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Contents

VOL. 9 • ISSUE 1

Feature Story Ed & Myrtle Swindle

Pa g e 70 Business Up Front

Feed Them Like

Page 10

You Love Them

Page 41

Something to Squeal About

Dale McClellan

Page 12

Page 45

Tampa Bay’s

Recipes

Fishing Report

Page 50

Page 14

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Danny Aprile ..............................President Bill Burnett ..........................VicePresident Jemy Hinton ..............................Treasurer

DIRECTORS FOR 2012-2013

Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, James Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker, Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack, Ray Wood

Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813.685.9121

Tumors and Tiaras

Page 54

Grub Station

Page 18

Growing Leaders

Page 67

Rocking Chair Chatter

Community Farmer’s

Page 22

Markets

Integrative Pollination

Page 30

Page 82 Around the World

Hunting, Film

Iraqi 4-H

Production & Gator

Page 84

Page 32

Country Folks 4-H

Wyoming Memories

Page 86

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

Thanksgiving Day comes, by statute, once a year; to the honest man it comes as frequently as the heart of gratitude will allow. ~Edward Sandford Martin In 1621 the colonists shared an autumn feast with the Wampanoag Indians. This day is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations. It wasn’t until 1863 that the day was proclaimed a national holiday by President Abraham Lincoln. This Thanksgiving Day, take the time to consider all that you have to be thankful for. This is a time to focus on what we have, not what we don’t. Slow down and take time to appreciate things that are often overlooked. The Thanksgiving season isn’t about giving gifts. It is about enjoying food and fellowship. Include the farmer and rancher as they made it possible for you to gather your family and friends together around the Thanksgiving table by producing the safest most abundant food supply in the world. When shopping for your holiday fare, as every day, be sure to select Fresh From Florida products. It will help boost your local economy and ensure your food is fresh! Among my many blessings, I am thankful that In The Field magazine has been covering what is growing for a full eight years! This issue begins our ninth year of bringing you stories of farmers and ranchers who work tirelessly to feed our country, state and nation. We look forward to many more years in the agriculture industry. Happy Thanksgiving!

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Callie Jo Parker CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Callie Jo Parker Lindsey English CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers ABC Pizza................................................................91 Ag Technologies......................................................29 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers .............................24 American Cancer Society.......................................90 Aquarius Water Refining.......................................90 Astin Strawberry Exchange...................................91 B Powerful Promos.................................................91 Badcock....................................................................23 Bill’s Transmissions .................................................81 Bingham...................................................................42 Bloomingdale Children’s House............................65 Brandon Auto Services, Inc. ..................................36 Brandon Region Hospital......................................40 Brewington’s............................................................17 Broke & Poor..........................................................46 Brown’s Jewelers.............................................7 & 49 Byrd & Barnhill, P.L...............................................17 Cecil Breeding Farm...............................................20 CF Industries, Inc....................................................78 Chemical Containers, Inc......................................31 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive.................................63

Index of Advertisers Crescent Jewlers.....................................................30 & 49 Dad’s Towing....................................................................58 Discount Metals...............................................................39 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................55 Driscoll’s............................................................................53 Earhart’s Runway Grill ...................................................95 East Coast Ag Products...................................................64 Erwin Technical Center...................................................59 Fancy Farms .....................................................................24 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................77 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................91 Farm Credit ......................................................................11 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fishhawk Sporting Clays ................................................35 Florida Dept. of Agriculture............................................74 Florida Mineral & Salt....................................................93 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................61 Forbes Road Produce ........................................................9 Fred’s Market ...................................................................15 Gator Ford........................................................................93 Gerald Keene Plumbing ..................................................40 Grove Equipment Service................................................48 Gulf Coast Tractor...........................................................96 Halfacre Construction Company...................................63 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply...................................3 & 37 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................................91 Haught Funeral Home....................................................69 Helena Chemical-Tampa ................................................31 Hillsboro State Bank........................................................61 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau ......................4 & 72 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................26 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................62 Jane Baer Realty...............................................................49 Johnson’s Barbeque..........................................................61 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm.................................................90 Key Plex ............................................................................56 Kinkaid Auction...............................................................33 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................72 Magnolia Hill...................................................................80 Malissa Crawford............................................................36 Mark Smith Excavating..................................................19 Meryman Environmental, Inc........................................58 Mosaic...............................................................................26 Myers Cleaners.................................................................46 O’Connor Enterprises........................................................2 Parkesdale Market .............................................................5 Pathway BioLogic............................................................89 Plant City Tire & Auto Service, Inc...............................90 Ring Power Corporation ................................................39 Santa Clause .....................................................................64 Savich & Lee Wholesale .................................................16 Seedway...............................................................................9 Shrimp & Co Express .......................................................7 South Florida Baptist Hospital .......................................83 Southside Farm & Pet Supply........................................13 Southwestern Produce.....................................................27 Stephanine Humprey.......................................................15 Stingray Chevrolet............................................................43 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................66 Sygenta..............................................................................21 Tampa Bay Times............................................................66 The Hay Depot................................................................36 The Hungry Gator...........................................................53 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort........................7 & 60 Tip To Toe Day Spa & Gifts..........................................48 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith .................................................................81 Walden Lake Car Wash ..................................................85 Wells Memorial................................................................90 Willie’s ...............................................................................17 Woodside Dental..............................................................72

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You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

InTheField速 Magazine P.O. Box 5377 Plant City, FL 33566-0042

Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

HAPPY THANKSGIVING Dear Reader: I hope you all have an enjoyable Thanksgiving. In addition to being a wonderful opportunity to enjoy family and share thanks for the countless good things we have, don’t forget the many items on your table came as a result of the hardworking family farms in this country.

I hope many of you took time out to enjoy the Farm City Festival November 10. While a great chance to visit Ybor City, the first time it has served as the venue for this celebration, this is another chance for Agriculture to stand up and be noticed for its importance to our local economy.

Congratulations to our newly elected local, county, state and national leaders. We look forward to working with them in the weeks and months ahead on behalf of agriculture and the Farm Bureau families we serve.

Dale McClellan, a past president of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors, recently received some well deserved recognition as he was name Southeastern Farmer of the Year at the 2012 Sunbelt Ag Expo at Moultrie, Georgia. Owner of M& B Dairy, Dale was recognized for his excellence in production and farm management, along with his leadership in farm and community organizations. Those of us who have known Dale and worked with him can readily attest to contributions to our industry and the community.

A special “thank you” to our Executive Director, Judi Whitson; the Florida State Fair Authority, 4-H/Hillsborough County Extension and our state agriculture commodity organizations for another successful Ag-Venture. Presented by Ag in the Classroom, Ag-Venture is a special opportunity for third graders here in Hillsborough County to learn about agriculture and its importance to our local economy. Approximately 3,000 third-graders came to the Fairgrounds during the eight days of Ag-Venture to touch, taste and see Florida Agriculture. I would also like to welcome three new members to your Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors: Alex Ritzheimer, who is active in the cattle industry, Ron Wetherington a strawberry grower and member of the Florida Farm Bureau board of directors and Will Womack, a landscaper. They take over the positions of outgoing board members George Coleman, Joe Keel and Glenn Harrell, who have to retire due to term limits. My personal thanks to George and Glenn for their dedicated service, and I look forward to the contributions of Alex, Ron and Will.

I close by reminding you of the many different benefits your Farm Bureau membership brings. You don’t have to be a cattleman or farmer to join. If you support what we stand for, we would encourage you to join. For more information on Farm Bureau, including how to join and the benefits of membership, please visit www.hcfb.org or call 813/685-9121

Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

Board of Directors

Danny Aprile, President; Bill Burnett, Vice-President; Jemy Hinton Member-at-large; Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker,Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack and Ray Wood, Judi Whitson, Executive Director 8

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• Thanksgiving Day is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November in the USA. • Thanksgiving Day is celebrated on the second Monday in October in Canada. • The Plymouth Pilgrims were the first to celebrate Thanksgiving. They celebrated the first Thanksgiving Day in the fall of 1621. • The Wampanoag Indians were the people who taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land. • The Pilgrim leader, Governor William Bradford, organized the first Thanksgiving feast in the year 1621 and invited the neighboring Wampanoag Indians to the 3 day feast. • The state of New York officially made Thanksgiving Day an annual custom in 1817. • The annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade began in the 1920s. • Thanksgiving did not become an official national holiday until more than 200 years later, when in 1863 President Lincoln proclaimed the event. • It is tradition for US Presidents to issue a pardon to the White House Thanksgiving Turkeys. Since about 1947 the National Turkey Federation has presented the President of the United States with one (and in recent years - two) live turkey(s) in a ceremony known as the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation.

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Business Up Front By Ginny Mink

EDUCATION’S OTHER OPTION – MONTESSORI SCHOOL

BLOOMINGDALE CHILDREN’S HOUSE

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ducation is a supremely important aspect of one’s life. As the years progress and people become parents they are accosted with a vast array of educational choices for their dearly loved children. The truth is, many are walking away from the concept of public education, quite displeased about a large number of problematic areas therein. Given that decision, most people think their only options revolve around private school and home schooling. However, there is actually another quite intriguing option if one is willing to investigate it. That option is Montessori school. Juliette Johnson has been a Montessori teacher for 45 years. She is currently employed by Bloomingdale Children’s House, a Montessori school owned by her daughter, Terjiana Montalvo. The story

behind this unique family endeavor is an interesting one for sure. Juliette reveals, “I grew up on a farm in upstate New York. What we had there is different than down here, McIntosh apples, pears and Hubbard squash. We had pigs. I just grew up with everything, horses, you name it. My daughters grew up the same way and my granddaughters can go in the woods where we live and go fishing in the creek. My granddaughter takes her llamas back there, we use them on the trails.” The llamas are a particularly interesting aspect of the family’s Montessori history. In fact, prior to opening Bloomingdale Children’s House two years ago, they owned Llamas and Learning on Boyette Road. Juliette explains that there was about 23 acres available to them at that site. They used ten acres to raise the llamas and miniature horses and the back 13 was used as a place for nature trails. She adds, “The parents would go back on nature walks with their children and go back on picnic lunches in the woods.” Today, their new site is located at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church on South Kings Avenue in Brandon. Its close proximity to Bloomingdale led them to choose the current name. While they no longer have the space for llamas to run free, they have not neglected their love of nature in the least.

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Juliette says, “Right now we have chickens, goats and rabbits that run free in a little courtyard. The kids collect the eggs from the roosting boxes in the morning. We have Flemish Giant rabbits, they will weigh like 20 pounds. We have the Rhode Island Reds and Barred Rock chickens so the kids can see the colored eggs. We also have little birds and fish inside so that the children can be exposed to all the animals and have a helping hand. They see them every day because they take care of them.” Bloomingdale Children’s House services ages six months to third grade. Their website adds, “Each of our classes has a low teacher to child ratio and our environments are designed to be pleasing to all children. Our outdoor environment is very much an extension of our indoor environW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


ment. We want children to be able to be "with" nature. Explore their surroundings, listening to the birds sing, find a caterpillar crawling or just be able to feel the breeze. Children need to be outdoors and we strive to provide an outdoor environment that is just as inviting as our indoor environment.” With regards to the teachers there, it is important to note that this is indeed a family organization. Terjiana (who has American Montessori Society and North American Montessori certifications) works with the infants and toddlers. Juliette is Montessori Educational Programs International certified and teaches the 2s, 3s, and 4s. Fiona Tarnowski (who is London Montessori Certified) is the Lead VPK teacher and Juliette’s husband, Tim, is Pan American Montessori certified and teaches Kindergarten – 3rd grade. While the broad age ranges might seem a little unusual, their importance becomes crucial within a thorough understanding of the Montessori education philosophy. Maria Montessori, the founder, was an Italian physician in the late 1800s. In 1897 she realized that the children she was trying to treat could not be helped by hospitals but instead needed to be trained in schools. She wanted to use nature in schools in order to meet the “real” needs of the students (www2.webster.edu). Juliette adds, “She designed beautiful equipment so children could work at their own pace. Everything that she designed for the children is made out of a different type of wood so the children can see the nature of the things as well.” According to Webster University, “Montessori was also the first in education to have child-sized tables and chairs made for the students. She believed that the learning environment was just as important as the learning itself. Because of this belief her schools were often peaceful, orderly places, where the children valued their space for concentration and the process of learning.” Obviously Maria Montessori was a pioneer in such an unheard of educational methodology and yet, her philosophy appeared to work quite well. Juliette was first introduced to the concept when she was in college studying child psychology. She says, “I thought, ‘if I ever have children I’m going to look into Montessori schooling.’” She did have children, and after attending a seminar held by Dr. Helen Billings, she was sold on the Montessori design. Juliette sees Montessori as an ideal educational environment for children. She concludes, “In a Montessori school it is hands-on and this is how little ones learn.” If you are equally sold on the idea for your own children or grandchildren, you should check out Bloomingdale Children’s House. You can visit their website at www.bloomingdalechildrenshouse.com or if you’d like to take a tour, feel free to give them a call at (813) 685-0009. You can also reach them via email at bloomingdalechildrenshouse@yahoo.com. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Something to Squeal About By Lindsey McClain English September 17, 2012 marked the 31st annual swine drawing, the first in the new Evelyn and Batista Madonia Sr. Agriculture Show Center. On this evening, hundreds of eager students, parents, FFA advisors and 4-H advisors lined the bright red chairs waiting for a specific number to be drawn and name to be announced. This year, 260 students entered the drawing to show a pig. Nails were bitten and cheers were let out as the first 50 names were announced by Lauren Der, Plant City High School Agriculture Department Head, and the anxiety only became more intense as Area 5 State FFA Vice-President, David Walden announced the final 35 participants. “We have new exhibitors and first time showers,” said Swine Chairman, Lane Wetherington. “Sometimes you have repeat showmen, and with the luck of the draw you have a new showman, that’s this year’s case.” The Florida Strawberry Festival swine show and sale have become a very important part of the FFA/Youth Agricultural Youth Program giving students the chance to showcase their work in their 12

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projects. This program was created to encourage interest in agriculture, to expose students to leadership, to develop character and to award Hillsborough County youth for their contributions. Students who wish to show swine are required to maintain a 2.5 weighted grade point average, as well as be a member of a FFA chapter or 4-H club. Members must be in the third through 12th grade as well as be a resident of Hillsborough County. By Monday, October 29, 2012 every exhibitor was required to have his or her pig and have them tagged at the Florida Strawberry Festival grounds. From that point, on these students will be devoted to their projects by caring for their needs and preparing them for the show in March. “New buildings opening will be exciting to move into and have the exhibitors use,” said Swine Chairman, Lane Wetherington. The names of this year’s showman are as follows: SHEYENNE ALBRIGHT WHITNEY ALVARADO SOPHIE ATEN CHEYENNE AUSTIN GARY BAKER NOVEMBER 2012

JENN BAKER KIERSTEN BASS AARON BINGHAM CLAYTON BROCK BRODIE BROWN LETTY BURGIN JACKSON BURKE TYLER CAIN CHESLEY CAMPBELL SARAH CARTER SHAWN CONNELL MADILYN CONRAD COOPER DELALLO SHYLEN DENMARK COLTEN DRAWDY JEREMIAH FORD EMMA FUTCH EMILY GLAUSIER STACI GOSSAGE LINDSEY GRAVES ELISE GRIFFIN TORI GRIFFITH ALYSSA GRIMES TAYLOR GRIMES ASHLYN GUDE BRIANNA HARP AMBER HARWELL CHARLES HEIDEL JAREK HERNANDEZ JOEL HILBRANDS ADRIENNE HORST TYLER JENSEN BRIEN JOHNSTON JENNA KEELY ALEXIS KEY PARKER KILLEBREW ALLISON KUMMELMAN ALLISON LANE BRADEN LEEK JOSHUA LEWIS CHEYENNE LOPEZ TARRA LOVE LANCE LOWER ERIN LYTLE

EMMA MCCONNELL TAYLOR MUELERLEILE DANIEL PAUL MEAGAN PETITT ADELINE PORT CLAYTON REASOR SHAYDE ROBBINS TRAILE ROBBINS MAKAYLA RODRIQUEZ JANNA ROYAL RACHELLE SAPP RICHELLE SAPP MADISON SIMCOX HANNA SIMMONS TRISTAN SIMMONS MEGHAN SODDERS MARYBETH STEWART JACE STINES BRENNA STURGIS JACOB SWEAT WILLIAM TISON TAYLOR TYSON RYLEE VANSTRONDER JONATHAN WALL CONNER WATSON SYDNEY WATSON JAYCE WAVE LINDSEY WHITE GERALD WILLIAMS, GRACE WILLIAMS JENA WILLIS CONNOR WOODS CORBETT WYATT BLAKE ZAJAC MARISSA ZOLNA The 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival Swine Show will take place on Thursday, February 28 at 7:00 p.m. The sale of these swine will take place on the following day, Friday, March 1 at 7:00 p.m.

