO 50 Zero turn mower, 36" cut, kawasaki engine, 43 hrs. $3,250 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 SHAVER 5O STUMP GRINDER 3pt. lift. Excellent condition. $2,950 Call Alvie 813-8722

FOR SALE KITCHEN CABINETS All wood kitchen cabinets. Call Tedd 813-752-3378 14KT GOLD AMMOLITE RING Unique Multi-colored fossil gem with unique mounting. Size 8 $250 or best offer. Call 863-370-8891 TOP GRADE TANZANITE RING 18KT GOLD Top grade, 18kt. Beautiful piece of jewelry. 1.05kt round nice blue gem with channel side diamonds. Size 7-1/2 $1,100 Call 863-370-8891

JOBS CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In T he Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

FARM EQUIPMENT JCB WORK MAX 800D UTV, less than 50 miles, 4X4, diesel. Used. $9,750. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY SHOP BUILT 14 FT TRAILER New tires & wheels $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MASSEY HARRIS FERGUSON NO. 16 PACER With belly mower $1950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES

FOR LEASE 24 Acre Farm 5" Well Gulf City & Willis Road. Ruskin FL. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 WANTED TO BUY Problem real estate mortgages. Will consider any situation, defaults, delinquencies. Hillsborough, Pasco and Polk County. CASH OUT! Call H. Lee 813-986-9141 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 FOR LEASE 15 acre for hay. State Road 70 & Vernon Road. Manatee County. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 FOR LEASE 32 acres strawberry farm in Plant City ready for spring cropor 60 acres for sale with 3 mobile homes. Call 334-355-1945 MOUNTAIN HOME Located in Blairsville Georgia! Private home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, unfurnished basement, nice kitchen, sunroom, back deck for cooking out. Nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! MLS#212679, $180,000. 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. Call Jane Baer with Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829

MISC.

MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

BUSINESS OWNERS Unpaid invoices dragging you down? Get your cash now! Factor your way out. Call H. Lee 913-986-9141

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620

HUSTLER X1 Zero Turn mower. Loaner, 88 hours, 60” cut, 31hp Kawasaki. $8,100 Call Alvie 813-759-87

PRIVATE INVESTOR Will consider any situation. 813-986-9141

94

WALDEN LAKE EAST Desirable Walden Lake home! 3/2, NEW Kitchen all stainless steel appliance’s. Ready to sell. Call Malissa Crawford @ 813-967-0168

RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

FORD 3400 INDUSTRIAL TRACTOR With loader, skid steer attached. $6,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

1940 FARMALL Model Super A, 4 cyl with all attachments. Engine needs rebuilding, rebuild kit is $500 Asking $1000 OBO 813-508-9072

info@inthefieldmagazine.com

REAL ESTATE LAND WANTED 30 to 100 acres, no improvements. Hillsborough, Polk or East Pasco. Call H. Lee 813-986-9141

MARCH 2013

W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

95


In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida