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Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply

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Purina Horseman’s Edge Feed SAVE $2 SEN IOR FEED SENIOR FEED • Complete (Built in Roughage) SWEETENA FEED w/ Vitamin & Mineral Package • 12% Protein • 14% Protein • Low Fat • Economy Priced Reg. Price $19.99

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• Adult Vantage - Chicken • Puppy Vantage - Chicken • Ocean Fusion - White Fish • Primitive Natural - Turkey/Chicken • Great Plains Feast - Bison • Coastal Catch - Herring • Meadow Feast - Lamb Prices Good from Jan. 15 - Feb. 14, 2013

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®

Contents

VOL. 9 • ISSUE 3

Feature Story History of Our Fairs

Page 67

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Danny Aprile ..............................President Bill Burnett ..........................VicePresident Jemy Hinton ..............................Treasurer

Business Up Front

Florida Sunchokes

Page 10

Page 38

Tampa Bay’s

FFA Journal

Fishing Report

Page 41

Page 14

Jewel Caterpillar

Kumquat Growers

Page 18

Recipes

Page 22

Page 54

Search For New

Alex Ritzheimer

Expansion Director

Tomato Disease

Page 32 Hear Them Roar

Page 34

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Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813.685.9121

Page 52

Chatter

Solutions For

Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, James Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker, Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack, Ray Wood

Cane Grinding

Rocking Chair

Page 24

Page 44

DIRECTORS FOR 2012-2013

Page 60 Getting Back To The Roots

Page 64 Jewel Candy

Page 72

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

I love fairs. And believe it or not, it has nothing to do with the variety of fried foods made available at every turn, although that certainly helps. I eat healthy most of the time. I can indulge in fried Oreos and cotton candy once a year, right? Oh and kettle korn. Definitely kettle korn. But I digress. I love the agricultural aspect of fairs. I love going to the livestock and horticulture events to see the youth of today with their projects. The cornerstone of these agriculture projects is 4H and FFA programs. These programs take the youth of today and mold them into the leaders that will direct the future of agriculture in the sunshine state. Today’s fairs have events for youth in 4H and FFA that range beyond livestock and horticulture projects. These students are learning the values of leadership, as well as life skills. When you visit the various fairs please take time to visit the agriculture areas and congratulate the exhibitors on a job well done. According to a USA Today article, enrollment at many colleges of agriculture is booming! The article states: Ag-related college majors appeal to both the heart and mind of a student, university officials say, as a booming agriculture industry and practical skills taught at the colleges can help develop a career that addresses issues such as global hunger and obesity in the U.S. This is welcomed news considering agriculture production will have to increase exponentially to feed the growing population of the world. The next time you sit down to a meal, thank your farmers and ranchers. They have worked hard to ensure that we have the safest, most abundant food supply in the world. Remember, No Farmers No Food! Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE JANUARY 2013

OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Calli Jo Parker CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Calli Jo Parker Lindsey English CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers ABC Pizza................................................................81 Ag Technologies......................................................29 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers .............................25 American Cancer Society.......................................27 Antioch Feed and Farm Supply............................73 Aquarius Water Refining.......................................84 Astin Farms Strawberry Distance Challenge.......17 Astin Strawberry Exchange...................................85 Badcock....................................................................23 Bill’s Transmissions .................................................48 Bingham...................................................................46 Brandon Auto Services, Inc. ..................................59 Brandon Farms .......................................................81 Brandon Region Hospital......................................39 Brewington’s............................................................58 Broke & Poor..........................................................21 Brown’s Jewelers.....................................................11 Cecil Breeding Farm...............................................20 Certis.............................................................16 & 78

Index of Advertisers Chuck’s Tire & Automotive...........................................74 Crescent Jewelers ............................................................ 41 Dad’s Towing....................................................................53 Discount Metals...............................................................42 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................56 Driscoll’s............................................................................76 East Coast Ag Products...................................................52 Fancy Farms .....................................................................25 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................77 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................84 Farm Credit ......................................................................27 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fischbach Land Company..............................................63 Fishhawk Sporting Clays ................................................50 Florida Dept. of Agriculture............................................33 Florida Mineral & Salt....................................................66 Florida State Fair................................................................5 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................61 Forbes Road Produce ........................................................7 Fred’s Market......................................................................9 Gator Ford........................................................................76 Grove Equipment Service.....................................49 & 65 Gulf Coast Tractor...........................................................88 Halfacre Construction Company...................................37 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply .............................................3 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................................85 Haught Funeral Home....................................................75 Helena Chemical-Tampa ................................................21 Hillsboro State Bank........................................................61 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau...............................55 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................65 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................62 Jane Baer Realty...............................................................86 Jarrett-Scott Ford................................................................2 Johnson’s Barbeque..........................................................61 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm.................................................85 Ken’s Well Drilling & Pump Service, Inc.......................74 Key Plex ............................................................................45 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................74 Magnolia Hill...................................................................57 Malissa Crawford............................................................37 Mark Smith Excavating..................................................19 Martin Law Office.............................................................9 Meryman Environmental, Inc........................................58 Mosaic...............................................................................17 Myers Cleaners.................................................................42 Parkesdale Market...........................................................13 Pathway BioLogic............................................................40 Plant City Tire & Auto Service, Inc...............................81 Savich & Lee Wholesale .................................................31 Seedway...............................................................................9 Shrimp & Co Express.....................................................15 Southside Farm & Pet Supply........................................12 Stephanine Humphrey.....................................................11 Stingray Chevrolet............................................................87 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................83 The Hay Depot................................................................81 The Hungry Gator...........................................................53 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort ..................................7 Tip To Toe Day Spa & Gifts..........................................57 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith .................................................................48 Wells Memorial................................................................85 Wert’s Wedling & Tank Services, Inc.............................83 Willie’s ...............................................................................57 Woodside Dental..............................................................85 W W W. 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You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

InTheField速 Magazine P.O. Box 5377 Plant City, FL 33566-0042

Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Dear Reader: I sincerely hope each of you and your families have a prosperous and great new year. We are just around the corner from two very special annual events: the Florida State Fair – February 7 – 18 and the Florida Strawberry Festival – February 28 – March 10. Mark your calendars and plan to attend both of these great activities. Both the fair and festival are wonderful opportunities for family fun and enjoyment together. No need whatsoever for texting or tweeting, just a nice time for total family enjoyment. In addition to the exciting rides and special food and beverage treats, each offers a chance to learn about the importance of agriculture to our community and view the many different ways youngsters are involved in agriculture. That’s pretty important since they represent tomorrow’s source for our food and leadership.

Once again I would like to remind those of you who are not yet members that Farm Bureau is not an organization just for cattle ranchers and farmers, it is for any family that believes in the traditional American way of life; our private, competitive enterprise system; private property ownership, management and operation for profit and individual satisfaction. We are a low cost, high value grass roots organization comprised of families across the country. Take a few minutes to visit our website: www.hcfb.org or call 813/685-9121. We would be pleased to have your family join us. My best to all of you for a blessed 2013.

Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

I would also like to remind all of our Farm Bureau members that the Women’s Leadership Conference is set for March 1-3 at the Plantation Inn, Crystal River. If you plan to attend or want to learn more about this important meeting, please visit: Michael.rogalsky@ffbf.org Mike is the coordinator of the FFB Women’s programs.

Board of Directors

Danny Aprile, President; Bill Burnett, Vice-President; Jemy Hinton Member-at-large; Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker,Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack and Ray Wood, Judi Whitson, Executive Director 8

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• The telephone was not widely appreciated for the first 15 years because people did not see a use for it. In fact, in the British parliament it was mentioned there was no need for telephones because “we have enough messengers here.” Western Union believed that it could never replace the telegraph. In 1876, an internal memo read: “This telephone has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication.” Even Mark Twain, upon being invited by Alexander Graham Bell to invest $5,000 in the new invention, could not see a future in the telephone. • President McKinley said that, “everything that can be invented has already been invented.” • When Alexander Graham Bell passed away in 1922, every telephone served by the Bell system in the USA and Canada was silent for one minute. • Alexander Graham Bell never phoned his wife or mother because they were deaf.

• “Ahoy” was the original telephone greeting. Alexander Graham Bell suggested ʻahoyʼ (as used in ships), but was later superceded by Thomas Edison, who suggested ʻhelloʼ instead. • The concept of allocating telephone numbers to individual phone lines was invented by a doctor

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Business Up Front

By Ginny Mink

KEN’S WELL DRILLING

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ater, the elixir of life, is more essential and probably more interesting than you would ever guess. There’s a site online that lists the top 216 pieces of water trivia ever collected. Here are some of the more interesting ones: the first water pipes in the United States were made of wood, water can dissolve more substances than sulfuric acid, it takes more than ten gallons of water to make one slice of bread, 1000 gallons of water are necessary to produce one gallon of milk, an elephant can smell water up to three miles away, an egg that is fresh will sink in water but a stale one won’t, the US consumes water at over twice the rate of other industrialized countries, 1.2 billion people worldwide do not have access to clean water and Americans flush 6.8 billion gallons of water down their toilets each day (www.watercheck.biz)! Clean water is something we all long for and thanks to people who are talented in the arena of well drilling, we are fortunate enough to have access to fresh water here. Caleb Holt is a man of such talent. His grandfather founded Ken’s Well Drilling in 1974. While Caleb can’t recall if there are any farmers in his family he does have quite an interesting story nonetheless. “I wasn’t in FFA in high school or anything. My family’s raised cows; my wife’s family

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has always had livestock and cows. My dad raised quarter horses back in the day.” So, while farming may not be Caleb’s forte he explains, “On the well side, I’m a fourth generation. My great grandfather, when he got out of the service, he started Streetman Well Drilling back in the 1930s in Brandon. And then he trained my grandfather on my mom’s side and he trained his son in the business. Then my grandfather, David, trained my dad, his name is Tony and then he trained me.” This doesn’t explain the Ken’s part so he continues, “My mom’s mom married another man who was Ken, and he went into the well business in the 70s. I really don’t know what made him go into the business. He actually started his when my dad started his and they’d actually worked together at another well drilling company.” Thusly we arrive at the beginnings of Ken’s Well Drilling. Caleb elaborates further, “Ken’s Well Drilling has been centrally located in Plant City since 1974. He’s always been in this area and parts of Lakeland. I would work with him a lot when I was younger on weekends and summers in high school with him and my dad, with both their businesses any time they needed help. Then I took the business over in 2005 when he retired. We all work together. My dad’s always advertised

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE DECEMBER 2012

strictly by word of mouth and he’s mostly in Brandon whereas Ken’s is pretty much Plant City and West Polk. My dad’s business is Brandon Water Systems and he drills for Ken’s and Streetman’s and we predominantly do pump systems and filtration. We do well drilling too but my main line of work, that I personally do, is the pump service and water filtration and purification.” Caleb says that Ken’s mostly focuses on residential drilling, pump systems and filtration services. However, he adds, “We do get into some of the smaller farms. We’ve drilled several wells for blueberry farmers and orange groves. We stay fairly small, not small, but not the giant wells with turbines for the strawberry farmers. We do domestic wells for residential. We drill irrigation wells and maintain those systems. We do all types of pump sizes from one horse power to 7.5 horse power. We didn’t always do filtration but we mainly got into it for our customers, so that we’d be a one stop. You know we’d drill the well for them and then put in the water purifier so they’d have the best quality drinking water they could get. Then we can take care of any kind of issues they’re having with their water.” Obviously water quality and customer satisfaction is of extreme import to Caleb and Ken’s Well Drilling. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


He tells us, “We’ve a got a system that we started selling seven or eight months ago. We had this guy whose water was coming out orange; it looked like a glass of tea. We put that system on and it almost instantly started coming out clear. You don’t need a chemistry set, this system is simple, it’s one cylinder and it takes care of itself. You don’t have to add chemicals to it, no salt. It’s called an AIO.” He seems very impressed with the new system and in closing he shares the affordability of his services. The starting price for a domestic well is $4150. He expounds, “It’s a four inch well, 150 foot deep and that comes with a

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one horse power submersible pump and an 81 gallon bladder tank.” If you’re in need of some fresh water, be it a new well, or some serious filtration assistance, feel free to contact Caleb at kenswelldrilling@live.com and you can find out more about their services on their website: www.kenswelldrilling.com or give him a call at 813-754-4409.

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DON’T

GET CONFUSED WITH TOO MANY KNOTS by Captain Woody Gore

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ook at any magazine or internet fishing site and you’ll find enough information about all those special knots you should be using to catch fish. In fact, there is so much information it can boggle the mind of the most serious angling individual. With the thousands of knots available today, anglers put too much emphasis on knowing how to tie them all. Regardless of the type of fishing you’re doing, at best you probably only need a couple of knots to make it happen.

3.

4. 5.

6.

of the line coming from your fishing reel. When pulling them tight always lubri cate your knots with saliva. This pre vents damage to the line. Trim knots closely. A good knot, pulled tight, will not come loose. Pull up all ends when tightening the knot, cinching them as tight as possible. If it slips in your hand, it will slip when you’re hooked up. Once you find a knot that’s working for your particular type of fishing, use it so you won’t forget it.