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To Much Fishing Pressure by Captain Woody Gore

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ver the years I’ve written many articles about fishing how’s and where to catch fish. Personally, I’m a dock, oyster bar and mangrove person. I love tossing artificial lures around docks, oysters and mangrove point with eddies. The dilemma comes when everyone else is fishing these same locations. Does that mean I stop fishing these locations? I don’t think so! I just need to make sure I fish them at the right time. That means I need to be there before others have run all the fish off! If you’ve spent any time on the water you know there are days when the fish get stubborn and decide not to eat. It might be due to weather conditions, or it could be fishing pressure has them shut down. There are still some things you can do to catch fish regardless of the weather or fishing pressure. One of the worst to overcome is fishing pressure, because the fish tend to get highly selective, but you still have a couple of options. Probably the best option is to get away from the pressure. If the area you're fishing has a lot of anglers, get away and go somewhere else. Simply move to the edge of the existing activity, or take off and find another spot all to yourself. While the secondary areas may not be quite as appealing with the numbers of fish, the fish in the new area just might be more willing to bite. Check out places that just look fishy. The apparent places might be where a current comes around a point forming an eddy, a few scattered oyster beds, an old barnacle

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covered dock that doesn’t appear to be used often, or a creek mouth. I teach folks to fish the right places, but these are the same places I fish and look for when I’m searching for new locations. Everyone is always looking for that magic fishing report. But once those fishing reports get out, the word spreads like a wildfire and everyone goes to that area. I’ve seen this fishing pressure happen time after time in Tampa Bay. A school of redfish will move onto a flat and in less than a week they are so beat up from being fished every day, the school splits into singles and doubles and seems to disappear. I realize everyone wants to catch fish, but having 15 to 25 or more boats sitting on a school of redfish every day is ridiculous. Weather has its effects on fishing, hot days warm the shallow flats and backcountry depleting the oxygen levels. Windy days muddy the water, rainy days cause a tannin stain runoff, and calm sunny days make the water crystal clear. All of these conditions might call for a different presentation, muddy and stained you might slow down and clear you might speed up. Smaller might be better so either way it’s always good to remember to match the hatch. And always remember to keep track of what they are feeding on because there are times when fish get selective as to which baits they want to eat. If you keep the above ideas in mind, you'll know what to do when those finicky feeding times occur.

LET’S GO FISHING! SNOOK bite is going strong and with

NOVEMBER 2012

cooling water temperatures they should become even more active. Cooler water means snook become more comfortable and not as lethargic, which should brighten up the bite. Although we’ve maintained some decent snook action all summer, November usually turns out nicely. We’ve been catching exciting amounts of fish on both half and three-quarter day trips with most averaging in the 25-29 inch range and several over 30 inches. Our big fish for October was a 36 incher. REDFISH action was active in the last month and should continue into November. Good redfish action should continue with catches around oyster bars, mangroves and grass flats. We’re catching plenty of slot sized reds with our big fish tipping the measuring stick at 34 inches. SEA TROUT bites will continue getting stronger right into and through the winter months, so be prepared for some decent winter trout action on strong incoming and outgoing tides. Try fishing the grass flats with both artificial, live greenbacks and shrimp. MACKEREL should still be hanging around the Bay area feeding on bait schools throughout the Bay and near the beaches. If you’re interested in some extra excitement, and possibly a nice kingfish or two, check out the mackerel bite. MANGROVE SNAPPER are found on every rock pile or structure around Tampa Bay and are fairly easy to catch. A small knocker rig with a #1 or 1/0 hook should produce a nice meal. They’re really partial to the small greenbacks and shrimp. When W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Amy with Snook

you find them and get a good bite going it seems like they wise up shortly after you start catching them using one bait or the other. I always take both with me and when that happens I’ll switch around. COBIA are often found around range markers, channel markers and bridges during November. Toss them a pinfish, greenback or artificial eel bait and hold on.

Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing 813-477-3817 Captain Woody Gore is the areas top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, and Bradenton for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. Visit his website at: WW W. CAP TAIN W OOD YGO RE.CO M or send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

Flounder

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grown locally in Plant City. Originally from California, his menu reflects the light, fresh style of food preparation for which the golden state is known. The menu is a veritable tribute to international cuisine, illustrating the chef’s familiarity with all manner of ethnic food with selections showing the influences of the U.S., Mexico, Italy, France, Germany, Greece, Thailand, and India. My tasting included a beautifully presented lemon vinaigrette Salad Nicoise, a French composed salad, with green beans, hard boiled eggs, tomatoes, onion, capers, new potatoes and ahi-grade fresh tuna.

By Cheryl Kuck

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f 75 percent of small businesses (whether or not they are restaurants) fail each year, the resulting question would be, what makes a successful business? It is a question that has occupied my thoughts many times throughout my years as a small business owner and independent contractor. Research indicates the top five reasons for failure are location, absentee ownership, poor management, poor staff training, poor customer service. All are things that can be addressed by something as simple as paying attention to your customer-base, the environment in which you operate (the surrounding community as your resource, as well as, inside the business doors), to people you pay and to people who pay for your services. Sounds simple doesn’t it? Well, generally speaking, it is…with one small caveat. You have to love or be very interested in what you do because you do that more hours a day than you do anything else. If you don’t, you should be doing something else because loving what you do requires time…a lot of it. Let’s see how the research issues have been addressed and why the Sumatra Bistro Cafe & Bakery and Executive Chef & General Manager Michael A. Wahl have raised the bar on the issue of attaining and maintaining success. Having visited the bistro location on the corner of Oakfield Drive and busy intersection of S. Lakewood Drive in years past when it was a boutique and tanning salon, it did not seem a likely place for a neighborhood restaurant. There was no expectation of people strolling by, no parking on the main street (parking is located behind the building) and most road traffic was

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headed for Westfield Mall. Yet, after three years, the Sumatra is thriving with a growing base of regular customers. A neighborhood restaurant has been created where there is no neighborhood. The inviting bistro décor with a handpainted mural of a European street scene and outside pet friendly patio, puts one in a relaxed mood, thus preparing the mind and palate for the expectation of something excellent, perhaps a little out of the ordinary…and it is, remarkably so. The space is intimate without seeming crowded and most of the excellent staff of 10 has been there since opening. Everyone is gracious and, though not related to each other, make you feel as though you have just wandered into a happy family restaurant. Part of the success may be attributed to being primarily (except for Friday and Saturday) a breakfast and lunch restaurant, located near the hospital, medical services, and business district. Breakfast might be something a business person may have missed but is ready for by 11:00 or as ‘just the spot’ for a business lunch. The bistro is also ideal for the health conscious who might be visiting the spa next door, after a workout at the gym, or for those with dietary restrictions, since fresh, organic, free-range, preservative free, gluten-free and locally grown food, as well as, vegetarian dishes are served here. The needs of those with specific food allergies are also met. In his position as Executive Chef, Wahl understands the value of using the best and freshest ingredients for which he personally shops and hand picks. Vegetables are

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I also tasted a Thai lean chicken breast wrap with fresh greens, bean sprouts, cucumber, carrots and fresh feta cheese with a side of house balsamic dressing for dipping or drizzling and a Herb Tuscan frittata, sun-dried tomato topped with feta cheese crumbles. Since I seldom have cravings for sweet foods, dessert is not generally of prime importance to me. That is, until I tasted a house specialty, Lemon Cello Italian liqueur white chocolate and mascarpone sponge cake, served with an iced coffee caramel mocha drink…a totally decadent pairing that was worth every single calorie. “Desserts are rotated to go with our special coffees. The Bistro Café is named for Sumatra coffee and our coffee drinks are all made from Sumatra roasts and blends,” said Wahl. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Chef Wahl, a man who obviously loves what he does, is studying to add the title of board certified nutritionist to his list of credentials and enjoys teaching healthy cooking for special events and organizations like the local YMCA. As General Manager, he is involved with community outreach for Delany Creek Lodge, an assisted living residence for senior citizens, Brandon Women’s Clinic and Special Op’s Warriors Foundation, providing full scholarship grants, educational and family counseling to the surviving children of special operations personnel and assistance to wounded warriors personnel. My first introduction to Wahl was during the Brandon Chamber of Commerce 2012 “Taste of Brandon” (see story for June 2012 publication online at www.inthefieldmagazine.com) where his view of the importance of organic, gluten-free and free-range dining options W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


caught my attention. Out of the 25 or more vendors I spoke with, he was the only restaurateur to send me a follow up e-mail. By taking his time to make contact I immediately knew he was an entrepreneurial businessman who would make his business grow and that made me interested enough to make an appointment to see for myself. During my visit he told me about his special monthly and holiday events which have included a Valentines Day showing of the movie “Julie and Julia” (based on a quest to cook all 524 recipes in Julia Child's book Mastering the Art of French Cooking) serving Child’s classic recipes. Hispanic Heritage month featured a weekend of haute Spanish cuisine and classic guitar music. A German Oktoberfest was recently held and attendees were encouraged to wear lederhosen (German short leather pants). On spooky Wednesday October 31 there was a Halloween mystery theatre and dinner, and for Thanksgiving, a traditional dinner will be served including a Grand Marnier range-free turkey or order

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a to go turkey, dessert or the full dinner for six to eight people no later than November 21. Check out Sumatra on Facebook for details on their New Year five course gourmet dine and wine tasting event. Wahl has turned Sumatra’s into one of the area’s most interesting places to eat or, as he says, “Sit and stay. We don’t care about turning tables. We just want customers to have a welcoming and enjoyable place to visit where they can relax. We care about the health of our clients and we want them to have a delicious, satisfying and nutritional meal.” The Sumatra Cafe and Bistro team are recipients of the CMUS (Celebration Media U.S) Talk of the Town Customer Satisfaction Award in the Food category. My partner in gourmet excursions asked if guys would want to go someplace with all that healthy food. I told him that if the food is great, and it is, they are getting a bonus that may be lifestyle altering without even knowing it. •

1602 Oa kfi el d Dr. #103 i n Bra ndon (813) 655-6200 Web si te: www.SumatraBistro.com

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“No,” the man replied. “The seat is empty, however it does belong to me. My wife was supposed to come with me to the game, but she passed away. This will be the first pre-season game we haven’t been together since we have been married.” “Oh, I’m sorry to hear that. That’s terrible,” I said. “But couldn’t you find someone else… maybe a friend or relative, or even a neighbor to take the seat?” The old man shook his head. “No, they’re all at her funeral.” My father, Albert Berry, as a senior citizen had a pretty sharp mind right up to his death at age 88. He spent a lot of time fishing after retirement, and I went along on many of his trips. One day he overslept and hurriedly put his fishing tackle in the car, dropped by and picked me up, and we headed for Trails End on the Withlacoochee River. He let me drive after he realized that he had left his billfold (which contained his fishing license) at home on the dresser. We had a great day, and caught a lot of bluegills. As we were pulling into the boat landing I noticed a game warden on the dock. He saw the bluegills swimming in the live well, and said, “May I see your fishing license?” Dad spoke up and said, “Well I got in a hurry and left my billfold at the house. Actually officer, these are my pet fish.” “What do you mean, pet fish?” the officer said.

As a senior citizen I have a lot to be thankful for. First, I survived the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s. And now I am fighting to keep up with 2012. There are so many new electronic gadgets that will do just about every thing but flush the toilet. Plus, there is the belief that a cataclysmic or transformative event will occur on December 21 of this year. Not to mention the New Age interpretation of this transition is that this date will be the time in which our planet earth and all inhabitants may undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation. Also, one of the scenarios suggests the end of the world, when the earth will collide with a black hole or a passing asteroid. Frankly I am not worried about any of that. As Jay Leno said on one of his late night TV shows, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and drank while they were pregnant. As infants and children, we road in cars with no car seat, no booster seat, no seat belt, no air bags, bald tires and sometimes no brakes. I remember drinking water from the garden hose, sharing an RC Cola with my friends, and no one actually died from this. I loved Mama’s cupcakes, ate lots of white bread with real butter and bacon. Drank Kool-Aid made with real white sugar, and I was never overweight ‘cause I was always outside playing. There was a time when I would get with the boys and we would talk about hunting and fishing. Now as a senior citizen we talk about the medicine we are taking and the aches and pains we have. Being a senior citizen isn’t bad at all. We are more valuable than any of the younger generation. We have silver in our hair, gold on our teeth, stones in our kidneys, and lead in our feet. Not to mention we are loaded with natural gas. I went to the first pre-season Bucs games this year. On my left was a vacant seat. I asked the man on the other side of the seat, who looked to be in his 80s, if anyone was going to sit there. 22

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“I take these bluegills out about every week and let them swim around for a few minutes. Then I whistle and they jump right back into the live well.” “You don’t expect me to fall for that, do you?” he replied. “It’s the truth,” dad replied. “Okay, I’ve got to see this,” the officer said. So dad pitched all the fish back into the lake. “Well?” said the game warden. “Well what?” said dad. “When are you going to whistle to call them back?” “Call who back?” “The Fish!” “What fish?” The game warden laughed and said, “Well that’s a first. You boys load your boat and get out of here.” Thinking back over the years. I remember my mother would threaten me with a dose of Castor Oil if I didn’t do the dishes or sweep off the walkway to the house. For you youngsters who do not know what Castor Oil is, I suggest you take a dose some time. How many remember Lydia Pinkhams pills, thought to be a fertility pill that would make your newcomer a girl. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Then there was the wonder medicine, Hadacol, a patent medicine marketed as a vitamin supplement. Its principal attraction, however, was that it contained 12 percent alcohol (listed on the tonic bottle's label as a "preservative"), which made it quite popular in the dry counties of the southern United States. I remember White’s Central Pharmacy in Plant City, now the location of the Camellia Rose Tea room. Over the years the pharmacy became know as “Where Paul White Stays,” namely because they were open from 7 a.m. till 11p.m. six days a week. They had a soda fountain where they served a cherry smash with a pretzel hung over the straw for a nickel. Around the block was Barwick’s Drug Store. They had a soda fountain too, and made the best chocolate malt in town for a quarter. My sister, Nettie Mae, once told me the soda fountain was invented to introduce the customer with an upset stomach to bicarbonate of soda. They would drink a glass of the bubbly mineral water, burp, and feel as good as new.

