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Contents

VOL. 8 • ISSUE 8

Cover Story Chip & Jemy Hinton cover photo by Stephanie Humphrey

Page 54 Business Up Front

Page 10 Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

Page 14 Grub Station

Page 18 Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22 Secret Recipe

Page 28 Beauty Pageant for Cows

Page 33 Going Native

Page 45 Recipes

Page 50 Ag-Abilities Sets Record

Page 62 From Sticks to Carrots

Page 67 Having Your Voice Heard Where It Counts

Page 84 Full Circle-Sarah Dwyer

Page 86 4

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

One of the oldest known diseases of man continues today. A bite or a mere scratch from an animal infected with the rabies virus can spread this almost always fatal disease to other animals and also humans. According to the Florida Department of Health web site (www.doh.state.fl.us), the rabies virus pathogenicity, or ability to produce disease, contributes to its reputation as one of the most feared zoonotic diseases. Once introduced into the body, rabies initially replicates in the muscle, connective tissue, or nerves at the site of inoculation. Subsequently, the virus moves to the nerve endings, which eventually leads to a migration to the spinal cord and brain. The site goes on to say, It (Rabies) can also alter the animals behavior to make it aggressive or unresponsive. Once the virus spreads to the salivary glands, the infection produces large volumes of the virus in the saliva. The abundant virus production promotes opportunities for continued virus transmission. Infected animals can transmit the virus when they are clinically ill as well as a number of days prior to onset of illness. What can you do? Check out www.tambabayvets.com for rabies prevention tips, which include vaccinating all dogs, cats and ferrets against rabies. Don’t leave garbage or pet food outside. It can attract wild or stray animals. If a rabies suspect or confirmed rabid animal bites your pet and your pet is not currently vaccinated, the only options are euthanasia or a strict quarantine. On May 22 a case of rabies was reported in a raccoon in Fort Meade. Previously, a horse in North Ft. Myers was confirmed as the first livestock or domestic animal rabies case in two years. Know the signs. Rabies is always a threat to unvaccinated animals but it can be prevented with good management and vaccination. Check with your veterinarian if you have questions or concerns. Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton José Mendoza CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

New Location!

We have moved our main office to better serve you. Our new address is: 1501 S. Alexander Street, Suite 102 • Plant City, Florida 33563 Our phone number is still the same - 813.759.6909

Dag-burnit Please note that the Shrimp Warehouse and Shrimp & CO Express are not affiliated in any way. We regret any confusion from the Grub Station printed in the last issue of In The Field.

Index of Advertisers Ag Technologies.............................................................100 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers.......................................29 Amazing Autos.................................................................69 Aquarius Water Refining.................................................98 Astin Strawberry Exchange ............................................85 Berry Blue Farm & Nursery, LLC.................................69 Bill’s Transmissions ..........................................................12 Bingham............................................................................89 Brandon Auto Services, Inc.............................................63 Brenda Simmons Horse Boarding..................................63 Broke & Poor...................................................................93 Byrd & Barnhill, P.L........................................................77 C&C Services of Tampa.................................................78 Cecil Breeding Farm ........................................................44 CF Industries, Inc.............................................................80 Chemical Containers .......................................................36 Choo Choo Lawn Equipment .......................................48 Chris Mink .......................................................................74 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive ............................................2 Circle “R”.........................................................................38 County Line Road Auction ............................................59 Cowboys Steakhouse & Saloon ....................................42 Cowboys Western World................................................13 Crescent Jewelers................................................................7 Dad’s Towing....................................................................79 Discount Metals...............................................................40 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................56 Driscoll’s............................................................................90 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................96 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................95 Farm Credit.........................................................................9 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fischbach Land Company..............................................71 Florida Salt and Mineral .................................................41 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................37 Fluid Measurements ........................................................35 Forbes Road Produce......................................................12 Fred’s Market......................................................................9 Gator Ford........................................................................87 Gerald Keene Plumbing ..................................................47 Gladstone Land................................................................79 Grove Equipment Service ..............................29, 42 & 97 Guthrie’s............................................................................63 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply .....................3, 25, 57 & 65 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................................85 Haught Funeral Home....................................................31 Helena Chemical-Tampa ................................................40 Higgenbotham Auctioneers............................................82 Hillsboro State Bank........................................................77 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau.................................4 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................36 Home Protection Pest Control .......................................68 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................52 IHOP.................................................................................39 Johnson’s Barbeque..........................................................87 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm.................................................85 Keel & Curley Winery.......................................................5 Key Plex..........................................................................101 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................77 Malissa Crawford............................................................59 Mark Smith Excavating..................................................19 Mosaic...............................................................................26 Myers Cleaners.................................................................60 Parkesdale.........................................................................23 Pathway BioLogic............................................................32 Pool Masters.....................................................................11 Product Consultants Unlimited (PCU) ..........................61 Rick’s Custom Meats ......................................................69 Ring Power Corporation ................................................26 Roadrunner Veterinary Clinic......................................104 Savich & Lee Wholesale .................................................16 Seedway ............................................................................59 Southern Water & Soil....................................................93 Southside Farm & Pet Supply........................................17 Southwestern Produce.....................................................27 Stephanine Humprey.......................................................41 Stingray Chevrolet............................................................21 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................72 The Catering Company.....................................................7 The Hay Depot................................................................87 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort................................41 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith .................................................................75 Walden Lake Car Wash ..................................................23 Wells Memorial................................................................75 Willie’s ...............................................................................77 Woodside Dental..............................................................15 Zaxby’s ...........................................................................103 W W W. 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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

SERVING OUR MEMBERS AND THE COMMUNITY Dear Reader: This is a special edition of IN THE FIELD for Hillsborough County Farm Bureau since it highlights two important activities that we have supported for many years. I am willing to bet, however, that most of you are not aware of either of them and how important they each are. Ag-Abilities is a special and highly rewarding program that we have organized and supported for the last 12 years. It was originally designed to respond to a request from a learning disabled high school student for a program he could participate in that was similar to FFA or 4-H activities. Ag-Abilities has since grown into a yearlong agricultural learning program for Exceptional Student Education Students that is capped with an event at the Fairgrounds where these young people get to experience what many of our young people take for granted. I would add my thanks to the great volunteers who help make Ag-Abilities what it has become. This issue also details another ongoing program of Farm Bureau here in Hillsborough County, Florida and the nation. It is the annual “Field to the Hill” trip to Washington, D.C. during which our Executive Director Judi Whitson and Director Michelle Williamson had personal visits with our elected representatives in the nation’s capitol. This is an important opportunity to tell our representatives and senators what is important to all of us who belong to Farm Bureau and where we stand on issues that will come before those elected officials in short order. Farm Bureau members from throughout Florida and the nation travel to Washington throughout the year helping to keep the Voice of Agriculture loud and strong with all of our elected officials. I sincerely hope you will pay particular attention to these two articles as you read this edition of IN THE FIELD. Should you have an interest in participating in either Ag-Abilities or the next “Field to the Hill” trip, please don’t hesitate to let us know. You will find both particularly rewarding. As with all Farm Bureau activities, you don’t have to be farmer or rancher to get involved. I would welcome your call or email to volunteer or to learn more about our programs. Please call 813/685-9121 or email me at hcfb@tampabay.rr.com. Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

Board of Directors

President: Danny Aprile, Vice-President: Jerry Hinton, Treasurer: George Coleman, Secretary: Glenn Harrell, Member-At-Large: Bill Burnette, Jake Raburn, Patrick Thomas, Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Carl Little, Lance Ham, Michelle Williamson and John Stickles, Executive Director: Judi Whitson 8

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• Florida means “Feast of Flowers” in Spanish. • Haines City is known as ʻThe Heart of Florida.ʼ • More than 150 life-sized dinosaurs live in Plant City at an outdoor dinosaur museum called Dinosaur World. • Florida is home to the largest breeding population of bald eagles in the lower 48 states. • Floridaʼs State Wildflower, the Coreopsis, is planted on Florida roadsides for highway beautification. It is found in a variety of colors ranging from gold to pink. • A museum in Sanibel claims to be the only museum in the world that is dedicated to mollusks. It houses 2 million shells. • DeFuniak Springs has one of the two naturally round lakes in the world. • Beef is a nutrient-dense food and is the #1 source of protein, vitamin B12 and zinc. • Hearty seafarers – goats were kept by sailors for milk. • The gestation period of a sow is 114 days (3 months, 3 weeks and 3 days). • The fear of chickens is called 'Alektorophobia'. • Peaches are the third most popular fruit grown in America. • Farmers and ranchers provide food and habitat for 75% of the nations wildlife. • Americans consume 1.12 billion pounds of popcorn a year. • Archeologists have found evidence that humans have enjoyed eating apples since 6500 B.C.

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Business Up Front By Ginny Mink

CHUCK’S TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE

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f you’re 16 or older and reading this, chances are you have a car or some form of transportation. That said, it is equally probable that at some point in the life of that vehicle, you will need repair work done. If you’ve any age on you at all then you are definitely aware of how difficult it is to find an honest repair shop. Well, that’s exactly what Sam Museitef, new owner of Chuck’s Tire and Auto, claims about his business. Sam isn’t from around here. He says, “I grew up in Chicago. We started in the grocery store business actually. I always had a passion for repairing cars though. Our family business was grocery stores so it was a normal transition to go from service in the grocery store to servicing customers by fixing their cars. When I first decided to get into the auto repair business we moved

from Chicago to Tampa and I had a place out on Nebraska where we did auto repair, body work and auto sales. We did that for a number of years until the economy took a downturn and we had to close our doors and we moved back to Chicago and went back into the family business, but I was never comfortable doing that.” Certainly there’s a huge difference between produce and pistons. Though he did not enjoy the family business, he endured it until, he says, “I had the opportunity to sell my business in Chicago so I sold it and came back to Tampa and that’s when I found out Chuck was selling his business, so I took my opportunity to get back into the business.” Sam bought the well known Chuck’s Tire and Auto in January of this year. He explains, “From there we’ve are maintain-

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ing the same level of integrity that Chuck had because he had a good reputation in the community. I tried to learn as much as I could from Chuck about how he ran his business and his customer service so that I could maintain his reputation.” Sam continues, “Everybody loved Chuck, and the way he ran his business was as honest as possible and that’s how I run my business. We do not do any unnecessary repairs. A lot of shops have a tendency to tell the customers that they need a lot of repairs that really aren’t necessary. When a customer comes in, we’ll tell them what is wrong and give them the best possible price.” Sam thinks that one of the ways to maintain that integrity is, “not only learning from Chuck, himself, but retaining as many employees as Chuck had. We kept the same employees that Chuck had.” This way, old customers are still seeing familiar and trusted faces. In the purchasing of the business Sam says, “We kept all his commercial accounts that he had so we do tires for farmers. Tino, my commercial sales rep, he’s been in the industry for 15 years; a lot of the farmers know him. We kept the 24-hour service, too.” In addition Sam explains, “I’d like to think that we can obtain or find tires that a lot of our competitors have difficulty finding. We try to help our farmers have as little down time as possible. We are really honest about our time frames. If we tell W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


you we’ll be there in half-an-hour, then we’ll be there. It’s better for commercial accounts to know when they’ll be operational again and by me telling them when exactly we’ll be there it helps them figure out what to do in the mean time.” No doubt that’s better than the cable companies’, ‘we’ll be there between twelve and four!’ Having come from Chicago and establishing residence in Tampa certainly didn’t prepare Sam for the unique bond that is Plant City. However, he says, “I like Plant City because of the closeness of community. In our business, word of mouth is essential. When you’re in a big city, there’s so many shops out there it’s hard to get a good customer base.” So long as he keeps up Chuck’s tradition of service it seems

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highly likely that he’ll maintain an already well established customer base here. Yet, he goes above and beyond that. He says, “We try to do as much for the community as possible. It’s a beautiful town. I love it! We had a lot of add-ons for the steer show. I can’t afford to buy a steer and I wouldn’t know what to do with it, but in order to help out we would put some money toward their steer. Whatever I can do to help out our community and my customers I try to do as much as I can. I think we donated somewhere around $1700 between the hogs and steers during the Festival.” That’s more than a lot of businesses would be willing to do. In closing he gives an example of the type of integrity he wants to portray and

uphold. He explains, “One of our commercial accounts had a vehicle go down about 30 to 40 miles away. The shop out there told him $1200. I told him $500 less based on what he said was wrong, so it was cheaper to have it towed. When all was said and done, it really only needed $440 worth. He was thrilled!” Anybody with any brain would be thrilled about that kind of savings. If that’s a true representation of the veracity Sam has, then perhaps this is a repair shop to check out. • Sam has been married for eight years and has a six year old son. His shop, Chuck’s Tire and Auto, is located at 600 S. Collins. You can reach him by email at: chuckstireandrepair@gmail.com or by phone: 813 752 6283.

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Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report Summertime Means Hot & Humid Fishing by Captain Woody Gore KNOW THE SIGNS: unconsciousness, seizures, difficulty breathing, confusion, vomiting and diarrhea, rapid heartbeat, and hot, dry flushed skin without sweating. These are all symptoms of one of the most common problems facing boaters and anglers during the summer. If you or someone close to you exhibits any of these symptoms take immediate action.

Cooling and rehydration are the cornerstones for treating heat exhaustion. The affected individual should stop their activity and try to move to a cooler environment. The person may be placed in the shade or, if in a boat, it can be started and driven to create a breeze. Clothes may be removed to help with air circulation across the body. Misting the skin with cool water also helps by stimulating evaporation and cooling the body. 14

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Rehydration is the next important step in treating heat exhaustion. This may be a challenge if the person begins to suffer from nausea and vomiting. Small sips of water, a mouthful at a time, might be tolerated even if some vomiting persists. Water, sports drink and other electrolyte replacement drinks are reasonable options. Keep in mind these hot days can really dehydrate your body, often to the danger point before you realize what is happening. Most heat-related illnesses are preventable by keeping the body cool and avoiding dehydration. So, remember to drink plenty of fluids, like water and sports drinks, to re-hydrate the body.

Snook (Season Closed) Snook fishing in the summer is almost a given. Practically every angler is looking to catch them and given the amount of fishing pressure, especially during weekends, it is a wonder they bite at all. Practically any mangrove shoreline holds snook provided there is bait and structure. Terrific ambush feeders, Snook love lying in wait along shady mangrove root systems. Rocky shores and adjacent sand bars are also good places to investigate when looking for snook. Early morning flats produce well using topwater lures, but remember live greenbacks always produce.

However, consider that fluids containing alcohol impair your decision-making process and also imposes safety issues to yourself and others. If you drink… do it “Responsibly.” Operating your watercraft and drinking alcohol equates to trouble. BUI or Boating under the influence carries stiff fines, confinement or both.

Expect good fishing this month but good fishing has a price… heat. Everything will be eating this month so plan your trips now and take advantage of good summertime fishing.

Redfish June produces some good redfish days around the flats. Heavy pushes and mullet schools are key factors in finding moving or feeding redfish. Finding redfish means covering plenty of water but once located W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


they do not venture too far if there is food present. Keep in mind as long as there is food there are fish. Live greenbacks and dollar-size pinfish work and are good choices. Do not forget the old standby… live shrimp and cut bait.

Spotted Sea Trout Trout fishing remains strong through the summer. Search out deep grass flats looking for grass beds with plenty of broken bottom or potholes. Tampa Bay offers good fishing areas using live shrimp and greenbacks free lined or under popping corks. The many broken-bottom flats with potholes produce larger fish and an occasional flounder. There are also plenty of silver trout, some topping the scale at a pound and a half to two pounds. These are great eating and awesome fun for the kids to catch.

Cobia Markers and sandy flats are good places for Cobia, especially those markers holding bait, and cruise the flats, usually following large rays.

Tarpon Tarpon fishing really comes alive in June. They are everywhere and they are hungry, from the beach to the bay, these fish offer the catch of a lifetime. Large Greenbacks, Threadfins, and crabs, found abundantly in the Bay, are excellent choices for bait. Tarpon fishing around the Tampa area is good through the summer from the beaches all the way to the causeway.

Mackerel, Bluefish, Jacks, and Ladyfish offer diversity during the summer and continue to be strong on moving tides. Fishing around structure or fish attractors are good starting places.

Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing 813-477-3817 If you want to catch fish, have a memorable adventure or perhaps learning some new fishing tips give me a call. I also specialize in group or multi-boat charters. Tell me what you need and leave the rest to me. Fishing Florida for over 50 years I offer professionally guided fishing and teaching charters around Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Bradenton, Sarasota, and Tarpon Springs. If you’re interested in booking a trip, please visit www.CaptainWoodyGore.com send me an email at wgore@ix.netcom.com or call me at: 813-477-3814.

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By Cheryl Kuck

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n the early years The Greater Brandon Chamber of Commerce featured its annual “T he Taste of B randon” to highlight how restaurants and businesses were moving into Brandon as Greater Brandon became, well, greater with a population jump of between 1,500 and 3,000 new residents annually. Increasing business and public attendance necessitated a move into the Florida State Fairgrounds and the event title became “The Brandon Business Expo and Taste of Brandon” in order to better showcase the greater number of chamber members while providing more opportunities for marketing and networking. The expo and taste event was held for the 24th successful consecutive year last month. In addition to great food vendors, there were plenty of other interesting businesses represented, from personal greetings and information from David Hudson branch manager of the newest bank (PNC) in town, to the Ed Morse Cadillac dealer with all the latest models on display. The Tampa Bay Rays and other organizations donated door prizes for periodic drawings. Of course, for your intrepid restaurant reviewer food is always the main issue. Both small and large restaurants represented offered a sampling of the food they serve in order to entice the public into a visit to their establishments. After food was sampled, people were given ballots and asked to vote for their choices in the competition for best Taste of Brandon. Some of the restaurants kept food they had brought in the right temperature through the use of warming trays and insulated portable containers, while others made freshly prepared items on portable burners and hot plates. Anyone who has tried to execute food in this fashion understands how hard it is to turn out a good product. It is beyond imagination to think of successfully serving hundreds of people this way. There were highly decorated and plain booths and some who thought good-looking women could take your mind off mediocre offerings. Models do not make my food taste better but smart, pretty women who can talk about their food in a charming and knowledgeable fashion, like the ones from B uffalo Wild Wings Grill & B ar and their savvy Marketing Coordinator Holly Smith, are assets to the sales of an already good product. Chick-fil-A of Lake Brandon Village on Causeway Boulevard is owned by community-spirited Paul and Tammy Holmberg. Their generosity to worthy causes is felt in their food. Yes, it’s fast food,

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but with TLC, as evident in the lines of children anxious to have a container of those famous chicken nuggets. Just when you think there couldn’t possibly be room for another pizza place, along comes some new entries into the market, Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza on Brandon Boulevard, the coal firing gives the pizza a delicious and interesting flavor that’s definitely worth a try, and MI – More Italian B istro & Pizzeria on West Brandon Boulevard (next to AMC Theatres), put out a droolworthy example of the fresh ingredients they use in their bistro, making you want to try more of their Italian fare. Cali Viejo Columbian Restaurant located on Brandon Boulevard, put out some wonderful regionally traditional yellow rice and beans while Tres Amigos (also on Brandon Boulevard by Sam’s Club) touts their fresh ingredients with all menu items made fresh daily. The Sumatra B istro Café & B akery caught my attention since they have a large selection of organic, preservative, gluten-free and vegetarian options at their location on Oakfield Drive. They feature free-range poultry, organic eggs and all veggies are grown locally in Plant City. Now, here are the voting results: Voted Taste of Brandon Winner, Cheddar‘s Casual Chic Catering; Cheddars Casual Cafe, 11135 Causeway Boulevard. Please note that the catering branch of Cheddars is a separate entity under different management. Director of Operations Andy Dennis drew crowds with the public favorite, very healthy servings of meaty, tender, slowcooked barbecued pork ribs finished with their homemade tangy barbeque glaze. Side dishes filled with marvelous spinach dip, homemade salsa and tortilla chips accompanied the ribs. The food served at this booth was generously meal-sized and could not be considered mere samples. In second place was T he Copper B ell Café, which had received the top awards for the past two years-in-a-row. The Brandon Café is owned and operated by Darren Denington, who has become the chamber of commerce board of director’s chair-elect. He is also an owner of Service with Style, a company that coaches’ restaurant staff, does employee evaluations, etc. and co-owner of The Copper Bell in Riverview. The café’s presentation was exceptional, covering the space of three booths where his chef cooked macaroni and cheese, similar to a buffet omelet station, and people selected the different ingredients they wished to have added, ham, bacon, green pepper, additional cheeses, onions, etc. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


“best baby-back ribs in town,” and Mimi’s, known for their bluecheese, walnut and strawberry salad, would not make that the star competitive attraction.

It is interesting that the top two restaurants voted as Taste of Brandon winners in the dessert category both served bread pudding, an old-fashioned warmly spiced baked dessert reminiscent of another era is made of day-old Italian bread cubes soaked with rich ingredients including eggs, sugars, milk or half and half. The top Taste of Brandon Dessert Winner, Jaymer- Q B B Q, on Lithia Pinecrest Road in Valrico, won best dessert for the second year in a row with their homemade bread pudding with caramel sauce. The Jaymer-Q booth is framed by a helium-inflated balloon-like checkered arch topped by the head of an inflated pink pig. Hard to miss. Approaching the booth, co-owner (with her husband Jaymer) Cyndi immediately handed me a cup of hot bread pudding with caramel and said, “We won for our dessert last year and we’re going to win again this year.” The dessert offering of the second place winner, Mimi’s Café, Providence Road near Lumsden, presented the more traditional French version of bread pudding (recipe is available on their website). The real puzzler is why a well-known BBQ restaurant would feature a dessert but not their savory specialties like the advertised,

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Although, I must add that it only takes about 45 minutes to bake a bread pudding while it takes Jaymer anywhere from five and a half to 12 hours to create a tender well-smoked piece of meat, so that might have something to do with it. Regardless, the best advice is to stay with a proven winner. The two-time award for a bread pudding recipe given to Jaymer and Cyndi 10 years ago from a friend at church is definitely something special. CEO and President of the Greater Brandon Chamber of Commerce Tammy Bracewell tells me that there were more than 130 participating expo vendors who attracted a crowd of approximately 1,300 event visitors. “We plan to continue showcasing and helping to market and grow Greater Brandon area businesses. I know our silver anniversary year 2013, will be even bigger and better because of our many volunteers who make it all happen. Our selfless volunteers are the life and heart of our chamber. They are hardworking small business people who provide services that enrich our lives, bringing new ideas and inventiveness that will help our community to continue to evolve and prosper.” •

A Taste of Brandon Brandon Business Expo & Taste of Brandon 330 Pauls Drive, suite 100, Brandon (813) 689- 9440 Website: www.brandonchamber.com

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Nancy West

RETIRES FROM GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER

By Jim Frankowiak

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or the last 35 years Nancy West has been an important member of the team at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC). She joined GCREC in 1977, when it was located in Manatee County, after moving south from Michigan with her family. Nancy is one of seven children.

There is one trip taking place this month that she is looking forward to and that’s a family reunion at Mammoth Cave, Kentucky. “That location works well for my scattered family and I can’t wait,” she said. Nancy also plans to expand her volunteer work “either at a local park or with a conservation organization.”

Now, some 35 years later, she has retired as a biological scientist working in the ornamental horticulture area of GCREC. Nancy considers her duties at the center to be that of a facilitator of experiments created and undertaken by faculty members. “That means I have helped with growing, sowing, fertilizing, pesticide spraying, data entry, purchasing, as well as irrigation for several different crops over the years,” she said. Those crops have included caladiums, chrysanthemums, poinsettias and lisianthus.

Though Nancy thoroughly enjoyed her assignments and co-workers at GCREC, she will not miss the majority of conversations that took place during her last seven years of car pooling. Those daily trips were initially within Manatee County and then from Manatee to Hillsborough County after the GCREC was relocated in 2005. “I carpooled with various people over the whole 35 years, but the last seven years carpooling to Balm was with four men who loved to talk sports. Thankfully, we also all talked about food on the way home.”

“I enjoyed the variety of responsibilities in my position and the independence that I was given to get the job done,” she said. “The faculty members that I worked for recognized that I understood the priorities of the various experiments I was involved in and did not micro-manage me. This independence coupled with a wonderful team of co-workers made my work very enjoyable.” An alumna of Michigan State University, Nancy was a biology major in college and has developed a keen appreciation for Florida’s native plants and the opportunity to bird watch. She has served the Manatee County chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society in many different capacities from board member to officer. “Promoting the use of Florida native plants in urban landscaping is something that I enjoy doing and will continue doing during my retirement,” she said. “There are also a number of tasks that need to be undertaken at my home, places to go and see and mid week events that I could not attend because of my work.” Travel has also been a popular hobby for Nancy. Shortly after receiving her degree from Michigan State, Nancy traveled to Kenya for a two year stint with the Peace Corps. “I taught biology for two years at the high school level,” she said. Her trips have included destinations throughout the world, among them New Zealand, Turkey and Armenia to visit a relative serving in the Peace Corps and various stops in Central and South America. 20

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“I appreciated the savings in fuel and auto wear and tear, but I was the only woman among our five member car pool and the discussions always seemed to focus on sports. That was an hour of sports talk coming to work,” she said. “I will miss the men, but not the sports talk.” GCREC Director Dr. Jack Rechcigl sums it up it best when it comes to Nancy and her tenure at the Center. “Nancy has been a very hard working, dedicated employee who truly cares about what she does. She has been well liked by her fellow employees and will be missed by all of us. We wish her all the best in retirement.” •

Nancy, Dr. Brent Harbaugh and Gail Brown W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


GM IS PROUD TO PARTNER WITH FARM BUREAU速 TO BRING YOU THIS VALUABLE OFFER1. Farm Bureau members can get a $5001 private offer toward the purchase or lease of most new GM vehicles, including the Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD lineup. Visit fbverify.com for more details. They get tough jobs done with a maximum payload of up to 6,635 lbs.2 and a conventional towing capacity of up to 17,000 lbs.3 And through the GM Business Choice Program4, business owners receive even more when purchasing or leasing an eligible Chevrolet or GMC truck or van for business use. Visit gmbusinesschoice.com for details. 1Offer valid toward the purchase of new 2011 and 2012 Buick, Chevrolet and GMC models, excluding Chevrolet Volt. 2Requires Regular Cab model and gas engine. Maximum payload capacity includes weight of driver, passengers, optional equipment and cargo. 3Requires available 6.6L Duramax速 diesel engine. Maximum trailer ratings assume a properly-equipped base vehicle plus drive. See dealer for details. 4To qualify, vehicles must be used in the day-to-day operation of the business and not solely for transportation purposes. Must provide proof of business. This program may not be compatible with other offers or incentive programs. Consult your local Chevrolet or GMC dealer or visit gmbusinesschoice.com for program compatibility and other restrictions. Take delivery by 9/30/2012. Farm Bureau and the American Farm Bureau Federation速 are registered service marks owned by the American Farm Bureau Federation, and are used herein (or by GM) under license. 息2011 General Motors LLC

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don’t think I have met a more colorful man than my friend, Ed Dees, who lives in Springhead, located just a stones throw southeast of Plant City. A few months back, while having lunch at the Red Rose Inn and Suites Dining Room with his boss, Bill Morrow of Morrow Steel, Ed reminded me of the time his mother’s house burned down, and my good partner, Ercelle Smith and I, lead a campaign on our morning radio show on WPLA “This’n That” to get her some help in rebuilding her house. The result was overwhelming Ed recalls. Everybody in the community pitched in. “I recall we had so much roofing supplies donated that we had to return some of it,” Ed said. Some of you locals I am sure remember the show, and recall that we were always ready to help in any needy situation. I asked Ed Dees to tell me about some of his experiences growing up in Springhead. He smiled and said, “Al, it seems I was always getting in trouble, and mama would beat me into the middle of next week with her hoe handle. I recall Aunt Jetty would always make a trip to our outhouse everyday around 4 pm. I figured I would have a little fun, so I wired a little speaker underneath the seat of the two hole’er, and then ran the wire from the speaker out the back side of the outhouse to the barn where I had a small PA system that Ercelle Smith loaned me from WPLA Radio Station. There she was right on time, 4 pm. I gave her a few seconds to get settled. Then I picked up the microphone and said ‘Aunt Jetty would you mind moving over to the other hole, I’m working down here!’ She tore the hinges off the outhouse door getting out. I have never laughed so hard in my life,” Ed recalls. “There she was standing in front of the outhouse with her drawers down around her knees, “holler’n so loud you could hear her as far as the Coronet Mine!”

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“Mama saw me over by the side of the house laughing, and knew full well I had been up to something. She grabbed her hoe and set out for me. I knew I was in for a good beating, so I headed south as fast as I could. After about an hour mess’n around the swings at Coronet grammar school, I slipped in the front door of the house. Closed the door quietly, and made my way to the bedroom. And there she stood! I know she was bigger than “King Kong” holding that hoe handle, and with one fast lick she knocked me up against the wall, and I went out like a light. Boy, I learned to leave Aunt Jetty alone after that.” “About a year later my cousin, Charlie Dees came over and we decided to play a joke on my Uncle Tom. We knew he could take it. After all he was always up to some kind of mischief himself. From the orange grove we saw him head to the outhouse. Forgetting the structure had seen it’s best days, and was just about to fall down, we quietly eased up to the back of it and hollered, at the same time giving it a push. We thought it would just rock a little and Uncle Tom would be surprised, but the whole thing went over and the two-holer he was sitting on collapsed, and down went Uncle Tom. I knew we were in trouble. Charlie and I both ran over to him as fast we could. We looked down in the toilet hole and there he was with only his head and feet showing. Charlie ran to the barn and grabbed a stepladder. We helped him out, and washed him down with the garden hose. He stripped down bucknaked, and I ran to the house to get him a pair of my pants and a shirt, but by the time I returned here comes Mama around the house swinging her hoe handle. I ran by Charlie and Uncle Tom, threw them the clothes and took off for the woods.”

view. The following week I went to Ed’s house in Springhead. He and his wife, Karen, met me at the front door leading into the living room. The first thing to catch my eye was a large #2 galvanized washtub hanging over the couch with a picture of Aunt Jetty on one side and a picture of Uncle Tom on the other. “Ed,” I asked, “I can understand the pictures of your aunt and uncle on the wall, but why in the world is that washtub hanging in your living room?” Immediately his wife Karen scurried out of the room. I cannot tell you this washtub story, but it had to do with Ed and his growth into man-hood! I suggest you ask him about the washtub incident the next time you see him. After a few minutes Karen returned from the kitchen with two glasses of fresh iced tea, and said, “Ed, why don’t you tell Al about the time you and some of your friends got in trouble at Howell Creek?” She turned and left the room laughing!

We cut our conversation short as they had an appointment, but Ed invited me out to his house so we could continue the interW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


“Well, what about (a small creek that runs through Springhead) Howell Creek, Ed?” “Al, back when I was growing up the only place to go swimming was Robinson’s Pool on highway 92 west of town. From our house to the pool was about 10 miles, much too far to ride our bicycles. During the month of March we had about a 10inch rainfall, and the creek was running deep. Billy and Tommy Heard, Perry Bradford and myself decided to dam up the creek just a little north of our house. After about five hours we had it made. The water backed up and made a nice pond

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about a quarter acre in size. The next day after school the four of us were having a good time skinny dippin in the pond, when up walks the sheriff.”

lows want to go to jail right now, I suggest you four start tearing that dam down right now.”

Perry Bradford spoke up, “Yes sir we dun it, but we ain’t bother’n no body!”

“What took us five hours to build only took one hour to tear down. Word got around that we were the culprits that caused the flooding. Needless to say we were not too popular around Springhead for a few months,” Ed recalled.

“What do you mean bother’n nobody,” the sheriff replied. “Why there’s about two dozen houses back there with water coming in their front door. Unless you fel-

I still have some more stories to tell about Ed’s “Springhead Adventures,” but they will have to wait until another edition of In The Field. •

“Boys, he said, did you make this dam?” he asked.

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Reducing Stormwater Runoff The 8th of 9 Steps to a Florida-Friendly Landscape Lynn Barber Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Agent • Hillsborough County and UF/IFAS Extension

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andscapes are a wonderful thing. They beautify our surroundings, attract wildlife and influence the health of our water bodies. All of our yards and neighborhoods are ultimately connected to our water resources. How each of us decides to manage our landscapes impacts our water resources because groundwater in Florida is very close to the surface.

PERVIOUS SURFACES – Use materials for sidewalks, patios and driveways that allow water to percolate into the ground. These materials include: mulch, bricks, pavers, gravel. All provide filtering of pollutants, recharge groundwater supplies and decrease the amount of runoff.