1. Start by tying a loose overhand knot in your leader. 2. Run the tag end through the eye of the hook or lure and down through the overhand loop. 3. Wrap the tag end around the main line two times. 4. Here’s the important part: take the tag end back through the overhand loop up from the bottom. Make certain the tag end goes through the middle of the overhand loop, as shown, to prevent the knot from slipping. If it only goes through one side, “it will slip.”

Learn to tie a few simple knots that directly relate to your style of fishing and you’re set. For example, with all my fishing, I basically use only three knots on my charters. These are a Yucatan (for leader to braid), Loop Knot (for hooks and lures to leader), and the Double-Uni Knot (for braid to braid). Once in a great while I might use a Bimini Twist (for a double line application). But 90 percent of the time I use the Yucatan and Loop. Since a large percentage of lost fish can be blamed on poorly tied knots, it’s essential to fishing success that they are tied correctly. By using these basic fundamentals your knots should be secure while still retaining their maximum breaking strength. 1. As always, “Practice, Practice, Practice”... Take a length of fishing line, an old lure with hooks removed, and practice until you can correctly tie each knot 25 times. 2. When learning knots, the "tag end" sometimes called the working end is the end of the line used to tie the knot. The "standing end" is that part 14

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LOOP KNOT: With many excellent knots in used today, especially when there is a desire to catch fish, one stands out as the perfect choice. It provides artificial lures and natural baits the most realistic approach and appeal. It’s called a Loop Knot. Actually loop knots have been use for decades but now with swim baits, top waters, diving and suspending lures along with a variety of soft plastics this knot has emerged as the go-to method of attaching hooks and especially lures to your fishing line.

JANUARY 2013

YU CATAN KNOT: This knot was developed by fishermen off the coast of Mexico with some confusion as to the correct way to tie it. Often confused with the Albright Special, when tied correctly the Yucatan is stronger than the Albright and probably the strongest monofilament leader to braided line knot. Many anglers using braided line prefer a double main line and use a Bimini Twist. However, I use exclusively braided line and prefer a single-line main line attached to the leader. To accomplish this you must start with a doubled braided line to wrap around Seaguar Fluorocarbon leader, similar to using a Bimini. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


1. Lay leader and doubled braid main line from reel parallel to each other. Doubled braid main line is often created (for the more adventurist types) by using a Bimini Twist. However, you can simply double your braid line and wrap it around the Seaguar Fluorocarbon leader. 2. If using Monofilament to Fluorocarbon wrap the doubled line around leader 4 to 6 times, 10 to 12 times when using braid to fluorocarbon. 3. Now feed end of leader through loop at end of doubled braided line. 4. It’s critical that when setting the knot you have a firm grasp on both ends of the doubled braided line and both ends of leader. Start pulling slowly until the knot begins to twist. Now wet it with saliva, drop the tag end of the leader keep ing a firm grip on the main leader, in your other hand get an extra firm grip on the doubled braid (making certain you have both ends in your hand) and with one quick pull the tag end of the leader and the braid will twist together into a tight compact knot. Note that although the wraps were made with the doubled line, when the knot is pulled tight the leader will –wrap onto the doubled line. There you go; there is nothing to tying the perfect Knot to Catch Perfect Fish! If you want to learn these knots and other great fishing tips “Give Me a Call and Let’s Go Fishing on a Catching and Learning Charter”. “LET ’S GO FISHING” TAMPA B AY FISHING REPORT JANU ARY - FEB RU ARY 2013 SNOOK (CLOSED): You can still catch snook however, if the water temperatures are lower than normal you might want to fish areas like creeks, canals, and rivers; especially those with muddy bottoms and deep water docks. On cool or cold days snook also like SHEEPSHEAD: Sheepshead should start moving in for the spawn and hanging out around sunny sandy bottoms along a shallow shore- we should begin to see some nice sized fish on the rock piles line because the sun tends to quickly warm the water. throughout the bay. Look for quality fish around bridges, pilings, docks, oyster bars and artificial reefs. Many folks don’t like to REDFISH: You can usually find redfish during the winter and some- keep Sheepshead and actually I really can’t think of anyone who times cut bait, shrimp and artificial lures are your best bet. Many really does, however if you’ve got yourself a mess of larger fish go times they’re not going to be the larger fish but many rats can ahead and bite the bullet and clean them, because the fish dinner make a good fishing trip, especially for the kids. Don’t forget is well worth it. canals, creeks, deeper oyster bars and docks. “Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain SPOT TED SEA T ROU T: Tampa Bay seems to be full of nice sea trout Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and especially around broken bottom grass flats with sandy pot holes. fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Plenty of trout should show up through the winter months and Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years; he offers world wading on low tide days is a great way to target them. Most grass class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. flats with moving water seem to produce the best bite using shrimp free-lined or under a popping cork and artificial lures. However Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years some deeper rivers, channels, canals, and creeks will hold nice fish of organizational experience and access to the areas most experiand often plenty of silver trout. enced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. MACKEREL, COB IA, SHARKS: When trout fishing the flats it’s not unusual to get a decent mackerel bite going. They like hanging Visit his website at: around chasing schools of glass minnows. Also many times we’ve WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, landed some really nice pompano off the same trout flats. So, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or when running the flats looking for your favorite spot watch the give him a call at 813-477-3814. wake behind your boat for pompano skipping in the wake. As the water cools down the power plants are the place to look for cobia and sharks during the winter months. But be alert as other species frequent the warm water discharges. During the winter months on the flats we still get the occasional mackerel and plenty of bluefish, ladyfish and jacks. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Oranges in Reverse Introducing

Kumquat Growers Incorporated

By Ginny Mink

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manda Hesser does a tremendous job exalting a little known fruit in her 2006 New York Times article entitled, “The Way We Eat: Skin Deep.” She refers to them as, “oranges in reverse,” with a sweet skin and a tart pulp. She warns however, that those expecting a miniature orange will find their first bite quite shocking. In fact she says the unsuspecting first timer will more than likely squirm and pucker. What on earth is she referring to? Well, she calls it a tidy orange with a punch of zest without drippy juice. Ms. Hesser is describing the kumquat, a fruit that originated in China and is currently being grown in Saint Joseph, FL as well as Fallbrook, CA.

There are two types of kumquats being grown in Florida, the nagami and the meiwa. The nagami is the most popular and was introduced to Florida in the late 1800s. It’s been grown commercially in the “Kumquat Capitol,” St. Joseph, Florida since 1895. The meiwa didn’t show up until 1910 and it’s still not that popular. The difference is that the nagami is considered a tart fruit with a sweet skin while the meiwa is the sweeter version of the two. The nagami’s are useful in cooking and the meiwa’s are better for snacking. There’s so much more to learn about them and thusly, Kumquat Growers Incorporated is the place to go for answers. We spoke with Margie Neuhofer, one of the founding members. She said, “We’ve been in business since 1971, my husband, Joseph and I and Frank and Rosemary Gude in Saint Joseph, Florida, 30 miles north of Tampa. Joseph has lived here all his life, seventy some years and Frank and Rosemary have lived here eighty some years. I’m the only outsider. I’m from the city. We grow kumquats and we formed this corporation and it’s grown ever since, it gets bigger every year. My husband used to be in the chicken business and oranges. Frank grew oranges and all that stuff. When they both retired they strictly went to doing kumquats.” Both oranges and kumquats are grown in groves, so the transition probably wasn’t too difficult. Margie explains why the nagami is preferred over the meiwa with regards to cooking. She says, “The sweet kumquat doesn’t have the pectin in it that the tart kumquat has.” Amanda Hesser further elaborates on the cooking possibilities. She suggests that cutting a kumquat into thin rounds can add zest to a salad, that adding whole kumquats to a braise of pork, duck or lamb during the last 30 minutes will add the desired acidity and that they make excellent desserts 18

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as well. Margie agrees, “They’re used for snacking, people love to snack on them. You eat them like a grape, skin and all. This is the only citrus you eat skin and all other than you spit out the seed.” She then explains that there are a number of recipes on the Kumquat Growers website as well as products available for purchase. “We sell jellies, jams, preserves, a vinaigrette, barbeque sauce and they’re all made with the tart kumquat.” Initially these little “gold gems” were classified as being part of the citrus family. However, in 1915, Dr. Walter T. Swingle set them apart in the genus Fortunella named after the British horticulturist who introduced the kumquat (or as the Brits write, cumquat) to Europe in 1846. That man’s name was Robert Fortune. There are actually four varieties, the Hong Kong wild, marumi, nagami and meiwa, but as previously mentioned the last two are the most commonly grown in the US. Margie adds, “It’s a fruit that’s not known too much around but every year we seem to be selling more kumquats.” No doubt the advent of the Kumquat Festival is a huge help in that arena. Margie tells us that it happens on the last Saturday in January and draws about 40,000 people. The Kumquat Festival’s website says that there are 400 vendors and 40 sponsors. It also delineates the delicacies available at the festival: kumquat pie and cookies, kumquat ice cream, smoothies and marmalade as well as kumquat salsa. Feel free to attend the January 26, 2013 Kumquat Festival to sample these unique morsels, or visit www.kumquatgrowers.com to access Margie’s cake or Rosemary’s pie recipes. You can also place an order for other scrumptious kumquat concoctions via that site. Enjoy some of the other tastes of Florida! One last bit of info, and a sort of warning, don’t ever confuse the kumquat with a loquat, especially if you are talking to someone who’s enthusiastic about these little wee fruit. We asked Margie the difference and she said, “The loquat is not in the citrus family at all! It’s yellow and has two big seeds and the loquat is usually a backyard fruit. You won’t find a loquat orchard or grove or whatever, you find it in people’s yards. It’s in the plum family.” So, while you won’t find loquats in Publix, you will find the Neuhofer’s and Gude’s kumquats there; their broker deals with Publix and other grocery stores. People growing backyard fruit don’t usually have brokers! •

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Turkey Creek FFA Get’s High Bid On First Flat

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urkey Creek FFA auctions their first flat of strawberry to the highest bidder each year. This year the first flat was sold to Chris and Tina Connell of Pebbledale Farm in Pinecrest for $500. The members and advisors, Buddy Coleman and Allison Sparkman, would like to thank the Connell's for their kind contribution.

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Produce grown and picked by Turkey Creek agriculture students will be on sale to the public each Tuesday and Friday from 9:00 am - 4:00pm beginning on January 8. Along with strawberries the students will also have mustard greens and collard greens for sale immediately. Other vegetables that will be available soon are

bell peppers, tomatoes, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, and turnips. All profits go to the agriculture department and assist the students with future projects. If you have questions you can reach the advisors at (813) 757-9442 ext. 262. •

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ne of my long-time friends in Plant City is Dick Elston. Ever since high school we have enjoyed our friendship and telling jokes.

I recall when Dick was in high school he was hired by A.P. Cooke, owner of the Plant City Courier, as a part-time type setter. Dick was later delegated the job of laying out the classified ads. He was pretty good at what he did, although at first he was known to make a few slip ups. On his first publication he had an ad for Barwick’s Drug Store, which should have read, “Wanted: Parttime job for married girl to work our soda fountain.” When the Courier came out it read, “Wanted: Part-time married girl to work our soda fountain.” The only other one I can remember was an ad for Carlos Cone. It read, “Wanted, man to take care of cows at Cones ranch that does not smoke or drink.” Last month Dick gave me a copy of his new book entitled, “Life and Times of Plant City in the 1940s” (copies are available at the Plant City Photo Archives). Reading through the pages brought back a lot of memories. He recalled in the good ole days, when everyone was low on money, they suffered because of rationing. He writes about gas being rationed during World War II, you were given a sticker to put on your windshield for gas. Either “A,” “B” or “C”. Usually, as I remember, you were allowed only five gallons of gas at a time. One day I went to Bell’s restaurant for lunch and sat next to Dick’s dad. I told him we were good friends, and were always telling stories on each other. He laughed and said, “Did you ever hear the story of Dick leaving home?” “No,” I replied. “Tell me about it.” He laughed and said, “When Dick was seven years old he decided to run away from home. I recall he packed his little suitcase 22