I have been thinking about all the big changes we seniors have seen in our lifetimes. Men on the moon, landing on Mars, the iPad and iPod! As a senior citizen we are faced with the fact that we’re 17 around the neck, 42 around the waist, and 109 around the golf course. The little old gray haired lady you help across the street is your wife. We have too much room in the house and not enough in the medicine cabinet. Our pacemaker makes the garage door go up when you see a pretty girl walk by the house. Yes, life was different when I was growing up. We got married first, and then slept together. Back then a meaningful relationship was when your uncle would take you to the movies. All and all, I take today’s life. It’s hard to beat indoor plumbing and life-saving pharmaceuticals. To be honest, if I’d been my current age back in those good old days, I’d be dead right now. •

Back then life was simple, the top six discipline problems in school were talking, chewing gum, making noise, running the halls, getting out of turn in line and not putting paper in the wastebasket. Today it’s drug and alcohol abuse, pregnancy, suicide, rape, robbery and guns in the school.

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Newsome FFA Takes Top Honors At Hillsborough County Fair

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ewsome’s Agriculture department and FFA program is excited to kick off another year. The livestock show exhibitors have doubled at Newsome. Students learn responsibility, communication, and marketing skills while raising these animal projects. This year at the Hillsborough County Fair Newsome had several exhibitors show swine, sheep, goats, and cattle. Newsome FFA excelled in the swine show. Lauren VanDame won first in her class with the chapter hog. Courtney Prebich also took home a first place ribbon on her hog. Shelby Miles received second place on her hog. Cassidy Stubbs received third place on her hog and Jessica Andrlik received seventh place on her hog project. Lauren Van Dame was also called back for swine showmanship and she did an excellent job exhibiting the chapter hog. This was her first time showing a pig. In addition to all of the high placings on the Newsome hogs, students excelled in marketing their swine projects. The Newsome chapter hog brought $5.25/lb, which was one of the top premiums for the night. The Newsome FFA chapter would like to extend a special thank you and appreciation to Ramm Transport for purchasing this hog. The proceeds from the hog will be used for FFA banquet awards and FFA leadership events for this year at Newsome. We would also like to extend appreciation and thanks to the following companies who supported other student swine projects. They are Publix supermarkets, Mosaic Inc., Ramm Transport, Big Timber Cattle, WareCreek Images, and Crystal McClelland. Even the Newsome FFA Alumni purchased a hog this year and supported the youth at the county fair. Briana Tribble and Katherine Miller showed Nigerain Dwarf goats at the fair and they did an exceptional job at placing and showmanship. This year they competed in the goat costume contest and did a fairytale theme. Caitlin Cinnamon and Kendall Reed competed in the lamb show and did an outstanding job placing third and fifth in their classes. Shelby St. Amant, Lauren Van Dame, Lindsey White, and Savannah Priestap showed beef cattle this year at the county fair. Shelby St. Amant and Savannah Priestap received first place on their animal projects. Lauren and Lindsey White both received third on their heifer projects. Newsome FFA is very proud of our beef exhibitors and congratulates them on a job well done. The Newsome FFA program continues to grow every year. Newsome FFA has three FFA advisors, which includes Woody Summerlin, Kenneth Hiscock, and Kelley Ware. They are very proud of all of the livestock exhibitors and the efforts in raising their animal projects. Newsome FFA continues to promote premier leadership, personal growth, and career success. Newsome FFA would also like to thank all the parents, alumni, and business supporters that contribute to the program and encourage everyone to shop at these businesses that are truly making an impact in these students’ lives.

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*** All Items Are 8 lbs. Unless Otherwise Noted.***

GEORGIA PECANS HALVES & PIECES 1 lb bag . . . . . . . . . . . $9 2.5 lbs bag . . . . . $22.25 5 lbs bag . . . . . . . . . $44 10 lbs bag . . . . . . . . $87

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Foodhooks.........................................$22 Baby Butter Beans ............................$14 Green Beans.......................................$14 Pole Beans .........................................$14 Speckled Butter Beans.....................$14 Blackeye Peas....................................$14 Butter Peas ........................................$14 Conk Peas .........................................$22 Crowder Peas ....................................$14 Pinkeye Peas......................................$14 White Acre Peas................................$14 Sugar Snap Peas ...............................$15 Zipper Peas........................................$14 Green Peas .........................................$14 White Corn .........................................$13 Yellow Corn ........................................$13 Cream White Corn 4#........................$6 Cream Yellow Corn 4#.......................$6 Collard Greens ...................................$13 Mustard Greens..................................$13 Turnip Greens ....................................$13 Spinach ...............................................$13

Cut Okra .............................................$13 Breaded Okra.....................................$13 Whole Okra ........................................$13 Sliced Yellow Squash........................$13 Sliced Zucchini ..................................$13 Brussel Sprouts..................................$13 Baby Carrots ......................................$13 Broccoli...............................................$13 Cauliflower .........................................$13 Mixed Vegetables..............................$13 Soup Blend.........................................$13 Blueberries 5# ...................................$15 Blackberries 5# .................................$15 Dark Sweet Cherries 5# ...................$18 Mango Chunks 5# .............................$15 Pineapple Chunks 5#........................$15 Whole Strawberries 5# ....................$15 Cranberries 5#...................................$15 Rhubarb 5# ........................................$13 Peaches...............................................$15 Green Peanuts ...................................$15

Call – or go on-line to place your order today and we’ll have it ready for you to pick up!

www.SouthwesternProduce.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Dry Creek

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t's been busy around the Dry Creek set this month. Our set is getting a major rebuild. With the sounds of hammers echoing and saws ringing, my thoughts travel back to my Dad. He was a carpenter and as I watch the crew I can't help but to see Dad. We worked on many projects together. I mostly held the tape measure on a line for him. He figured and cut and hammered and I got tools for him, also a board here or there. I look back at these times we spent together and with a tear recall our last project together.

Why I Built A Stagecoach Everybody that passes by asks the same old question, why would anyone build a horse drawn stagecoach? After they stop laughing some I invite them to sit a spell. Its all due to a man I most admire. He's short of words and his talent is working in wood. Like his creator his occupation was a carpenter. He's also known for keep'n his word. One day he built a stagecoach that seemed to appear from scraps of wood. He hammered night and day and finally rolled a shiny stagecoach out. Folks came from miles around to admire his work. Then one day while a passin' by I noticed something was a missin'. Then I came to realize that the stage had up and gone. After all the man who built it had the right to send it down the road. 28

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By Les McDowell Photo by Les McDowell

Years went by and I promised him I'd help him build another one. I knew the time had come to start the job before to many years slipped away. I hammered night and day to make the runnin' gear Now what was needed was the coach box on top. For that, the plans called for a master carpenter. That was the man I most admired. We'd spend hours talkin', laughin' and workin' side by side and really got to know each other. The more time we spent together, the more I marveled at this man. When his work was done I tinkered around and finished the job. Wait before you go... Let me tell you who the man is I admire the most You see its my Dad. And why then did I build this big Ole Stagecoach with my Dad? It was a labor of love between a father and his son. So when you see that Stagecoach roll across the scene on Dry Creek, you'll know the real meaning of it. I guess building the Stagecoach wasn't Dad and I's last project together... Even though he is no longer here, because of that Stagecoach he's right here helping me build Dry Creek. Watch Dry Creek on BlueHighwaysTV, Channel 246 on Verizon Sat nites at 7:30. Go to DryCreekT V.Com for more information. Check us out at drycreektv.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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By Mickie Anderson

UF/IFAS Scientists Part of Team Set to Study

Integrative Pollination of the Nation’s Specialty Crops Researchers with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are part of a team awarded $1.7 million for the first year of a national crop pollination research and outreach project. The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded the grant to Michigan State University. Over the five-year life of the $9.1 million grant, UF/IFAS entomology researcher Jamie Ellis said he expects UF will receive about $700,000. The project will focus on improving specialty crop yields and profit by supporting both wild and managed bees, and it is part of the USDA’s $101 million initiative on behalf of the nation’s specialty crop producers.

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In Florida’s case, the specialty crops to be studied include watermelon and blueberries, Ellis said.

Farmers often rent honeybee colonies and have them brought in during key periods to pollinate crops. But their availability can be limited, Ellis said, so one area the researchers hope to study is whether native species can be used in an integrative manner to increase the pollination and yield of Florida’s specialty crops. “We hope the results from this project will allow us to tell farmers what they can do to increase the pollination contributions made by native bees in their area,” he said. “That will include telling farmers what native wildflowers can be planted near their crops to attract and enhance native bee pollinator populations.”

There are more than 310 bee species in Florida, including native and “managed” species, the latter including honeybees.

Finding alternative pollinators could be critical for growers, Ellis said, especially as Colony Collapse Disorder continues to threaten honeybee populations around the United States.

During the project, researchers will identify factors that affect bee abundance, evaluate farm and habitat management practices so growers can best enhance bee populations, and develop and test native bee populations that could become managed in the future. They will then ensure that the findings are shared with specialty crop growers.

“There are over 310 bee species in Florida, and only one of those is the honeybee,” he said. “Many of the other bee species likely contribute significantly to the production of specialty crops in Florida. Our study aims to maximize the contributions made by these other bee species.” •

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By Ginny Mink unting is a well loved sport among many people, especially those within our publication’s reach. While it is easy to appreciate the yumminess of game meat, it is often difficult to stomach the methodology in which that meat is achieved, not so much the shooting, or spearing, or whatever method is preferred, but the actual “processing” of the meat, you know, the skinning and gutting part. Of course, some people so love the hunting aspect the rest doesn’t seem to bother them much. However, for those of us who just want to eat the glorious products of such ventures, we’ve good news because The Hungry Gator Meat Market has entered the Plant City domain and wild game (especially gator) is their area of expertise!

the top of it and smoosh it down and level it out so that the farmers could get as much cotton as possible into the trailer before they hauled it off to the cotton gin. Now days they have a module builder, it’s a machine that packs the cotton so little kids don’t have to jump around on cotton anymore.”

Shane Smith and Glen Grizzaffe have created this wonderful new presence. We spoke with Shane and got all the personal and business history therein. He explains, “I grew up on a cotton farm in Mississippi. My dad was a high school principal and basketball coach. We grew up in Yazzo City and it’s right dead in the center of Mississippi. When I was seven years old I started working for a cotton farmer packing cotton, which means when the cotton pickers came and dumped their loads into the cotton trailer (picture an extremely large horse trailer with no top) I would pack it. Me and the sons of the farmer and some other boys would literally jump on

He switches gears here and explains the roots that blossomed into this new venture. “I’m a big outdoorsman, I love to hunt. My granddaddy made his living making turkey calls and I wanted to find out a way to make a living hunting, because that’s what I loved the most. So, I started working as a hunting guide at a hunting outfitter on the Mississippi River. People would buy a deer hunt there and I would take them out deer hunting and that escalated. I started taking a video camera with me and I started taking video of my clients hunting.” Perhaps a meat market and video taping hunting trips isn’t connecting in your mind yet, just wait!

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It is always interesting to learn about the agricultural products and procedures of other states. Thusly, Shane continues, “The older I got I still worked on the farm. At age ten or eleven I started driving a tractor in a hayfield. Then, in my teenage years, I’d drive a tractor planting and then a cotton picker picking cotton ‘til about half way through high school. That was the early 90s.”

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Shane begins to pull the concepts together, “When I graduated high school, I went to the University of Southern Mississippi. I decided to major in film production because I was really only interested in hunting and videoing my friends and family hunting. So, I tried to make a major that was in the outdoors and if I got a film production degree then maybe I could get a job with someone who had an outdoor TV show.” You have to admit, it’s an interesting thought process at least, and apparently one that worked. He continues, “I finally got a job for a company called Primos Hunting Calls, they hired me to be on their video crew. Primos is a big call company and they had two TV shows and I was one of the personalities on the TV show. So, basically I got to travel around and hunt and video for their TV show. I was with them for seven years and after I left them I came down here on a gator hunt.” Ah, the gator hunt that changed his life’s direction! Obviously Shane couldn’t go on a gator hunt without filming the excitement therein. He elaborates, “I was filming and I met the guy who was running the gator hunt, his name is Glen Grizzaffe, and me and him hit if off and he was neck deep in the gator business, hunting gators, processing gators, everything to do with it. We partnered up to really market and sell gator meat. Really, in the beginning that’s all we were going to do, process and sell gator meat to local restaurants, food distributors W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


and whoever else wanted it. So, we decided to also offer all types of wild game processing. We process alligator, deer, hog. The facility we moved into was already set up to do the retail side of the meat so it seemed a no-brainer to offer a full line of retail meats and so we also offer beef, chicken and pork.” Herein lies the birth of The Hungry Gator Meat Market in downtown Plant City.

All our gator meat is all natural, wildcaught, gator. We’re not buying any farm raised. So we buy from other hunters. When we package our meat it’s just a pure natural meat product.” Gator, as a finished meat product, will run you about $11 a pound, but Shane adds that his blend of gator sausage has been a real hit and he can hardly make it fast enough to meet the demand. It’s $5.25/lb.

Shane explains, “We specialize and are known for our gator meat. The gator is the bread and butter of our business here. We sell a lot of gator meat up north to restaurants. We also supply a lot of the restaurants in this area with gator meat, as well.

The Hungry Gator also sells produce, fresh fish, shrimp and some exotic meats like buffalo and venison. Shane says, “We’re also known for our high quality beef products. We only offer the upper choice and prime beef and it’s all fresh.” When he

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talks about his business he concludes, “It’s going great! Every day it gets busier. Deer season’s open so I’ve really been getting in a lot of deer. Like us on Facebook. It’s The Hungry Gator Meat Market. We post pics from our gator hunts, we’re not just trying to sell you stuff on there.” However, if you are interested in checking out what they are selling, they’re open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am to 6 pm. 206 S. Evers Street Downtown Plant City 813-752-6328

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Wyoming Memories By Erica Der

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am not a hunter. Never have been, never will be. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good piece of venison as much as the next girl, fried, grilled, fried, did I mention fried? I like it any way you cook it. I’ve just never had the urge to go hunting myself, unlike my sister who will shoot anything that stands still too long. It’s not the killing part or covering your scent in deer urine or the unflattering camo, I’d just rather be on the frying end of a deer rather than the gutting end. I say all this to say that when my dad suggested that he and I take a sportsmen trip to Wyoming, I just knew this vacation would entail me behind the barrel of a rifle, in much too cold weather, blasting away at some animal 10 times the size of me. Much to my surprise, he suggested a fly-fishing expedition and road trip in northern Wyoming. What I lack in love for hunting, I make up for in fishing. So at the first mention of a fishing trip, he had me hook, line and sinker. In late September, we took off for Jackson Hole and after a long day of travel and an even longer conversation with a TSA agent who swore we must be from South Carolina with accents like that, we arrived in The Cowboy State. Wyoming is gorgeous. It may not have the charm of a Plant City strawberry field in early spring or the mystique of my papa’s orange grove in the middle of bloom, but Wyoming has an allure that is all her own. The way the aspens turn yellow just to welcome fall visitors and the snow hibernates on top of the Tetons, it is truly a reflection of God’s beauty. If you’ve never seen Wyoming, you should. And may I suggest, if at all possible, you should see it with your dad. You see, this weeklong excursion across the state of Wyoming was no fishing trip. Yes, we wet our line fly-fishing, and yes, my dad landed his hook in the middle of the fishing guide’s hand, and yes, we caught a few Spotted Snake River Trout. But this trip was bigger than a mess of fish. And for you fishermen, you know how big a mess is. We fished the Snake River in Jackson Hole, set our watches by Old Faithful in Yellowstone, ate Rocky Mountain oysters in Cody, went to a classic car show in the parking lot of a Kmart in Sheridan (which only had four entries, by the way), planted our feet in Montana, just to say we’d been there, and rode a very bumpy helicop-

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ter around Mt. Rushmore. While these adventures will always be special to me, they are not the reasons this trip means so much. When I picture our little rental car with too many McDonald’s cups in the backseat and a sea of sunflower seeds on the floor, I can hear the laughter. Laughter when my dad told me about going hunting in the Ocala forest as a kid, and his belief that the only reason he didn’t kill anything was because his gun ran out of corks. Or the time he and some buddies got kicked out of a place called Hell’s Half Acre during an antelope hunt gone wrong, but that’s another story for another time. Or the one about when my papa made

him drive half way across the state of Wyoming, just to attend a Rotary Club meeting so he could get his attendance point. And as the stories unfolded, so did the laughter. Other stories he told made me simply sit back and listen. There was his senior year of high school, when he was laying irrigation in an orange grove and wondering what he was going to do with his life, when my grandmother walked down the rows of trees and asked him simply if he wanted to run a small feed store. Running off little feed experience, but a great deal of hard work, he and his buddy Melvin Lee kept the little store afloat by trading off work schedules and going double session at Plant City High School. My dad is the best example of working hard and having something to show for it. He had no idea at the time what Southside Farm Supply would mean to our family, he just knew he needed a job. My dad lost his father when he was eight years old. He didn’t have a dad to look to and learn how to be a father. So how he knows how to be the best dad in the world, I’m not quite sure. But he is. And while I have always known this, I was reminded of his greatness in the middle of our talks on the plains of Wyoming. Someday, good Lord willing and the creek don’t rise, when I have kids of my own, I will tell them about the time their grandpa and I drove clear across the state of Wyoming, just for the heck of it. And I’ll remind them, whenever you go hunting, always be sure to bring enough corks. •

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According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one cup of boiled cooked kale (130 g) contains 36 calories, 4.01 g protein, 0.68 g fat, 9.33 g carbohydrate, and 5.3 g of dietary fiber. One cup of kale also provides a whopping 1328 percent of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for vitamin K, 354% for vitamin A, 89% for vitamin C, 27% for manganese, 10.4% for dietary fiber, 10% for copper, 9.3% for calcium, 5.4% for omega-3 fatty acids, and plentiful amounts of the B vitamins and important minerals including potassium, iron, and magnesium. All of this sums up to an incredible amount of vitamins and minerals for very few calories.