Our surface waters (lakes, rivers, etc.) are connected to our groundwater by springs, sinkholes and drainage basins. We use groundwater inside our homes and outside in our landscapes. When it rains, water runs off our roofs, streets and landscapes into water bodies. This flow of water picks up whatever it can that is in its path: fertilizer, grass clippings, pesticides, pet waste and much more. These pollutants cause algae growth, remove oxygen from the water and cause fish kill. By having a Florida-Friendly Landscape, stormwater runoff is filtered and/or absorbed which protects our water sources. There are some simple things each of us can do to reduce stormwater runoff and its negative effects on the environment. These include using pervious (porous) surfaces, installing a rain barrel or cistern, creating a rain garden, berms and swales and positioning downspouts.

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RAIN GARDENS – These shallow gardens decrease and filter stormwater before it seeps into the ground. The water does not runoff and helps add to our water supply. If you have an area in your landscape that is lower than the rest or under a downspout, that’s a good area to create a rain garden. The plants you select should tolerate wet feet during the rainy season and be drought tolerance between rainfalls. Marina D’Abreau, former Horticulture Agent here, created a Rain Garden Manual which you can pick up for free at the Extension Service. Please stop by to get yours. BERMS AND SWALES – You can create a raised area or indentation in the ground perpendicular to the slope to capture or slow down runoff. You need to contact the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and other local governmental agencies before changing shorelines. If the changes you make are significant, you should consult a professional and a regulatory review may be required. DOWNSPOUTS – If you have a guttering system, downspouts should be directed into pervious areas so the water can seep into the soil. Positioning downspouts onto driveways or sidewalks creates stormwater runoff. You can use a flexible downspout or rain drain to move water from your downspout into your landscape and away from your foundation.

RAIN BARREL OR CISTERN – If you haven’t attended a rain barrel workshop at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, you should! Each county household that attends for the first time receives a free rain barrel that has been drilled and spigoted by staff and Master Gardener volunteers. Rain barrels/cisterns reduce stormwater runoff because they catch it; they decrease erosion for the same reason and they decrease the amount of potable water used for landscape irrigation because you use the water you capture to irrigate your plants. One inch of rain on a 1,000 square foot roof will yield 625 gallons of water. Considering we receive 50-52 inches of rain per year, we could each save greater than 31,000 gallons. You can sign up for our workshops at: http://hillsborough.extension.ufl.edu/ HomeGardening/event-calendar.html

The information contained in this article was adapted from the Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook 2009, which is available for free at our office. If you live in a deed restricted community, check with your landscape or architectural control committee as required before making landscape changes. Visit our demonstration gardens at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, 5339 County Road 579, Seffner. For assistance with horticultural questions, call: 813-744-5519 Extension 4. More gardening information is available at: http://hillsborough.extension.ufl.edu and http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu Remember to reuse, reduce and recycle. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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www.SouthwesternProduce.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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UF Researchers Uncover

SECRET RECIPE From Nature For A Great-tasting Tomato By Robert H. Wells

UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

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upermarket tomatoes that taste like heirloom tomatoes are closer to reaching grocery aisles as a result of a discovery from the University of Florida. A team of researchers, including members of UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, have identified the chemicals inside heirloom tomatoes that make people enjoy their taste, and the discovery is expected to enable them to create bettertasting tomatoes for the commercial market. Heirloom tomatoes are old varieties not bred for large-scale production and prized for their true tomato taste, something that many believe has been lost in commercial tomatoes. The research is detailed online in the May 24 issue of Current Biology. “A big problem with the modern, commercial tomato is that growers are not paid to produce a tomato that tastes good,” said Harry Klee, an eminent scholar and professor in the UF/IFAS horticultural sciences department. “They are paid purely on how many pounds of tomatoes they put into boxes.” Florida is a top producer of fresh tomatoes, and the state’s crop for 2010-2011 was valued at $431 million. To make the discovery, Klee and a team of researchers determined the chemical components of nearly 100 tomato varieties, including many heirlooms, calculated the levels present of each chemical identified, and then

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Harry Klee, an eminent scholar and professor in the UF/IFAS horticultural sciences department, is pictured in the greenhouse with hybrid tomatoes derived from heirlooms. The tomatoes are part of a tomato flavor improvement project that is looking at producing hybrids that have great taste like heirlooms but better performance. The project is also looking at transferring the enjoyable taste of heirlooms into supermarket tomatoes.

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subjected the tomatoes to taste tests. The taste tests were comprised of 13 panels of 100 people who rated each tomato’s taste. The researchers then statistically analyzed their data to ascertain the chemicals that were most abundant in tomatoes people liked the most and the least. The research showed that some chemicals that scientists previously thought were important weren’t and some they thought weren’t, were. For example, cis-3-hexenal had long been considered to be important to tomato taste, mostly because it is so abundant in many tomatoes. “However, it has zero correlation to what people like,” Klee said. On the other hand, geranial, which was considered less important, correlated strongly with the highest-rated tomatoes and enhanced sweetness, the research showed. “We really have to rethink the way that we look at what is the chemistry of flavor,” Klee said. Klee’s research has begun focusing on ways to transfer the chemicals important to taste into commercial tomato varieties that produce higher yields and have better disease resistance than heirlooms. Klee said during the taste panels, administered by Charles Sims, chairman of the

UF/IFAS food science and human nutrition department, several heirloom varieties received high scores. These included the cherry tomatoes Cherry Roma and Maglia Rosa, the somewhat medium-sized Ailsa Craig and the large German Queen tomato. These heirlooms are excellent candidates for transfer of good flavor into commercial varieties, Klee said. Some of the chemicals uncovered during the research also have potential applications outside of tomato breeding, said team member Linda Bartoshuk, Bushnell Professor in the UF College of Dentistry and director of human research at UF’s Center for Smell and Taste. “Using statistical analysis, we found volatile chemicals that are contributing to sweet independent of sugar,” Bartoshuk said. This could be important to the food industry, she said, as foods, such as fruit juices, can be made to taste sweeter without added sugar or artificial sweeteners. UF has applied for a patent on the chemicals. Eating tomatoes can be part of a healthy lifestyle as they are high in vitamins C and A, are a good source of potassium, contain no cholesterol or fat, have few calories and sodium, and are high in the antioxidant lycopene. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, IFAS and Seminis Vegetable Seeds Inc. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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TAMPA TERMINAL AND WAREHOUSE CRITICAL CRITICAL TO TO CF CF INDUSTRIES’ INDUSTRIES’ CENTRAL CENTRAL FLORIDA FLORIDA MINING MINING AND AND PRODUCTION PRODUCTION OPERATIONS OPERATIONS

By Jim Frankowiak

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he Tampa Terminal and Warehouse are fully integrated and important elements of CF Industries’ Central Florida operations, which also include a phosphate mine in Hardee County and production facility in Plant City. Together, these facilities produce and distribute phosphate based plant nutrients that help farmers in North America and around the world enhance crop yields. “Our Port of Tampa presence began in 1972 with a 21-acre storage and shipping complex and expanded in 1992 to include an 18-acre ammonia terminal,” said Lynne Vadelund, Manager of Operations. “Our storage and shipping facility gives us access to Gulf Coast, Corn Belt and export markets for CF Industries’ plant nutrient products.” Bulk fertilizer is shipped by barge and ship. “Large barges typically offload to smaller barges for shipment up the Mississippi River to Corn Belt distribution facilities and other customers.” The company also exports “significant tonnages” in conjunction with its partnership with global fertilizer trading company KEYTRADE AG. Ocean-going shipments serve markets in South and Latin America, as well as Africa. Anhydrous ammonia and sulfur are two raw materials that are important to the production of fertilizer. CF Industries produces both diammonium phosphate (DAP)

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and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) fertilizer at the Plant City Phosphate Complex. Both DAP and MAP are shipped to the Port of Tampa complex by truck and rail from the Plant City manufacturing facility located approximately 30 miles away.

are readily evident among the CF Industries’ employees at the port. “There also is a very strong sense of pride in our work here,” she said. “We always strive to always do the right thing.” That, too, is evident from the carefully maintained office areas, terminal and warehouse.

“Many of the fertilizer trucks are dual haul trailers,” said Vadelund, “which allows transport of raw materials to the plant and then the trucks return with bulk fertilizer to our warehouse at the Port. These vehicles bring greater efficiency and lessen truck traffic.”

Vadelund, a chemical engineer by training, has spent the majority of her career with CF Industries in various environmental health and safety roles. She has served as Manager of Operations at the Port of Tampa for two years. Her prior assignments with the company have included process engineering and environmental posts, including an over a decade-long stint associated with the closing of a gypsum stack at CF’s former chemical operation near Bartow. Vadelund also was a participant in a CF Industries’ employee development program over a two-year period during which she was involved in environmental and safety audits at different company facilities.

“In 2011 CF’s Port operations had a throughput of approximately two million tons,” she said. CF has 40 employees at the Port to meet the demands of both the terminal and storage/shipping complex. The majority of the personnel are trained in both operations and maintenance. “This gives us the flexibility to optimize our staff resources in a very cost-effective fashion while helping our employees build and maintain their skills through varied assignments,” said Vadelund. “We are more than just a substantial business operation here at the port. Our staff is like an extended family focused on maintaining a safe, efficient workplace and protecting the environment.” Long term employees and multiple family members

“When it comes to genuine concern for the environment and the well-being of our employees, we all not only talk the talk, but walk the walk as we support CF Industries’ business operations every day here at the Port of Tampa.” •

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g WILLIAM MARION HUNTSMAN, 82, of Plant City, devoted husband, father and grandfather, passed away on May 28, 2012. He was worn December15, 1929, in Toledo, Ohio. Survived by his wife of 61 years, Juanita Curtis Huntsman, three daughters Cathy (Jerry) Stein of Plant City, Anna (Bill) Phillips of Fairfax Station, Virginia, and Sara (Jeff) Leonard of Tampa; grandchildren Josh (Theresa), Steven, and Kaylyn Stein, Holly (James) Collins; Andy, Rebecca, and Charles Phillips; Emma and Will Leonard; great grand children Joshua and Julianne Stein; brothers Jim and Tim Huntsman. He was preceded in death by his parents Mac and Rose Huntsman, brother Richard and sister Susanne. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Shiloh Baptist Church Scholarship Fund, 905 West Terrace Drive, Plant City, Fl. 33563, or, USF Foundation Florida Coalition to Cure Parkinson始s Disease Fund, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., ALC 100, Attn: Laura Bolduc, Office of Donor Relations Tampa, FL. 33620 LILLIE LUCILLE CARMON, 80 of Zephyrhills, Florida died May 31, 2012, at her daughter始s home in Plant City. She was born May 6, 1932 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She was the daughter of the late Harrison Hurst and the lat Prudence Seay Hurst. Lillie Lucille was the wife of the lat Jimmie Carmon. Surviving sons are, Jack Wilson, James Michael Carmon and Jimmie Lee Carmon; 17 grand children, 22 great grand children. She was predeceased by sons, Larry Wilson and Craig Wilson, daughter, Sherri Carmon. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

FAIRY NELL HANCOCK, 72 of Plant City, Florida died on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. Born Friday, November 24, 1939 in Golden, Mississippi, she was the daughter of the late Floyd Brown and Ola Pharr Brown. Surviving are daughter, Darlene Hancock of Plant City, FL, sister, Eva Faye Price. Granddaughter Crystal Hancock and great grandson Hunter Vosburg, Nell had been a cashier for years at Felton's worked at Mayfran Metal Fabricators, and was a baker with Publix Bakeries. Funeral service was held at 10:00 AM on Monday at Haught Funeral Home Chapel located at 708 W. Dr. M.L.K. Jr. Blvd. Plant City, Florida 33563. FRANK ANTHONY MORRIS, Jr., 80 of Lakeland, Florida died on Wednesday, June 6, 2012. Born Sunday, July 26, 1931 in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. He served in the U.S. Navy. Surviving are daughter, Karen Marie Ayers, sister, Genevi猫ve Hervieux. Grandchildren: Kimberly Powell, Jody Healey, Rachel Healey, Woodrow Ayers III, Harrison Cody Ayers, Emily Lemons, and Robert Ayers. CRECENCIANO SAPIEN-VALDOVINOS, 74 of Plant City died June 8, 2012, at Saint Joseph Hospital in Tampa. Born Saturday, October 9, 1937 in Mexico. The Funeral service was held Thursday, June 14, 2012 at Haught Funeral Home Chapel located at 708 W. Dr. M.L.K. Jr. Blvd. Plant City, Florida 33563. Interment at Mt. Enon Cemetery, Plant City, FL.

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Kallee Cook Explains By Ginny Mink

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hen it comes to cattle shows, the money is in the steers. People aren’t paying big bucks for the heifers, one because they usually aren’t for sale, but two - because their purpose isn’t served in the form of sirloin and ribeye. So why in the world would anyone invest in showing heifers? Perhaps Kallee Cook can shed some light on the subject since her heifers are award-winning. Kallee isn’t new to the realm of agriculture. She explains, “My mom always showed steers at the Strawberry Festival when she was growing up. My Papa, my dad’s dad, they were always from W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

a Southern background also. They were farmers but they weren’t big farmers, they weren’t known, they had their own crops at home. My granddaddy, my Papa’s dad, had a watermelon field and that’s where my cows are. We live in my great grandparents’ house. When he passed away the watermelon field got turned into a pasture.” So, given her heritage, her current endeavors shouldn’t be the slightest bit shocking. She says, “Growing up, I always wanted to be in FFA and agriculture. My brother was the first one, he showed steers at the Strawberry Festival. He did it to make INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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money. It was a lot of fun for the family. My dad always told me he couldn’t wait ‘til I could show and my chance finally came when I entered FFA in the sixth grade. From there I started showing commercial heifers sixth, seventh and the beginning of eighth grade.” Things changed after that. Kallee continues, “Then I got introduced into the Angus industry by a man from Lakeland, his name is Dale Locke and he owns Locke N Load Cattle Company. They’ve been showing Angus heifers for a very long time. When I got introduced to him he gave me my first Angus heifer and helped me go to shows, get prepared, and showed me what to do. My first Angus heifer, her name was Rio Uno 721, but we called her Maggie, I showed her every show possible. I always did well with every cow I got from Dale, never had a bad one. With one of the heifers I got from him I went to the Nationals, which is the National Junior Angus Association Show hosted in Perry, Georgia. I only had one cow, there were people who had a dozen cows each. It was an honor to go there and get eighth in my class.”

Before haircut

Eventually, Kallee decided that she wanted to start her own ranch and thusly she bred Maggie. Maggie produced a heifer. Kallee adds, “We call her Panzi, which means young girl in Indian, but her registered name is Kallee’s Royal Pain. After her we purchased Snooki. That’s when Snooki came into the picture. From the start we knew she was going to be a champion! We raised her, took her to over a dozen shows and she never lost, she always placed first in her class, Grand Champion, or Reserve Champion. She’s always been phenomenal!” Snooki is by far the pride and joy of Kallee’s five cow Angus Ranch. “In 2010 she got, at the Strawberry Festival (which is a big show for us), Reserve Champion and then last year in 2011 she got Reserve in the Angus division. Then, 2011 at the State Fair she got Division Champion for Bred and Owned heifers and then this year at the Strawberry Festival she took home Grand Champion Angus Heifer. Then she got Grand Champion Overall Heifer, which is over every cow in the barn. And at the State Fair she got Grand Champion Overall Heifer. Those have been her biggest shows and now she has gone into the pasture to be bred to where she will have a champion of her own, hopefully.”