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with a few clothes and a couple of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. As he started for the front door his mother asked him where he was going. ‘I’m leaving home,’ he said. ‘And what are you carrying?’ she asked. ‘Some clothes and food,’ was his reply. ‘Dick, if you want to run away, that’s alright,’ his mother said. ‘But you came into this home without anything and you can leave the same way.’ He put down his suitcase on the floor defiantly and started for the door again. ‘Wait a minute,’ his mother said. ‘You didn’t have any clothes on when you arrived, and I want them back.’ Turning red as a beet he quickly took off his clothes, shoes, socks, underwear and all, and hollered, ‘Now Mom, can I go now?’ ‘Yes’, was her answer, ‘but once you close that door, don’t ever expect to come back.’” Dick’s dad said his son was so angry he slammed the door and stepped out on the front porch. She peeked through the window and there he stood completely naked. He saw two girls coming down the street and immediately jumped in the shrubbery. After the girls passed by he ran to the front door and knocked loudly. “Who’s there?” his mother said. “It’s me, Dick, let me in!” “Dick doesn’t live here any more!” she replied. “Aw, c’mom, I’m still your son. Please let me in!” Dick’s father concluded, “I watched her slowly open the door with a smile on her face, and say, “Did you change your mind about running away?” Dick walked in, grinned, and said, “What’s for supper?” Dick pointed out a lot of things I had forgotten about the 40s. Blind Charlie was the peanut vendor. We had inner tubes inside of W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


automobile tires. Photos were taken in black and white. We put water in ice trays, and then into the freezer to make ice cubes. We had old fashion tent revivals. First class postage was 3 cents. The Artic Ice Company delivered ice to homes for iceboxes. There were no disposable diapers and all cars had manual transmissions. Things have changed since the 40s! Dick points out that a gallon of milk was $.62, a loaf of bread $.09 and a gallon of gas was $.16!

answer the question about his father’s cause of death. The agent asked why. After some embarrassment the client explained that his father had been hanged. The agent paused for a moment and said, “Just write: ‘Father was taking part in a public function when the platform gave away.’” Dick Elston and his wife Shirley live on Cedar Run in west Plant City. •

For those of you that have lived in Plant City for a long time, do you remember where McGuires’s Second Hand Store was located? What about Helm’s Dress Shop, Bender’s Market, Pan Tex Dry Cleaners, Kirby’s Bakery, Harold’s News Stand, and Table Supply? You’ll find the locations and many others in his current edition of “The Life and Times of Plant City in the 1940s.” For more memories of the 40s in Plant City, why not stop by the Plant City Photo Archives and pick up a copy. By the way, Dick Elston has published three individual editions. All very thought provoking. He has served Plant City well. He worked with his father in the insurance business at the apex east of Maryland Fried Chicken. Richard (Dick) Elston was named Citizen of the Year in 1986 and served as City Commissioner/Mayor 1968-1969. I asked Dick what was the funniest thing that ever happened to him as an insurance agent. He said, “We had a new agent working for us one summer to help fill in while dad went on vacation. A customer came in and this new employee noticed the applicant was having trouble filling out the application. He asked the man what trouble was he having, and the man said he could not

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STEPHEN GRAN Information is delivered by satellite courses, computer software, seminars, video presentations, the web or by traditional lectures and via the media. Extension customers, residents of the counties served by each office, participate in classes and implement new information in their businesses, homes and communities. For information about available educational programs at Hillsborough County Extension, visit: http://hillsborough.extension.ufl.edu. For the past several months, Stephen Gran has served as Interim Director of Extension while also continuing to hold his Hillsborough County post as Manager for Agricultural Development. Gran is an applicant for the permanent Extension directorship.

SEARCH FOR NEW EXTENSION DIRECTOR UNDERWAY ACTING DIRECTOR PLANS

TO

APPLY

By Jim Frankowiak

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he search is underway for a new person to head the Hillsborough County Extension Service and the interim director is among those who have applied for the position. Extension, as it is most commonly referred to, is an educational service provided by both the University of Florida and Hillsborough County, providing information to the public through workshops, publications and mass media. It is part of a national network that traces its roots to 1914 when the U.S. Congress established the Extension Service as a means for disseminating and implementing research-based information from land-grant universities. Here in Florida, the University of Florida in Gainesville is the state’s land-grant University. The transfer of knowledge from UF to people throughout the state is facilitated by Extension faculty located in each of Florida’s 67 counties. This partnership between counties and the university is the heart of the Cooperate Extension Service mission and enables the university to extend its knowledge base to each community. There is a common misconception that Extension is focused exclusively on the needs of the agricultural community, but that is not true. The mission of extending and implementing research-based information to the people of Florida has not changed, however the information and delivery methods have improved. The driving force for these information delivery methods are the needs of citizens in each county, not just those involved in agriculture. County extension faculty develop educational programs based on issues determined by their urban and commercial customers or citizens. These priority issues form the basis for major educational programs that are conducted across Florida. Extension blogs provide an example of the range of subject matter available: Parenting 4 Tomorrow – Parenting Resources, Commercial Horticulture – Agent’s Update, Personal Financial Management and Home Gardening.

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Gran was asked to serve as acting director by County Administrator Mike Merrill when the former director resigned in 2012. “It was natural for me,” said Gran, who holds a masters degree in Food and Resource Economics from UF. “My career includes nearly three years with Extension in Sarasota County before I joined Hillsborough County in 1998 as Agricultural Development Manager,” he said. His activities with Hillsborough County have included ongoing involvement with Extension and its overall advisory committee, as well as the vegetable advisory committee and agricultural public policy advisory committee. “The appointment as acting Extension Director was in a way a homecoming for me,” he said. In Gran’s county positions he has served as a link between the county and agricultural interests. “There was a time when that relationship was less than ideal,” said Gran. “Gene Gray helped improve that situation and I have worked to continue to foster those relationships.” “I like the work of Extension and see opportunities to bring my educational background and county experiences to the position and ongoing challenges of meeting the expectations and needs of the residents of Hillsborough County,” he said. Gran and his wife, Belinda, an Ag teacher at East Bay High School, have two children. Gran’s interest in the Extension position has the support of several ag leaders. Among them is Judi Whitson, Executive Director of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, who would like to see Stephen “cloned so he could continue in his position with the county and also take on the responsibilities of Extension Director.” Hugh Gramling, recently retired head of the Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers Association and a Southwest Florida Water Management District board member is “highly supportive of Stephen and the Extension director’s position. It is a great opportunity for Extension, for Stephen and the people of the county,” said Gramling. “I know he would be missed, but I am confident that the county would find the right person to fill Stephen’s former role and I know he would make that transition as smooth as possible and help mentor his replacement.” Florida Strawberry Growers Association Executive Director Ted Campbell feels Gran’s selection “could become a win for all involved, because it would only enhance the cross-involvement and working relationships of both his former position and new one.” A final decision on the new Extension director is expected within the first quarter of this year. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Community Association Outreach Program JULIE HIRST, HILLSBOROUGH AND POLK COUNTY Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION OUTREACH COORDINATOR

Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL) means landscaping with low maintenance plants and following nine simple Florida-friendly principles. The mission of the FFL program is to conserve water, protect water quality and reduce negative effects on Florida’s natural resources. FFL is a joint venture with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, county governments and Florida’s water management districts. Central to the FFL program are its 9 Principles including: Right Plant, Right Place; Water Efficiently; Fertilize Appropriately; Mulch; Attract Wildlife; Manage Yard Pests Responsibly; Recycle; Prevent Stormwater Runoff and Protect the Waterfront. We recognize that homeowners associations (HOAs) can have a significant effect on water consumption and the environment through restrictive covenants involving landscape design and maintenance. In 2009, the Florida legislature enacted laws defining and promoting FFL. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program works with HOA boards of directors, property managers and landscape maintenance professionals to educate them on FFL principles and assist them in making landscaping decisions. Florida Statute 373.185 (S.B. 2080) precludes HOAs from prohibiting property owners from implementing FFL on their land. The legislation also specifies that local governments cannot disallow homeowners from using FFL principles in their landscapes. In addition, it states that HOAs cannot prohibit FFL in their association covenants and documents nor can HOAs mandate landscape rules that are not FFL, such as water wasting practices or inappropriate site design. There are several items this legislation does not require. For instance, HOAs and their homeowners are not required to practice FFL. The law does not change the HOA review-approval process. It also does not invalidate HOA landscape and architectural committee require26

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ments that landscape changes must be requested and approved in advance of changes being made. HOAs may still set reasonable restrictions with regard to FFL practices, including specifying the location of rain barrels, compost bins and certain plants. HOAs can also require the use of St. Augustinegrass as turfgrass. The FFL legislation does not address community common areas, but recommends that HOAs set an example for residents by exhibiting FFL principles in those areas. The law also recommends that HOAs hire landscape contractors that are certified in the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMPs). There is no enforcement agency associated with the legislation. Therefore, when disputes between homeowners and HOAs arise regarding this legislation, they are commonly settled by lawsuits. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is educational in nature and does not intervene in disputes between HOAs and residents. However, we can offer resolution suggestions. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is related to S.B. 494, which deals with commercial fertilizer contractors. This legislation requires that all commercial fertilizer applicators be licensed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services by January 1, 2014. Passing GI-BMP training or equivalent is a requirement for licensure. This law stipulates that all homeowners that have an in-ground irrigation system must have an operational rain shut-off device or a soil moisture sensing device. As a means of providing guidance to community associations, the FFL Community Association Outreach Program offers free site evaluations. Areas that are assessed include: plant health and maintenance; water conservation recommendations; landscape design and plant suggestions; landscape maintenance contracts; covenants and W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


deed restrictions dealing with landscape issues; pruning practices; problem plants such as invasive, non-native plants; pesticide and fertilization practices; plant nutritional deficiencies; mulch application; and irrigation system issues including frequency and timing of applications. Other frequent areas of interest cited by communities participating in the FFL Community Association Outreach Program have included stormwater pond best management practices, dealing with erosion caused by stormwater runoff and questions involving reclaimed water. Evaluations and recommendations are based on science-based research from UF/IFAS. In addition to site evaluations, the Community Association Outreach Program offers onsite presentations about the FFL principles. The FFL Community Association Outreach Program is a free resource for HOAs and other community associations to provide for guidance in instituting sustainable landscape practices, reviewing landscaperelated covenants and working with landscape maintenance contractors. FFL has had several success stories with communities that adopted FFL practices from which they were able to see reduced water consumption and water utility and maintenance costs. Contact me at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, 813-744-5519 x 54142, if these services would benefit your homeowner or condominium association. For more information on environmental horticulture topics, contact your local County Extension Service. Additional information on Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ can be accessed at http:/ / floridayards.org, http:/ / fyn.ifas.ufl.edu and WaterMatters.org. The Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Community Association Outreach Program is sponsored by the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the Hillsborough and Polk Boards of County Commissioners and the Southwest Florida Water Management District.

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Dry Creek

Resolutions for a New Year By Les McDowell Photos Courtesy of Linda Constant

The New Year always brings a new fresh beginning to life. With this said I wrote a little poem about it.

New Year On the back of the ranch near the fence line there’s a cabin in the woods. So on this rainy day I thought I’d sit in there a spell even though there’s things to do and things I should. The wind is swirling up the leaves. The rain is beating against the eves. My two cow dogs are dry and don’t seem to mind. Heck they’re always under my feet rain or shine. The calender blow’n against the wall says it’s New Years day. Guess it’s time to make a resolution but no one would listen anyway.

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’m so excited about this New Year. Dry Creek just got back from New York City and The Cable Fax Awards. We were nominated for Best Series Family Friendly Programming. We walked away with an Honorable Mention. We were in a room full of giants with our Little Show That Could. All the big networks where there. We were there, with no budget but a zillion dollars worth of fire in the belly and lots of prayers behind us. It really was a testament to all the hard work everyone on Dry Creek has done to bring us there. So this year we start off with gained respect from the industry and are ready to keep climbing the mountain to where family programing has been put out to pasture. Praying that this year will have family programing brought out of retirement and back into families homes.

The wind is whistling thru the barbed wire. It brings to mind a cowboy choir. This new year, what would I do different underneath this worn out old hat? Maybe, thru the doors of a church is where I need to be at? Maybe be a little kinder to my old dog George. Even when he does his business on the floor. Cut back a little on the Cope. Lose some weight so old Suitor don’t have so much to tote. But for now before I get to work I’ll take a long nap. So really this New Year, I can’t see me changing a lot from where I’m at!

Everybody knows where Dry Creek is... cause it’s inside each one of us. Watch Dry Creek on BlueHighwaysTV, Channel 246 on Verizon Sat nites at 7:30. Go to DryCreekT V.Com for more information. Check us out at drycreektv.com 28

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GALVANIZING

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he American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) has established classes of zinc coating for steel wire. There are four types of galvanizing on most common field, horse, goat and chain link fence that we stock. Commerical or regular galvanizing is the least protected. It is not a good fit in the state of Florida (We do not stock this wire) Class I has a light zinc coating. It can be a good fit in some parts of the country or where long term use is not the purpose. Class 3 wire has two and a half times more zinc coating than Class I. It is the preferred coating in most installments because of the extended life. Class 4 is most common in chain link fence. Wire gauge is also a determining factor in wire corrosion. The chart below shows wire size, climate conditions, gauge size and the number of years of service for Class I and Class 3 wire.