PHYTONUTRIENTS By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

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lorida kale is one of the most nutritious foods that exists. Its dark green leaves are exploding with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and important anti-cancer compounds. This low calorie leafy vegetable is a member of the Brassica family, which also includes cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, and cauliflower. Fresh Florida kale is a cool-weather crop and at its peak between November and April. Kale is also available frozen year round. According to the University of Florida Extension Office, kale is grown in one out of ten Florida gardens.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE With plenty of antioxidant and anticancer compounds, kale is as much medicine as food. Kale contains health promoting compounds that prevent carcinogen formation, inhibit tumor growth, and enhance detoxification of free radicals in the body. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet rich in dark green leafy vegetables lowers risk for cancers of the lung, colon, breast, ovaries and bladder. Current research studies show that people who eat the most cruciferous vegetables have a much lower risk of prostate, colorectal and lung cancers, even when compared to those who regularly eat other vegetables. Kale is extremely nutrient-dense. In addition to its cancer-fighting properties, kale is considered an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K and manganese, and a very good source of fiber, calcium, copper, tryptophan, potassium, and vitamin B6 and a good source of iron, magnesium, protein, phosphorus, and omega 3 fatty acids. 38

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Beneficial compounds found in kale and other vegetables, phytonutrients are potent promoters of good health. Some of these such as glucosinolates and sulforaphane, boost the liver’s detoxifying enzymes and help neutralize harmful substances. In animal studies, these compounds seem to slow or halt the growth of cancer cells in the breast and colon. Other compounds such as carotenoids and flavonoids act as powerful antioxidants. They protect the body from oxidative stress, which can lead to chronic health problems such as cancer, lung disease, and atherosclerosis (the building of plaque on artery walls).

VITAMIN K Kale is one of the richest sources of vitamin K that exists, containing over 1300% of your daily requirement in just a single serving. Just a few bites of this powerful vegetable would meet your daily requirements for this vitamin! Vitamin K is an essential component for proper blood clotting in the body. This vitamin also helps your body transport calcium and metabolizes the mineral into your skeleton. Several research studies have found that vitamin K boosts bone mineral density and reduces fracture rates in people with osteoporosis.

MANGANESE Florida kale is considered an excellent source of manganese, an important mineral that plays a role in a variety of physiological functions throughout the body. Manganese is needed for glucose, protein, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism from the foods we consume, as well as for pancreatic function and development. The mineral is important in normal skeletal growth and development, prevention of sterility, and synthesis of thyroid hormone. One cup of boiled kale provides over a quarter of your daily requirement for manganese.

CALCIUM Great news for the lactose-intolerant and those who don’t like milk or dairy--- you can meet all of your daily calcium needs through kale, other vegetables, and calcium-fortified foods. Kale is an excellent non-dairy source of calcium, providing 22.6% of your daily requirements in one cup of cooked vegetable. Calcium is important in the maintaining the strength and density of bones. Additionally, this mineral has been shown to prevent bone loss and reduce symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome. Adequate calcium intake is needed to prevent calcium stores being leached out of bones. Calcium also plays an important role in muscle contraction, nerve conduction, and cell membrane function. HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Choose kale that has fresh, deeply colored leaves free of wilting, yellowing, or holes. Smaller leaves are more tender and mild than larger leaves. The stems should look hardy and moist. Store kale in a ventilated plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to five days. Cooked greens also freeze well for up to six months in an airtight container or freezer bag.

HOW TO ENJOY Wash well to remove all sand and grit immediately before use. Kale can be eaten raw, steamed, or sauteed. To preserve kale’s many nutrients, cook the vegetable quickly and lightly. It can easily be added to salad, soup, vegetable stir-fries, or eggs. More ways to enjoy this delicious vegetable include: • Braise with collards, apples and onions, then drizzle with balsamic vinegar • Lightly steam with garlic and herbs • Sautee lightly with olive oil and herbs • Boil with smoked or salted meat, such as smoked turkey wings or ham hocks • Combine with feta cheese and pasta • Toss with olive oil, spread into a single layer on a baking sheet for a healthier substitute for potato chips • Stir-fry with chicken and soy sauce • Juice in a juicer with apples and ginger Fresh Florida kale is at their peak today. Enjoy more of these leafy greens in all of their nutritious glory! SELECTED REFERENCES http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ http:// www.floridata.com http://www.whfoods.com http://www.florida-agriculture.com

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Feed Them Like You Love Them By Libby Hopkins

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lyceryl Monostearate, Phosphoric Acid, Propylene Glycol, Corn Gluten, Wheat Gluten, and Glandular Meal, would you eat these products? Can you pronounce some of these products? The odds are probably not, but our pets eat these and more un-pronounceable products every day in their dog food and treats. We give our pets treats because we love them or because they’ve done a good deed, but most of their store bought treats are filled with ingredients that can make them sick. A lot of pet food companies use additives like the ones I’ve mentioned along with binders like corn and wheat gluten. These binders are an inexpensive by-product of human food processing that offers very little nutritional value and serve mainly to bind food together. They also can conceal hidden contaminants. After grains are harvested, they must be stored and the longer they sit in storage, the more they run the risk of being contaminated by insects, mites and mold. Grain infestations are so common that damage by insects after crops are harvested is sometimes greater than the damage done during the growing season itself. These dead grain insects can easily end up in commercial dog food and treats. They are also the prime suspect in canine allergies such as atopic dermatitis. Symptoms of this condition can include chronic itching, excessive licking or chewing of the paws, hair loss and bacterial infections in the ears. A recent study of atopic dermatitis conducted at Wright State University in Ohio has concluded, “storage mite sensitivity in dogs may be as important, if not more important, than dust mite sensitivity.”

Left: “Bonnie Boyer (left) and Connie Lawter (right) are the owners of Two Girls and a Beagle. Hoss (center) is the CEO of the company. They make all natural gourmet pet treats.”

What you will find is whole wheat flour, oats, pumpkin, raw honey, and sweet potatoes to name a few. “We’ve done a lot of research on our ingredients and the medicinal use of them,” Boyer said. “We design and copyright our own recipes and we do not use any pre-made mixes.” All of their treats are made to look like people food. Boyer said they did this because of Hoss. “Whatever I was eating, Hoss wanted to eat it, too, so we make his food look like our food.” Their banana nut biscotti looks like a real biscotti. Their sweet potato muffin looks like a real muffin. All of the ingredients that go in their treats are purchased from local produce farmers. “That’s the only way will will purchase our products,” Boyer said. They are strong believers in buying local and supporting local as well. “We love working with local dog rescues and doing local pet events,” Lawter said. “We are always open to making up a gift basket of our treats for a donation or raffle item.” The girls usually cook for 12-16 hours before an event and then vacuum seal the treats to make sure they are fresh. “Our treats have a shelf life of two weeks in the refigerator and six months in the freezer,” Lawter said. “You can leave them out on the counter, but it’s best that they stay in the refrigerator since they have no presevatives, they will mold if they are left out.” They know this because they have tested every treat to see how long they will last.

Bonnie Boyer and Connie Lawter of Land O’ Lakes, have had a run in or two with pet allergies. Their beagle, Hoss, had food allergies that caused him to break out in an itchy rash and loose his hair. They wanted to be able to give Hoss healthier food options and since Lawter had baking experience, Boyer said, “You know what, we need to make some healthy treats!” Two Girls and a Beagle was born and Hoss became the CEO.

They also make cat treats. They have a tuna cracker, a cheese puff and a catnip bite. “We have tasted all of the products we have made because we wouldn’t give our clients anything we wouldn’t eat, but we did not sample the catnip bite because we weren’t sure what catnip would do to us!” Boyers said with a laugh. They will tailor any of their treats to fit the needs of your pet. “We just want people and their pets to be happy,” Lawter said, “We want them to feed them like you love them.” Lawter and Boyer hope to have a store open by August of 2013.

Their goal is to provide their client’s pets with natural, healthy and wholesome treats and gourmet goodies. They offer made to order treats, gourmet cakes and special ocassion baskets. You won’t find aditives you can’t pronounce or gluten in their treats.

For more information on the different treats Two Girls and a Beagle offer, you can vist their Facebook page or email them at twogirlsandadog2012@gmail.com You can also contact them at 813-907-2428.

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Florida Dairy Farmer

Dale McClellan Named Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year for 2012

Photos By Ron O’Connor, Farm Credit

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airy farmer and milk and fruit juice processor Dale McClellan of Thonotosassa, Fla., has been selected as the 2012 overall winner of the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year award. McClellan was named as the overall winner during the Willie B. Withers Luncheon held on the opening day of the 2012 Sunbelt Ag Expo farm show. McClellan was chosen as Farmer of the Year over nine other state winners who were finalists for the award. The Farmer of the Year award recognizes excellence in agricultural production and farm management, along with leadership in farm and community organizations. The award also honors family contributions in producing safe and abundant supplies of food, fiber and shelter products for U.S. consumers. J. Thomas Ryan, president of Swisher International, Inc., of Jacksonville, FL, praised McClellan for his farming accomplishments. “Dale and his family represent the best of American agriculture,” said Ryan. “He is an innovative farmer, an environmental steward and a person who gives back to others through his leadership in farm and community organizations. He and his wife Mary have raised three fine sons who all hold key management positions in the family’s farm and milk and fruit juice processing businesses.”

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Swisher International has been the award’s major sponsor since it was first established. “It is an honor for our company and our Swisher Sweets cigar brand to recognize this outstanding farm family and the families of the other nine state winners for their many accomplishments,” Ryan added. At his dairy farm near Lecanto, McClellan milks about 700 cows three times each day. These cows produce a rolling herd average of some 23,000 pounds of milk per cow per year. His farm includes 1,272 acres with 952 acres of rented land and 320 acres of owned land. Cow comfort is a priority at his dairy. He grows much of his own feed including bermudagrass, oats and corn silage. He recycles dairy waste by separating solids for application on non-irrigated land and by applying the liquid to his cropland through his irrigation systems. Dale McClellan also was instrumental in establishing a milk-marketing cooperative, Premier Milk, based in Ocala. M & B Products is McClellan’s milk and fruit juice processing facility and is based in Tampa. His processing plant is known for fat-free, sugar-reduced chocolate milk sold to schools throughout Florida. Dairy farming is a family tradition for McClellan. Both his mother and father came from dairy farming families. McClellan was raised on a Tampa dairy farm owned by his

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grandparents. He milked cows at the dairy to earn money during high school. His grandparents also owned a milk processing plant that went broke and closed during 1979. McClellan was able to purchase cows from his grandparent’s farm. His persistence resulted in the re-opening of the farm’s processing plant in 1987. He now employs 140 people at the processing plant. He equipped the plant with new equipment and modern refrigeration. M & B has also pioneered in its innovations in milk and juice flavoring, packaging, and vitamin and calcium fortification. When he established his dairy farm in 2003 at Lecanto, McClellan faced strong local opposition. He was able to overcome this opposition by patiently meeting with the neighbors to his farm, answering their questions, and persuading them that his farm would be a positive influence on the local environment and the local economy. His efforts paid off. McClellan’s dairy farm is now widely respected and has earned several local awards for its contribution to the economy of Citrus County. “I thank Swisher International, the Sunbelt Expo, and the other award sponsors for this award,” said McClellan. “It is indeed an honor for our family, especially after meeting the other state winners and their families, and learning of their many accomplishments in farming and in service to their communities.” continued on page 47... W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Photo by April Wietrecki

Florida Blues (Polyommatinae) Hopefully some of you were able to make it out to St Marks National Wildlife Refuge for the Monarch migration. If not, there is no need to sing the blues when you can watch them. It’s no secret that the blues have always been associated with the Deep South, not just in music, but there is a pretty amazing subfamily of butterflies that they call The Blues. Polyommatinae is a subfamily of Lycaenidae, or gossamer-winged butterflies. Lycaenidae is the second largest family of butterflies, second only to the Brush-footed butterflies. Gossamer is a very delicate sheer fabric or light cobweb, from which these butterflies derive their name. These true butterflies are distinguished for their feathery wings; a closer look will reveal some of this butterflies extraordinary characteristics. Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have insect friends that would stick by you, cover your back, and divert your enemies from bringing you harm? Well, the Lycaenidae do just that, with one of the most effective group of insects known to man, the ant. About half of the gossamer winged butterfly species worldwide have an association with ants in one way or another. Some have a hostile relationship in which the caterpillar will prey on ant brood. Most of the Blues (Polyommatinae) are opportunistically carnivorous but have a mutualistic relationship with ants. Caterpillars of the Blues have a special organ that produces a sugary protein rich solution that attracts and feeds the ants, in return the ants protect the caterpillar from predators and parasitoids. Some caterpillars are even capable of producing low pitched sounds by stridulating a scraper and file similar to the way a cricket chirps. The sounds made by the caterpillar are thought to be a defense mechanism but some researchers suggest it’s a means of communicating with ants.

mimics a head. This deception tricks predators into attacking from the front. With the element of surprise removed from the predator’s strategy, the butterfly has a greater chance of escape.

are not dependent on ants. Species such as the Blues require not only the correct host plants, but also particular ant species many of which are considered pest ants in urban environments and controlled with toxins.

The Blues are a delicate indicator species and populations are easily diminished with environmental changes, in fact one species, the Miami Blue (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) is the only subspecies of Cyclargus thomasi found in the United States and is found only in Florida. Needless to say, it is one of Florida’s most endangered insects. Some sources suggest it may even be the rarest insect in the United States. As of September 2012, a single extant population supporting less than 100 individuals remains in an isolated colony site within Bahia Honda State Park in the lower Florida Keys.