With Mom and Dad

Kallee admits, “A heifer show is basically a pageant for cows. You don’t get as much money as you put into it, but you get paid per pound, which is pretty good. The money that we get is just helping us with our production. Heifers are just used for breeding cows. My Angus cows are high quality, just for breeding to make a good cow. The steers are created to make the best beef, ribeye and sirloin. I showed steers all four years of high school at the Strawberry Festival.” Kallee’s cattle aren’t the only ones’ winning awards. Kallee adds, “In 2010 I was elected Princess of the Junior Angus Association, you get voted in. This year I was lucky enough to be elected the Queen. It’s mainly a voting thing, pretty much a popularity contest. I had to 34

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In the Ring W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


give a speech, tell how long I’ve been showing and what the Angus industry means to me and then all the Junior Angus Association took a vote, so knowing a lot of people helps.” There’s more though. “In 2010, in showmanship, where they judge you and not your cow, I got Reserve Champion. In 2011 and 2012 I got belt buckles for getting Grand Champion at Strawberry Festival. This year I actually got second runner-up at the FFA Sweetheart at Durant, it’s a scholarship pageant. I got a $150 scholarship.” Kallee is going to need that scholarship and the others she has received because she is completing her senior year and says, “I plan to go to HCC for two years and do the University of Florida transfer plan and then go to UF to become an ultrasound technician for large animals.” Thankfully, she has a $500 Ag Hall of Fame Scholarship from the State Fair and a $1000 scholarship from the Strawberry Festival, which she says is “something I always dreamed of. It’s a great honor.” She closes by saying, “Without my dad I probably would not be showing. He does the feedings in the morning so I don’t have to get up at the crack of dawn. My dad kinda puts it all together. He helps me groom them before shows and I work every day so if I don’t make it home in time he’s the one out in the pasture. My mom contributes, too. She’s always willing to take off work and help at one of my shows. She likes washing them and helping me fit, which is basically making their hair pretty.” Kallee is definitely appreciative of her family and she’s looking forward to a career in the agriculture field while steadily building up her own Angus ranch. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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of Directors, staff, vendors and entertainers is unparalleled,” says Festival General Manager, Paul Davis. Ellany Johnson has been affiliated with the Florida Strawberry Festival since 1972 when she participated as a vendor to showcase the bookstore she owned in town. In 1975, she was asked to oversee the Show Tent, which she ran as a volunteer for several years. During that time, she originated the Shoe Box Float Contest for 25 years. The Contest is now beginning its 36th year. In 1989, Ellany’s dedication to the Festival was so evident that she was asked to join the staff. Her first position was working in the ticket office where she was promoted to Ticket Office Manager in 1991. By 1996, she was given the additional responsibility of managing all exhibitors and concessions, which she is still conducting. Because of her extensive Festival knowledge and experience, she was promoted to Office Manager in 2009 and continues in this position today. “Her humble personality, care for others, pride for her own work and love for this community and the fair industry has helped mold her into the devoted leader she is today,” says Paul Davis.

NAMED

TO

FLORIDA FEDERATION HALL

OF

FAME

Ellany Johnson Surprised was her expression Saturday Evening, May 19, 2012 at the Florida Federation of Fairs Convention in St. Augustine, Florida, when Ms. Ellany Johnson of the Florida Strawberry Festival was inducted into the Florida Federation Hall of Fame. More than 30 members of the Festival’s Board of Directors, staff, family and friends of Ellany were present as she was presented with the award. The induction into the Florida Federation Hall of Fame is an honor like no other in the fair industry. The recipients of this award are recognized for their leadership in their fair, community and making a difference in the industry. With credentials like Ellany’s, there was no doubt that she was the perfect nomination for this prestigious award.

Ellany has also been active in the Florida Federation of Fairs for many years. She served on the organization’s Board of Directors, then worked her way up the ranks where she served two terms as Secretary, Treasurer and Vice President. “Integrity, trustworthiness, dedication and leader are all words I associate with Ellany Johnson. She applies high standards to her work as well as her interpersonal relationships while also putting great dedication to the pursuit of perfection in her work. She posses a calm demeanor, a sweet personality and a wicked sense of humor. She is an individual who cares about the success of others as well as taking pride in her own accomplishments,” said Martha Leverock, CFE, President/CEO of the Greater Jacksonville Fair. The Board of Directors and Staff of the Florida Strawberry Festival are honored to celebrate Ellany Johnson and her outstanding achievements as the newest inductee of the Florida Federation of Fairs Hall of Fame. •

“Ellany Johnson is the heart and soul of The Florida Strawberry Festival. Her commitment to the success of this organization, our Board

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Dieter Iten Receives Wildlife Officer Award

The East Hillsborough Law Enforcement Association held their 50th Anniversary East Hillsborough Law Enforcement Appreciation Dinner at the Florida Strawberry Festival Exhibition Hall on Tuesday, May 8, 2012. Since 1962, one officer from the Florida Highway Patrol, Hillsborough County’s Sheriff’s office, Plant City Police Department and the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are recognized for their outstanding performance. This year Investigator Dieter Iten was honored for his work with the Game Commission. This past year he was the lead investigator for 13 boating accidents in the greater Tampa Bay area, nine of which involved fatalities and two with serious bodily injury. He is also active in investigating hunting incidents, resource violations, Internet crimes and title fraud cases. Investigator Dieter Iten has been with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission since 2005. Others receiving awards included detective John McDowell, Plant City Police Department; Trooper Michael Wilder, Florida Highway Patrol; and Deputy Michael Hannaford, Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Department.

Now Open 24 Hours ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY Every Weekend is Hospitality Appreciation Weekend Receive 10% OFF Your Purchase 15% OFF Appetizers from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Weekends ONLY. Military Discount 10% OFF your purchase anytime FREE COFFEE with the purchase of Any Menu Entree when you tell your server you saw this ad in “InTheField Magazine” This Location Only 805 Collins St., Plant City 33563

813.754.7400 Ed Mahoney, General Manager W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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THE LITTLE SHOW THAT

COULD

Dry Creek By Les McDowell Photos courtesy of Linda Constant

I

remember as a child my mother reading to me THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULD. Seems at one point or other we all had rooted for that little train engine to huff and puff and make it up that hill. I ran my life fast forward to today and as the creator of Dry Creek, the little TV show that could, I have to ponder, I have to go back to that thin little children’s book and say it was the book that shaped Dry Creek. You see Dry Creek was only dreamed up a couple of years ago on a small ranch in Manatee County. Yes, it was me that first got the idea, but people from everywhere started showing up and adding to it. Those folks are called The Dry Creek family. The Dry Creek family is THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULD. Folks that believe that even in today’s fast paced world it’s the simple things that don’t cost a dime that are important. Your word, family, friends and common sense, did I mention faith? All these things guided by our Creator have added the steam power to make the climb. Episodes with those principles and values were produced and Dry Creek ended up on Dish, BlueHighways TV and Direct TV and added folks from across America rooting for the little show that could. It is said on your climb, always remember to stop and smell the roses. In our story of Dry Creek, the little show that could, we did just that. It was an episode called My Rose. It dealt with the fact that there are really no strangers, just friends you haven’t met yet. How a simple rose could stop a person that had been chasing ghosts from their past. Country Music great Confederate Railroad wrote a theme song for Dry Creek called “My Rose.” That added more coal to our little engine. Then BlueHighways TV entered the “My Rose” episode for The Cable Awards in NYC in September. Dry Creek will be up against all the big engines in the industry. Dry Creek, the little show that could, has a long climb left and our story is not over yet. But thanks to The Dry Creek family and people who grew up having THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULD read to them know all things are possible. • To find us turn on your TV and go to https:/ / bluehighwaystv.com for times and listings or you can find us on Facebook at https:/ / www.facebook.com/ pages/ DryCreek/ 151126284929387?ref=ts or on Drycreektv.com

Everybody knows where Dry Creek is... cause “it’s inside each and everyone of us”!

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By Jim Frankowiak

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hether starting anew or thinking about changes to your home’s landscape, the Florida Native Plant Society suggests you consider using plants native to this area and taking a fresh look at your overall landscape plan. There are some very good reasons for doing so and they benefit you, the environment and our wildlife. “We are not suggesting a wholesale revamping of your existing landscape,” said Suncoast Chapter Vice President Devon Higginbotham at the Society’s recent, 32nd annual state conference at Plant City. “Gradual is good and begin by replacing or interspersing natives among your existing landscape. If you’re just beginning on your landscape plan, consider a mix of native and non-native.” Those interested in learning more about native plants are encouraged to visit www.fnps.org, the state society’s website, or www.suncoastnps.org, the Hillsborough County chapter’s website, as well as the county Extension office’s web presence at http:/ / hillsborough. extension.ufl.edu. The sites are full of detailed information, including membership information. “Local chapter meetings include a plant auction with prices of W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Photos courtesy of Vince Lamb, FNPS Conradina Chapter member

$2 - $3 per plant,” she said. “We also take fieldtrips to wilderness areas to see what is growing in the wild. Chapter membership is a great way to learn about natives and buy the ones that strike your fancy. The Suncoast Native Plant Society meets the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Hillsborough County Extension Office, 5339 County Road 579, Seffner. “When xeriscaping was first introduced, it gave natives a bad name,” said Higginbotham. “It was ugly, just mulch and an occasional shrub, but Florida’s natural landscape is beautiful and we are suggesting that you mimic what nature has already provided by going native.” There are a number of myths and misunderstandings that often cloud the discussion of native plants and their use in our landscape. “Some think bugs are bad, but they are vital to wildlife and natives provide nourishment for native wildlife and that’s a good thing,” said Higginbotham. Litter and mower cuttings must be raked, bagged and removed. “Not true, leave them be. To go native, it isn’t necessary to eliminate mowed areas in your landscape, just reduce them somewhat.”

“Cost is another issue. Natives are comparable in cost to non-natives and you can find out where to buy them by visiting the websites listed previously or visiting floridanativenurseries.org,” she said. There are also the University of South Florida (USF) spring and fall plant sales at their Botanical Gardens, http: / / gardens.usf.edu/ . “We have to be honest and recognize that a yard is more than something to just look at. Government can’t keep buying more land for conservation, especially in these days of tight dollars, but each of us can turn our yards into parks and wildlife corridors. That will certainly help reestablish some of the wilderness areas lost to development and we can all help,” Higginbotham added. Doing that will allow wildlife to flow through rather than around our cities and towns “if all homes would plant more trees, under story and shrubs and reduce mowed lawns and plant more natives. Let’s face it, a mowed lawn is equal to a desert in terms of wildlife and the average yard is 92 percent mowed grass.” “Central Florida should not try to look like Atlanta, California or England. We have plants that are site specific to our INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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area. Miami and Tallahassee don’t look anything like Central Florida and our yards shouldn’t either,” she said. “Native plants are specific to our wildlife which has evolved to fit together. People love butterflies, but caterpillars are very picky eaters. Female butterflies flit from plant to plant looking for those specific ones that their hatchlings can eat. If she lays her eggs on the wrong plant, her eggs will die. Homeowners need to realize this and not to spray caterpillars with insecticide when they find them because that just kills the next generation of butterflies.” For a keen insight into the importance of bugs, Higginbotham suggests reading Doug Tallamy’s book, “Bringing Nature Home – How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants.” “It takes 4,800 caterpillars to raise one Chickadee hatchling since baby birds eat bugs not seeds. The only bugs mowed lawns support are chinch bugs,” said Higginbotham. “Putting up a bird feeder with seed is a great way to see birds, but it does nothing to help the babies. Birds also need cover to keep from being eaten by other wildlife. Nesting habitat is another need we can all help to fulfill along with care and conservation of our water supply. “You might also want to think about your yard and its potential importance to migrating birds. Consider your yard as a fast food stop for migrating birds. Give them the food they desperately need in their migrations,” she said. “They want to drive-thru your yard, grab a bite to eat and keep going. Eighty per cent of bird mortality takes place during migration. Many bird species migrate from South America during the spring. Native hollies like the Dahoon have red berries that birds can spot. Red Mulberry also provides berries in the spring. “It’s good to go native. There’s no premium cost and there are many benefits that far outweigh our normal tendency to overlook species that are truly home,” said Higginbotham. “A special thanks to the following for their role in making the Florida Native Plant Society’s 32nd Annual Conference great: Red Rose Inn & Suites Southern Gourmet Catering (Fred’s Market Restaurant) The Corner Store Gigi’s Garden Crystal Springs Preserve University of Florida/.Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences The Suncoast and Hernando Chapters of the Florida Native Plant Society and all of their volunteers and the endless hours they devoted to making this conference a success.” •

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TIME... SURE DOES FLY

It's hard to believe that my year is coming to an end in just a few short weeks. This year has flown by and I am going to treasure every memory, lesson, and friendship I have made. The year has brought so many new experiences into my life. I have been to China and back, was able to attend the 82nd Washington FFA State Convention, spent the year serving Florida FFA and so many more. As it gets closer and closer to the 84th Florida FFA State Convention, I sit and wonder what comes next in my life. I have worked my whole middle and high school career trying to become a state officer. I remember it was the second week after being elected last June and felt I had no more goals or dreams. I thought and thought about what would be my next goal in life. After a couple of days, I figured out I would be attending Hillsborough Community College then transfer to a university in Florida. We have to have motivation in our lives if we are ever going to get anywhere.

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I have found that as we go about our daily lives, there are many obstacles we must overcome. Many could be small but some could be large, it is a matter of how we handle them. We have to go in to every obstacle with an open mind. We have to assess all the options if we are ever going to come out on top. Through my experiences as a state officer, I have noticed that when we analyze what a certain outcome could be, you can better understand the situation to the fullest. During the first week of May, the state officers and staff were in Orlando for convention planning where we were able to sit and plan everything that was going to happen the last week of June. We were able to decide the fun activities we will have during our convention, establish who the keynote speakers will be, what the dance is going to look like, as well as, get all of our scripts done for each of the sessions. I cannot wait to see each and every one of you at the 84th Florida FFA Convention in Orlando, June 25-29. We have a couple of tricks up our sleeves as we celebrate all of our achievements in Florida and see how we are truly For The Future! I would like to leave you with this quote, "When it comes to the future, there are three types of people: those who let it happen, those who make it happen, and those who wondered what happened." Which are you going to be over the next year? I challenge you to take control of your life and live it to the fullest. Many thanks!

John John Modrow Jr. – Area 5 State Vice President

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

Garlic Prime Rib INGREDIENTS 1 10-pound prime rib roast 10 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons ground black pepper 2 teaspoons dried thyme

PREPARATION Place the roast in a roasting pan with the fatty side up. In a small bowl, mix together the garlic, olive oil, salt, pepper and thyme. Spread the mixture over the fatty layer of the roast, and let the roast sit out until it is at room temperature, no longer than 1 hour.

Firecracker Salad INGREDIENTS 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 small jalapeño, seeded and coarsely chopped 1 1/2 teaspoons honey 1/4 teaspoon cumin 1/4 cup vegetable oil kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 4 cups fresh corn kernels (from 4 ears) 6 medium radishes, halved and thinly sliced crosswise 1/3 cup flat-leaf parsley, coarsely chopped 1/4 small red onion, thinly sliced

PREPARATION Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Bake the roast for 20 minutes in the preheated oven, then reduce the temperature to 325 degrees F and continue roasting for an additional 60 to 75 minutes. The internal temperature of the roast should be at 145 degrees F for medium rare. Allow the roast to rest for 10 or 15 minutes before carving so the meat can retain its juices. Yield – 10 servings

To make the dressing, purée the lime juice, jalapeño, honey and cumin in a blender. With the machine on, add the oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste; set aside. In a large bowl, toss the corn with the radishes, parsley, red onion and dressing. Season the salad with salt and pepper, transfer to plates and serve. Tip: For a roasted taste, lightly season and oil the whole corn cobs and then roast in a 375-degree F oven until lightly browned. When cool, slice the corn off the cob and add to the salad. Yield – 4 servings

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Specialty Tag Raises Funds For Foundation

The Catch-A-Dream Foundation recently received legislative permission to offer a new license plate to raise funds for its mission of fulfilling the hunting – and fishing-related wishes of children with life-threatening illnesses. The new specialty tag features the Catch-A-Dream Foundation logo. The tag fee is $31 annually in addition to the regular tag cost, $24 of which will go to the foundation. “We must pre-order a minimum of 300 tags before the state will print,” said Marty Brunson, executive director of the Catch-ADream Foundation. “Funds generated through the specialty tag program provide once-in-a-lifetime hunting and fishing experiences for young people diagnosed with life-threatening conditions such as cancer and cystic fibrosis.” To pre-order a tag, download the application at http:/ / www.catchadream.org/ wp-content/ uploads/ 2011/ 10/ CADF-Specialty-License-Plate.pdf Complete the form and send with payment to the Catch-A-Dream Foundation or contact the foundation office for details. The foundation will notify applicants when the tags can be picked up at their local tax collector’s office. For more information, or a copy of the application form, contact the foundation office at (662) 325-8149 or catchadream@ext.msstate.edu

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Farm Credit of Central Florida Announces David J. Stanford as Chairman of the Board

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arm Credit of Central Florida’s Board of Directors has elected a new chairman for the first time since 1978. David J. Stanford, a Winter Garden citrus grower, was chosen to succeed Al Bellotto, Sr., a Lakeland cattle rancher and citrus grower, who came on the board in 1977 and served as chairman since 1978. Mr. Bellotto chose to step down to attend to family matters, but was honored by the board with the title Chairman Emeritus, and will continue to serve as a board member.