CLIMATIC CONDITION Wire Size

9 11 12 1/2 14 1/2

Dry 1 15 11 11 7

3 30 30 30 23

Humid Class 1 3 8 13 6 13 6 13 5 10

Coastal and Industrial 1 3 3 6 2 6 2 6 11/2 41/2

The S Knot design uses a separate piece of wire to attach the line wire to solid stay wire. Our non-climb and sheep and goat wire use this knot. The Fixed knot (Staylock) adds a third knot wire that is twisted around the vertical and horizontal wires under pressure, locking them tight. This knot provides far greater vertical and horizontal holding strength. We stock fixed joint field fence. The advantage of this wire is that it keeps the same shape after intense hitting by animals. It also will have a class 3 coating for longer life. Fixed knot fencing is more expensive than standard field fence, but with post spacing 20 – 25 feet on center (instead of 8 – 10 feet) the installed price runs about 20 percent less versus a conventional field fence and you’ve got a superior fence that is easier to install and maintain for less money. We will have this wire in inventory after July 4. When buying farm fence always look at the tag to see if you are getting Class I or Class 3 wire, and what is the tensile strength of the wire. If the tag is missing, it might have been pulled. Sometimes wire is purchased because of the manufacture. Look at the tag-make sure it is Class 3 wire high tensile is even better. Painting the top of wire does not give the wire more galvanizing. You might be surprised at what you’ve been buying.

WIRE FENCE

TENSILE STRENGTH There are three tensile strengths in ranch wire stocked in most stores, low tensile (low carbon) with a 60,000 pound PSI, medium tensile has a 125,000 PSI. High ensile wire has a 175,000 PSI. When installed properly, high tensile wire will stay tight for years, using fewer posts and less labor. We stock all three tensile strengths.

KNOTS There are basically three types of knots in farm fence. Hinge joint is the most common in farm fencing. The knot is formed by wrapping the vertical stay wire around the line wire at each intersection. The hinge joint is the most economical knot. All of the field fence that we stock has a hinge joint.

1047-330’ Field Fence 14ga CL3.............$115.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL1............139.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL3 LOW CARBON ............$139.00 1047-330’ Field Fence 12½ga CL3 HIGH TENSILE ............$155.00 Barb Wire 15½ CL3 Gauge .......................$35.00 Barb Wire 12½ GA CL3 ............................$65.00 Barb Wire 15½ GA 3” spacing .................$49.00 100’x4’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$125.00 100’x5’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$149.00 200’x4’ CL1 no climb horse wire ............$199.00 200’x4’ CL3 no climb horse wire ............$229.00 100’x4’ CL1 4 X 4 goat wire ....................$75.00 330’x4’ CL1 4 X 4 goat wire ..................$239.00 5’x16’ Horse Panel 6GA 2x4....................$59.00 50”x16’ 10 Line Panel 4GA .....................$22.00 39” Field Fence 12½ga 330’...................$112.00 Barbless Wire 12½ga 1320’.....................$54.00 Barbless Wire 14ga 1320’ ........................$35.00 Smooth Wire 9ga 140’ .............................$11.95 Smooth Wire 12½ga 210’ ........................$12.50 Fence Stays 100 pair 42” ........................$46.00 Staples 1¼-1½-1¾ 50# ............................$49.00

Ph: (813) 620-3006 • 6902 Causeway Blvd, Tampa • www.Fencing-Farm-Ranch.com 30

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Solutions May Be At Hand For Tomato Disease Problem By Jim Frankowiak

hortly after Dr. Jay Scott joined the Gulf Coast Research Center in 1981 as a vegetable breeder in the Horticulture Department, he was challenged for the first time by a bacterial spot outbreak at area tomato farms. “That happened just two weeks after I joined the faculty and despite significant work over the years, we have yet to come up with a way to effectively treat and control this problem,” said Scott.

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pathogens,” he said. “We continue to see very positive results and that has given us great hope.”

However, there is hope on the horizon thanks to gene transfer work done two decades ago by Dr. Paul Staskowicz at the University of California – Berkley between a pepper plant and tomato, VF-36 an older variety. That served as the basis for contemporary efforts by Dr. Scott and his colleagues.

“While we respect the right for individuals and groups to oppose the utilization of technology such as this, it is equally important for those opposed to consider the scientific findings,” said Scott. “It is estimated that our global population will grow from 7 billion today to 9 billion by 2050 and our ability to feed the world must consider advances in technology that permit greater yields from the same or less agricultural acreage worldwide if we are to be able to feed the world.

In addition, the Two Blades Foundation, a United Kingdom-based organization with the mission to use modern techniques to deploy disease resistance genes among vital crops of developed and undeveloped countries, helped move the overall effort forward. “The foundation approached me several years ago to test Bs-2 containing varieties to help solve bacterial spot disease problems that our farmers face,” said Scott. “Bacterial spot is a big problem for our farmers and there is no way to control it when the weather is wet and rainy.” Adding to the complication of this challenge is the fact that races (types) of pathogens that cause bacterial spot are not static and new races have evolved over the years. “Through conventional breeding, we have only been able to introduce varieties with partial resistance to bacterial spot,” said Scott. That has changed with insertion of the Bs-2 gene into several different varieties of tomatoes. “Trials done with the VF-36 variety resulted in no disease at all,” said Scott. Similar trials were recently done with the Fl-8000 and hybrid Fla.8314, which has Fla. 8000 as a parent. This was after Two Blades Foundation funded work at the University of California – Davis in which the Bs-2 gene was inserted into the Fla.-8000 and 8314. The findings of these recent trials have been significant. “Varieties with the Bs-2 gene have developed yields twice that of the same varieties without the gene,” said Scott. “When there was an instance of bacterial spot in fall 2011, it did not reoccur the next season and we have found control and resistance effectiveness among all races of 32

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However, there is more to this situation since it involves the genetic transformation of a tomato with a pepper gene and that overall process is categorized as a genetically modified organism or GMO, a process that is opposed by some groups and individuals.

“There is no reason to fear a process such as the one involving the insertion of a pepper gene into tomato varieties with the resulting benefits of disease resistance, higher yields, less environmental impact and energy usage. With this approach there is no need to apply copper, the current treatment for this disease. That means no copper residue on the plants and no copper in the dump tanks at packing houses, thus no copper effluent in the groundwater. Consumers receive a crop that has been subjected to less pesticide applications which is better for them and the environment. “It also helps to make our farmers more competitive in the global marketplace since their costs for pesticides, labor and energy use is reduced. This technology is very similar to that used in the production of pharmaceuticals and vaccines. No one objects to that,” he added. To move this process forward, use of the Bs-2 gene must become deregulated by the USDA, an action estimated to require over $1 million in funding. “It is our hope to see that take place within the next year or two,” said Scott. “Funding is the challenge, but we are seeing support from several of our big tomato growers and organizations such as the Florida Tomato Committee.” •

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ommon sense would dictate that anything that can bite your face off in one gulp is probably not an ideal pet. If you suffer from the delusion that bobcats, cougars, lions or tigers are family friendly, perhaps this article will set you straight on the matter. Big Cat Rescue (BCR) is the world’s largest accredited sanctuary focused solely on abandoned and abused big cats. They have 13 species of cats: tigers, lions, leopards, cougars, ocelots, bobcats, lynx, servals, caracals, jungle cats, leopard cats, a Geoffroy cat and a sand cat. It is home to the most sundry populace of exotic cats in the world, many of whom are endangered or even extinct in the wild.

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Carole Baskin and her late husband, Don, got their start in the exotic cat arena when they decided that they’d like to have bobcats as pets. They bought out a fur farm’s lynx and bobcat kittens to end that individual’s endeavors. They brought all 56 of them back to their then 40 acres and began to raise them. Initially they chose to get into the pet trade with these cats, but as they began to see the rate with which these animals were abused or abandoned, their goals changed. The sanctuary officially got its start in November of 1992, but over the years the goals and objectives, as well as the vision and mission, have changed. Currently, BCR’s vision is: a world where animals are treated with respect. Its mission is two parts: to provide the cats in their care with the best home possible and to educate the public about the plight of these animals both in the wild and captivity. We spoke with BCR’s Education Director, Willow Hecht. She’s a graduate of Ithaca College in New York where she earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology. While this may seem like an odd turn of events, she explains, “After college I changed my mind about what I wanted to do. I’m from Vermont and we don’t have any exotic animals there. I found out about Big Cat Rescue in late 2006 in Glamour Magazine. I flew down to Tampa, took a tour and within six months I moved here. I was a volunteer for about three and a half years. Then two years ago I got the Education Director position, in addition to that I’m also trained as a Senior Keeper which means I get to clean cages and feed all the cats including the biggest cats, lions and tigers!” Willow tells us a little about her job and her experience on the premises, “Mostly I deal with kids, anything that has to do with educating the public. My job is pretty much my dream job and Big Cat Rescue is amazing! I’m just so glad to be a part of this. Big Cat Rescue is at the forefront of changing laws; this little 55 acre place in Tampa, Florida is changing the lives of animals all over the country. The animals are wonderful, they’re beautiful; they’re W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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fascinating. I never get bored of seeing them.” The political side of BCR really gets Willow excited. She adds, “We have a bill in Congress, it’s passed the House and in the Senate, it would ban the private possession and breeding of big cats. We’d eventually like to see that there aren’t any more big cats needing rescued by us. That’s what we hope this bill will do.” Apparently this issue of personal exotic pet ownership is a hot topic and according to Carole Baskin’s writings on the BCR website, many states are passing laws banning big cat ownership. She adds that 2012 provided the passing of a federal bill that bans possession and breeding except in very restricted circumstances. This bill was a joint effort of other animal protection organizations. Willow informed us that BCR would like to put themselves out of business via the creation of more restrictive laws since it’s the lax laws currently in place that subjects these majestic animals to cruelty and abandonment. People are truly not prepared to raise wild animals and thusly they have a tendency to fail in their care giving efforts or they determine that it’s “not working out” and BCR has to come to that animal’s rescue. There are over 100 big cats on the BCR property, though they do have a few non-cat residents as well. Many of these cats are rescues. In fact, Carole reveals that there are cats whose owners: could not manage them, became ill, got divorced, moved or went to jail. There are also cats there that are retired from circus life, have been rescued from fur farms; have attacked children, or whose owners just didn’t want them anymore. In some instances, there are cats whose mother’s were killed and have had to be raised by hand. BCR has stepped up to the task and is doing its very best not only to provide for these gorgeous creatures, but also to eliminate the need for that provision by working in the legal arena to propose and support stricter ownership laws. If you are interested in supporting their endeavors or would like to learn more about their programs please feel free to visit their extensive website: www.bigcatrescue.org. If you’d like to take a tour or set up a school fieldtrip, please feel free to contact Willow Hecht at 813 920 4130, or by email: education@bigcatrescue.org. 36

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By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

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he Florida sunchoke, also known as the Jerusalem artichoke, is an interesting tuber vegetable with an equally fascinating name. Neither an artichoke nor from Jerusalem, this vegetable is in the same family as the sunflower and has been grown for centuries by the American Indians. Hardy and easy to grow, Jerusalem artichokes are grown in Florida and in many other states around the country. Popular varieties include French Mammoth White, Golden Nugget, Smooth Garnet, and Fuseau. These varieties differ in length, color, and taste. Sunchokes resemble bulbous ginger roots in appearance, and they taste like a cross between a potato and water chestnut. They can be prepared the same way potatoes are, but taste nuttier and slightly sweeter than potatoes. One of the most remarkable features of this tuber is its high concentration of inulin (not to be confused with insulin). A type of carbohydrate, inulin passes through the body without being metabolized for energy, so inulin does not raise blood glucose levels or contribute to calories as other starches do.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Jerusalem artichokes are comprised of water, inulin, fiber, and plenty of vitamins and minerals. This vegetable is also a great vegetarian source of iron. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one cup of raw, sliced sunchoke (150g) contains 117 calories, 3 g protein, 0.02 g fat, 26 g carbohydrate, and 2.4 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 28% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for iron, 20% for thiamin, 18% for potassium, 12% for phosphorus, and 10% for vitamin C, copper, niacin, and dietary fiber. A single serving also contains plentiful amounts of magnesium, folate, riboflavin, and vitamin B6. 38

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INULIN Jerusalem artichokes are one of the richest natural sources of the soluble fiber, inulin which comprises about 75% of the carbohydrates in this tuber. Other plant sources of inulin include onions, jicama, garlic, banana, and agave. Since the body cannot digest inulin as it does other carbohydrates, the enzymes in your gut digest it. Inulin is considered a probiotic because it increases the beneficial bacteria in your gut, which may improve bowel function. Notably, this type of carbohydrate does not raise blood glucose, a consideration for people with diabetes. Calcium absorption is improved when eaten with foods containing inulin. This soluble fiber also decreases total cholesterol and triglycerides, aids in weight loss, and reduces constipation. THIAMIN Jerusalem artichokes are a fantastic source of thiamin, with a one cup serving providing one fifth of your daily needs. This B vitamin plays a vital role in the proper functioning of muscles and the nervous system. It helps to convert carbohydrates into energy for the body to function and is needed for multiple enzymatic reactions. Thiamin aids in the flow of electrolytes through nerve and muscle cells, and is required for the production of stomach acid, which is needed for proper digestion. Since this vitamin is water soluble, it’s not stored in the body and needs to be replenished regularly with foods rich in thiamin. POTASSIUM A single serving of Florida sunchokes contains 18% of your daily potassium needs. This important mineral promotes healthy heart functioning and protects against high blood pressure. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance, aids in muscle contraction, and helps transmit nerve impulses. This mineral is also critical in maintaining cell membranes, and balances

with other minerals in the blood to regulate heartbeat and blood pressure. Most vegetables and fruits, such as sunchokes, are a rich source of potassium.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Choose sunchokes that are firm and free of decay or wet spots. They can be refrigerated for up to several weeks, or they can be simply left in the ground until ready to use. Rinse and scrub under running water to clean before use. Peeling is optional but unnecessary, and much of the fiber is found in the peel.