In general the Blues can be found all year in Florida flying low in open woodland. The Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius) has the greatest populations in the southern peninsular of Florida. Its intolerance of cold weather prevents it from surviving winters in northern Florida but is abundant here in central Florida. The Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus) can be found in all 67 counties in Florida all year long

Before urbanization and the loss of coastal habitat jeopardized this species it ranged from Hillsborough, Volusia and Monroe counties south through the Florida Keys and the Dry Tortugas. Some scientist suggest that butterfly species that are associated with ants, such as the Blues, are more susceptible to environmental changes and are predisposed to extinction more so than species that

The Miami Blue (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) produces multiple generations (February through November) and adults are found all year long in the Florida Keys. The McGuire Center for Lepidoptera Research at the University of Florida has implemented a highly successful captive rearing program to attempt recovery of this species. In 2003 the program began with less than 100 eggs collected from the wild and since then has reared thousands of pupae for release at select sites. The successful release was thwarted by the 2005 hurricanes but persistence has resulted in the recovery of the Bahia Honda colony. More colonies were discovered on other islands in the Florida Keys, more surveys and conservation be needed to prevent a Miami Blue extinction.

Adults have equally interesting characteristics. We think of adult butterflies as being important pollinators, and they are. Most adults visit flowers for nectar but some members of the Lycaenidae subfamily, such as the harvester butterfly, feed on wooly aphid honeydew, the hairstreaks feed on both honeydew and bird droppings. Adults do not rely on the ants for protection so much as their markings. Many adults have antenna shaped tails and a spot on the base of the tail that W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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...continued from page 44

T The new Farmer of the Year was selected for the honor by three judges who visited his farm and the farms of the other nine state winners during early August of this year. The judges included Charles Snipes, a retired Mississippi Extension weed scientist who is president and research scientist with Stoneville R&D, Inc., from Greenville, Miss.; John McKissick, a longtime University of Georgia Extension agricultural economist from Athens, Ga., and farmer Brian Kirksey of Amity, Ark., who was selected as the overall winner of the award in 2008. Charles Snipes, the senior judge for this year, praised McClellan for enhancing the public’s perception of production agriculture. Snipes also praised McClellan’s adoption of new farming technology, his environmental stewardship and his ability to turn a profit, even when facing strong public opposition to his farm. “He also has a great family-run farm, with all family members providing major contributions to the success of his operations,” adds Snipes. Since the award began in 1990, McClellan is the seventh overall winner to come from Florida. In the 23-year history of the award, Florida has had more overall winners than any other state. This is the 35th anniversary year for the Sunbelt Expo. The farm show was first held during 1978 in Moultrie, Ga. As the Southeastern Farmer of the Year, McClellan will receive a $15,000 cash award plus $2,500 as a state winner from Swisher international. He will also receive the use of a tractor of his choice for a year from Massey Ferguson North America and gift certificates totaling $1,000 from the Southern States cooperative. From Dow AgroSciences, McClellan will receive the choice of either $2,000 in PhytoGen cottonseed or a $1,000 donation to a designated charity. From Ivey’s Outdoor and Farm Supply, he will receive a Columbia Cathedral Peak Vest and a Columbia Steen Mountain Tech Full-Zip Jacket. Other state winners this year include Sam Givhan of Safford, Ala., Heath Long of Tichnor, Ark., Barry Martin of Hawkinsville, Ga., Jim Sidebottom of Greensburg, Ky., Bill Spain of Booneville, Miss., Gary Blake of North Wilkesboro, N.C., Monty Rast of Cameron, S.C., Steve Dixon of Estill Springs, Tenn., and Maxwell Watkins of Sutherland, Va. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

hey say time flies when you are having fun, and it has. It’s hard to believe that the years have flown by and we are celebrating the eighth birthday of In The Field Magazine.

In The Field started as an idea that I know God placed on my heart in 2004 and through the years He has surrounded me with people that have helped the publication get where it is today. Our advertisers and contributors continue to make it possible for us to grow each and every year, enabling us to have educational, interesting and timely editorial content. If you have purchased advertising space, sent in an idea, picked up a magazine at one of our many distribution points, or gotten it in your mailbox, you have become a part of our team! We have received many hand written letters, cards, emails and phone calls from you, our readers, sharing your thoughts and compliments, giving us your ideas on stories and reading it each every month. The Hillsborough County Farm Bureau is a huge part of In The Field Magazine. They have been extremely supportive over the years and it makes us proud to partner with such an incredible organization. Farm Bureau has been at it for 70 years now, and they continue to work in making a difference in the agriculture community. I encourage you to consider becoming a member if you are not already. To find out about the benefits they offer, call the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau at 813-685-9121. Thank you to the Executive Committee and the Directors, with a very special thank you to Judi Whitson. To everyone at In The Field…….”THANK YOU” for everything that you do on a daily basis. Sarah Holt, Managing Editor/Associate Publisher; Bob Hughens, Office Manager; Danny Crampton, Sales Manager; Tina Richmond, Sales; Mona Jackson, Art Director; Gordon Johnston, Circulation; and to all of our contributing writers! The next two people I want to thank are my parents, Al and Patsy Berry. I find myself extremely fortunate to have parents that continue to be supportive and are a huge part of what this magazine has become. Thank You Al and Patsy Berry. I have always said this – and will continue to do so: “We are proud to continue to create a bond with those that are not directly involved in agriculture in order to build a better understanding of our industry. We believe what we continue to put in print on a monthly basis….”NO FARMERS NO FOOD.” Without our farmers and ranchers, Florida can’t grow. Be blessed and follow your dreams,

Karen

Karen Berry - ITFM Publisher

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. – Philippians 4:13 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Strawberry History

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trawberries are thought to have been cultivated in ancient Rome. Strawberries as we know them today were originally grown in Europe, however, varieties also can be found in Chile, Russia, and the U.S. The first known American species of strawberries was cultivated about 1835. The berries seem to be strewn among the leaves of the plant, and were first called strewberries in the late 18th century. Later the name was changed to strawberry, possibly from the practice of English children threading the berries on pieces of straw for sale or from the 19th century practice of laying straw around the strawberry plants to protect them

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from bad weather. Other stories noted that farmers would bring the strawberries to market on beds of straw to protect them during traveling. Alpine strawberries are believed to have medicinal use. The leaves, roots and fruits were used as a skin tonic. The berries were eaten to relieve diarrhea and an upset stomach. Leaves and roots were eaten for gout. In addition, a paste made from the strawberries was used for sunburn and skin blemishes, and the juice of the fruit would be used to whiten teeth. •

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

Skillet Beef

with Red Potatoes and Greens INGREDIENTS 3⁄4 lb Round beef steak Non-stick cooking spray 4 red-skinned potatoes, halved 1 cup finely chopped onion 2 cups (16-oz. can) beef broth, low-sodium 2 cloves, minced or 1⁄4 teaspoon garlic powder 1⁄4 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon chili powder 2 large carrots, peeled and cut into thin strips 2 bunches (1 lb total) mustard greens, kale, or turnip greens, stems removed, chopped

Florida Salad INGREDIENTS 1 cup romaine lettuce, torn 1/2 cup escarole, roughly chopped 1/2 cup endive, roughly chopped 1 bunch cilantro, chopped

PREPARATION Thinly slice beef across the grain. Spray skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat pan. Add meat; cook, stirring for 5 minutes to brown. Add potatoes, onion, broth, and spices. Cook covered, over medium heat for 20 minutes. Stir in carrots, lay greens over top, cover, and cook until carrots are tender, about 15 minutes.

1 avocado, peeled and sliced 1 cucumber, peeled and sliced 4 radishes, sliced 2 carrots, peeled and sliced 1 green bell pepper, seeded and sliced 1 tangelo, peeled and sectioned 1/2 cup kale, roughly chopped 1/2 cup strawberries, sliced 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, whole

PREPARATION Toss all ingredients together in a large salad bowl. Serve with the dressing of your choice.

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Lee Williams

Specialty Meats Ducks, Capons, Fresh Ham, Rabbits, Quail, Fresh & Smoked Turkey Wings and Drumsticks, Beef and Pork Kidneys, Hog Heads, Hog Maws, Pork Skin, Tripe & Honeycomb Tripe, and Alligator Meat. • We Accept TECO Payments • Western Union Money Orders 49¢ each

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HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FAIR SWINE SHOW

Kailey & Jake By Calli Jo Parker

each and every one of them. Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.” It is simple swine shows and sales like these where our community has perfected this concept for generations, and will for many generations to come. •

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he Hillsborough County Fair hosts an annual swine show and sale. Each year young agriculturists compete to see who the Grand and Reserve Grand Champions will be. On October 19 at 7pm the show took place. After many hours of waiting in the heat, the judge finally made his decision. Kailey Stollard and Jake Stines were the happiest kids in the show ring. Stollard won Grand Champion with her pig and Stines was right behind her winning Reserve Grand Champion. Both of these kids are actively involved in the agricultural industry. Stollard has been seen in numerous livestock shows in the area. She has a passion for livestock and has achieved many goals in showing. Stines, in a much younger phase of his life, is a member of the Sydney Stampede 4-H group. Through his endeavors in 4-H, he has been able to show livestock and prove that it’s possible to be an agriculturist at any age. On Saturday October 20, at 7:15 p.m., the annual swine sale began. Buyers from all over the county came to support the youth of our community. This year there was an excellent turn out. Numbers were flying, and bids ran all the way up into the double digits. The majority of the exhibitors use the money from the sale for their college tuitions, furthering their education in the agriculture industry. It is important as a community to invest in our youth and inspire them to brighten their futures. Stollard and Stines are just a mere glimpse of the passion our youth hold. God has truly blessed our community. Not only do we have gifted 4-H and FFA members, but also an entire town supporting

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Morgan Boykin’s Potential Tragedy By Ginny Mink

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ne year may seem a short period of time to most, but in that twelve month span a slew of unexpected things can occur. For instance, the 2011 Harvest Queen can meet with terrible tragedy (or potential tragedy) and end up fearing for her very life. That might sound a little excessive, but when last we spoke with Morgan Boykin she was on top of the world and then whamo! She was diagnosed with a tumor. She shares her story with us here. “In January I was diagnosed with a parotid tumor and I had to have surgery at Moffitt to have it removed. The parotid gland is a gland in your cheeks that produces saliva. I had a lump come up in May, up between my jaw and behind my ear. At the time, it was really small but over time it got bigger. Around November it was big enough to see it. I found out two days before Christmas that it was a tumor. January 20 I had surgery to have it removed.” Morgan is a senior in high school and that was definitely not the Christmas surprise she was hoping for. She explains, “It’s common in white males over the age of 40, so it was crazy rare for me to get it. All the nerves in your face go through that gland so it’s a very fragile surgery, one wrong thing and my face could look like I had a stroke.” In fact, after the four hour surgery was completed, her doctor informed her that she would definitely have some facial paralysis for up to eight months. However, Morgan’s faith and the prayers of those who treasure her seem to have had quite an effect. She says, “After being in recovery for two hours, my cheek started twitching. My nerve was coming back. Doctors and nurses were shocked that I had movement in my cheek. The Lord is good, and He was looking after me.” Of course, as we mentioned in the beginning of this article, this was just a potential tragedy. Morgan says, “Everything came back benign, there is a chance of recurrence but that’s rare. It probably took me a month to fully get recovered. I’ve slowly been getting back into my full activity.” While the experience was a scary one, she recalls some of the brighter moments. “When I was going through my surgery the County Fair Board was right by my side. Mrs. Evelyn Stewart, she was the one who put the Harvest Queen Pageant on, the Pageant Director, she was one of the first ones to be in my room after the surgery and her first words to me were, ‘We wanted to come check on our Queen.’ That meant so much to me, that they were some of the first people in my room meant the world to me. The County

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Fair has sent me so many cards and phone calls and visits to me. They sent me texts, they provided food for me in my recovery and their prayers alone (when they didn’t have to) just shows how much love the board has and that’s a blessing. Mr. Myke Morris has sent me numerous cards and cds and was constantly checking up on me. He was a big support along with the Hillsborough County Board.” When asked to switch gears to happier memories and thereby recall her experiences as the 2011 Hillsborough County Harvest Queen, Morgan says, “Honestly, I don’t know where to begin. It’s been such an honor and a blessing to serve as basically an ambassador for the Hillsborough County Fair and Hillsborough County. The fair has given me so many opportunities. I got to attend so many banquets and award ceremonies and I actually got to attend the Ag Hall of Fame Dinner. Since I’ve been so involved with agriculture since my freshman year, that was something I’ve always wanted to go to and being Harvest Queen I got to. That was one of the highlights, being able to attend that and represent the fair at the dinner. I got to attend the 4th of July Parade; there’s many different things you attend from County Fair Board meetings to banquet dinners to all sorts of things. Overall it has been just a blessing. I’ve made so many friends. I’ve come into contact with so many people and have so many mentors in my life now.”

so many doors for her. It was definitely sad to have to give my title away, but it was time for someone else to have a chance.” We asked her if she had any words of wisdom for the new Queen and she shared, “Cherish every moment because a year goes by in nothin’! So, enjoy every moment and cherish it while you have it.” Morgan will graduate from high school this year and she plans to attend the University of South Florida to achieve a degree in radiology. Like she told us last time, she reiterated her lifelong goal, “My absolute dream is to be with the professional bull riders so I really want to work towards that goal.” Then, before we parted ways she wanted to make sure we shared her appreciation. She said, “I just want to thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers and everything they contributed for me while I was going through my surgery.” We pray she will remain in excellent health and reach the magnitude of her goals, she’s a good kid. •

Like all good things though, Morgan’s reign had to come to an end and she has passed the crown on. We asked her about that. She explained, “It was awesome, the new Queen is Kallee Cook, she’s going to have a great time and this is going to open W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Kallee Cook is an 18-year-old Durant High School graduate. She currently attends Hillsborough Community College but will transfer to Santa Fe College in January. Kallee has a strong agricultural background, having been in the FFA all throughout high school, but will pursue a degree to become an Ultrasound Technician. Kallee has a strong passion for helping the lives around her. Harvest Queen is just one step closer to her goal of becoming an Ultrasound Technician and helping mothers in her community. Haley Riley is a 14-year-old eighth grader at Tomlin Middle School. Haley is a member of the Tomlin FFA chapter and an active young agriculturist. While Haley is in a much younger stage in her life, she strives to share her love of agriculture with those around her. She can be seen at local FFA Career Development Events and other occasions informing her community about the importance of agriculture. Haley is an exceptional FFA member, not only advocating agriculture and leadership, but living it as well. Each year numerous teenage girls compete for the title of the Hillsborough County Harvest Queen. The fair is looking for girls like Kallee and Haley, beautiful, intelligent, well spoken, and more times than not, familiar with the agriculture industry. The fair is never let down and are truly thankful for the wonderful job Kallee and Haley have done. •

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FAIR HARVEST QUEENS

Kallee & Haley By Calli Jo Parker

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he Hillsborough County Fair was held October 17 through the 21. Like any other fair, there were carnival rides, lots of food, people and laughter. However, no fair is complete without a queen. Luckily the Hillsborough County Fair is blessed with two beautiful young ladies to serve as Queens. Kallee Cook and Haley Riley were chosen to represent the fair as the 2012 Senior and Junior Harvest Queens. The pageant was held on October 13 the week before the fair opened. It was split into two competitions, the Junior Harvest Queen for ages 13-15, and the Senior for ages 16-19. In the Junior division, the girls had to wear an evening gown and answer an on stage question explaining one characteristic about themselves. The Senior girls were a bit more involved. They were asked to wear two outfits, business casual and an evening gown. In their business casual outfit, before the pageant, the girls went through a four minute interview. On stage they introduced themselves and modeled in their evening gowns. After they were crowned the girls had no idea how busy the next week would be for them. Kallee and Haley made appearances at nearly every event held at the fair. At each livestock show, the rodeo, the baby and kids pageant, they truly served their community and impacted the youth at the fair. The girls will crown the new Harvest Queens next year at the pageant. There, Kallee will be awarded a $1,000 scholarship to the school of her choice. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FAIR STEER SHOW

Haley & Aly By Calli Jo Parker

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he Hillsborough County Fair Steer Show, also known as the Justin Gill Memorial, is an annual steer show that the youth in our community competitively take part in. On October 21 seven classes of steers and exhibitors anxiously awaited for their division to begin. The show consisted of mostly young Strawberry Festival steers competing to see where they place before the big show in March. It turns out that two Strawberry Festival steers took Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion at the show. Haley Smith, a senior at Durant High School, was the owner of the Grand Champion steer. Haley is an outstanding FFA member at Durant. She is very active, competing in numerous Career Development Events, livestock shows, and even served as the Durant FFA Sweetheart. Aly Joyner, a junior at Strawberry Crest High School, won Reserve Grand Champion with her steer. Aly comes

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from a long line of active agriculturists. She has been in the FFA for many years serving her community. She, too, competes in many Career Development Events, along with showing livestock around the state. Both girls are dedicated leaders reaping the rewards of their hard work. At this show Haley’s steer weighed in at 870 pounds, with Aly’s slightly larger steer weighed in at 950 pounds. For the Strawberry Festival, the steers must gain at least two pounds each day from the day of the original weigh in which is held each September. It is a daily chore to properly feed the steer to achieve this weight gain. Whether it’s hot, cold, rainy, or sunny, these girls wake up every day to make sure their animals are fed. There are numerous prospect shows still to come before the big show in March. FFA members and young agriculturists in our community enter as many shows as they can before the Festival to be certain they and their steers are prepared. The Hillsborough County Fair Steer Show was a great success. It will be interesting to see if the results are the same in March. It is safe to say that it was a nice little preview of what may happen at the 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival Steer Show and Sale. •

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Spreading the Love for Agriculture

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he school year has begun and the last two months have flown by. Over the last few weeks I have had the opportunity to learn about the diverse agriculture industry in Florida, helped put on two leadership events, visited 14 different schools to inspire a love for agriculture and the FFA in their students, all the while interacting with over 6,000 students from across the state, and finally attend national convention in Indianapolis.