David J. Stanford

Mr. Bellotto, along with Seminole County citrus grower, W. Rex Clonts, Jr. and Lakeland realtor and citrus grower, John S. Langford, were re-elected by the cooperative’s membership to new three-year terms. Mr. Clonts, a third generation Farm credit Director, was elected by the board as Vice Chairman. Mr. Langford is a second generation Farm Credit Director and also serves on the AgFirst Farm Credit Bank Board. “The board bestowed the title of Chairman Emeritus upon Al Bellotto in recognition of his 35 years of dedicated service to the members, staff, and board of this association. He has been a solid, consistent leader of this association and we look forward to taking the cooperative to even greater heights in the near future,” said Chairman Stanford. David Stanford represents the sixth generation of his family to be involved in Orange County agriculture. He was an executive of Winter Garden Citrus Products, overseeing their orange juice concentrate operation, which at the time was the state’s second largest. “Dave Stanford has been a critical member of this associations board for over 20 years. He offers a diverse skill set, having been a grower, processor, and a director of commercial banks and savings loan associations,” said Farm Credit of Central Florida President & CEO, Reggie Holt. Mr. Stanford was elected Vice Chairman of the Board in 1997. Farm Credit of Central Florida is a member-owned agricultural lending cooperative providing funds for agricultural operations, residential mortgages, as well as selling crop insurance. The association serves 13 central Florida counties, including Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, Polk, Orange, Osceola, Seminole, Lake, Sumter, Volusia and Brevard. It has outstanding loan volume, exceeding $800 million serving almost 1,100 member/borrowers.

Clonts, Bellotto and Langford W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Farm Credit of Central Florida is part of the nationwide Farm Credit System created in 1916 to provide a stable, reliable source of credit to America’s ranchers, farmers, and growers. The Farm Credit System celebrated its 95th anniversary in 2011. • INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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including our horses, were located at our place in near Kathleen, northwest of Lakeland.”

By Jim Frankowiak

heir relationship began in a freshman chemistry class at the University of Florida in the mid 60s and has grown into a relationship with a special synergism that has and continues to benefit Florida agriculture and the community in a variety of ways.

T

That class meeting in Gainesville involved Jemy West, the daughter of former Lakeland mayor and physician James Robert West, and a Gator football player from Pensacola, Charles F. Hinton III, known by most as “Chip.” The youngest of three West girls, Jemy grew up amid goats, chickens, rabbits and horses. “While we lived near Florida Southern College, we did have some farm animals at our home there,” said Jemy. “Our other animals,

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Jemy enrolled at the University of Florida with an eye to becoming a veterinarian, but that changed after meeting Chip. “We got married and had the first of our three children while we were in college. Chip continued to play football and after having our first child I went to work at UF and pursued my AA degree. “Though our parents were very supportive, completing college with a child was a challenge, especially when you consider our monthly housing allowance under my football scholarship was $132.50, but we did it,” he said. Chip and Jemy have three daughters. Each is married and they have given the Hinton’s seven wonderful grandchildren. A self-described sand crab from the water’s edge in the Panhandle, Chip’s parents grew up on farms, but both enlisted in the Navy. He has a sister 14 years his junior.

“I honestly thought I would become either a commercial fisherman or game warden after spending summers working at a Pensacola area fish camp and the cooler months hunting at Eglin Air Force Base.” That all changed after meeting Jemy and her introduction of agriculture to Chip. He had been on the UF Arts and Science route to veterinary medicine but changed majors to poultry. Chip suffered a debilitating knee injury his junior year and despite surgery and a comprehensive rehabilitation program, the knee gave out in the day of the summer two-a-day practices. That put an end to thoughts of a professional football career. Though his UF football career ended prematurely, he did enjoy some special time playing as a Gator. For example, Florida played and defeated highly touted Georgia Tech in the Orange Bowl with quarterback Steve Spurrier during his Heisman award-winning season. When the Gators won and Tech’s coach felt the

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Gators had an unfair advantage with the Gatorade they were drinking that led to an interesting aspect of Chip’s career on the gridiron for UF. “I was one of the first guinea pigs for Gatorade. Seeing how the scientific method was applied to solving the problems of heat stress and cramps during the heat of the early football season intrigued me. When all is said and done, my legacy to Florida football was that I sweat a lot!” After earning his bachelors degree, Chip received an academic special merit fellowship from the UF Provost of Agriculture and earned his masters doctorate in Poultry Products and Nutrition. He became the first multi-county UF Extension Agent as a Poultry Specialist based in Hillsborough County. “At that time two and one half percent of all eggs produced in the U.S. were produced within 50 miles of Tampa. The next seven years were great for me with educational programs, youth work and wonderful involvement with the industry,” said Chip. “We had the largest county poultry association in the nation at that time.” However, the industry was undergoing an evolution and “I could see my role was going to diminish and be limited.” As a consequence, Chip took a sabbatical from UF in 1978 and began to pursue another doctorate… this one in Education Administration. While a fulltime doctoral student at North Carolina State University, Chip taught two classes and Jemy worked in the Entomology Department. After his sabbatical, in which he completed all aspects of his doctoral program except his dissertation, he returned to Tampa and Extension. During that period in North Carolina, Jemy’s father became terminally ill. “After returning to Extension I lost my patience while waiting for someone’s death or retirement for promotion,” said Chip laughing. He left Extension and spent the next few years working with various industries in Florida and their use of processed chicken manure as a potential food source for various livestock and even a nutrient used to help grow mushrooms. “We even came up with a bagged product we named Ka Ka Doodle Doo.” In 1982 Chip was presented with an opportunity that he could just not pass, it was the Executive Director’s position for the newly formed Florida Strawberry Growers Association, an organization he serve for nearly 25 years, during which time annual sales grew from $38 million to more than $350 million. “That was really a blessing,” said Chip. “That position allowed me to expand my activities to benefit agriculture at large while guiding the strawberry industry through the essential steps for a successful industry.” Currently, Chip is a consultant to an organization that is helping to feed the hungry through an endorsed agricultural program that is affiliated with the nationwide program Feeding America. “I have been able to apply my organizational skills together with my diverse contacts in the industry to help feed the hungry.” When Chip began his relationship with the organization it was providing 53 million pounds of food to the hungry. Last year, the figure had grown to 145 million pounds. “Our goal is to move toward a grower incentive initiative that becomes part of the daily management decision-making process relating to crops that are wholesome, but unmarketable. Agriculture’s mission is to feed people, our endeavor is to expand their mission into a ministry to feed the hungry. We are providing assistance to make it easy for the already generous agricultural community to help feed the hungry.” Since receiving her associates degree from UF, Jemy went on to earn a Bachelor of Science in Natural Sciences from Florida Southern College and worked toward a Masters of Environmental W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Education at UF. When the family moved to Hillsborough County in 1972, she took a job at the UF/IFAS Strawberry Lab in Dover as the Center’s first biologist. She later co-owned and operated a production plant nursery. When the family returned from North Carolina, she joined Extension in Hillsborough County as a Home Environmental Specialist, helping farmers and homeowners to resolve common problems. After nine years in that position, Jemy became a 4-H Extension agent for the next four years. “During my years with Extension, it became very clear to me that there was a need for a link between farmers and the various regulatory agencies,” she said. The process of working with regulatory agencies is often complicated, difficult and even frustrating. Plus, there’s a good deal at stake, even the future of the farmer’s operation. When an opportunity arose for her to join the Florida Department of Environmental Protection as an Environmental Specialist and Agricultural Liaison with the newly formed Ecosystem Management Program, it was an opportunity to serve as that link, assisting farmers with questions and concerns they had about regulations and procedures. In 2006, Jemy had the chance to enhance her service to farmers in west central Florida as a team member of the University of Florida/IFAS Agricultural Best Management Practices Program. Her team is under contract to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Office of AG Water Policy that oversees statewide Water Quality and Water Quantity Best Management Practices. Jemy used her knowledge of agriculture to encourage reason in the regulatory community and diminish “urban bias” that produced unanticipated impacts on agriculture through environmental regulations. “That proved to be helpful and valuable to us as we were able to meet the needs of the community at large while serving the best interests of agriculture,” said Chip. Jemy’s problem-solving skills have originated in part from her mother who told her, “Never accept a ‘no’ from someone without the authority to say ‘yes’.” She uses that concept in every facet of her everyday life. 56

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“Whatever it is, Jemy is known for her problem-solving abilities,” said Chip. And those skills are not just limited to the career paths the Hinton’s have chosen. “There is no question, we both love agriculture and Florida,” said Jemy. “And we believe strongly in the responsibility to give back.” In the mid 1980s the Hinton’s decided to become involved in a program for refugees whose lives were at risk in their homelands. “We offered our home so immigrant families had a place to stay and transition from a lifethreatening situation to one with a future,” said Jemy. “That is part of our desire to make our corner of the world a nicer place.” Today, many of these refuges are American citizens and are living the “American Dream.” Their love of and service to agriculture, particularly here in Florida, has not gone unnoticed. Chip has numerous honors and awards, including the UF Distinguished Alumnus Award, Florida Blue Key and NAADA National Agricultural Award for Service and Leadership. He is also the Charter President of the UF/CALS Alumni and Friends Association. Locally, he has served on the Planning Commission, the Hillsborough County Citizen’s Advisory Committee, the Hillsborough County Environmental Committee and was the first chairman of the county’s Agricultural Economic Development Council. Jemy has been recognized by RCMA, was a Harvest Award Ag Woman of the Year in Hillsborough County, Hillsborough County 4-H Leader of the Year and has received several awards for outstanding service wherever she worked. Both Chip and Jemy have been active in various youth agricultural programs, as well as Farm Bureau initiatives. Jemy has been a member of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board on and off for over 20 years. “We appreciate that recognition, but that’s not what’s important. We have only wanted to be helpful to the industry we love and people in need,” they said. For Chip and Jemy it’s all about loving God and loving your neighbor whether next door or from around the world. The Hinton’s always stand ready to serve. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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T

he State of Florida’s popular Master Gardener program is overseen by the University of Florida/IFAS Cooperative Extension Service which trains and maintains horticulture volunteers for this program throughout the state. To give you an idea of the program’s popularity, here in Hillsborough County, “more than 200 applicants have expressed interest in the next class which is limited to 20 participants,” said Urban Horticulture Agent and Master Gardener Program Coordinator Nicole Pinson. This high level of interest for the program is not unusual and has prompted Pinson and her colleagues to suggest planning well ahead if you want to be considered for the program. “We would suggest potential candidates for our 2013 class make application now,” she said.

volunteer activities. Each county Extension office in the state determines the focus and structure of the program locally. The volunteers undertake a variety of outreach tasks as determined by the county coordinator. Here in Hillsborough County, those tasks include answering horticultural questions over the phone and in person at the Extension office. They also participate in educational outreach activities. This may include research assistance, providing gardening presentations and helping to spread information via emerging techniques such as the use of new media. “While our Master Gardener volunteers share a common love for horticulture, we appreciate and try to utilize the other talents they bring to the program such as subject area expertise, management expertise and outreach skills like writing, public speaking and dealing with the media,” said Pinson.

To understand why the program is so popular, it’s important to recognize its scope and substance, which is dynamic and continually changing to meet the needs of the community. “One example of that is the growing popularity of urban gardening and the establishment of urban community gardens,” noted Pinson. “To be effective with our county programs, we must be sensitive to emerging trends and adjust our programs accordingly,” she said.

If you have an interest in becoming a certified Florida Master Gardener, you are required to attend the prescribed hours of instruction and pass an exam. In Hillsborough County, the course is 10 weeks, typically one five-hour day each week of the course. While specific dates have yet to be determined, this year’s schedule will be late summer through early fall.

Program goals are to increase the availability of horticultural information for the community at large and to improve the quality of life for the residents of each county in Florida through horticulture

The cost for the course, which primarily covers the expense for materials, including three substantial handbooks, is $175. Upon successful completion of the course and examination, you receive a one-year

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certificate. After the initial year of certification, new Master Gardeners are required to volunteer for 75 hours during the year and undertake 10 hours of continuing education. In subsequent years the annual service requirement is 35 hours and the 10 hour continuing education requirement continues unchanged. “We currently have just over 120 active Master Gardeners ranging in each from the 30’s to 80’s and many of our volunteers serve well above the required 35 hours,” said Pinson. “We also have a group of emeritus Master Gardeners who continue to participate in our program.” The county’s Master Gardeners have a core group that coordinate library programs and oversee the Speakers Bureau program. “Many also co-teach,” said Pinson. “We are really talking about an extension of Extension through the activities of our Master Gardeners both at our offices and throughout community outreach.” • For additional information and an application to participate in the Florida Master Gardener Program in Hillsborough County, visit: http:/ / hillsborough.ifas.ufl.edu or call Nicole Pinson, (813) 744-5519, or by email at pinsonn@hillsboroughcounty.org Please keep in mind that Extension is accepting applications for the 2013 Master Gardener class. The 2012 class is closed. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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A Closer Look Independence – The American Farmer

By Sean Green

W

ith Independence Day less than a few weeks away, I find myself thinking of what we have gained Independence from as a nation. Independence from British rule is an obvious starting point for the thought process. More importantly, however, is our independence from any subjection that denies or limits our natural rights. Much of our independence is seeded in our agriculture industry and I encourage our readers to acknowledge the significance of America’s agricultural roots as we celebrate the spirit of Independence this July. This month we will take a closer look at how agriculture has contributed to American Independence. Farming characterized the band of adventurers, tradesman, and soldiers that comprised early colonial settlers. In fact, almost 90 percent of the population in the early colonial period owned and operated a family farm for their personal livelihood. By 1850 the domestic farming market was 1.4 million strong, and grew to 4 million in the next 30 years, topping off at 6.4 million by 1910. Sadly, the agricultural tradition that bought our independence in the earliest days of our nation began a continuing decline in the mid 1900s and as of 2008 the U.S census reports only 2.2 million strong, less than 30 percent of our current population. Ironically, the reduction in the number of farms has not created a reduction in the overall American agricultural production. In fact, we remain one of the largest agricultural producers and exporters in the world. The disturbing inference is that we may be working our way back into dependence rather than maintaining our independence. These figures do not indicate a shift in agricultural demand. Economics at its most fundamental level would lead one to conclude that a growing world population will require a growing supply of food. What is left to consider is the shift in supply. Once an American tradition, farming has become a corporate enterprise. The world’s agricultural supply is largely dominated by mechanized corporate agriculture rather than our community neighbors. Politicians will persuade us into believing that the globalization of agriculture is an impeccable solution to the world’s demand for food, energy, and economic abundance. While it’s difficult to refute the production capacity of mechanized corporate agriculture and its theoretical benefit as an export commodity, many are becoming more critical of the net benefits of globalizing agriculture.