HOW TO ENJOY Jerusalem artichokes are very versatile and can be enjoyed raw, cooked, or pickled. Raw sunchokes are nutty and slightly sweet, much like water chestnuts. They can be sliced or grated into salads or sandwiches. Sunchokes are similar to potatoes when cooked, and they can be sautéed, steamed, roasted, baked, or fried. Here are more ways to enjoy this nutritious vegetable: • Slice and serve with crudités in a veggie platter. • Dice and mix into tuna or chicken salad. • Slice and stir-fry with other vegetables. • Roast in the oven after tossing with olive oil, salt and pepper. • Bake whole, then mash as you would with potatoes. • Steam and then puree into soup. • Grate and use for hash browns, dumplings, or potato pancakes Fresh Florida sunchokes are in their prime during the winter months. Enjoy more of this delicious, nutritious vegetable today! SELECTED REFERENCES http://www.harvesttotable.com http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ http://www.sunchokes.net http://www.hort.purdue.edu W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Contests and More

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t has been yet another busy month in Florida FFA. Since I last wrote you we have held two state contests, two leadership conferences, and started the process to crown next year’s speaking champions at the sub-district contests. The amount of knowledge, skill, and leadership that has been displayed to me by FFA members of the past month has reminded me why I do what I do. First were the leadership conferences held in the month of December. We held the middle school conference for middle school members and the 360° conference for our high school members. Middle school conference was a success, as we had one of the largest turnouts ever for the conference itself. My team and I put together the curriculum that we taught, which was thoroughly embraced by the members around us as we traveled to different destinations in the world to learn about different aspects of leadership. These members proved to truly be some of

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the best in the state by showing us their hard work ethic and their ability to learn at this event. Meanwhile the 360° conference was put on by National FFA. The state officers participated with the members at this conference to let us connect with them on a new level. By participating with them we were able to connect with them as fellow students instead of just the facilitators that we usually are. Both conferences were successful due to the amazing members that we had participate. Also in the month of December we hosted state competitions for citrus and tool identification. The citrus contest is open to middle school and high school students and is always very competitive. In the citrus contest students must be able to not only to recognize different types citrus but also different weeds, pests, and rootstocks as well. Hillsborough County had teams place high in both divisions and I would like to congratulate all those who participated. The tools contest is one that is only

open to middle school members. However, there was no shortage of competitors for this event. In the tools contest students must be able to recognize different types of tools, as well as take a written test to identify the uses of those tools. Again, Hillsborough County had many teams place high in this contest and I would like to congratulate those as well. Finally at the end of December we held our sub-district contest to start the process of crowning our new speaking champions of Florida FFA. These contests remain some of the most competitive in the state. These contests include parliamentary procedure, extemporaneous and prepared public speaking, creed speaking, tractor driving, and the dairy management test. Hillsborough County has had a state winner come out of our two sub-districts for at least the past five years and this is not a streak that I see being broken soon. Next month I will be telling you all about my trip to Argentina as I travel with other state officers from around the country to learn more about international agriculture. As always if you have any questions comments or concerns feel free to email me at david.walden@flaffa.org and I will respond to you as quickly as I can.

David Walden

Area 5 State Vice President

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Ford Motor Company and Jarrett Scott Ford Continue Strong Commitment to FFA Ford Motor Company’s 2012-2013 commitment includes substantial support of National FFA events, and $1,000 collegiate scholarships for hundreds of FFA members. Ford, with local dealers such as Jarrett Scott Ford, has awarded 7,119 scholarships since 1997.

helping three local students attend the college of their choice.

For the 2012-2013 school year, Jarrett Scott Ford is sponsoring three Built Ford Tough scholarships helping students attend the college of their choice.

“We’re pleased to be able to support the local chapter and Ford Motor Company in its strong commitment to the National FFA,” says Jim Scott. “All our previous scholarship recipients tell us how grateful they are for the financial support and how the FFA experience has changed their lives.”

FFA develops students’ leadership, business skills and community service in preparation for a career in agriculture, which accounts for one out of five U.S. jobs.

Jim Scott announced that Jarrett Scott Ford would join Ford Motor Company in its ongoing commitment to the National FFA (formerly known as the Future Farmers of America). Ford has committed to a sixteenth year of the Built Ford Tough – FFA collegiate scholarship program, which will award $1,000 scholarships to hundreds of FFA members, each co-sponsored by Ford Dealers like Jarrett Scott Ford.

To be eligible, FFA members must submit an online 2013 Scholarship Application at www.ffa.org and take the required signature page to Jarrett Scott Ford for the dealer endorsement and dealer code, this provides FFA members the opportunity to meet, and thank, the dealer for their support of continuing education.

“Visit any local farm and you can see that trucks, particularly F-Series, play an integral role in the agricultural industry,” said Jim Scott. “We want to help these future leaders succeed and become our customers from the start of their careers to the end, just like many of their parents and grandparents.”

About Ford Motor Company

employees and about 70 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com

About National FFA Organization The National FFA Organization is a national youth organization of 557,318 student members as part of 7,498 local FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The National FFA Organization operates under a federal charter granted by the 81st United States Congress and it is an integral part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visit the National FFA organization online at www.FFA.org on Facebook, Twitter and the official National FFA Organization blog.

Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, MI, manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 164,000

Ford has supported the National FFA since the first F-Series truck was introduced in 1948, and has sponsored the Built Ford Tough collegiate scholarship program since 1997. The program, equally funded by Ford Motor Company and Ford dealers, has awarded over 7 million in scholarships to FFA members. Jarrett Scott Ford is sponsoring the Built Ford Tough collegiate scholarship program for Plant City High School, Durant High School and Strawberry Crest High School. For the 2012-2013 school year, they are W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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By Sean Green

A Closer Look

Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa)

Jewel Catepillar It’s time once again to celebrate a new beginning. I hope you have all had a terrific holiday season and can reflect on this past year with gratitude. Stories and icons of transformation make it easy for some to cast away the past as little more than an ugly memory with anticipation of a more beautiful future. Some of the stories many of us grew up with support the notion that whence we came is less astounding than whither we go. Nature provides evidence that beauty is sometimes expressed in the preparation for transformation and not always restricted to its results. This month, we take a closer look at one cool cat (caterpillar), notorious for its spectacular beauty (before transformation). The Tropical Slug Caterpillar Moth (Dalceridae) is a small family of moths with 84 known species, most of which are found in tropical rainforests of the Neotropic ecozone. This family of moths, along with two similar taxa is collectively called slug moths or slug caterpillars describing their resemblance to slugs. Until recently, these insects did not get much exposure beyond the likes of National Geographic, and Scientific American publications. One species in particular, the Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa) has become a hit after amateur nature photographer Gerardo Aizpuru submitted his photographs to Project Noah, a citizen science community organization backed by National Geographic. The Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa) is native to the rainforests of Mexico. It’s most striking characteristic is the transparent, glasslike appearance of its body making it resemble a jewel. It is not the only species in the family 44

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Jewel Catepillar Moth

Spun Glass Slug

with these characteristics, but it may be the most colorful. Little is known about the Jewel Caterpillar and some of our understanding is the result of studies of similar species within the family (Dalceridae). It is believed that Dalcerides ingenita is the only Dalceridae species native to the United States and studies of D. ingenita revealed that adults are active from April to September producing two broods, the first persisting until the end of June and the second from July to September.

that a Neotropic ecozone of tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests are needed to support this caterpillar and South Florida is a Neotropic ecozone with moist broadleaf forests. We know that this caterpillar feeds on mangrove and the Florida Everglades is the most extensive continuous system of mangroves in the world supporting red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle), black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) and white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa). There are certainly other factors to consider, but there is at least a basis for possibility.

Nothing was known about the chemistry or function of the distinctive gelatinous coating of Dalceridae until the late 1980s when scientists proposed that the coating may serve as a defense function. Staged encounters between dalcerid caterpillars and ants demonstrated that when ants attacked the caterpillars, the jelly-like coating would stick to the ants mandibles making the attack difficult, and in some cases, the ants antenna would get stuck in the coating. Scientists observed ants that had previously attacked the caterpillar actively avoided them in subsequent encounters. This strategy alone provides a significant reduction in the number of natural enemies the caterpillar must endure to reach adulthood. Coloration is a common defense mechanism for all caterpillars, Dalceridae are believed to change their color scheme with each growth period (instar) which just makes the caterpillar that much more exciting, although it makes identification in the field more difficult. Although the odds of seeing one of these fascinating caterpillars in Florida are slim, it may be worth a shot to try. We know

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If Dalceridae can’t be found in South Florida, The Limacodidae family, one of the other two taxa of slug moths that were mentioned earlier can be found. The spun glass slug moth (Isochaetes beutenmuelleri) ranges from New York to Florida and west to Colorado and Texas and it is a year-round resident here. The spun glass slug moth can be found on the underside of beech and various oak trees, keep in mind that these are stinging caterpillars, if you intend to look for them caution will need to be exercised. Adults will be active from June to August and there will be a much better chance of finding these anywhere in Florida than finding Dalceridae. Both the eggs and the caterpillar will have a flattened appearance. Eggs may be found in either clusters or singly, and will be transparent enough to watch the larva developing inside. The caterpillars have suckers instead of prologs and use a lubricant made of liquefied silk to slide their way to a food source. Cocoons are hardened and the adults emerge from a small round hatch after metamorphosis. It’s not too late in the year to see caterpillars, Enjoy! • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Seen At The Christmas

Dinner

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Wish Farms Attributes Growing

Decisions To Consumer Feedback

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ish Farms, Florida’s largest grower and shipper of strawberries and year-round supplier of blueberries, attributes some of this year’s growing decisions to consumer feedback. Wish Farms utilizes FreshQC™ How’s My Picking?™, a patented consumer feedback and food traceability system, to connect with the people who purchase and enjoy their fruit. Thousands of people from across the nation submit surveys telling about their experience, good or bad, and make suggestions to the company. One common theme in these responses has been a request for more organic product, so that’s exactly what Wish Farms granted. “The feedback we receive through our FreshQC™ How’s My Picking?™ program is invaluable to us,” said Amber Kosinsky, Director of Marketing at Wish Farms. “We want our consumers and fans to know that we are listening to their requests and that their needs influence our business decisions.” Florida strawberry season is underway and Wish Farms expects approximately 20 percent more organic strawberry production

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this year from last year, as well as becoming a much bigger player during this year’s Chilean blueberry season by more than doubling organic blueberry production. “In years prior, we’ve solely offered conventional berries during our Florida blueberry season, which starts in March,” said J.C. Clinard, V.P. of Grower Relations at Wish Farms. “Now with this increased consumer response for more organic product, we’ve made the decision to start offering organic berries, as well. “ All Wish Farms organic product is Certified Organic by the USDA. By soliciting consumer feedback, Wish Farms has found not only a way to connect with consumers and learn more about their needs, but also an important tool for accountability within the organization. For more information about Wish Farms and the FreshQC™ How’s My Picking?™ program, please our company website wishfarms.com or visit us on Facebook facebook.com/ wishfarms

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Specialty Meats Ducks, Capons, Fresh Ham, Rabbits, Quail, Fresh & Smoked Turkey Wings and Drumsticks, Beef and Pork Kidneys, Hog Heads, Hog Maws, Pork Skin, Tripe & Honeycomb Tripe, and Alligator Meat. • We Accept TECO Payments • Western Union Money Orders 49¢ each

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Cane Grinding By Calli Jo Parker

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lant City is known as the Winter Strawberry Capital of the World. However our state is known for its high variety of crops that go far beyond the growth of the Strawberry. Surprisingly enough, among the main money making crops that are grown in Florida are sugar, lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and potatoes, along with the well-known crops such as oranges, lemons, limes, and other citrus crops. Many of these we see on a daily basis growing in the fields, however one that is particularly shy around these parts is the growth of sugar cane.