In mid September my team and I had the opportunity to participate in an internship with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Over the course of five days we visited the various divisions of the department including Aquaculture, Ag Marketing, Food Safety, and the Florida Forest Service. This experience gave me a deeper insight into the spectrum of the department’s responsibility. We also got a hands on look at harvesting oysters in Apalachicola Bay, the proper way to set a controlled burn in Lake Talquin State Forest, and inspected the Tallahassee WalMart Supercenter for any food safety violations. This was a once in a lifetime experience to see how agriculture and our government work together for the people. Also, over the past two months I have participated in two different leadership events with my team. The first event, Chapter President’s

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Conference, is designed for the president and vice president of each chapter to teach them the principles of leadership they need to lead, not only their chapter, but also their officer team. Next was Chapter Officer Leadership. This conference was one that my team and I put on five different times in three locations around the state to over 2300 students. At this event we gave chapter officers the tools necessary to lead their chapters this year. This is the largest leadership event my team and I will put on this year. Finally, my team and I just returned from the National FFA convention in Indianapolis, Indiana, where we served as delegates for the state of Florida. Our responsibilities included serving on delegate committees, attending sessions, and electing the new National Officer Team. Other highlights from the week included the Florida FFA RFD-TV segment and seeing the 2010-2011 Florida FFA State President be inducted into his new office as National FFA President. As always if you have any questions, comments or concerns you can reach me at david.walden@flaffa.org. Be sure to check out flaffa.org, like us on Facebook, and follow us @floridaffa on Twitter.

David Walden Area 5 State Vice President

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Old Traditions BECOME NEW AGAIN By Lindsey M. English

A

n old Plant City FFA tradition was brought back on October 2 of this year. The Plant City FFA Pig’ N’ the Poke was a thing of the past until it was brought back by the Plant City FFA Alumni and the chapter officers as a way for Plant City’s agriculture students, FFA members, families, friends and members of the community to socialize and grow their love for agriculture and the FFA. The last Pig’ N’ the Poke took place in 2008. Over 180 guests, including distinguished members of the east Hillsborough County agricultural community attended this year. After the opening ceremony, conducted by the Plant City Sr. FFA officers, many events took place. Attendees dined on barbeque provided by the FFA Alumni, as well as covered dishes provided by parent and students. Members and agriculture students competed in a talent competition where The Peacemakers, consisting of Colton Conrad and Ben Luchka, won with their performance of “Free Bird.” Following the talent contest, a desert contest was held, and Tanah Tyoe won with her pumpkin cookies. This year’s Pig’ N’ the Poke was very beneficial to the Plant City FFA Alumni, as well as the Plant City FFA Chapters, initiating numerous students and their parents to join and become more involved. “For this being the first time in four years we are very pleased with the turnout of this year’s Pig’ N’ the Poke,” said Plant City Sr. FFA President Justin Gajewski. “I am sure that this will be just the first of many more successful Pig’ N’ the Poke’s to come.” Once just a thing of the past, the Pig’ N’ the Poke is a tradition that is sure to continue in the future. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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THE 85TH NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION

AND

EXPO

Growing Leaders, Growing Agriculture By Lindsey M. English

“The convention hall will come to order, we are now holding this, the First General Session of the 85th National FFA Convention and Expo,” were the words given by 2011-2012 National FFA President Ryan Best. The National FFA Convention and Expo is the organization’s premier gathering, during which all FFA competitive events and programs are recognized nationally. The event brings FFA members together to learn, be inspired and celebrate their accomplishments in the organization. This year’s theme was “to grow.” The FFA is a national organization that reaches from Alaska to Puerto Rico and from the State of Maine to Hawaii. It provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 557,318 students in grade seven through 12 who belong to one of W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

7,498 local FFA Chapters throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

read “Indy welcomes FFA” and streets were marked with FFA’s official colors: National Blue and Corn Gold.

More than 55,000 student members and advisors from throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands attended the convention and expo.

Hillsborough County had many FFA chapters demonstrate their talents and knowledge at the convention. Strawberry Crest’s Elton Hinton FFA Chapter competed in Creed and Agriculture Issues, Durant Sr. FFA in Extemporaneous Speaking, Brandon FFA competed in Dairy Evaluation and Tomlin Middle FFA competed in the first ever National Middle School Parliamentary Procedures and Opening and Closing Ceremonies competitions. In addition, Ray Clark, a former advisor of Plant City FFA, was awarded the Honorary American FFA Degree.

This year’s convention and expo was held in Indianapolis, IN. Indianapolis and Indiana have long been known as the “Cross Roads of America,” largely because of the central location to the United States populations. Similarly, it’s a “crossroad of agriculture,” home to some of the finest farm land, livestock and crop diversity, agribusiness, youth development and just about all things agriculture, seemingly a perfect place to host the convention. Indianapolis residents were very welcoming to the FFA members from across the country. Streets were closed off and named “FFA Way,” signs posted around the city

Throughout the duration of the convention, nine general sessions brought tens of thousands of FFA members together at a single time under a single roof during the four-day event at the Bankers Life Fieldhouse and the Lucas Oil Stadium.

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Students and their advisors had the opportunity to flow through the aisles of the expo, an event that showcases nearly 400 corporations, businesses, organizations and colleges. During the many sessions and workshops, teachers and students were able to meet and listen to many different key note speakers. Figure skating star Scott Hamilton was the opening speaker for the convention. Other keynote speakers included Dr. Lowell Catlett, a nationally renowned agriculture professor, former NBA star Walter Bond and native Hoosier Josh Bleill, a former Marine-turned-motivational-speaker after losing both legs while serving in Iraq. This year’s convention marked the launching of a program to help eliminate hunger with a million-meal rally. More than 10,000 FFA members, teachers, alumni and volunteers worked hard to pack one million meals during the “Rally to Fight Hunger.” Half of the meals created were distributed to the Indianapolis area contributing to “Feeding the World-Starting at Home,” and the other half were shipped overseas in coordination with Kids Against Hunger, a humanitarian food-aid organization. “No one is better positioned to address hunger than FFA members who are tomorrow’s leaders in providing food and nutrition for a growing planet,” said National FFA Organization CEO Dwight Armstrong. The 2012 National FFA Convention and Expo culminated Saturday with the election of a new, six-member National FFA Officer team to help lead the organization for the next year.

T he 2011-2012 National Officer team: President, Ryan Best of New Mexico; Secretary, Jason Troendle of Minnesota; Central Region Vice President, Alicia Hodnik of Wisconsin; Eastern Region Vice President, Kenneth Quick of New York; Southern Region Vice President, Cain Thurmond of Georgia and Western Region Vice President, Seth Pratt of Idaho, passed the gavel to the new 2012-2013 National Officer team President, Clay Sapp of Florida; Secretary, Kalie Hall of Georgia, Central Region Vice President, Brennan Castello of Nebraska; Eastern Region Vice President, Joenelle Futrell of Kentucky; Southern Region Vice President, Willey Bailey of Alabama and Western Region Vice President, Lindsey Anderson of California. •

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Juanita B. "Nita" Murray, 94 of Plant City died October 24, 2012. She was born December 11, 1917. She was preceded in death in 1985 by the “love of her life” William Charles Murray after 49 years of marriage. James “Bo” Fortner, 81 of Plant City died October 23, 2012. Bo was born March 26, 1931 to the Late Frank and Mary Tatum Fortner in Springhead, Florida. He is survived by his loving wife LeDell, She and Bo celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in March of this year. Basilia Santana Jimenez, 75 of Plant City, died October 22, 2012, at Saint Joseph Hospital in Tampa. Born September 13, 1937 in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, she was the daughter of the late Agustin Jimenez Davila and the late Lydia Rivera Santana. She was the wife of Rafael Santana. Fay Elizabeth Blanton, 83 of Thonotosassa, died October 22, 2012. Born October 23, 1928 in Birmingham, Alabama to the late Claude and Beulah Wade Hancock. Elizabeth was preceded

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in death by her beloved husband Dalton in August of this year. Dan elle Lynn Whitt aker, 55 of Tampa, died October 22, 2012, at Melech House in Temple Terrace. Born September 15, 1957 in Dayton, Ohio, she was the daughter of the late Dana Whittaker and the late Donna Killing Whittaker. Doris Mozelle DuBois, 98 of Plant City died October 19; She is survived by her sons Gerald DuBois and his wife Edra, Donald DuBois and his wife Regis. Other survivors include 14 grandchildren 9 great grandchildren and 1 great great grandchild, Sisters Estelle Evans and Mildred Coker and a Brother Sanford Delk. Paul Roosevelt Williams, 76 of Tampa died Friday October 19, 2012 surrounded by his loving family. He was the son of the Late John Henry and Annie Bell Brock Williams. He is survived by his beloved wife Sheila Williams, Son Paul Williams and Daughter Kelly Cory.

Mary D Lapman, 90 of Sarasota died October 17, 2012, at Sarasota Memorial Hospital. Born July 28, 1922 in Watersbury, Connecticut, she was the daughter of the late Thomas Daly and the late Mary Holmes. Surviving niece Donna Griffith of Chatham, CT. Ronald G. Evans, 86 of Plant City died October 16, 2012, at South Florida Baptist Hospital. Born March 21, 1926 in Brooklyn, New York, he was the son of the late George Evans and the late Helen Evans. Surviving daughter, Cheryl Johns of Riverhead, NY. Lamar "Ed" Varn, 90 of Plant City entered into rest on October 14, 2012, at his home. Born August 19, 1922 in Brandon, Florida, he was the son of the late P.H. Varn and the late Olive Wood Varn. He was the husband of Martha Joann Holbrook Varn for 62 years.

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The Importance of Giving Back

By Jim Frankowiak

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hey met on a blind date in 1947 arranged by Ed’s friend Donny McClelland. He was a football player at Plant City High School and Myrtle Lou was in the band at Turkey Creek, and that date marked the beginning of a very long relationship. Married in 1950, the Swindle’s have two sons, Larry, 59, and Rodney, 56, plus four grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. A native of Davenport, Ed and his family moved to the Plant City area when he was two, located on the north McIntosh Road area north of I-4 and that’s also home to Larry, who is president of the ESI Group, a company Ed founded in 1960, and his family and other relatives. Rodney and his family live near Marianna in north Florida where the family has a 9,000-acre timber operation, which he oversees.

A little later this month,

Ed & Myrtle Lou

Swindle will be celebrating a wedding anniversary, it will be their 62nd and the

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The Swindle family has been successful and “very blessed,” according to Myrtle and that’s one of the reasons they feel it is so “important to give back to the communities that have been good to us.” But that’s just part of the story. Ed recalls a time when he was with the U.S. Marine Corps at Camp LeJeune in North Carolina when “two weeks to go before payday and we had $1.50.” Thanks to good friends they made it through “just fine, but we learned how to be cautious and careful. We didn’t have much money in those early years, but we did have a budget and Myrtle Lou and I agreed we would try very hard to save 10 percent of what we made and to never buy anything until we could pay cash for it all.” Following his service in the Marines, Ed joined Aber Insulation, a Texas-based industrial insulation company considered one of the biggest in the nation in the 1950s. He stayed with the company until 1960 when plans for Aber to open a local office did not materialize. “That was a good company with great people where I learned a whole lot about working with power plants and meeting their insulation and metal protection needs.”

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One of the keys to working with utilities, which Ed and his company have done since the very beginning in 1960, is providing a level of service and satisfaction that involves not only new construction but service as well. “You have to have good people and I am pleased to say we have some of the best. Some of our staff members have been with us for 35 years and we are beginning to work with the fourth generation members of some families,” he said. TECO is a good example of a long term relationship. “We had our first job with TECO in 1962, and I am pleased and proud to say we are still working for them after all of these years.” Originally Energy Service Insulation, Inc., the company is now known as ESI Group, Inc., a general, mechanical, scaffold, asbestos and lead abatement and insulation and sheet metal contractor. ESI Group offers all of its services to customers, enabling customers to obtain all of their services from a single contractor instead of having to deal with multiple contractors. The company’s primary customer base includes power generation facilities in Florida and throughout the Southeast. In addition to both fossil

and nuclear power plants, ESI group serves chemical plants, petrochemical refineries and pulp and paper producers. Projects involve teams ranging in size from 150 to as many as 450 staffers. Ed was a Director on the National Maintenance Committee (NMAPC) for 18 years. The committee dealt with major utilities, auto manufacturers and other large-sized companies. He has also been active in a national utility maintenance group that has worked with utilities, contractors and unions so that all could benefit by working together in a collaborative effort. Business has been good for the Swindle family and has enabled them to acquire and run their north Florida timber operation. Myrtle Lou, who was born at Pierce in Polk County and relocated with her family to Hillsborough County at a young age, says the family “has always been involved in agriculture. My family had what was known as a truck farming operation, producing strawberries, peppers, squash, egg plant and other crops.” Though Ed and Myrtle Lou are no longer actively involved in farming locally, she is the primary lawn mower at their home on McIntosh Road. Both Ed and Myrtle Lou are quick to note their self-sufficiency, including the construction of their home and those of nearby family members. But it’s not all work. “We enjoy hunting and being able to hunt with our grandchildren and great grandchildren, which is very special for us,” said Myrtle Lou. Ed and Myrtle Lou recently returned from an elk hunting trip to New Mexico with plans to return in pursuit of mule deer. They also enjoy hunting with family members in north Florida. “Ed has done well in New Mexico,” said Myrtle Lou, who loves turkey hunting “and she’s good at it, too,” said Ed. “We grew up in an era where you really had to do things for yourself and that has carried over and with our sons,” said Ed. An ordained deacon, Ed and Myrtle Lou have been active members of First Baptist Church of Dover since December of 1945. That includes several decades as Director of the pre-school nursery for Ed and Myrtle Lou’s work with four-year-olds. “Some have said very young children are unable to appreciate love, but they respond and it’s not make believe. They cry when they are sad and laugh when they are happy, something we can’t always do as adults.” continued on page 73...