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Before agriculture was handed over to large multi-national corporate entities long-term soil quality was maintained through practices that replenished soil nutrients without depending on non-renewable sources such as fossil fuels. Traditional farming practices ensured sustainability. Instead of depleting the soil of its nutrients and continually amending it with synthetic fertilizers, early American farmers avoided soil depletion all together by engaging in practices that provided for the natural recovery of the soil such as shifting cultivation and crop rotation. America still has more arable land than any country in the world, arguably because the early American farmer found more efficiency in soil conservation than in today’s trend of soil capitalization. Political and bureaucratic motives have literally created mutations in not only the nucleus of farming (the seed), but also the spirit of farming itself. Somewhere along the line, farming has become weaved into the corporate and political web of the energy cartel. The independence it once represented seemingly fades with memories of partnering with the land to homestead our freedom. Farmers once shared a sacred calling to be stewards of the land and its animals, to bring forth wholesome nourishment for their fellow man. Community values were centered in the personal responsibility of hard work, family

life and helping your neighbor. The cherished tradition of the American farmer is embodied in a quote by Thomas Jefferson; “Cultivators of the earth are the most valuable citizens. They are the most vigorous, the most independent, the most virtuous, and they are tied to their country and wedded to its liberty and interests by the most lasting bands. Our soil is the most significant natural resource we have. Of all our renewable resources our soil provides the greatest competitive advantage in assuring our independence of other nations. Globalization and mechanized agriculture may have cost us the loss of farm land in the United States but it does not have to continue costing us our independence. The renewed interest in local farmers markets and food coalitions are evidence that consumers understand the economic value of sustainable production and consumption of food on a local level. Though the low retail price of imported crops may be difficult to overlook, many Americans will agree that the costs of relying on a foreign country for food are a greater threat to our independence. This month, I encourage our readers to celebrate our independence with a visit to the local farmers market. •

Gainesville Opens The Door For Durant Contestants

Durant FFA members in the Trophy room at the athletic facility. On April 27, Durant FFA traveled to the University of Florida campus to compete in the state Ornamental Horticulture Demonstration Contest. Students in this contest were asked to create a 7 to 10 minute presentation about some facet of the horticulture industry. Participants were judged on their speaking ability, ability to work together as a team, knowledge of the subject and overall poise. Durant students competed against area winners from around the state and will be recognized at State FFA Convention in June. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

State Winners Artistic Arrangement Tiffany Tucker and Bailey Harrell with their presentation on constructing a Betta Fish Planter. 2nd Place Consumer Use - Sydney Robinson and Madison Astin with their presentation on making Strawberry Tarts. While in Gainesville, the students were also able to meet with some of the University of Florida Football players. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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AG-ABILIITIES SETS RECORD FOR PARTICIPANTS A Very Special Competition for Students and Teachers By Jim Frankowiak

FFA

competitions and programs are very popular, but up until 12 years ago not all students were able to participate. A request from a student who was unable to participate in regular FFA competitions due to a learning disability led to the creation of Ag-Abilities by Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, and the rest, as they often say, is history. Originally designed for students with learning disabilities, the program has turned into a yearlong project for Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students, some with severe learning, physical, social and health disabilities. “Our program was held in mid May at the Florida State Fairgrounds and we set a new record for participants with 116 students from six District schools,” said Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Executive Director Judi Whitson. “I am most appreciative for the assistance we received from 15 wonderful volunteers.”

T hose volunteers were: Glenn Harrell and his daughter Taylor; Jemy Hinton; George Coleman; Kenneth Parker; Sheri Ray and son Yancy; Natalie Rayburn and her daughter Kathleen O'Connell; John Lawson – Hydro Harvest Farms donated all of the strawberry shortcake; Alan May; Michelle Williamson; Terri Zelzenock and her son Caleb; Pam Walden and Darren Cole. During the school year, Ag-Abilities students learn plant and tool identification, the use of certain plants, uses for animal products, nutrients required by plants for proper growth, a hands-on lab for making butter, fruit and vegetable identification and various other activities. The Fairgrounds event is the culmination of the program when participants are “tested” on lawn tractor driving. “The test is an awesome experience for these students since many of them have never been on a bike let alone driven a garden tractor,” said Whitson. “The opportunity to take my kids to Ag-Abilities is comparable to taking them to Special Olympics,” said King High School Teacher and FFA Advisor Cassie Miles. “While Special Olympics focuses on ESE students competing in more physical tasks, the experience offered by the Ag-Abilities day allows the students to show others in their community that they are aware of the impact agriculture has on their lives. “Traditional FFA members and agriculture students compete in District, State and National Career Development Events. The AgAbilities program has given my special needs students the opportunity to showcase what they have learned in my ESE agriculture class through the year.” “The Fairgrounds setting is very open and friendly, which gives the kids the opportunity to see teachers who they might have had at another school as well as run into former classmates,” said Miles. “After a delicious hot dog, Cuban and strawberry shortcake, all of the students proudly took the stage to receive their two ribbons for participating in all of the activities of the day. I hope Ag-Abilities will be available for my ESE students for years to come.” Caminiti Exception Center Agriculture Teacher Juan Guevara echoed the sentiments of Cassie Miles and noted that Ag-Abilities yearlong program “is a great opportunity to teach our ESE students with a purpose, it gives them a goal to study for, they 62

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actually enjoy it while learning. It’s important to remember FFA and 4-H students participate in dozens of competitions all year long, our ESE students only get it once a year. It’s great to see their faces as they show off the ribbons, it is wonderful for their confidence and to boost their self esteem,” said Guevara. Turkey Creek Middle School Agriculture Teacher Buddy Coleman promotes the team concept for his AgAbilities competitors. “We go to the Fairgrounds all wearing dark blue T-shirts with our team name. It gives my students a very positive feeling for the opportunity to compete and participate in an activity that’s just like their fellow classmates,” said Coleman. “I hope the program continues to grow. It‘s a rare opportunity for my students to participate and to be able to learn.” “Watching my students compete and enjoy every aspect of Ag-Abilities puts a very big smile on my face,” said Agriculture Teacher Aaron Davis from the Lavoy Exceptional Center. “Having some of my blind students drive a tractor is a new and tremendous experience for them. I’m genuinely overwhelmed and excited for my kids and all they get to do at Ag-Abilities. It helps each of them become highly absorbed and focused on their agriculture lessons as they look forward to the competition and the special day AgAbilities has become for each of them.” Special Thanks to Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, The Florida State Fair, CF Industries, Hydro Harvest Farms, Farm Credit of Central Florida and the volunteers who all help make Ag-Abilities a very special program for a group of deserving students. •

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From Sticks to Carrots

Agencies Update Agricultural Interests On Water Issues At Regional Meeting By Jim Frankowiak lorida Farm Bureau Federation, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumers Services and Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association recently partnered to host the first of what is planned to be a series of Regional Ag Water meetings. Organizers brought in guest speakers from several state departments, the water management district and the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) in a forum setting.

consumption in the district currently totals approximately 1,293 million gallons per day (mgd) “with the highest agricultural use in the southern portion of the district at 415 mgd. Throughout the district, the combination of public and agricultural consumption averages 75 percent of total use,” Hammond said. “With Agriculture as the second largest water user in the district, we want to work closely with this stakeholder on water supply issues now and into the future.”

“It is our vision to provide an opportunity for agricultural producers from across the state to improve their knowledge of regulatory issues that affect agriculture, update them on Best Management Practice manuals, costshare opportunities, Environmental Resource Permit and Consumptive Use Permit updates,” the organizers said. “These gatherings will also provide an opportunity for the agricultural community to give feedback to these organizations on what works well, and what programs need improvement.” The initial session was held at the James R. Trinkle Center on the campus of Hillsborough Community College at Plant City. More than 60 attended with about half representing various agricultural interests of west central Florida and the balance from the agencies or departments that presented.

The District offers a number of programs geared to agriculture in two general categories: Ag Permitting and Technical Assistance and Ag Cost-Share Programs. Under the Ag Permitting category there are four assistance areas. The first comes from Regulation Ag Team permitting staff that focus on understanding and integrating agricultural production practices with the permitting process to assist growers with their permits. “The Ag Team can offer the assistance of a Certified Soil Scientist to act as a mediator in wetland or seasonal high water table disputes,” said Hammond. Under Ag Ground and Surface Water Management (AGSWM), the district works with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) in a permit exemption confirmation program that provides surveying assistance, drainage/irrigation assistance, Conservation Plan and Permit Exemption letter. “Our Mobile Irrigation Lab helps growers reduce water use through on-site efficiency improvements and we continue to support University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural

F

Kickoff speaker Mark Hammond, Resource Management Director for the Southwest Florida Water Management District, discussed the consolidation of permitting from the district’s four service offices to the Tampa Service Office. He noted water 67

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Sciences research to establish proper science for water use decisions and other programs like the Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) and the Best Management Practices (BMP) Teams,” said Hammond. “We historically have provided approximately $1,000,000 annually to support IFAS research on issues that are key to the District and to growers.” The District remains committed to Ag-Cost Share Programs such as the Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems (FARMS) initiative, which is a Best Management Practices (BMP) cost-share reimbursement program for Ag projects like tailwater recovery systems. “Thus far, the 135 Governing Board approved projects have a projected offset of over 22 MGD in the District,” he said. “The District will increase funding for the FARMS Program moving into our next fiscal year and will also continue to support the Mini-FARMS Program which is geared to small Ag operations and is administered by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS).” Additional information about District Ag programs is available at www.WaterMatters.org/agriculture. John Abendroth, Environmental Administrator for the Watershed Planning and coordination Section of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), reported, “the numeric nutrient criteria issue is not yet resolved as we wait on the final order coming from the Administrative Hearing Officer on the challenge to the adopted FDEP rule and

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then the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision on the FDEP rule.” “FDEP is also undergoing its Triennial Review of state water quality standards and is considering updates to our human health criteria and our Dissolved Oxygen standards,” said Abendroth. “We continue to develop Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and the Basin Management Action Plans (BMAPs) and lastly we are encouraging agricultural interests to sign the FDACS Notice of Intent (NOI) and begin implementing Best Management Practices.” Abendroth said information on the Numeric Nutrient Criteria and the Triennial Review can be found at: http:/ / www.dep.state.fl.us/ wqssp/ index.htm while information on TMDLs and BMAPs is available at: http:/ / www.dep.state.fl.us/ water/ tmdl/ index.htm. Dr. Ann Shortelle, Director of FDEP’s Office of Water Policy, began her presentation by telling attendees she and her colleagues recognize Consumptive Use Permitting (CUP), though based on the same Florida statute have developed differently over time within the Water Management Districts “and this has become confusing for applicants and problematic at borders between Water Management Districts. We want to make the program less confusing for applicants, particularly those who work in more than one District.” “Our Cup consistency review goals also include treating applicants equitably statewide, consistent protection of the environment, streamlining of the process and incentivizing behavior that protects water resources, including conservation. Essentially, we want to use the carrot and not the stick,” she said. She said that sorting out the various CUPcon issues involves several layers of complexity and “the more complex the issue, the greater the need for stakeholder participation.” She went on to detail the schedule of sessions statewide and makeup of workgroups engaged in the process. “Our permitting threshold concepts include a common permitting framework in each district and the identification of thresholds such that the level of review is appropriate to the risk to the resources,” said Shortelle. “Allocation flexibility concepts include recognition of fluctuations in growth and/or economic conditions permit agriculture to most water intensive rotational crop plan submitted and allow agricultural users to respond to market conditions.” “Compliance monitoring concepts involve monitoring only to ensure that permitting criteria and conditions for issuance are being met with a consistent submittal format and frequency,” she said. “Conservation objectives include consistent requirements, flexible implementation, incentives and an appropriate level of effort. Concepts in that regard are designed to reward and not penalize for those who comply.” With a specific eye to attendees, Dr. Shortelle noted the Ag outreach objectives include: • Creation of a single point of contact in each District • Quick connection of Ag clients with the right staff member • A knowledgeable and service-oriented staff to facilitate successful outcomes • Integration of Ag programs for a one-stop-type approach • A streamlined process that avoids duplication and provides timely decisions • With all of this effectively marketed to Ag clients “This Ag outreach will have an organizational structure that promotes program integration and interaction with a staff grounded in agriculW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ture,” she said. “We will train staff, utilize information management techniques and utilize pre-application meetings and on-site visits.” She concluded her comments with a discussion of the timetable for rulemaking and rule development and a request to Ag clients and prospective clients “to become involved by working collaboratively with the various entities engaged in the process.” More information on CUPcon is available at http:/ / www.dep.state.fl.us/ water/ waterpolicy/ cupcon.htm Director Rich Budell of FDACS Office of Agricultural Water Policy then discussed BMPs, Payment for Environmental Services and the Central Florida Water Initiative. “Water is a limited resource in Florida and we are consuming it rapidly,” he said. “In 2010, Floridians used 6.9 billion gallons of fresh water per day, and by 2030 Florida is expected to use 8.2 billion gallons each day which is a 19 percent increase over the next two decades.” Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam considers “water the most significant challenge facing the state of Florida,” Budell said. “Since 1999 FDACS has been working with the industry to help producers implement Best Management Practices designed to protect water quality by reducing the runoff and leaching of nutrients into Florida’s surface and ground waters and to enhance water conservation.” More than 7 million acres of Florida agricultural lands are enrolled in BMP programs, including 826,840 acres enrolled during last year. FDACS Mobile Irrigation Lab (MIL) program, which is implemented locally in cooperation with the Water Management District, has done more than 4,000 evaluations during the last seven years. “The MIL has saved producers approximately 1 billion gallons of water last year alone,” he said. “If resources were available to fully implement MIL recommendations, farmers could save more than 2 billion gallons of water per year.” Given the success of BMP initiatives, FDACS is proceeding with revisions and consolidations are taking place. “We continue to work with farmers and Ag representatives to assist them in understanding and implementing BMPs,” said Budell. “We are continuing our contracts with UF/IFAS, Water Management Districts, the Soil and Water Conservation Districts and private sector entities to provide cost-share, educational and technical assistance, and as funding allows we will work to monitor the effectiveness of BMPs in protecting water quality.” 70

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“It is important for producers to recognize that in areas with FDEP-adopted BMAPs that include agriculture, farmers must implement BMPs or conduct water quality monitoring,” he said. “Also, implementation of FDACSadopted BMPs provides a presumption of compliance with state water quality standards.” Budell also noted that work continues on the Central Florida Water Initiative, which is focused on the three largest Water Management Districts in the state to determine if there is a better way to create a water supply for this area. “We are looking at possibly a new model for water supply planning and while doing so have recognized that this is more art than science as we work to protect the resource while providing sufficient water for users.” He went on to discuss Payment for Environmental Services, a concept that was developed over the last six years whereby landowners are rewarded for land use that provides benefits to the general public, wildlife habitat and groundwater recharge. The landowner enjoys a predictable income stream over the term of the contract and may return the land to its former footprint at the end of the contract without penalty, if the decision is made not to enter into another contract. “This innovative program is limited to the northern Everglades area at this time, but our next goal is 400,000 acres north of Lake Okeechobee, but there are challenges that have to be overcome.” For additional information from FDACS Office of Agricultural Policy, visit: http:/ / www.floridaagwaterpolicy.com/ B MP.html. Dr. Joan Dusky, Associate Dean for Extension with UF/IFAS, explained how UF/IFAS is focused on giving growers and regulators the science needed “to make informed policy decisions.” She also named a number of ongoing research projects currently underway that include: • reduced nursery water use • soil moisture sensors • alternatives to water use for freeze protection • center pivot irrigation systems • automatic citrus irrigation • reduced irrigation for strawberries She also noted the continued interaction between scientists and growers as vital to optimize the use of research findings by end users. “We appreciate the research support that you have given UF/IFAS,” she concluded.

With the conclusion of presentations, attendees were given the opportunity to pose questions or provide comment. There were few with general agreement that the “carrot versus stick” approach was appreciated along with the perception that the presenting agencies and department were open to considering new approaches and recognized shortcomings and difficulties associated with some past practices.•

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MAGAZINE

Find us in your neighborhood... Crescent Jewelers 1514 S. Alexander St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.752.2413

Cowboys Western World 120 S.R. 60 E. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.650.3888

Johnson’s BBQ 1407 MLK Blvd. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.759.0009

Sisters & Company 104 E. Reynolds St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.754.0990

The Hay Depot 1001 S. Alexander St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.478.1654

The Catering Company 115. E. Reynolds St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.707.1447

Rick’s Meats 10252 S.R. 39 South Lithia, FL Phone: 813.737.6776

Southside Farm & Pet Supply 3014 Jim Redman Pkwy. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.752.2379 Note: This is just a sample of our distribution points. We’ll list different locations each month. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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— but not all — genes. They had expected that exposing the bees to the combination of mites and chemicals might produce a more pronounced negative impact, but they didn’t find any. But their results did suggest, among other things, that two common fungicides — chemicals used to protect crops from fungal infections — apparently have more influence on bees than previously believed. By examining the selected genes, researchers found the fungicides had pronounced effects on the larvae, although they are generally considered non-toxic to bees. “The data suggest that fungicides are not innocuous to bees,” he said. Ellis’ next study will go much further, with scientists preparing to raise the bees from larvae to adulthood, labeling and following each individual bee.