Growing sugar cane is seldom found in our county, however for Hank and Pat Varnum it is an annual celebration. Each December the Varnum family gathers together to turn their sugar cane into syrup. This is thick syrup that is made by evaporating the juices extracted from the sugar cane. They boil the juice in a massive cauldron for several hours, while skimming the surface of the juice throughout the process. The family works day and night to be certain that their syrup is the ideal sweet cane syrup, perfect for cooking and pancakes. Hank and Pat Varnum take it upon themselves to include their entire community in the syrup making process. The first Saturday of each December they invite their church, family, and friends to celebrate the harvest and join together in fellowship. It is a special day set aside for old friends to catch up and new ones to feel included. Along with pre-

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serving their agricultural roots, Hank and Pat use this as a part of their ministry. Pat begins cooking breakfast for their guests at four in the morning, Hank sets up picnic tables by the barn, both preparing the perfect atmosphere for people to visit. They ask the blessing before eating breakfast and thank God for the abundant crop He has provided and the wonderful friends and fellowship. Young and old alike enjoy the day. Children run around playing games, while the adults sit around telling stories. In our busy society, this day is a step back in time to a simpler world, where no one is too busy to sit and visit. This Varnum family tradition is merely one example of the many taking place in our agricultural community. This industry is vital to our lives. It puts food on our tables and clothes on our backs, however we often forget how important this industry is to our personal psyche and the relationships we build and cherish. While Hank and Pat Varnum choose to spend time with their loved ones over a bottle of cane syrup early on a December Saturday morning, it doesn’t take a crop production to achieve this goal. The Varnum family encourages everyone to set aside at least one day a year simply to be thankful for the land and loved ones God has so generously given. •

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

PREPARATION For crust: Combine 3/4 cup chopped pecans, whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, sugar and salt in a food processor. Pulse ingredients together until the nuts are finely ground. Add the cold butter to the pecan mixture and pulse until well incorporated. In a small mixing bowl, whisk egg, oil, vanilla and almond extract together. With the motor running on the food processor, add the egg mixture to the pecan mixture. Continue to pulse mixture until it begins to clump, 30 to 45 seconds. Measure out 1/2 cup of the mixture and combine in a bowl with the remaining 1/4 cup of chopped pecans, and set it aside to be used for the topping. Set aside.

Florida Berry Snack Bars INGREDIENTS CRUST 1 cup pecans, chopped, separated 3/4 cup natural whole-wheat pastry flour 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup natural sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 1 large egg 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 teaspoon natural vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon natural almond extract pan-release cooking spray FRUIT FILLING 3 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and diced 2 1/2 cups fresh blueberries

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with pan-release cooking spray. Combine 2 cups strawberries, 2 cups blueberries, orange juice, sugar and cornstarch in a large saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture has thickened (about 4 to 5 minutes). Stir in the remaining fresh fruit and add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Transfer the crust mixture to the sprayed baking dish. Spread evenly and press firmly into the bottom to form the crust. Evenly spread the fruit filling over the crust. Sprinkle the top of the fruit filling with the reserved topping mixture. Bake the bars for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F and bake until the crust and topping are lightly brown, 25 to 30 minutes more. Let the bars cool completely before cutting. Serve with fresh fruit.

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Strawberry-Yogurt Freezer Pops INGREDIENTS 1 pound fresh strawberries, hulled 1/4 cup natural sugar 1 lemon, juiced 2 cups low-fat vanilla yogurt 10 freezer pop molds and sticks

PREPARATION In a blender or food processor add strawberries, sugar and lemon juice. Purée ingredients until the sugar is dissolved. Pour mixture into a small pitcher or container. Fill each freezer pop mold by alternating layers of the strawberry mixture and yogurt. Insert the handle or stick into each freezer pop and freeze for at least 5 hours. To serve freezer pops, run warm water over the outside of the molds until the pops come out easily. Chef’s Tip: If you don’t have plastic freeze pop *C molds, you can use small paper cups. Cover tops of the cups with plastic wrap once you have added your ingredients and poke the sticks through the plastic to keep them standing upright while in the freezer. Yield: 10 servings

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4892 Sun City Center Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573

P O Drawer L Plant City, FL 33564

12880 E US Highway 92 Dover, FL 33527

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UF/IFAS

STUDY SHOWS

INVASIVE LEAF

BEETLE COULD THREATEN COLE CROPS IN COLD CLIMATES By Tom Nordlie

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ulf Coast farmers know that the invasive yellowmargined leaf beetle loves cooler temperatures, devouring leaves on turnips and other cole crops in fall and winter; now, a University of Florida study suggests the beetle’s cold tolerance could help it spread much further north than its current range. Researchers report in the December 2012 issue of Annals of the Entomological Society of America that the beetle’s eggs can withstand prolonged periods at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. That means the insect might survive in Kansas, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky and Virginia, says entomologist Ron Cave, an associate professor with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Native to southern South America, the beetle was first reported in the United States in

1945 and is now found in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Larvae and adults feed on the leaves of many cole crops, with turnips being the preferred host. The pest also poses a threat to mustard, radish, collard, watercress, bok choy and napa cabbage. In conventional production, the beetle is susceptible to foliar insecticides but that’s no help to organic farmers, Cave said. So UF/IFAS researchers are investigating several biocontrol options, including the spined soldier bug, green lacewing, trap crops and fungi that attack the beetle’s larvae. In the meantime, Cave advises all cole crop producers to scout their fields thoroughly in early fall, so that infestations can be addressed before the beetles become too numerous.

FLORIDA AGRICULTURE LITERACY DAY SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013

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he 10th annual Florida Agriculture Literacy Day is scheduled for Tuesday April 30, 2013, and the children’s book being developed for the event will commemorate the 500th year anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s discovery of Florida. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and Florida Agriculture in the Classroom, invite farmers, growers, ranchers, FFA teachers and students and agriculture industry representatives to read in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms around the state as part of the event. The book being developed is about Florida history and the role agriculture has played in it. The book and materials provided to volunteer readers for free thanks to the funding Florida Agriculture in the Classroom receives

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from sales of the agriculture specialty license plate nicknamed the ’Ag Tag.’ Teachers and agriculture industry representatives interested in participating, please check Florida Agriculture in the Classroom’s website, www.agtag.org in early 2013 to register. Florida Agriculture in the Classroom is a non-profit organization that educates Florida teachers and students about where their food, fiber and fuel come from using lessons, materials, grant programs and other projects. To buy an Ag Tag online, please visit https://www.eztagfl.com/ag.htm For more information contact FAITC’s Marketing Program Manager Holiday Noel Hogg at 352-846-1391 or email hgriffin@ufl.edu

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place in this competition went to Clay Joyner from the Elton Hinton FFA Chapter at Strawberry Crest High School. The only contest that is specified to middle school chapters alone is the Opening and Closing Ceremonies competition. Tomlin Middle School added another first place to their memoir with team members consisting of Parker Killebrew, Lauren Madera, Shelby Womble, Gresham Stephens, Caroline Brummer, Mackenzie Steele, and Marybeth Stewart. The last CDE announced was the Parliamentary Procedure winners for both middle school and high school. In the middle school competition Tomlin took one more first place ribbon, the team members were Taylor Harrell, Anthony Tripi, Arie Fry, Matthew DelCastillo, Lauren Madera, and Marybeth Stewart. Durant High School took first place in the Parliamentary Procedure competition, team members consisted of Chair Kelsey Newsome, Alyssa Shepherd, Mariah Kunze, Mylie Feaster, Haley Smith, Morgan Belsely, and Kaitlyn Taylor.

FFA

Sub-District News By Calli Jo Parker

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n December 13, FFA Chapters from all over Hillsborough County gathered together at the Hillsborough Community College’s Trinkle Building to compete in various Career Development Events. These FFA members study and practice for their contests months prior to Sub-Districts. Teams began arriving at 8:15 in the morning, signing up for their contests and getting checked for their official dress. Each student competing must be in the proper blue corduroy FFA jacket and appropriate black bottoms. The 2011 Sub-District Chair, Ashley Modrow, worked tirelessly along with CoChair, Mylie Feaster, to keep the competition running at a steady pace. Modrow’s advisor, Susan Mayo, along with Pam Walden, got the judges in order and the contest underway. Throughout the course of the morning FFA members demonstrated their agricultural knowledge and public speaking skills to a panel of judges handpicked for the job. Nearly 10 different contests between both middle school and high school FFA members took place all at once. The Trinkle Building was buzzing with nervous jitters and students exemplifying their talents. After four hours of competition, the scores were tabulated and the winners were announced. In the Prepared Public Speaking Competition, the middle school winner was Paige Gran from Barrington Middle. In the high school contest the winner was SubDistrict Co-Chair Mylie Feaster from Durant High School. The first place winner in the Tractor Driving competition was Tyler Leonard from Lennard High School. The Extemporaneous Public Speaking contest is both a high school and middle school competition. The first place winner in the middle school competition was Shelby Womble from Tomlin Middle School. Taking first in the high school competition was Anna Conrad from the Elton Hinton FFA Chapter at Strawberry Crest High School. The FFA Creed Public Speaking Contest is recently a 9th grade and middle school competition. First W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

At the end of the announcements, the Chapter delegates gathered to nominate and elect this year’s Sub-District Chair and Co-Chair. After a heartfelt speech the delegates voted and Adrian Dyer was elected the Sub-District Chair. The floor opened one more time for nominations of the 2012 Sub-District Co-Chair. Two excellent speeches were given by nominees Alyssa Shepherd and Levi Mayo. The delegates voted and Alyssa Shepherd was named the Sub-District Co-Chair. Dyer and Shepherd are both dedicated and talented individuals who will do an incredible job serving our Sub-District this year. This competition is the first of three throughout the FFA school year. Those who have won Sub-Districts will compete at the District competition in January, then go on to compete at the State FFA Convention. Congratulations to all of the winners and good luck in your future competitions. •

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the University of Miami and graduate school, a hoped for interim step before med school. “While in south Florida, I needed income and became an outside sales rep for Color Wheel.” Things changed for Ritzheimer when he met his wife Laura through a mutual friend. They married in 2000 and moved to Zephyrhills. “I became a sales rep for Scott Paint Company and Laura, who had changed her major at Florida Atlantic University from music to elementary education, joined the faculty of Socrum Elementary in Lakeland as a second grade teacher. Laura is the most important factor in my life. Her support and motivation for whatever I do is invaluable.” Alex also enrolled in grad school at the University of South Florida, majoring in applied anthropology. In 2002, Alex and Laura moved to Dade City where their new home included 10-acres of land, giving them the opportunity to raise cattle. A year later, he decided to get into the contracting business and formed his own painting/waterproofing company. “I needed the flexibility to pursue my degree and our agricultural interests and forming my own company gave me that,” he said. He did just that and now raises beef cattle on three parcels of land, including 38-acres in Hillsborough County. While pursuing his graduate degree, he became involved with Farm Bureau, first in Pasco County and later in Hillsborough. Now retired Farm Bureau “Fieldman” Ray Crawford was instrumental in getting Ritzheimer into the Farm Bureau family and his cattle activities in Hillsborough plus his graduate school work put him in touch with Jemy Hinton, a member of the Farm Bureau Board in that county.

NEW MEMBER BRINGS DIVERSE EDUCATION INTEREST TO FARM BUREAU BOARD

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Alex Ritzheimer By Jim Frankowiak

“I was troubled by the negative media coverage of agriculture I was seeing on a consistent basis,” said Ritzheimer. “That became the focus of my thesis and in doing so also led me to many Farm Bureau members in Hillsborough County. I found them cordial and welcoming.” Hinton and her board colleagues felt the same about Alex and he was invited to join the board. His thesis is aptly entitled, “Agriculture and Tampa Bay News: How do Local News Media Frame Agribusiness?” He approaches the subject from an applied anthropological perspective, reflecting how local media frame coverage of agribusiness

lex Ritzheimer is a new member of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors. You might wonder what the owner of a successful painting and waterproofing company is doing sitting on the board of an important, local agricultural organization with statewide and national ties. The answer is both interesting and surprising.

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In the meantime, the Ritzheimer’s have expanded their land holdings and now own 100-acres in DeKalb County, Alabama where they plan to retire. “Most of the land is in long leaf pine now,” said Alex. “Once cut in 10-15 years, we plan to convert that land to pasture and raise grass fed beef.” He also has plans for pursuing his doctorate and possibly teaching at the junior college level.

A Lakeland native with two brothers, Ritzheimer’s agricultural pedigree can be traced back to his mother’s family, sharecroppers from Cash, Arkansas, who moved to St. Louis for jobs making various ammunition for U.S. forces in World War II. They next moved on to Lakeland where Alex was born and began his education.

“I want to do whatever I can to help people appreciate agriculture and come to understand where their food comes from.” Since he began to raise his own cattle and produce his own food Ritzheimer feels the best he has in years. “The overall experience is physically, mentally and spiritually rewarding,” he said.

“I was anxious to start work and earn money,” said Ritzheimer, whose first job was shoveling fertilizer at the Agrico facility in Plant City from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. “I left Lake Gibson High School and moved to San Diego to live with my older brother who was in the Navy there. I enjoyed restoring things aesthetically and got a job as a commercial painter.”

So while Alex owns and operates a successful painting and waterproofing company active throughout the Tampa Bay area, he is actively involved in agriculture and committed to helping to educate those not involved in the industry. “The people involved in agriculture – whether farmers or ranchers – are some of the most marginalized in the world. That’s wrong and I want to help correct that so their value to the world’s population is recognized and appreciated.”