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Wild Horse Ministries

& Front Line Ministry January 26 & 27, 2013 

Paul Daily Relates Horse Training with God Based On: • Trust • Faith • Obedience “Let’s face it,” says Ed. “Our only salvation is the young people and we have to show them love and affection from early on. They will respond.” Ed, a long time Hillsborough County Sheriff Honorary Deputy, reports Sheriff David Gee talks of non-involved youth who get in trouble with the legal system “costing taxpayers $1.4 million on average over their lifetime. That’s another reason to work to have our youth involved in productive activities.” The Swindle’s have long supported youth and various agriculture programs including 4-H and FFA, where their sons were very active growing up. Larry has been president of an FFA alumni group active locally and at the national level. There have been a number of honors over the years and they include the Plant City Chamber of Commerce Good Egg Award, the Chamber’s Citizen of the Year honor in 2010, Plant City High School Class of 1950 honor for Support of Medical Needs. Ed also served as an FFA Federation Director for eight years and he received an Honorary State FFA Degree in 2010. Farm Credit of Central Florida cited the family this year for Supporting youth and agriculture and the Hillsborough County Fair presented the Swindle’s with its Farm Family Award for 2012. And most recently, the family was recognized for its livestock pavilion contribution at the Florida Strawberry Festival grounds. The new facility will support youth programs during the annual festival. The near million dollar pavilion encompasses 25,000-square feet and is adjacent to the Madonia Agricultural Center. The Plant City community at large has also benefited from the Swindle family’s commitment to “giving back.” Their foundation was instrumental in funding construction of the Swindle Diagnostic Clinic adjacent to South Florida Baptist Hospital and there have been similar community contributions in north Florida. “The Lord has definitely blessed our family,” said Myrtle Lou. “Part of our appreciation is giving back to the community in ways that help those who have helped us,” said Ed. Perhaps the words of Ed and Myrtle Lou’s Great Grandchild Anna Beth Conrad best sums things up: “My Gran and Mema are two of the greatest people I have ever known not just because they are my grandparents, but because of the huge imprint they have placed on our community. My Gran gathers us as a family each year at Christmas and always speaks to us as our patriarch. His message is loud and clear and resonates with me as it keeps our family strong and guides us on our daily walk though life: Love your family, love God, thank Him for your blessings and appreciate what you have. Share your blessings with others and help to be a blessing to them. Do what you can to lay a foundation for the family you have and make this a good place for those who are yet to come.”

“Our family is so incredibly lucky to have two amazing individuals to look up to, learn from and lead us.” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Gary Shepherd Forgiveness • For the past • Grace - For present • Hope - For Future Location:

The Farm “ Home of Cowboy Up Ministry” 7820 Lithia Pinecrest Road Lithia Fl. 33547 Directions: Hwy 39 S, to Lithia Pinecrest Road, turn Right past school Farm on Left Time: 11:00AM - 6:00- PM Saturday & Sunday 11:00AM- 3:00 PM For Information (863) 559-3093 or (813) 764-8064 SATU RDAY JANU ARY 26, 2013

11:00 am - 12:00 am 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Cowboy Poetry Rope Tricks Horse Related Demonstrations Paul Daily God Based Horse Training

SU NDAY JANUARY 27, 2013 Cowboy Up Church- Skipper Calder 11:00 am 12:00 am

Sevice & Demonstration Free BBQ dinner and Fixins for all. Many Activities All Day Food, Fun and Fellowship

Praise the Lord Our Savior All proceeds donated to Wild Horse Ministries and Front Line Ministries. Tax deductable donations - Make Checks to: Front Line Ministry P.O. Box 3112 Plant City, Fl. 33563-3112 Food BBQ and more dedicated to sharing Jesus Christ and bringing people to know him as their Savior. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Comparison of beetle to a penny; b) top view and c) side view of a single adult; Photo - Mike Thomas, DPI

Affected Redbay; Photo - Dan Culbert, UF/IFAS

Wilt

Threatens Trees in the Laurel Family, Including Redbay and Avocado

by Susan Haddock Commercial Horticulture/Integrated Pest Management/Small Farms Agent, UF/IFAS Hillsborough County Extension

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omeowners, landscape professionals and naturalists need to be on the lookout for a devastating disease that has been confirmed in Hillsborough County in 2012. The disease, known as Laurel wilt, affects trees in the Laurel family, most notably the redbay and the avocado. The disease was first detected in Georgia in 2002 and has steadily spread north to South Carolina and south to Florida.

T HE DISEASE The disease, caused by a fungus (Raffaelea sp.), is introduced into host trees by a nonnative beetle, the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). The beetles are dark brown to black, cylinder shaped and about 2mm in length, or smaller than a grain of rice. Fungal spores are transported on the beetle’s mouthparts and then introduced into the tree by the beetle. The beetle bores into trees and creates tunnels or galleries in the sapwood. The fungus then grows in the galleries and serves as food for the beetles and their larvae. The fungus gets its’ nutrition from the tree. The fungus, moves into the water and nutrient system of the tree and plugs up and prevents the flow of water, causing the tree to wilt and eventually die.

avocado species drop dead leaves. • Stem and limb dieback. T RU NK AND MAJOR LIMB SYMPT OMS • Trunk and major limbs may show dried sap, a white crystalline powder-like material. • Removal of the bark to the sapwood may show dark (black to brown) streak ing running parallel to the grain of the wood. This streaking indicates fungal infection. Sapwood should normally be white to yellowish with no dark streak ing or staining. • The presence of small dark holes in the sapwood indicates boring beetles. • Small strings of compacted saw dust may protrude from bore holes in heavy infestations. RECOMMENDAT IONS Currently, homeowners and landscape professionals are advised to report any suspicious redbay, avocado or other tree in the laurel family to the Division of Plant Industry at 1-888-397-1517. Reporting helps scientists and regulatory agencies track the movement of this disease. Redbay and other host trees should not be

FOLIAR SYMPT OMS • Leaves and young stems droop and wilt. • Leaf color change from light green to dark purplish-green, bluish-green to greenish-brown or reddening. • Initially foliage may be affected in only part of the crown, but eventually the entire crown wilts. • Dead leaves hanging on tree; some W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Protruding sawdust Photo - Dan Culbert, UF/IFAS

moved or sold as firewood, mulch, BBQ smoke wood or for any other purpose. When planting or moving live host trees, insect and disease free containerized trees should only be purchased from registered nurseries. Homeowners and landscape professionals may collect a sample for confirmation of the disease. Samples are sent overnight to the Division of Plant Industry. For information on how to collect a sample scroll down to How to Collect a Sample on the Division of Plant Industry website below. Once a tree has been diagnosed as being positive for Laurel wilt, it should be removed immediately and disposed of properly. Disposal may involve contacting your local waste disposal service to have it picked up and destroyed or buried. According to Mike Thomas of the Division of Plant Industry, tree trimmings can be bagged and sealed for disposal by the waste disposal service. The best alternative is to cut the tree to the ground and have it chipped. It is important to chip all portions of the tree as this destroys the beetle’s habitat. Chips should be disposed of at a local landfill that will destroy or bury the chips. Or the chips can be placed on top of the stump and completely covered with a tarp and allowed to compost. The tarp helps prevent any

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Sulfur Amendments May Boost Tomato Yields, UF Researchers Report By Tom Nordlie

Above: Dark staining of sapwood, Below: Live beetles and egg chambers Photo - Dan Culbert, UF/IFAS

beetles not destroyed in the chipping process from escaping. The composting process may be accelerated with the addition of topsoil, manure, fertilizer and water. Burning the cut tree material is also an option, but not recommended due to burn restrictions, the need to obtain burn permits and the danger of an uncontrolled burn. The fungus can be transmitted on handsaws but not power saws. It is important to disinfect pruning equipment between trees and after each use. Tools should be soaked for five to ten minutes in 25% chlorine bleach (3 parts water and 1 part bleach) or 50% rubbing alcohol (70% isopropyl with equal part of water). PREVENTAT IVE MEASU RES High value landscape trees may be treated preventatively with systemic fungicides. Propiconazole (trade name Alamo®) has shown some success protecting high value trees. The diluted fungicide is dispensed into the tree using a passive uptake or microinjector system. Homeowners should contract a licensed landscape company or arborist with a pesticide certification to perform this work. Currently, there are no recommended fungicide treatments for avocado trees in the urban landscape. The best defense is to keep trees as healthy as possible in the first place. Reduce tree stress by planting in appropriate locations and irrigate as water restrictions allow during times of drought. • More Information Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry, Laurel Wilt website: http:/ / www.freshfromflori da.com/ pi/ enpp/ pathology/ laurel_wilt_disease.html Laurel Wilt: A Threat to Redbay, Avocado and Related Trees in Urban and Rural landscapes http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ hs391 76

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lorida tomato farmers may increase their yields by adding sulfur to their soil before planting, according to a University of Florida study published in the current issue of the journal HortTechnology. Adding 25 pounds of elemental sulfur per acre boosted yields by 1.7 tons per acre in the study, said Bielinski Santos, an associate professor with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and part of the research team responsible for the paper. Sulfur is an important major nutrient and one of the ways it reaches agricultural fields is via atmospheric deposition. However, in recent years the amount of sulfur in the atmosphere has declined, due to tougher cleanair standards. So some farmland may not have the same sulfur content it once did. “Growers should be aware that sulfur-related deficiencies are now more common than a few years ago in vegetables and small fruit crops,” said Santos, who is based at UF’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Balm.

There are no field tests available for soil sulfur content, Santos said. So he recommends adding a sulfur amendment to soil once each year. In the study, scientists grew tomatoes on sandy soil at the Balm center. Treatments were set up using sulfur amendments ranging from 25 pounds to 200 pounds per acre. The results showed that soil amended with 25 pounds per acre yielded 1.7 tons more marketable fruit per acre, compared to a control plot with no sulfur amendment. Adding more sulfur had little additional benefit, Santos said. The 25 pounds per acre falls within UF/IFAS recommendations for Florida vegetable production. Santos said that possible sulfur sources include gypsum, elemental sulfur and sulfate-based fertilizer. He added that a UF/IFAS research team has conducted similar experiments with strawberries and found similar results. That study will be published in the coming months.•

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2012 Sheriff David Gee’s Charity Sporting Clay Shoot

There were 250 shooters registered for the event and it was a sell out.

A significant amount of money was raised that will benefited the following charities: Special Operation Warrior Foundation, Operation Helping Hand and The Haley House Fund. Thanks again to all who attended and our corporate sponsors for the making the event a success.

The event was held at Tampa Bay Sporting Clays located at 10415 Ehren Cutoff in Land'O Lakes, FL.

There were approximately 15 vendors who also lended their support.

There were also many prizes that were raffled off the day of the event. All who attended were treated to a breakfast and lunch.

We look forward to seeing you next year. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M AG A Z I N E .C O M

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4892 Sun City Center Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573

P O Drawer L Plant City, FL 33564

12880 E US Highway 92 Dover, FL 33527

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Community Farmers Markets

Information courtesy of www.hillsboroughcounty.org • HILLSB OU ROU GH FARMERS MARKET S • SWEET WAT ER SU NDAY ORGANIC MARKET Sweetwater Community Farm, 6942 W. Comanche Avenue Tampa, Florida • Open-air / seasonal • November through May Sundays, Noon to 4:00 p.m. Contact Information: Andrea Harms, Market Manager 6942 Comanche Avenue Tampa, FL 33634 Telephone: (813) 887-4066 • www.sweetwater-organic.org TAMPA DOWNT OWN MARKET Lykes Gaslight Square Park 400 and 500 Block Franklin Street and 200 and 300 Madison Street, Tampa, Florida 33602 Open: Mid-October through Mid-May Fridays, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Ms. Tiffany Ferrecchia 601 North Ashley Drive, Suite 1100 Tampa, Florida 33602 • Telephone: (813) 649-8747 Email: marketmanager@tampadowntown.com www.tampadowntownmarket.com TAMPA WHOLESALE PRODU CE MARKET 2801 East Hillsborough Avenue Tampa, Florida Open year-round: Monday through Saturday from 3:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Contact Information: Peter Filippello 2801 East Hillsborough Avenue Tampa, Florida 33610 Telephone: (813) 237-3314 YB OR CIT Y SAT U RDAY MARKET Centennial Park at the corner of Eighth Avenue and 19th Street, Ybor City Tampa, Florida Year-round, Saturdays: 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Contact Information: Lynn Schultz P.O. Box 5294, Tampa, Florida 33675-5294 Telephone: (813) 241-2442 Email: ybormarket@yahoo.com Web: www.ybormarket.com • MANAT EE FARMERS MARKET S • DOWNT OWN B RADENT ON FARMERS’ MARKET Old Main Street (12th Street West) Bradenton, Florida October through May • Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Susan Blake, Market Manager 101 Old Main St. - City Hall Bradenton, Florida 34205 Telephone: (941) 544-8077 Fax: (941) 932-9552 Email: susanblake@earthlink.net www.bradentonfarmersmarket.com LAKEWOOD RANCH FARMERS’ MARKET Main Street, Lakewood Ranch, Florida Street-side Market Open November through May Saturdays, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Contact Information: Bob Fernandez, Market Manager 301 North Hillcrest Drive Clearwater, Florida 33755 Telephone: (727) 461-7674 Email: pbjfernandez@ij.net • PASCO FARMERS MARKET S • DOWNT OWN NORT H PORT RICHEY MARKET Historic District, Railroad Square Nebraska Avenue, one block east of Grand New Port Richey, Florida Open: Year-Round, Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Contact Information: Carlene Hanlon 6231 Grand Boulevard, New Port Richey, FL 34652 Telephone: (727) 842-8066 • Fax: (727) 264-0460 Emails: judy@nprmainstreet.com carlene@nprmainstreet.com • www.nprmainstreet.com

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FLORIDA ESTAT ES WINERY MARKET 25241 State Road 52, Land O’ Lakes, FL 34639 Second and fourth Saturday of each month 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. • Contact Information: Ron Hunt 25241 State Road 52, Land O’ Lakes, FL 34639-7172 Telephone: (813)996-2113 Email: corp@flewn.com • www.floridaestateswines.com • PINELLAS FARMERS MARKET S • DOWNT OWN CLEARWAT ER FARMERS’ MARKET Downtown on Cleveland Street (500 block) Clearwater, FL • Mid-October through May-Wednesdays, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Bob or Pat Fernandez, P.O. Box 1017, Clearwater, FL 33757 Telephone: (727) 461-7674 • Email: pbjfernandez@ij.net www.clearwaterfarmersmarket.com DU NEDIN GREEN MARKET Pioneer Park, corner of Main Street and Douglas Avenue Dunedin, Florida Mid-October through April • Fridays, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Contact Information: Richard Kendler, Market Manager 200 Woodette Drive, No. 803, Dunedin, FL 34698 Telephone: (727) 733-4215 Email: greenmarketmanager@verizon.net  GU LFPORT T U ESDAY FRESH MARKET Beach Boulevard, near 29th Avenue South Gulfport, FL Open year round • Tuesdays from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Contact Information: Daniel Hodge 4920 29th Avenue South, Gulfport, FL 33707 Telephone: (727) 366-4086 • Email: dan@igc.org Web: www.gulfportma.com/Freshmarket.html