UF/IFAS RESEARCH LOOKS AT IMPACT ON

HONEYBEES FROM CHEMICALS AND MITES

By Mickie Anderson

U

niversity of Florida honeybee researcher Jamie Ellis is interested in what happens to bees that encounter chemicals and Varroa mites — but he’s even more interested in how younger bees fare long-term after facing those challenges. Scientists have been trying to explain the bee-killing malady known as Colony Collapse Disorder, which causes honeybees to abandon their hives, become ill and die. Ellis’ lab has been studying how combinations of environmental factors — chemicals, pathogens, natural enemies — affect bees. Since widespread honeybee die-offs began to be reported around the U.S. in 2006, researchers have been working to pin down a cause. Bee pollination is critical for much of the food we eat and some estimates suggest the U.S. bee industry is responsible for pollinating as much as $15 billion worth of crops every year. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

In the Ellis lab’s most recent study, outlined recently in the Journal of Insect Physiology, researchers reared honey bees from young larvae to the pupal stage. The UF researchers then exposed the immature bees to a variety of chemicals used in agriculture and beekeeping, including two fungicides, two herbicides and five insecticides. They also exposed them to Varroa mites, which weaken bee colonies. During the experiment, a control group of bees wasn’t exposed to anything, others were exposed only to the chemicals, or only to mites, and some of the bees were exposed to a combination of chemicals and mites.

“In most studies, investigators treat a field with a product, put bee colonies adjacent to the field and then sample whole colony strength after pesticide exposure. At the end of the day, all you are able to say is ‘this colony is responding in this way to the field treatment.’ You don’t know why it’s responding in that way. When we begin to label bees, it will permit us to investigate an area that has yet to be studied. We’ll be able to follow individual bees throughout their entire lives, thus allowing us to determine long-term impacts of pesticides on bees.” Besides Ellis, the research team members included former UF postdoctoral research fellow Aleš Gregorc; Michael Scharf, a former UF entomologist and now the O. Wayne Rollins/Orkin Endowed Chair in Urban Entomology at Purdue University, and Jay D. Evans, research entomologist with the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Md. • The study was funded by the National Honey Board, the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

The researchers gauged the effects on larvae by analyzing the activity of about 50 genes associated with stress, immune response and bee development. Ellis, an assistant professor of entomology in UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, stressed that the scientists were only able to screen for expression in some INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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the unique facet of the shooting sports is what really captures a kid’s attention. Joe says, “We have certified instructors. We teach kids the basics of each one of those disciplines: rifle, shotgun, archery and black powder. The parts, gun safety, we cover range commands; we teach the kids how to shoot, load, some basic care of what they’re shooting. If kids are really interested we encourage them to get their own equipment. Our club has a fair amount of equipment for the kids to learn the basics. We tend to be more of a fun club, but there are opportunities for kids to enter into competitions both through 4H and other organizations.”

Future Top Shot Contestants… On Target 4H Club By Ginny Mink

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f you have ever watched the show, Top Shot, then perhaps you have wondered where those impressive marksmen got their beginnings. Might it have been in 4H? Certainly that thought might throw you off a little, but not if you are aware of the On Target 4H club in Lithia. Joe and Nancy Squitieri are the leaders of the club. Joe grew up in the suburbs, so without a history in agriculture it seems quite interesting that he would end up leading a 4H group. He explains how that occurred. “Really it wasn’t until I moved my family to Florida. My older kids got to be 4H age

and they joined Hoofprinters. It was mostly an agriculture club. We did a lot of the traditional 4H activities: sewing, cooking, bugs, animals, it was a fairly large club, kids did a lot of different things.” Which was great for a while, but eventually some things had to change. He continues, “What we realized was that as the kids got older, particularly the boys, they lost interest in bugs and bunnies. So we started looking for something to keep the teenage boys engaged and right about that time my wife and I became the leaders of the Hoofprinters so we started adding rifle programs with our activities. I got certified as a rifle instructor through 4H, that’s a requirement for becoming an instructor in the shooting sports, you have to go through the training.” Having achieved his instructor certification, his group and another group began shooting together. Ultimately he says, “We joined forces to have more leaders, to get more parents trained in other shooting sports disciplines such as archery, shotgun, and black powder. We morphed the two clubs into the On Target 4H Club. We focus on the shooting sports but the kids do a lot of the traditional 4H activities. They still participate in a lot of the activities that 4H offers. They show animals at Strawberry Festival and State Fair and participate in county events: ecology, forestry, small engine repair, it really runs the gamut, shooting, cooking. The nice thing about 4H is that boys and girls can participate side by side. I heard once that 4H is the best kept secret of youth development. It spans a large age group, 6 to 18. Kids from 6 to 18 are in the same 4H club and can participate in activities side by side.” While allowing for the traditional 4H stuff is certainly a positive aspect of the club,

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Joe says that 4H’s job is “to promote life skills, leadership, discipline, public speaking and respect. It’s to develop leaders for tomorrow. You put them into leadership roles and give them help and direction.” Though he recognizes the import therein, and though he classifies his club as a “fun” one, there have certainly been some impressive accomplishments. He says, “We had the third place team in the state archery competition this year. One of our girls ranked in the top 20 for the country in archery. We won the state competition a few years ago in muzzle loader and we sent some kids to Nationals.” Even with those honors, Joe says, “Our real accomplishments are in teaching kids a life sport, basic skills and safety. There’s not a lot of opportunity for kids whose families aren’t into shooting sports to get a lot of exposure. We don’t push the kids too hard to go into competition. Shoot, have a good time and fellowship, that’s what 4H is.” He adds, “We’ve got 35 kids in the club. We’re open to more kids, not everybody comes on the same day. We break up into the disciplines. We have multiple instructors so we can run multiple ranges at once. We shoot out in Lithia; we’ve got a big open field.” Anyone interested in joining the On Target 4H Club, which is on hiatus for the summer, can contact the Squitieri’s at: squitieri6@hotmail.com. In closing, since the On Target 4H Club provides kids with the equipment to learn the different shooting sports, they want to acknowledge the organizations that have helped them. Joe says, “We got a Phase One NRA Grant which really helped us with equipment. The Safari Club International Tampa Bay Chapter has really been very helpful by providing funds to get equipment.” • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Naturally Amazing Activities

Simple Funnel Trap

Step 1

Step 2

By Sean Green There are many types of traps that are used for capturing insects and the funnel trap is arguably the simplest and most versatile of traps. I made my first funnel trap years ago when I needed to catch small fruit flies to feed my Jumping Spider (Salticidae). I modeled my trap after a similar trap described in The Goodman of Paris, a French medieval guidebook. The idea is for the insects to be lured through an opening in a funnel and once inside, the task of navigating back out is generally too difficult for the insect and it remains contained, unable to navigate through the entrance from which it came. This is great if you want to collect insects just for observation because the insects can be released unharmed later. When used for pest control, the funnel trap offers a quarantined space in which a toxin can be used, thus protecting beneficial insects and the environment. Although the trap described below resembles many found on the internet, the origins of this type of trap are ancient and likely evolved from the observation of nature itself. This type of trap can be modified for a large variety of insects, however, this month we will utilize the funnel trap specifically for stink bugs. The number of insects that are attracted to light is astonishing and in Florida, we witness this behavior at the porch light. Different insect species are attracted to different wavelengths of light, some are attracted to fluorescent while others are attracted to UV (black lights), this is also why certain species only come out during specific times of the day, when the light signals them to become active. For this project we can use an inexpensive LED light, the Sylvania DOT-it series seems to be the most popular for this project.

Remove the top from a 2 Liter Bottle by cutting along the top edge of the bottle label.

Place the LED light into the bottom half of the 2 liter bottle.

Step 3 Place the top of the (now separated) bottle upside down into the bottom of the bottle to create a funnel that leads into the bottle.

Step 4

Step 5

Supplies Needed: 2 Liter Soda Bottle Black Tape Touch Activated LED Light Box Knife

Tape the edges of the bottle top and bottom to secure them to each other.

Turn the LED light on with a long object (such as a pencil) that will fit through the funnel.

TIP: Insects may be attracted to the bottom sides of the bottle if they can see light through it. The sides of the bottle can be covered with anything that will prevent light from showing through, such as tape or even a tube made of dark construction paper.

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Delicious and Sweet

By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

O

ne of the biggest fruits out there, jackfruit can weigh anywhere from 10 to 100 pounds! The fruit is delicious and sweet, like a cross between pineapple and banana. A member of the same family as breadfruit, fig, and mulberry, jackfruit in the United States is grown only in Florida and Hawaii. This tropical fruit is native to India, but has been cultivated in Florida for more than a century. Beneath the green-yellow skin is sweet orange pulp surrounding starchy seeds. The fruit can be enjoyed raw or cooked. The flowers, pulp, and seeds are all edible. Florida jackfruit is at its peak now in the summer months!

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE This sweet, tropical fruit is an excellent nutritional source of dietary fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, and is naturally fat and cholesterol free. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one cup of raw chopped jackfruit (151 g) contains 143 calories, 2.60 g of protein, 0.97 g of fat, 35.1 g of carbohydrate, and 2.3 g of fiber. It also provides 18% of the Daily Recommended Value (% DV) for Vitamin C, 16% for manganese, 15% for both magnesium and copper, and 14% for potassium, as well as significant amounts of vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, and iron. VITAMIN C: FOR A STRONG

IMMUNE SYSTEM Vitamin C is an important antioxidant, supporting the body’s immune system in its ability to fight infections and viruses. This vitamin is also involved in keeping capillaries, gums, and skin healthy and supple. The vitamin C in jackfruit also

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enhances iron absorption from other foods, which reduces the risk of anemia. Jackfruit is a good source of iron as well.

VITAMIN A: FOR GOOD EYESIGHT Vitamin A is essential for optimal eye health and can help prevent night-blindness. It also plays a role in immunity by supporting the white blood cells in fighting infections. This vitamin is also involved in hearing, taste, and normal fetal development.

POTASSIUM: FOR

BLOOD

PRESSURE CONTROL Like many other fruits and veggies, jackfruit is high in potassium, a mineral which promotes healthy heart functioning and protects against high blood pressure. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance, aids in muscle contraction, and helps transmit nerve impulses. People with low potassium levels are more prone to muscle cramps.

HOW

TO ENJOY Jackfruit can be sliced and eaten out of hand. The large seeds surrounding the center core are the bulbs, and are sweet, like a cross of bananas, pineapples, and cantaloupe. The pulp can be enjoyed fresh, dried, or canned in syrup, as well as made into ice cream or jam. It can also be added to fruit salads, soups, stews, and any dessert. The seeds, much like chestnuts, can be roasted or boiled. Even the leaves and flowers of jackfruit can be cooked and eaten as a vegetable. Enjoy this delicious tropical fruit during Florida’s peak jackfruit season. Eat it out of hand or cook it, and enjoy all the great nutrition that this sweet fruit provides. Selected References http://www.hort.purdue.edu http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org

IRON: FOR BLOOD AND MORE An important mineral found in every cell in the body, iron is essential for synthesis of hemoglobin and myoglobin. These compounds carry oxygen around the body. Iron is also an essential component of many other proteins in the body. Florida jackfruit is a fantastic source of this mineral. HOW

TO SELECT AND STORE Choose ripe jackfruit that has a sweet smell and feels moderately soft when squeezed. Jackfruit can be refrigerated for up to one week or frozen for several months. Jackfruit can also be eaten when green and immature, but it should be cooked first. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FARM BUREAU REPRESENTATIVES MEET WITH CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION

Having Your Voice Heard Where it Counts By Jim Frankowiak

F

lorida Farm Bureau membership dollars work in many different ways to advocate on behalf of its membership at the local, state and national levels. The annual “Field to the Hill” trip is one of them. It is an opportunity for Hillsborough County Farm Bureau members to visit our elected officials in Washington, D.C. to tell them personally what the organization’s positions are on many different important matters that will come before them. The program also enables Farm Bureau representatives to share membership concerns on various items that may or currently have an impact on the way of life that is important to the more than 144,000 families in Florida that comprise its membership.

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Though “Field to the Hill” is Florida Farm Bureau’s annual effort, other state federations have similar initiatives they annually undertake with the net result being a constant flow of Farm Bureau members from throughout the U.S. meeting with their elected representatives and senators on behalf of agriculture and the way of life in rural America. Each state Farm Bureau organization annually follows a methodology for identifying the issues and concerns of importance to its members. Theses memberdriven policies then become part of an annual focus in dealings with elected officials at all levels. This process is guided by Farm Bureau’s Agricultural Contact Team, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s grassroots action network. Reaching out to Congress in this manner, among others, has an impact on the decisions made by these officials. The team advances agricul-

tural and rural interests by connecting members of Congress to their constituents. Florida Farm Bureau staff and leaders get their “marching orders” from the policy book. Policies are adopted annually through a process that is designed to reflect and act upon concerns and issues that affect producers throughout Florida. Issues are introduced in resolutions developed by Florida Farm Bureau Federation Advisory Committees and county Farm Bureaus. These resolutions are compiled into a workbook that is mailed to all county Farm Bureaus several weeks before the state convention. At the convention, voting delegates meet and discuss the workbook during resolutions sessions. Finally, the resolutions are voted into policies. Advisory Committees represent 11 major commodities produced in Florida and four major general issue areas that have a major W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Ask A Vet Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort has teamed up with In The Field magazine to bring you a new Ask A Vet column. Submit your questions to AskAVet@inthe fi eldmagazine.c om. If selected, your question may be answered in an upcoming issue of In The Field. It is our goal to help you improve the knowledge of your pet’s needs and health care. Please remember, if you suspect your pet is sick and it is an emergency, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Farm Bureau group with Rep. Castor. From left: Scot Eubanks, FFB assistant director of Ag Policy; Richard Carroll, a director of the Pinellas County Farm Bureau; Judi Whitson, Hillsborough County Executive Director; Congresswoman Castor, Michelle Williamson, Deb Laramy and G.B. Crawford, FFB manager of communications.

impact on production agriculture. The purpose of each committee is to develop communication among Farm Bureau members and to serve in an advisory capacity for the president, board of directors and staff. Last month Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Executive Director Judi Whitson and Board Member Michelle Williamson traveled to Washington as our local participants in “Field to the Hill.” They met with Congressmen Dennis Ross, Kathy Castor, Gus Bilirakis, Steve Southerland and Tom Rooney. Representative Rooney will be representing portions of Hillsborough County as a result of redistricting. Both he and Rep. Southerland are also members of House Agriculture Committee The trip began with an American Farm Bureau briefing session on the various issues that would soon be acted upon and the organization’s position. Top priorities during this session are the 2013 Farm Bill, immigration and estate tax reform along with water and budget issues.

Dr. Christy Layton, the owner and operator of Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort, graduated from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Biology and her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine Degree. A Plant City native, she lives with her menagerie of pets including Appaloosa horses that she rides and shows in her time off work. Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort 1704 Walden Village Court • Plant City, FL 33566 813-754- PETS (7387) • www.timberlanevet.com

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“In each of our congressional meetings, we were warmly welcomed and felt a genuine interest in each of our areas of discussion with the congressmen,” said Williamson. “While they may not all be experts or strongly familiar with all aspects of agriculture, each has an appreciation for the importance of agriculture to Farm Bureau and its members, as well as Florida’s economy.” “I would encourage any interested Farm Bureau members to consider participation in this annual event or our yearly trip to Tallahassee,” said Whitson. “This type of involvement is vital to continually having the voice of agriculture heard by our elected officials.”•

Farm Bureau group with Dennis Ross in Washington W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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hat happens to FFA and agriculture students after high school? Do they pursue their agriculture interests or matriculate into other programs completely unrelated to the field? Certainly there are some that lose that focus once the cornucopia of college courses envelopes them. For some, that loss of focus remains and they continue down a wholly different path. Yet, for others, like Sarah Dwyer, that path of multiple choices somehow brings them back to their first love, agriculture. This is her story. Sarah says, “When I got to high school in ninth grade, I started out in the orchestra and I decided that I didn’t want to do the orchestra anymore. And in the tenth grade at Armwood High School, I got into the ag program. Right away I just decided I loved it! In October was the National FFA convention and I got my mom to buy us tickets. That was my first event with FFA, going to National Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. When I went there I

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realized how huge the program was and how much you can do. It wasn’t just farming, it was leadership, team-building, public speaking and a lot of other activities that taught responsibility and time management skills.” At that time she had no idea just how significant and beneficial the FFA would be to her life. She continues, “Once we got back from National Convention, our ag teacher, Mr. Edgar Watkins, had some dairy heifers that he purchased at the auction and I got to go with him to the auction. I fell in love with one immediately when I saw her. The heifers were for the school program but I kept on him for wanting to name her first and I asked him if I could show her and finally he let me show her for the remainder of my FFA career and when I graduated I bought her from the school and now she’s my pet cow, Hannah. She was just born that day (at the auction) and I got to bottle feed her and raise her since the day she was born. I’ve had her since that day.”