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Welcome to the Farm Bureau Board Alex. •

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AVAILABLE

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J

oe Planz of Tampa, grew up living between Long Island, New York and upstate Pennsylvania. “I say that I went to school in Long Island but I lived in Pennsylvania,” Planz said. Growing up his jobs included milking cows and baling hay on his Uncle Ray’s cattle ranch. He enjoyed working on the farm as a kid, but after graduating high school he moved away to the city where he worked in the hospitality industry for over 35 years. “I was the national sales manager for the Tampa Convention and Visitor Bureau until I became one of the bureau cuts due to the economy,” Planz said. Even before Planz lost his job with convention and visitor bureau, he was thinking about getting back to his farming roots. Planz is a strong believer that God leads you in the direction that he wants for you. He believed it was God leading him back to his roots when Planz had a chance meeting with a woman who ran a dairy farm down the road from him. The woman’s niece and his son were in the same class at school. He found out that she needed help on her dairy farm. “I told her that I knew how to milk cows and I could give her a hand now and then,” Planz said. “I ended up helping her just about every day.” He loved getting back on the farm and he told the women he was thinking about getting back into cattle farming. “She said if I continued to help her milk the cows, I could have two of her pastures for my beef cows,” Planz said. Providence Cattle Company was born. A hydroponic farmer approached Planz about raising grass-fed steers for one of his customers who was very health conscious. “I was hesitant, but my wife convinced me that we could do it,” Planz said. “We researched it and realized it would take a lot of work but we could do it.” In an ironic twist, this is how Planz grew up on his uncle’s ranch. They harvested grass-fed beef each year. “We did not know there was such a movement gaining strength for beef that was naturally raised and harvested,” Planz said. People are becoming more aware about the food they eat. Antibiotics, anti-parasitic drugs, and hormones are just some of the chemicals found in store-bought beef. 64

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There are numerous health benefits to eating grass-fed beef. Grass-fed meat is low in “bad” fat and it gives you two to six times more of “good fat” or Omega-3 fatty acids, which play a vital role in every cell and system in your body. The meat and milk from grassfed ruminants are the richest known source of another type of good fat called “conjugated linoleic acid” or CLA. According to americanwww.americangrassfedbeef.com), “In a Finnish study, grassfedbeef.com (w women who had the highest levels of CLA in their diet, had 60 percent lower risk of breast cancer than those with the lowest levels of CLA.” In addition to being higher in Omega-3 and CLA, grassfed beef has a higher level of vitamin E which is linked to lower risk of heart disease and cancer. Most Americans are deficient in vitamin E. Providence Cattle Company is a small family business and each member contributes to the company success. “We have found that there are so many businesses like ours out there and that’s why we try to support local family owned businesses whenever possible,” Planz said. “Support your local community and friends and you will be successful and happy.” The majority of their customers are small independently owned restaurants, health food stores and food co-op buying groups. They don’t do much advertising other than a small brochure about their company. They get their business from word of mouth. “We feel that God has brought our family the many blessings that we have, and has guided us along our path,” Planz said. On every product, they print “AMDG”, which stands for the Jesuit creed, “Ad Marjorem Dei Gloriam” which translates to “For the Greater Glory of God.” For more information on Providence Cattle Company, you can visit them on the web at www.providencecattle.com or call them at 813610-0020.

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No Groaning Allowed by Ginny Mink hen the word “history” is mentioned, most people groan. It seems to have such a negative connotation, the whole “old school” concept, the granny with a cane telling the same story over and over again is conjured up in one’s mind. How many times can we hear about walking to school up hill both

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ways? Well, what if the word, agricultural, is added, as in, the agricultural history of the Florida State Fair and the Florida Strawberry Festival? Would that spark a little interest? We certainly hope so since that’s what this article is about! Article photos courtesy of the Florida State Fair and the Plant City Photo Archive.

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Clean Milk display - 1933

Boy’s 4-H Club We’ve just begun 2013, but the Florida State Fair, at that time called the South Florida Fair, got its beginnings in 1904, that’s 26 years before the Florida Strawberry Festival! Let’s back up 20 years or so though, just to get a feel for old Florida. There were two Henry’s in the 1880s, who massively impacted this state, Henry B. Plant (the railroad man from whom Plant City gets its name) and Henry Flagler. Both these gentleman competed in the building of hotels as they set out to redefine Florida. In fact, Plant built the Tampa Bay Hotel (which is now part of the University of Tampa campus) and that’s where the first South Florida Fair was held. On November 15, 1904, the first South Florida Fair debuted and Governor William S. Jennings presided over the grand event. This began the longstanding Governor’s Luncheon tradition, it also initiated the first floral parade, which ultimately developed into the Gasparilla Parade we know today. As time progressed, permanent structures were added to the Tampa Bay Hotel in order to house all the exhibitions, these structures included stock stalls. Unfortunately, as times go, there were feasts and famines. Some years all the buildings were jam-packed, other years, many were empty. Somehow though, the South Florida Fair managed to prosper in the booms and survive in the busts.

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By 1932, Jacksonville’s Florida State Fair fell apart, it had been pulverized by the rough economic times and thusly the Tampa fair’s supporters scooped up that name. In 1934, the Tampa area held its first Florida State Fair. Historically this fair has attracted hundreds of thousands of visitors and locals. Some came to enjoy and others to participate but the point is, they came and so by 1975 the Florida Legislature named Tampa’s annual event the official Florida State Fair. Nineteen seventy-seven marked the first year on the 325 acre fairgrounds we are familiar with today.

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1949 - Swine 1940 - Brahman Cows in barn While these previous paragraphs delineate the overall history of the Florida State Fair, we found it necessary to speak with Vina Jean Banks, the Director of Agribusiness for the Florida State Fair Authority, to get the agricultural aspect of its saga. She says, “The agricultural part of a fair was the foundational part, because people came and showed their animals, their cooking abilities, their sewing and canning, because without agriculture you just have carnivals with games and rides.” This is an interesting perspective, essentially carnivals are there to take your money while fairs allow you to make some (or at least get a ribbon). Vina Jean adds, “We just continue on with all our Ag programs, they kind of go in cycles. We have a steady number of kids that participate each year from throughout the state, all the way from the panhandle to Miami and South Florida.” In fact, she shared with us the number of youth participants from last year: “Youth beef, 364; youth dairy, 185; youth goat, 252; youth rabbit, 389; youth Boer goat, 14; youth cavy, 16; youth poultry, 609; pre-junior poultry, 18; and youth llama, 36.” In case you’re wondering, and don’t feel like finding a calculator, that makes 1883 youth entries in last year’s Florida State Fair! While this was supposed to be an article focused solely on the historical aspects of the Florida State Fair and the Florida Strawberry Festival, Vina Jean couldn’t help but share her enthusiasm about the new agricultural additions the 2013 Fair will boast. So, here’s what she had to say, “There are a few new things this year, we have the Florida Cattle Ranching: Five Centuries of Tradition exhibit; it will have its permanent home here. We are redoing what used to be the Forestry Learning Center. It’s going to have a new look this year and it’s going to be very exciting. We will be hosting the National Cattlemen’s Beef Associations (NCBA) youth livestock judging competition on Friday, February 8. It’s a great opportunity for our youth in Florida to join youth from across the country in this livestock judging contest.” In addition, they will be debuting the Florida Learning Garden, which is part of a partnership with Keep Tampa Bay Beautiful and the Florida Agriculture: 500 Years in the Making exhibit will make its first appearance in the Ag Hall of Fame. This year’s Florida State Fair promises to be a new and exciting experience for all interested in the agricultural aspects of its existence. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

1949 Hams

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Florida Strawberry Festival - 1955

Florida Strawberry Festival - 1955

Though the Florida State Fair is a larger event than the Florida Strawberry Festival, that doesn’t necessarily mean it has any deeper agricultural roots and as Plant City natives would probably agree, that concept is hardly feasible. Truth be told, the Florida Strawberry Festival’s agricultural history is significantly more documented than the state fair’s thanks in huge part to Jim Jeffries, a long time festival activist and board member. He tells us, “I’m pretty well aware from 1970 on what agricultural events happened. Earlier on there’s a thread of events that occurred. There was, and continues to be, exhibits by various FFA and 4H groups. They have, in some form, been held since the beginning. There have been agricultural exhibits; they feature strawberries of course, but not only strawberries, all areas of agriculture. There’s been a representative of the strawberry industry and other agricultural commodities since the beginning of the festival.”

the Marshall Watkins 4H group was named in that program. Unbeknownst to many of us, the Strawberry Festival took a five year hiatus, it was not conducted from 1942-1946! Hopefully you’re enjoying this trivia; here’s one that is quite amusing, the 1955-57 programs included a Frog Jumping Contest! By 1964, there was a pet show and a dog show. In 1970 the first strawberry recipe cook off took place and the next year a horse show was added. Jim adds, “What’s not clear to me is what animals were shown in the beginning. The livestock shows started in 1972 and they continue to exist. The first annual Steer Show and Sale was initiated and Randy Langford exhibited the first Grand Champion Steer. The steer sale was initiated after a group of 23 steers, belonging to Hillsborough County FFA and 4H members, were rejected due to a lack of ‘fat content’ at the Florida State Fair entry.” The longstanding Flower Show was replaced in 1973 by the Horticulture Show and the steer show added a carcass contest. East Bay FFA provided a petting zoo under the grand stand for the next two years and in 1976 strawberry eating, picking and growing competitions were held. East Bay’s petting zoo moved to a tent that year. The dairy and poultry shows began in 1978 and in 1980 the Festival added its first milking contest as part of the dairy show. That was also the first year of the Youth Horticulture Show and Sale. Jim says, “The Youth Horticulture Show and Sale was initiated to strengthen ties between the students interested in horticulture and the grow ers. It has become very successful.” We have arrived now, at 1981 when the first Cow Chip Tossing Contest was listed and the Rabbit Show was added. The Youth Swine Show and Sale, as well as the Youth Dairy Cattle Judging contest began a year later. Several years passed before anything new was noted in the programs, but 1988 proved to be the advent of the Youth Beef Breed and Commercial Heifer Show. Unfortunately, that was discontinued in 1989 due to a lack of interest. However, this discontinuation only lasted a year because it was reinstituted in 1990

Jim is quite humble about his Festival knowledge, especially since he was able to provide us with a detailed and bullet-pointed list of the agricultural events beginning in 1930. He says, “Reference was made in the first program to the ‘Strawberry Packing’ contest and to the Plant City Flower Show. The Plant City Flower Show was sponsored by the Women’s Club and the Home Demonstration Clubs. Perhaps not truly considered an agricultural event, the show became the most consistently held event at the festival other than the Queen Contest.” Jim spent a good deal of time researching this information and actually utilized the original programs from the festival that he located through the East Hillsborough Historical Society. According to Jim, the 1931 program included agricultural community exhibits that allowed communities to exhibit in one of four groups: strawberries, citrus fruits, canned products and vegetables. The first specific reference to FFA participation occurred in the 1936 program and they were probably part of the community exhibits previously delineated. By 1939, the FFA must have made a significant impact on the Festival because it received its own category of events. This was also the first year that a 4H exhibit was mentioned, 70

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and has grown ever since. Jim adds, “Like the initial Steer Show, the Beef Breeds Show began with 23 animals and has grown to well over 100.” Robinson’s Racing Pigs began that year and is still going strong.

Florida Strawberry Festival - 1959 Florida Strawberry Festival - 1964

The Youth Livestock Judging Contest started in 1993 and in 1996 the first annual Lamb Show began. Tom Umiker’s Barnyard Petting Zoo came to fruition in 1998, but the next year it became the Ag-Ventures Farm Tours and remains a popular attraction. Phillips Exotic Petting Zoo and the Youth Livestock Judging contest were added that year but the Organic Olympics (cow chip tossing, hog calling and rooster crowing contests) were held for the last time. The new millennium created the Youth Livestock Scholarship Program and income raised from the rental of vendor signs in the Livestock Show Arena are used to fund that program. Undoubtedly we are all better educated on the agricultural history of those winter festivities we hold so dear, the Florida State Fair and the Florida Strawberry Festival. If you desire to learn more, please feel free to visit the following websites: www.floridastatefair.com and www.flstrawberryfestival.com or you can call the Florida State Fair offices at (813) 621-7821 or the Florida Strawberry Festival offices at (813) 752-9194.