• POLK FARMERS MARKET S • AU B U RNDALE FARMERS’ MARKET Downtown - 119 West Park Street Auburndale, FL November through April • Fridays, 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Larry Helms 119 West Park Street Auburndale, FL 33823 Telephone: (863) 965-5545 • Fax: (863) 965-6319 Email: lhelms@auburndalefl.com www.auburndalefl.com HAINES CIT Y FARMERS’ MARKET Railroad Park - Downtown (Sixth Street and Jones Avenue) Haines City, FL Year-round, Wednesdays, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Tommy Cassel, Market Manager P.O. Box 1507, Haines City, FL 33845 Telephone: (863) 421-3700 • Fax: (863) 421-3701 Email: tacassel@ci.haines-city.fl.us http://www.ci.haines-city.fl.us LAKELAND DOWNT OWN FARMERS’ CURB MARKET 200 North Kentucky Avenue, Lakeland, FL Open September to July • Wednesdays 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. • Saturdays 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Mr. Jim Luna 228 South Massachusetts Avenue Lakeland, FL 33801 Telephone: (863) 687-8910 • Fax: (863) 683-2783 Email: becky.abel@lakelandgov.net www.LDDA.org/curbmarket  • SARASOTA FARMERS MARKET • PHILLIPPI ESTAT E FARMERS’ MARKET S Phillippi Estate Park 5500 South Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL Open November - April, Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Tim Brown, c/o Phillippi Estate Park, 5500 South Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida 34231 Telephone: (941) 266-6691 • Fax: (941) 373-7080 Email: thtttbrown@aol.com

LARGO’S DOWNT OWN MARKET Ulmer Park • 301 West Bay Drive, Largo, FL 33771 Open November through April Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Kinsit Cooley P.O. Box 296, Largo, FL 33779 Telephone: (727) 587-6740 • Fax: (727) 586-7406 Email: kcooley@largo.com • Web: www.largoevents.com  MARKET IN T HE PARK Heritage Village, 11909 - 125th Street Largo, FL 33774 November through mid-April Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Contact Information: Richard Kendler, Market Manager 200 Woodette Drive, No. 803, Dunedin, FL 34698 Telephone: (727) 733-4215 Email: greenmarketmanager@verizon.net

SARASOTA DOWNT OWN FARMERS’ MARKET Downtown Sarasota - Corner of Lemon Avenue and Main Street Sarasota, Florida Year-round • Saturdays, 7:00 a.m. to noon Contact Information: Leann Aldridge, Market Manager 1365 Fruitville Road, Sarasota, FL 34236 Telephone: (941) 951-2656 Email: leann@downtownsarasota.com www.downtownsarasota.com 

OLDSMAR DOWNT OWN FRESH MARKET 100 State Street West next to City Hall November through April Wednesdays, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Contact Information: Richard Kendler 200 Woodette Drive, No. 803, Dunedin, FL 34698 Telephone: (727) 733-4215 Email: GreenMarketManager@verizon.net

COMMU NIT Y FARMERS MARKET S For More Information Contact: Agriculture Industry Development Program Hillsborough County Economic Development Department P.O. Box 1110, Tampa, Florida 33601-1110 Phone: (813) 272-5909 Fax: (813) 276-2638 http://www.hillsboroughcounty.org/econdev/agriculture/

SAFET Y HARB OR FARMERS’ MARKET 400 Main Street - Downtown Safety John Wilson Park Safety Harbor, Florida • Mid-October through May Thursdays, 8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Contact Information: Bob Fernandez 301 N. Hillcrest Drive Clearwater, FL 33755 Telephone: (727) 461-7674 • Email: pbjfernandez@ij.net www.safetyharborchamber.com ST. PET ERSB U RG SAT U RDAY MORNING MARKET First Avenue South and First Street St. Petersburg, FL October through May • Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Contact Information: Gail Eggman 104 Fareham Place, North • St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 Telephone: (727) 455-4921 Email: saturdaymkt@yahoo.com www.saturdaymorningmarket.com

Listings in this directory are not paid advertisements and are provided as a free service. A listing in this directory does not imply an endorsement by Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners, the Economic Development Department, or the Agriculture Economic Development Council. Sources: Hillsborough County Agriculture Industry Development Program and the FL Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.



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4H Around the World

Iraqi 4H

By Ginny Mink

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atch the news and undoubtedly you’ll hear a plethora of negative conversation about countries in the Middle East. Therefore, this article is certain to peak your attention as we had the opportunity to interview a man from Iraq. No doubt that concept is a little odd given the fact we’re an agricultural magazine, but when you discover what Mohammed S. Lafta is doing, you’ll understand our reasoning. Mary Kerstetter was an Ag worker for USAID in Iraq. As a former Pennsylvanian 4H member and 4H leader she saw a need for the program there. When she met Mr. Lafta a new purpose came to life. He says, “We started in 2010, in mid 2010, like June, we started with a 4H club in Mahmudiah. It’s 30 kilometers south of Baghdad. We started with 29 members, 50 percent boys, 50 percent girls, half and half.” Anyone having started a 4H club is aware of the fact they usually don’t garner such high initial enrollment. This was of course a tell tale sign of the kind of success Mr. Lafta, Chairman of the Iraqi 4H, was about to experience. He continues, “These members called the club Alamal, which in English means Hope. So after that, 4H GROW! We did three clubs in Baghdad. We started many other clubs in many provinces in Iraq, in South, mid-Iraq and North Iraq.” Eventually Mary left and Mr. Lafta was on his own. All the people involved work on a voluntary basis and are connected to the Iraqi National Center for Youth Clubs. Iraq is the 81 international country that

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does 4H. Many countries are joining 4H in developing nations. Most of our readers are familiar with 4H but Mr. Lafta’s group has some interesting additional aspects. He shared them all with us. “Some of these clubs are interested in animals, some how to learn computer, sheep and dairy clubs. We offer computer courses, music lectures, art gallery visits, visiting the dentist, sheep breeding, first aid courses and attendance in town council meetings.” While that might not sound hugely different from what we do here, the kicker is this revelation, “We worked with the widows and orphans. They are supported from INMA Organization.” Working with widows and orphans is a radical step in a predominantly Muslim country. He explains, “We established this club in a very dangerous area of Iraq.” In fact, due to some of the community service projects the club has been involved in, Al-Qaeda has targeted him on their websites. They say he’s an agent of America and that he’s there to brainwash their children. He says he’s told them, “This is for Iraq from Iraq to Iraq. It’s an American idea but it’s for Iraq.” Apparently they have paid him visits at his home insisting that he teach the kids how to draw guns and tanks.

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For a man accused of brainwashing children, he tells a story that proves everything but. He says, “Najat, 13 years old, could not read or write. I refused to put her in the club. On the second meeting I saw her standing outside where we were meeting. I said, ‘Najat, I cannot let you join because you cannot read or write,’ but she’s really strong. She said, ‘Ok, I promise you I read and write.’ And in just six months she can read and write and use computer. The TV station came. She’s on government TV!” Mr. Lafta has many such success stories about the children he reaches via Iraqi 4H. By the way, in the two years it has been in existence it has grown to more than 60 clubs with about 3,000 kids involved. 4H clovers dot the country from top to bottom. It is apparent that this was a much needed move for their country. Kids are learning to participate in community service projects which is something Mr. Lafta said was completely foreign to them. They painted their schools, inside and out and they planted trees on their school grounds. Mr. Lafta was here in the states to attend the National 4H Conference. He attended W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


the Orlando based meeting with all the 4H Agents in the nation along with Joann Cobe from Kenya. They were the first two international leaders to attend this conference. In closing Mr. Lafta discusses the financial issues he faces. Actually, he’s quite humble, “I need support, but I did not ask for money. I ask training. I hope the Iraqi government understands what we did to start this program. When I come back to Iraq I will try to meet with the Minister of Agriculture or of Youth or of Sport.” Remember, we told you that all those involved are volunteers. If you think you might be interested in offering some support you can check out their website: www.incyc4h.org (but it’s in Arabic) or just contact Georgene Bender at the IFAS Center in Plant City at (813) 757-2184.

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Finding Contentment in Your Own Pasture Country Folks 4H

By Ginny Mink

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o one is immune from the grass-isgreener disease. It seems that no matter what we do, we suspect that someone else has it better whether it be in his/her career or family. This discontent can have negative effects of course, but it also spurs us on to try new things. Sometimes these new ventures prove fruitful and other times they serve to remind us we have it pretty good in our own pastures. Kathy Surface found the latter out when she tried to leave her agricultural roots. She explains, “My parents ran a farm and I still live on a farm. I’ve always been part of it. I don’t know what I’d be without agriculture. I was raised right here in Hillsborough County, my parents had a cattle ranch, my mother still has a cattle ranch and I still work on the family farm. When I was in high school I thought there was a lot better way to make a living so I went to college, but after four years and getting a degree in political science, I realized it wasn’t a better lifestyle. I looked around at what everybody was doing and I found there wasn’t anything I enjoyed doing more than working on the ranch. Agriculture offers you space and the

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opportunity to learn life-long skills of dealing with livestock and learning how to care for something other than yourself.” So basically, Kathy learned that though political science could have produced a financially stable career it couldn’t provide her with the joys of ranch life. There’s something to be said about the agriculturally focused lifestyle versus the daily grind and Kathy learned that real quick. She continues, “I got married to my husband, I knew I wanted our children to have the same benefits I had growing up, not being in the rat-race, how to be self sufficient and use their imaginations, because all problems can’t be solved by a book when you’re on the farm and I didn’t want them to be influenced so much by the electronic age. Because of that I wanted my kids to show. I never showed as a kid, so I started talking to my sister and she told me that Karen Green had a 4H group and they showed livestock. So, I went and I was enthralled. I was just a parent going with an eight year old. That next fall, the State Fair was starting up an achievement program and I said, ‘that’s perfect!’ We all started working on that in the club. Since my son did so well in the poultry division,

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I became the project leader. Karen was going to retire, so in 1999, I became the organizational leader of Country Folks 4H and I’ve been it ever since. We are the oldest continuous 4H group in the county! My kids put me into 4H and that’s how I’ve ended up here.” Certainly she never thought she’d be in the position she’s in now, but it is obvious that this is an aspect of the agricultural lifestyle that she really loves. Kathy tells us a little about her club, “The kids in my group can do anything but they have to have one thing in common and that’s a love of talking about livestock animals because I want to teach about livestock. I’ve had kids do crafts and plants but I primarily teach cows, pigs, chickens, rabbits, sheep and dairy goats. I do not do sewing or crafts of any kind.” Essentially, Kathy’s 4H kids are there to show livestock. If they have interests in other arenas she says that they have to find someone else to educate them therein because livestock is the only thing she truly focuses on in her club. She adds, “I am blessed with a very easy going group of people. My parents stay right with their kids.” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


We are the oldest continuous 4H group in the county! Given the limited focus of the Country Folks 4H club, it seems expected that they would do well at the different competitions. Kathy says, “I’ve had individual kids do extremely well. I’ve had a child in that ring every year, in the champion of champions. Since I’ve been an organizational leader, I’ve had at least one kid in there. I’ve gone to Nationals with poultry twice and I took one as an individual and one as a state winning team. I’ve been blessed with very good kids. I’m just a regular mom who teaches stuff. If you’ve got a kid that wants to do this stuff, I’ll teach him to the best of my ability.” Kathy’s background in cattle ranching is without a doubt the drive behind her passion for livestock and it has aided her members in the ring for sure. Though Kathy thought she could find a better venue to focus her life on, returning to agriculture has made all the difference. She says, “It’s the gift it leaves for years to come. If you can get a kid to touch agriculture, to really do something with it, it will stay with them all their lives, no matter what they do. It’s astonishing the impact it has, people will talk about what they learned and how it affected them, the feeling of pride, it’s very unique.” Kathy’s group contains eight children, but that’s enough for her because she’s a very hands-on leader and wants to be able to devote large amounts of time to individual children. Currently they are preparing for the state fair. Keep your ears out for their future successes. She closes by saying, “Over the years I’ve met some very great children and they’ve turned into wonderful people and it’s a wonderful organization!” •

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Edible Cornucopia

Photo by Mandy Heaston (Gormetmom) Photo is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

By Sean Green The cornucopia, or horn of plenty, is an ancient symbol of abundance and nourishment. In Greek and Roman mythology it is associated with the harvest, prosperity and spiritual abundance. The cornucopia is typically a large horn shaped container overflowing with various kinds of fruits and vegetables, flowers, nuts, or any harvest bounty. This month we will celebrate the harvest and abundance (in whatever abundance you are gifted with). An edible cornucopia, like our gifts of abundance, is not necessarily something that is manifest with a formula, but rather a gift that results from the spirit of abundance.

Materials Needed: Large Sugar Cones – This is the horn of the project, everything else is what you fill the horn with • • • • • • • • 88

Nuts (suggestion) Dehydrated Fruits (suggestion) Baby Corn (Suggestion) Candy Corn (suggestion) Berries (suggestion) Grapes (suggestion) Raisins (suggestion) Popcorn (suggestion) INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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• Mini Marshmallows (suggestion) • Mint Leaves (suggestion) The idea here is to be creative, use what you have, anything you have. It does not take much to make this project a grand success, great stuff can be found in the bottom of what would otherwise be considered “empty” boxes of cereal or other snacks. I have provided suggestions above and tend to encourage raw or natural foods over processed foods and sugary treats, but I have to admit, some sugary foods are fun and I have included some in my suggestions. Fill your sugar cone with an abundance of treats. Be creative with it, there is no harm in going crazy with decorating the outside of the horn with chocolate, and sprinkles or chopped nuts. There are also many small leafy foods that make this both attractive and tasty, consider mint leaves, parsley, licorice leaves or any number of other herbs. Baby corn is fantastic for an authentic looking miniature cornucopia. Whatever you decide to fill your horn with, the most important step is the acknowledgement and gratitude for the abundance you have been given and sharing it with others. Have Fun! •

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T

he Trinkle Center at the Plant City Campus of Hillsborough Community College was the site of a special “Blueberry Short Course� on Tuesday October 20. US Congressman Dennis Ross, representing the 12th district of Florida gave the welcoming address. The Florida Blueberry Growers Association held a 25-minute business meeting, conducted by Bill Braswell, President of the Association. The short course covered such issues as labor, diseases, principles of chemical weed management, and a blueberry cultivar update by

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Dr. James Olmstead, from the Horticultural Sciences Dept., IFAS, University of Florida. After a lunch break time was given to attend the trade show that featured more than 50-trade exhibits. At 1:30 the short course resumed with a review of the 2012 three day Blueberry Festival held in Brooksville in May of this year. Dr. Oscar Liburd, entomologist, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida spoke on the spotted wing drosophila and what his department is doing at the University to combat the pest. Silvia Marino, a graduate student with the Horticultural Sciences Department, IFAS, at the University of Florida, gave an interesting

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comparison of the tissue culture and softwood cutting derived from southern high bush blueberry plants during the two years following blueberry planting. The final speaker was also a graduate student with Horticultural Sciences, IFAS, at the University of Florida. His topic was the effect of time and intensity of summer pruning on flower bud initiation and vegetative re-growth of the southern high bush blueberry plant. It was noted during the short course that the blueberry industry is expanding around the globe. They predict blueberry growers need to increase production 40 percent by 2015 in order to keep up with world demand.

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MASSEY FERGUSON 255 Grove Tractor with 6’ mower $7,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722.

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KUBOTA M7500 72hp on 48 inch centers $5950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 2009 AGCO CHALLENGER MT 465B MWR Tractor. Cab, a/c, 2 remotes, 3 pt. hitch. Call Mike 813-478-0723

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REAL ESTATE FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620

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FARM LAND FOR LEASE 85 acres, South County on Gulf City Road. Long term lease possible. Contact Dennis Carlton at (813) 620-8312

USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

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FERGUSON T020 TRACTOR Gas model, Good condition. $2,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722

CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In The Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

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LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

NOVEMBER 2012

Merry Chri stmas W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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In The Field Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County, Florida