Hannah wasn’t the only thing Sarah dedicated her time to with regards to her FFA career. She says, “I was very into the FFA program. I held office as reporter, Vice President and then President my senior year. I participated in almost every FFA event that Armwood went to. I did parliamentary procedures, opening ceremony competition, forestry, land judging, dairy judging, dairy showing, public speaking. I also showed a rabbit in the FFA.” She pauses there and then reveals, “I have to say, I started out really shy when I went into the program. The FFA helped me overcome that. It taught me how to speak to a large crowd and communicate my ideas. It helped me to become more outgoing. It made it easier to talk to people.” She says that her biggest moment in FFA was during her senior year when the group came in second place in the state for dairy judging. Then she graduated and that’s where she got a little lost with regards to her life goals. She says, “Once I graduated W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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high school I went into community college. I started out in theatre and then as I was finishing my AA degree I decided to go into geology instead. So, I got an AA in liberal arts from Hillsborough Community College. I attended University of South Florida for a semester, going after geology.” Theatre to geology seems like quite an odd jump, and yet, that’s not where her educational vacillation stops either. In fact, she says, “Then Mr. Watkins told me that the University of Florida had started an agriculture education program at the HCC, Plant City campus. So, I worked on that and then the following year I had the opportunity to move up to Gainesville. So I moved up here to continue working on my education degree. My second semester up here, I took an elective course for Ag construction with Dr. Wendell Porter. It’s kind of an introductory course for the Agriculture Operations Management (AOM) Program. And once I took that course I decided to switch my degree to AOM.” Keep in mind that she will now have switched majors four times!

After finishing her BS she decided to continue on through an MS and a PhD. However, she was in need of funding. She sought out assistance from Dr. Porter. He found her an Assistantship with Dr. Pierce Jones at the Energy Extension Office in Gainesville. She’s doing her thesis work with him. It’s on the Weatherization Assistance Program, which is the state run program that has funding available for low-income families who have high energy bills. The program goes into their homes, caulks windows, weather-strips doors, adds insulation and/or puts in energy efficient appliances and HVAC systems. Her research focuses on the effectiveness of the program. She’ll be finishing that thesis this summer and then immediately starting her PhD program. She adds, “For my PhD work I may be doing work on sustainable agriculture. I’ve kind of come full circle starting with ag

and going all over the place and ending back in Ag. If I get the chance to work on the sustainable agriculture grant then I’ll have background in sustainable construction and sustainable agriculture!” She does have an additional Assistantship with Dr. Sherry Ahrentzen focusing on the health of the occupants whose homes are retrofit for energy efficiency. She says, “One thing I’ve learned in the college world is that funding is very important so I’m very thankful for Dr. Jones and Dr. Ahrentzen for funding my graduate career!” Sarah may end up at an Extension office upon graduation, or perhaps she’ll become a professor, but one thing’s for sure, she’ll know a whole lot about green construction and agriculture sustainability when she’s done! •

She continues, “Dr. Porter is the advisor so it was an easy switch over because he knew me and helped me get into the program because at that point I had a lot of credit hours towards my degree, so they were reluctant, but he got them to let me switch over. So, I graduated in 2010 with my Bachelors of Science with my AOM specializing in construction.” Here’s where she acknowledges how advantageous FFA was for her. “Through my college career the FFA prepared me more than anything else because I’d written so much for all the competitions I was in, it was easy for me to work in teams. I aced my public speaking course. A lot of kids come to college and after the first year they drop out because they can’t handle it on their own.”

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On May 11, 2012 We held a luncheon with Driscoll’s Growers and our employees to celebrate our successful Strawberry Season. The growers were given awards for recognition of their excellence in the following categories.

Most Accurate Forecast of the Year and Highest Scoring Ranch for Yields and Quality Pictured right to left is

Arturo Rodriguez of Sam Williamson Farms, with Mark Greeff, Driscoll’s Vice President Eastern Region

Highest Overall Quality Pictured right to left is

Alejandro Jimenez of Florida Pacific Farms, with Mark Greeff, Driscoll’s Vice President Eastern Region

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Grower of the Year (for the second year in a row) Pictured right to left is

Sam Williamson of Sam Williamson Farms, with Mark Greeff, Driscoll’s Vice President Eastern Region

In addition to the Growers receiving their Awards they were treated to a day with the Tampa Bay Rays with their families in sky box seating to enjoy the game.

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In The Field magazine participated in the Florida Strawberry Growers Association’s first Berry Brawl. The ‘In The Field Avengers’ placed second in the competition. Team members were: Danny Crampton, Brandi Crampton, Sarah Holt, Karen Berry, Jose Mendoza and Dave Davenport. 92

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813

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• Roof Overs • Metal Roofing • Shower Stalls • Complete Line of Plumbing • Trim Moulding • Vanities • Kitchen Cabinets • Antiques • Stepping Stones/Pavers

2670 Hwy. 92 E Plant City, FL (Between Lakeland and Plant City)

OPEN SATURDAYS: 8:30-5:00 www.brokeandpoorpc@aol.com

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UF/IFAS in Plant City

IFAS Branch Campus at Plant City History By Felix Haynes “A branch campus of the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences should be established in East Hillsborough County,” said thenState Representative Johnnie Byrd in a local newspaper article in the spring of 1999.

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ast Hillsborough, said Byrd, was a major center for much agricultural activity. UF/IFAS could be a spur to further growth in the region. New Hillsborough Community College Plant City Campus President Felix Haynes read the article and was in Byrd’s office in Plant City the next morning, where the two discussed how they might work together to bring an IFAS branch campus to fruition in East Hillsborough. Haynes proposed that the campus should be built on the Plant City Campus of HCC, where a number of agriculturally-related education and training programs were already located. Haynes had background in similar types of University of Florida branch campuses, because he had earned a UF doctorate at just such a branch campus housed at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Byrd urged Haynes to contact UF/IFAS officials in Gainesville and said that he would support Haynes’ efforts. That afternoon, Haynes was on the telephone with then UF Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Jimmy Cheek. Cheek and Haynes discussed the proposal to build a UF/IFAS branch campus on the HCC Plant City Campus. Given the campus’ location and the agriculturally related programs already offered there, Cheek agreed that the campus would be an excellent location. Cheek and Haynes agreed to work together on a written pro-

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posal to establish the branch campus at HCC Plant City. Cheek also encouraged Haynes to travel to the Milton Campus of then-Pensacola Junior College to view UF/IFAS’ operation there, which Cheek said could serve as a model for a HCC Plant City IFAS branch. Haynes made the trip and discovered how successful that IFAS operation was, that the state of Florida had constructed a new jointuse building on the campus to house the UF/IFAS branch campus there, and that the operation included a large teaching and community garden. These concepts were incorporated in the Cheek/Haynes proposal. Once the 25-page proposal was written, Haynes and Cheek agreed that the effort now had to shift to the political realm in order to steer the project through the Florida legislature. They began a campaign to build a broad local coalition of Plant City organizations to support the political effort. The City Commission of Plant City’s support was immediately enlisted, with Commissioners Mary Yvette Thomas-Mathis, Mike Sparkman, John Dicks, Randy Larson, and Bill Dodson all signing on. The Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors was the next organization to agree to join the coalition. This was followed closely by the Plant City Strawberry Festival, the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, and the Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers. Chip Hinton and Hugh Gramling, already skilled and successful lobbyists from agricultural organizations, were particularly helpful in forging the coalition. Representative Byrd took the proposal to the next annual legislative session, in the spring of 2000. Despite major lobbying efforts in Tallahassee by all the groups and individuals in the coalition, success was not achieved.

Over the next 12 months, organizing efforts in Plant City continued, and by the time the 2001 legislative session began, Plant City was able to mount a formidable effort behind Representative Byrd in Tallahassee. This effort proved successful when the House of Representatives and Senate both passed the legislation. At this point Plant City faced the last hurdle, obtaining then Governor Jeb Bush’ signature on the bill. Initially, the message came down from the Governor’s office that, while the Governor was in agreement with the concept, he was unwilling to fund a new building on the HCC Plant City Campus to house the branch campus. At that time, the HCC Plant City Campus contained a 29,000-square-foot building known as the Florida Studies Center. This building, which was the former Felton’s Grocery Market, had been purchased and remodeled by HCC in 1989. However, growth on the campus had not caught up to this available space yet, and only about 20 percent of the building was utilized for administrative, classroom, and laboratory space. Then HCC District President Gwendolyn Stephenson had charged Haynes with greatly increasing the utilization of the Florida Studies Center, so Haynes proposed that the Center be designated as joint-use space to house a new UF/IFAS branch campus. This proposal created a new set of major questions. Since the state would not be building a new joint-use building to house the IFAS branch campus, how would the University of Florida reimburse Hillsborough Community College for the use of space in the HCC-owned Florida Studies Building? Neither UF nor HCC wanted to base this reimbursement on a simple rental, because they both wanted the partnership to be based on a higher level of integration than a rental concept. Haynes proposed that UF invest in the W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Felix Haynes HCC campus by funding joint use facilities and activities, with HCC being the final decider of whether a UF expenditure was funding a true joint-use function. Creating a new office for a UF/IFAS faculty member or building a science laboratory that would only be used by UF would not qualify as a joint-use expenditure. Constructing a new outdoor teaching garden, which both UF and HCC instructional programs would use, would count as joint-use. The final question was, how much should UF invest in joint-use facilities and activities on the HCC campus over the course of the first five-year agreement? To answer that question, Cheek had to bring his boss, then IFAS Vice President Mike Martin, into the discussions. In a memorable meeting in a Gainesville restaurant, Martin answered the question in a voice loud enough for all the restaurant’s patrons to hear: “How does $300,000 sound?” With that, the question of UF’s payment to HCC was answered and the action returned to Governor Bush’s desk. In close consultation with the City of Plant City, the College agreed that the possibility of obtaining gubernatorial approval for a UF/IFAS branch campus was sufficiently important to offer the non-used portion of the Florida Studies Center as a joint-use facility to house the UF/IFAS branch campus. With an agreement of all involved organizations in place, a flurry of last-minute lobbying of Governor Bush on the part of all the local organizations in the Plant City coalition ensued. With the overwhelming support of the Plant City coalition and without the need to support the construction of a new building, Governor Bush immediately approved the legislation to establish the UF/IFAS branch campus on the HCC Plant City Campus. With the approval of all branches of Florida’s government in just the second year of the community’s pursuit of the project, Plant City had its new UF/IFAS branch campus. The five-year UF/HCC agreement on which the branch campus is based has been renewed once, in 2006, and the two organizations are in negotiations to continue the program into the future. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Haley Smith Crowned FFA Sweetheart The Durant FFA Alumni and the Durant FFA Chapter held their 6th annual FFA Sweetheart Pageant on March 24 with 16 young ladies taking part in the event. Durant Alumni member, Tonya Mayo chaired the event where the young ladies were scored in the areas of evening wear, and questions dealing with the agriculture industry and the FFA. Scholarships were awarded to the top three winners at the Durant FFA Banquet that was held on May 17. The Scholarship funds were obtained through sponsorships of the contestants from local business in the community. Court members were as follows: second runner up Kallee Cook, first runner up Celeste Lewis and the 2011-2012 FFA Sweetheart was Haley Smith. Darby Hasting was awarded the top award for obtaining the most sponsors. The Durant FFA Alumni and FFA Chapter would like to congratulate all of the young ladies for an outstanding job. •

Durant FFA Agriculture Mechanics Team Places 2nd in State The Durant Agriculture mechanics team took part in the 20112012 State Contest that was held in Haines City on May 5 at the Polk County Technical Training Center. Each member took part in six different tasks, plus a team event during the contest. Team members were Alex Fernandez, Konnore Long, Cole Ebdrup and Kody Aubel. Cole Edbrup was tenth high individual in the state and each member won a $6000 scholarship to attend the University of Northwestern Ohio. The team will be recognized at the State FFA Convention held in June in Orlando. • 98

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Classifieds

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ANIMALS & NEEDS

DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378

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8 X 8 X 16 ALLUMINUM STORAGE BUILDING Roll up door. $3,395. Call Alvie TODAY 813-749-8722 Limited supply!

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BUSH HOG HS 1736 Zero turn mower. Approx. 2 years old. 36" cut $1,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

HORSE BOARDING Stalls and individual turnout, lighted arena and round pen. Owners on property. $325 full care. Call 813-610-4416 1998 HART HORSE TRAILER All aluminum gooseneck trailer. Two horse slant load with dressing room. Original one owner. Call Today! $9,500 CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232

AUTOMOTIVE 97 NISSAN PICKUP Short bed regular cab, 5 spd, gas saver 4 cylinder, ice cold AC, runs good, looks good, cash price $3988. Ask for Bill - 813-650-0535. O'Connor Automotive, Plant City 99 TOYOTA TACOMA Regular cab, short bed, 5 spd, 4 cyl, cold AC, gas saver pickup. Excellent Cond, Looks Good, Runs Good - $3950 Cash. Ask for Bill - 813-650-0535. O'Connor Automotive, Plant City

TILL 4 X 8 SHEET B-grade $17.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378 NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378 MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378

COUPONS SAVICH & LEE/STALNAKER Horse Fence 200’x4’, Sheep & Goat Fence 330’ x 4’ 1 to 3 rolls - $2.50 off, 4 or more $5 off, 10 piece limit. Field fence 47” 1-8 $2.50 off, 9 or more - $5 off, 10 piece limit. Barbed Wire - 5 or more - $1 off 10 piece limit. Pick up ONLY while supplies last. See our ad on page 101 for pricing.

FARM EQUIPMENT 02 FORD F150 XL SUPERCAB 4dr 4x4 lift pkg, oversize whls & tires, excellent cond, runds & looks good. $9850/Financing Available. O'Connor Automotive, Plant City 813-650-0535 87 FORD F250 XCAB Runs good, built to pull trailer 7.5 V*, goose neck, 5th whl cradle in bed. Cash $1950. O'Connor Automotive, Plant City 813-650-0535 99 DODGE RAM 3500 Turbo Diesel Dually, Quad Cab 4 dr, cummins Diesel, loaded, low miles, great shape, tow pkg, $11,988. Financing available. 813-650-0535 O'Connor Automotive, Plant City 1997 FORD F-250 4X2 Lariat Super Cab. This is a very low mileage (83,000) original one owner (non smoker) vehicle that has been professionally maintained and garage kept since new! Call 813-650-3173 $7,000 MAZDA 626 Ice Cold A/C, touch screen stereo, brand new Rims & Tires! Runs Perfect. Call Greg @ Amazing Autos today 813-759-1975 RANCH HAND GRILL GUARD Fits Ford F150 2004-2008 $250 Call (561)329-4051

DECKING BRDS. & TILL SIDING Call Ted 813-752-3378 102

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FOR SALE TRAILER FOR SALE 44x12 single wide trailer in Winters Mobile Home Park. Zephyrhills 5k or best offer. Call (813)967-4515 MUSCADINE AND SCUPPERNONG, GRAPE PLANTS,VINES Seffner, Fl. 33584. Call 813-857-4586 ALL A BLOOM FLORIST Roses $19.95 a dozen. 813-567-5735 116 N. Collins – Downtown Plant City. www.allabloomtampa.com

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

2008 MASSEY FERGUSON 1533LC, 33hp with loader, cab, ac,1367 hrs. $16,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

NEW HUSTLER SPORT ZERO TURN 48" cut, 16hp. Honda engine. Special Price! $3,500 with 3yr. warranty. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

MASSEY FERGUSON 245 Diesel tractor. Good condition.$5,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTOR 1980 Massey Ferguson 230. 34pto hp, power steering. $4,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 14’ Shop built, heavy duty trailer, 2 axel with ramps. $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 WELL MOTER FOR SALE 20hp general electric and Worthington turbine 4” column drop – 6” flange $600.00. Call Tim 863-602-1743 3PT LIFT 3 row hole punch. Very good condition. $500.00 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 CROP SPRAYER 60 gal, 3 pt hitch, 3 row, crop sprayer. 1 year old. Hypro pump and custom remote control valve. $750.00. Call Steve 813-299-8358

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REAL ESTATE BEAUTIFUL PLANT CITY 1 ACRE LOT With well. Private one street subdivision frontage 290 x 145 depth. 4521 Highland Creek Drive. $45,900. Call Today! 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 A SLICE OF HEAVEN 2.03 acres lot on Hare Mtn. Estates in Franklin NC. Breath-taking views. Purchased 10/08 for $73,400. Yours today for $32,900 GREAT INVESTMENT! Call 813-655-6769 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M



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