Florida Strawberry Festival - 1974 Rick Lott Florida Strawberry Festival - 1964

Florida Strawberry Festival - 1984 Todd Bailey

Florida Strawberry Festival - 1978

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Make Jewel Candy By Sean Green

Materials: Cooking Pot Non-stick cooking spray a candy thermometer Pyrex measuring cup Hard Candy Molds Ingredients: Liquid Food Coloring Candy Flavoring Oils Light Corn Syrup Granulated White Sugar Water

PREP FIRST: Producing and consuming candy has been a natural activity for human beings for thousands of years, in fact, the origins of candy represent a key technology in the history of agriculture. Today candy is made from processed sugar, and is valued as a recreational food, its history, however, may surprise you. Ancient civilizations coated fruits and flowers with honey to preserve them. Because of its high sugar concentration, and its natural ability to absorb moisture, bacteria were unable to survive thus beginning one of the earliest methods of food preservation. In addition to the benefit of food preservation, early civilizations used candy as a form of medicine. Digestive problems were common in the Middle Ages because the food consumed was rarely fresh. Candies made from spices and sugar adorned the tables of only the wealthiest to calm the digestive system and sooth the throat. North American colonists learned that Native Americans had been tapping trees for sap and boiling the sap into maple syrup and maple sugar for hundreds of years, the technology shared by the Native Americans soon became a colonial staple food. By the 17th century, boiled sugar candies (hard candies) became all the rage in England and the American colonies and by the mid 1800’s over 400 factories in the United States were producing candy.

Calibrate your candy thermometer. Bring a pot of water to a boil (212 °F at sea level). When the water is boiling, make note of the temperature difference between the water you are boiling and 212 °F. If your thermometer reads 220°F when the water boils, there is a difference of (+8°F) so you should add 8°F to the recipes target temperature Spray the molds with the non-stick cooking spray (thin coat without letting it puddle) Cover the work area with aluminum foil near the pot – (1 sheet for candy molds, 1 sheet for measuring cup.) Stir together everything except the flavoring oil, mix the color in well. Clip the candy thermometer to the pot, making sure it does not touch the bottom. Turn the burner on high (do not leave unattended). Let the sugar boil to target temperature As Soon as the mixture reaches the target temperature: • Remove the thermometer • Pour the mixture into the measuring cup Don’t panic, you have time, the mixture actually pours better after a minute or two of cooling. Add flavoring oil, (stir quickly but carefully)

This month’s activity was intended to supplement the article on the Jewel Caterpillar, but no caterpillar candy molds could be found. Not all is lost, everything happens for a reason. Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and this is a great activity to make sweet jewels for that someone special. In addition to creating a beautiful treat, a little research will reveal some healthful ingredient options for your candies, for example; peppermint oil not only helps sooth an upset stomach, but is also effective for killing germs and mint has been linked to an increases in short-term memory, heart rate, and the amount of oxygen in the brain. Experiment with ingredients and color, children can participate with close supervision and will learn measurement skills along the way. 72

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The mixture will be very easy to pour for 5 or 6 minutes, more than 8 or 9 minutes, it’ll be too thick to pour. Try to avoid dripping between the mold pieces, it will make the candy difficult to separate. Let the candy cool for 10-15 minutes and remove it from the mold by flexing the mold. The candy will be oily from the non stick spray which will prevent them from sticking together. Confectioners’ sugar or powdered sugar can be used to coat the candy if desired. Store the candy in an airtight container such as a zip lock bag.

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LEOTA CAIN MILEY MAUERSBERG, formerly of Plant City, Florida and North Fort Myers, Florida, answered the calling of her Lord on November 29, 2012, in Easton, Maryland from stroke related complications.

EUGENE JOHNSON, 88 of Dover died December 8, 2012. Born February 14, 1924 in Opp, Alabama, he was the son of the late Homer Johnson and the late Ruth Hendrix Johnson. He was the husband of Audrey Haynes Johnson.

TIMOTHY CURTIS BALLARD, 57 of Dover died December 5, 2012, at his home. Born August 24, 1955 in Plant City, Florida, he was the son of the late Jesse Ballard and Georgia Butler Ballard. He was the husband of Cynthia Ballard.

DAVID RUDDELL "RUDY" WATSON, 61 of Plant City died December 17, 2012, at his home. He was the husband of Sandra Smith Watson. He was employed as a lineman and service technician for US Lec, and served two tours in Vietnam with the US Marines.

GUSTIN, RAYMOND E., 88, Lakeland, FL (formerly of Leonardsville, NY) passed away November 29,2012 at his home surrounded by his loving family. Gus (as he was known) spent his entire life in Leonardsville until he retired to Lakeland several years ago.

GREGORY STEPHEN LONG, 52 of Tampa and Plant City died December 6, 2012. Born March 12, 1960 in Plant City, to the late William Long and Murel Tindle Jones (Billie).

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ELIZABETH ALICE BORUFF, 68 of Lakeland died December 9, 2012, at her home. Born March 24, 1944 in Dover, Florida, she was the daughter of the late Claude Holder and the late Jelemma Peeples Holder.

JOAN ROWE ELLIS, 81 of Plant City passed on December 19, 2012 with her daughters Liz and Suzanne Ellis at her side. Joan was preceded in death by her husband Dr. John B. Ellis, and her son Stephen A. Ellis. She is survived by her sister,

Barbara Blanton, and an extended loving family. Joan was born on July 25, 1931 in Rome, Georgia and moved to Plant City at the age of 14. DORIS AILENE RANDALl, 81 of Dover, Florida died December 21, 2012. Born February 5, 1931 in Dover, Florida to the late Ola Butler and the late Irma Carr Butler. She was preceded in death by her husband Ralph Randall, Sr. and two sisters, Helen Smith and Betty Surrency.

Rogers P. Fisher, 77 of Plant City Died December 23, 2012. Mr. Fisher was born January 12, 1935 to the late Holloway Knight and Leomia Fisher.

JAMES MADISON PRINCE II, 59 of Plant City died December 25, 2012 he was born May 8, 1953 in Hendersonville NC.

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RESEARCHERS

PINPOINT

CULPRITS IN

Grapefruit DRUG INTERACTIONS

By Tom Nordlie

T

he quest to develop a grapefruit hybrid that will not interact with medication has taken a step forward, as researchers pinpoint compounds most responsible for the problem, a University of Florida citrus breeder says.

varieties of pummelo that have been shown to have low furanocoumarin content and can transmit the trait to their offspring.

The data were published in the December 2012 issue of the journal Xenobiotica.

In the current study, researchers investigated the effects of furanocoumarin compounds, testing each one to determine the amount required to slow the enzyme reaction by 50 percent. The results showed that a handful of furanocoumarins had the strongest effect.

Scientists have been aware of the so-called “grapefruit juice effect” since 1989. Compounds in the fruit called furanocoumarins inhibit the action of an enzyme that breaks down certain medications in the human digestive system.

More importantly, juice samples from 40 different hybrids and their parents were tested directly for their overall effect on enzyme activity, and one of the selected hybrids approved for impending release, known as UF 914, was among the samples with the lowest effect.

The phenomenon poses a health risk because it can produce unexpectedly high levels of these medications in a patient’s bloodstream. Doctors, pharmacists and prescription drug labels warn patients to avoid grapefruit and related products under these circumstances.

Gmitter said further study is needed to learn how low furanocoumarin levels must be to reduce the interaction risk.

The phenomenon is a disappointment for fans of the tart treat, but Fred Gmitter, a faculty member at UF’s Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred, is part of a team working to address the problem by developing a hybrid between grapefruit and selected

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Other members of the research team included David Greenblatt, Yanli Zhao, Michael Hanley and Jerold Harmatz of Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center in Boston; Chunxian Chen of the Lake Alfred center and Paul Cancalon of the Florida Department of Citrus in Lake Alfred. .•

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UF/IFAS

RESEARCHERS SAY

Florida Panther

EFFORT LIKELY SAVED BIG CATS FROM EXTINCTION By Mickie Anderson

An adult Florida panther perches in a tree, in this file photo supplied by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A study published in Journal of Animal Ecology shows that Florida’s population of the big cats was probably saved from extinction by the importation and raelease of eight female pumas from Texas, in 1995. Madan Oli, a population ecologist with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, has a long-term research interest in the Florida panther, which has been federally classified as endangered since 1967.

W

hen wildlife managers imported eight female Texas pumas in hopes they would mate with native Florida panthers, they knew they were taking a bit of a risk.

But a new University of Florida research study, published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology, suggests their gamble paid off. Without those pumas, UF researchers Madan Oli and recent UF doctoral graduate Jeff Hostetler found that the probability of the Florida panther population falling below 10 panthers by 2010 was nearly 71 percent. “We found that the Florida population would’ve declined, on average, by about 5 percent per year,” said Oli, a UF population ecology professor and Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty member. “And that’s essentially telling us there was a high chance that the population would’ve eventually gone extinct.” There were an estimated 20 to 25 panthers left in the state when the Texas female cats were brought to Florida in 1995. Officials believe the population has since grown about 4 percent per year, and their estimate now ranges from 100 to 160, said Dave Onorato, a panther expert with the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Florida Panther Project. Having a scientific study in hand that validates what conservation officials had believed would happen is helpful, Onorato said. “It shows that the genetic restoration effort was effective at averting the loss of the Florida panther,” he said. The Florida panther had been listed as an endangered species since 1967, and although it was named the official state animal by 1982, it was in peril by the 1990s. The cats suffered from numerous inbreedingrelated problems, including poor sperm quality and other reproductive abnormalities, kinked tails, heart defects and heavy parasite loads. 80

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When the Texas cats were brought to Florida, officials weren’t sure how they would fare or that the breeding effort would work, but with the success of the genetic restoration, Onorato said a similar effort could be initiated again in the future. For now, however, there is no specific timetable for such an effort. He said the cats continue to face threats from loss of habitat, cars and inbreeding. Although they sometimes roam far and wide, Florida panthers – the only puma population east of the Mississippi River — are primarily found in the Big Cypress National Preserve and Everglades ecosystem areas that include parts of Collier, Lee, Hendry, Monroe and MiamiDade counties. The recent UF study, which examined several decades’ worth of field data and genetic information about the panther, found that the robust survival of the Florida-Texas hybrid kittens played a large role in the panther population being reeled back from the brink of extinction. “I would say that at least in the short term, the outlook is good for the Florida panther,” said Hostetler, who worked on the project for more than four years as part of his doctoral studies. “But there are still a lot of threats to their survival that could be important in the long run.” The paper’s other author is Deborah Jansen of Big Cypress National Park. The research study was funded by the Florida Panther Research and Management Trust Fund (via sales of the Florida “Protect the Panther” license plate), National Park Service, the University of Florida and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.•

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Parkesdale Farms – Cheryl Meeks

Farm Bureau Insurance – Julie Colding and Megan Zaccaro 82

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Our Services Include: Cosmetic Crown and Bridge Dentures Xrays • Cleanings • Root Canals Whitening • Denture Repairs - while you wait • In-Office BOTOX Now Offering LASER PERIO SURGERY (A more effective way to treat gum disease)

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Open Fridays Most Insurances Accepted

WOODSIDE DENTAL Practicing in Plant City for Over 20 Years

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813.752.5554 704 N. Alexander St., Plant City, FL

Cleaning, Exam and Xray $ New Patients Only. Must present coupon

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WOODSIDE DENTAL Coupon Expires 2/15/13 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909

ANIMALS & NEEDS ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. (813) 752-2230. Call Don Ammerman. www.ammermans.com Swaps July 14, 2013 and December 1, 2013. CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 DOVE HUNTS Lithia area limited number of memberships still available. Call Fish Hawk Sporting Clays. 813-689-0490.

BUILDING SUPPLIES DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378 WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378

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USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722 SNAPPER PRO 50 Zero turn mower, 36" cut, kawasaki engine, 43 hrs. $3,250 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 SHAVER 5O STUMP GRINDER 3pt. lift. Excellent condition. $2,950 Call Alvie 813-8722

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14KT GOLD AMMOLITE RING Unique Multi-colored fossil gem with unique mounting. Size 8 $250 or best offer. Call 863-370-8891

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2009 SHADOW TRAILER STABLEMATE All Aluminum bumper pull! 2 horse slant, tack/dressing room, Torison ride axels w/ electric brakes. Floor mats, Single rear door (lockable), Drop feed windows, Led Lighting system, Please call for more information. $6,000 firm. Ask for Karen 813-759-6909

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INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In T he Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES NEW HOLLAND TC18 2001, 525 actual hours, 4X4. $4,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

TILL 4 X 8 SHEET 5/8-INCH THICK B-grade $22.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378

MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378 $145.00

info@inthefieldmagazine.com

RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 FOR LEASE 24 Acre Farm 5" Well Gulf City & Willis Road. Ruskin FL. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 FOR LEASE 15 acre for hay. State Road 70 & Vernon Road. Manatee County. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 MOUNTAIN HOME Located in Blairsville Georgia! Private home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, unfurnished basement, nice kitchen, sunroom, back deck for cooking out. Nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! MLS#212679, $180,000. 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. Call Jane Baer with Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829

TOP GRADE TANZANITE RING 18KT GOLD Top grade, 18kt. Beautiful piece of jewelry. 1.05kt round nice blue gem with channel side diamonds. Size 7-1/2 $1,100 Call 863-370-8891

JOBS KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722 KUBOTA M7500 72hp on 48 inch centers $5950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com JANUARY 2013

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In The Field Hillsborough edition  

agriculture magazine in Hillsborough County, FL

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