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®

Contents

VOL. 9 • ISSUE 4

Feature Story Our New Queen

P age 68 Cover photo by Stephanie Humphrey

2012 Queen’s Court

Kumquats

Page 10

Page 38

Tampa Bay’s

Growums

Fishing Report

Page 43

Page 14

USDA

Page 79

Queen of Hearts

Page 18

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Danny Aprile ..............................President Bill Burnett ..........................VicePresident Jemy Hinton ..............................Treasurer

DIRECTORS FOR 2012-2013

Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, James Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker, Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack, Ray Wood

Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813.685.9121

Strawberry Festival

Page 82

Rocking Chair Chatter

Dough Belden

Page 22

Page 90

Harvest Queen

Growums in Springhead

Page 24

Page 94

Calabaza Recipes

Page 26

Page 106

Twilight Market

Page 30 2013 Tractor Review

Page 34

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

I just returned from the Fresh From Florida Breakfast at the Florida State Fair. It is always a pleasure when those involved in the various facets of agriculture gather together as one big family. This year Governor Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater joined Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam in welcoming everyone to the breakfast, held on the opening day of the Florida State Fair. Those involved in agriculture are an amazing group of people. If you look up the word “agriculturist” in the dictionary, you will find a definition that reads something like, “the science, art, or practice of cultivating the soil, producing crops, and raising livestock and in varying degrees the preparation and marketing of the resulting products.” Agriculturists are so much more than that. They are a community of people that are truly passionate about what they do. This is a lifestyle, not a job. The rest of us couldn't survive without agriculturists. The food we eat, the clothes we wear and a multitude of things we use every single day are so readily available to us because someone with resilient determination, put their blood, sweat and tears into their work. When you sit down to your next meal, get dressed in the morning, drive your vehicle, among many, many other things, thank the farmer and rancher. They are the lifeblood of this great state and our nation. When you see FFA and 4H members with their projects, let them know you appreciate their hard work and congratulate them on a job well done. Check out next month’s issue. We will have coverage of the agriculture events from the Florida State Fair and possibly a recap of the newest fried creation available to fairgoers. It just depends on how adventurous I am feeling.

Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Calli Jo Parker CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Calli Jo Parker Lindsey English CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers ABC Pizza................................................................85 Ag Technologies......................................................29 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers .............................25 American Cancer Society.......................................24 Antioch Feed and Farm Supply............................73 Aquarius Water Refining.......................................80 Astin Strawberry Exchange........................60 & 85 B Powerful Promotions........................................105 Badcock....................................................................23 Bill’s Transmissions...............................................100 Bingham...................................................................46 Boots and Buckles ................................................104 Brandon Auto Services, Inc. ..................................85 Brandon Farms .......................................................81 Brandon Region Hospital......................................39 Brewington’s............................................................11 Broke & Poor..........................................................21 Brown’s Jewelers...................................................105 Buckeye Storage....................................................103 Cecil Breeding Farm...............................................48 Certis.............................................................16 & 78 Center State Bank.................................................83 CF Industries.......................................................108 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive ................................76

Index of Advertisers Crescent Jewelers ............................................................ 71 Dad’s Towing .................................................................107 Discount Metals...............................................................17 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................64 Driscoll’s............................................................................65 East Coast Ag Products...................................................97 Eshenbaugh Land Company..........................................81 Fancy Farms .......................................................................9 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................77 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................84 Farm Credit ......................................................................27 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fischbach Land Company..............................................63 Fishhawk Sporting Clays ................................................50 Florida Dept. of Agriculture............................................33 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................42 Forbes Road Produce ........................................................7 Fred’s Market ....................................................... 25 & 54 Gator Ford........................................................................65 Grove Equipment Service................................................49 Gulf Coast Tractor ........................................................112 Halfacre Construction Company...................................42 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply...................................3 & 93 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.....................................................107 Haught Funeral Home....................................................75 Helena Chemical-Tampa ................................................21 Higginbothum..................................................................31 Hillsboro State Bank.............................................23 & 52 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau ............................107 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................41 Home Protection Services ...............................................84 Hopewell Funeral Home ................................................92 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................62 Jane Baer Realty.............................................................110 Jarrett-Scott Ford................................................................2 Johnson’s Barbeque .......................................................103 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm ..............................................105 Ken’s Well Drilling & Pump Service, Inc.......................74 Key Plex ............................................................................45 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................74 Magnolia Hill...................................................................97 Malissa Crawford............................................................37 Mark Smith Excavating..................................................74 Martin Law Office.............................................................9 Meryman Environmental, Inc........................................11 Morrow Steel, Inc............................................................96 Mosaic...............................................................................17 Myers Cleaners.................................................................37 Parkesdale Market...........................................................13 Pathway BioLogic............................................................40 PC Awning .....................................................................105 Plant City Tire & Auto Service, Inc.............................107 Platinum Bank....................................................................5 Poppell Insurance.............................................................57 Railroad Credit Union.....................................................98 Savich & Lee Wholesale.......................................27 & 32 Seedway ............................................................................25 Shrimp & Co Express.....................................................66 Sister’s & Company.........................................................67 Southside Farm & Pet Supply........................................12 South Florida Baptist Hospital.....................................101 Stephanine Humphrey.....................................................15 Stingray Chevrolet .........................................................111 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................83 Tampa Bay Times..........................................................100 The Hay Depot................................................................81 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort........................7 & 10 Tip To Toe Day Spa & Gifts..........................................76 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith...............................................................103 Vertigro .............................................................................31 Walden Lake Car Wash ..................................................98 Walk In BINGO...............................................................95 Wells Memorial................................................................27 Willie’s ...............................................................................97 Wish Farms.......................................................................58 Woodside Dental..............................................................85 Your Family Jeweler......................................................105 Zaxby’s ...........................................................................109

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You Too, Can Be A Winner

Hey Readers, hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on that page you located the logo to:

InTheField速 Magazine P.O. Box 5377 Plant City, FL 33566-0042

Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner! Search for the logo below and enter now!

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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

IT’S FAIR TIME! Dear Readers: This is a great time for all of us and our families to attend two great Ag-related events. I hope you all enjoyed the Florida State Fair and plan to visit the Strawberry Festival February 28 – March 10. These annual events are not only great opportunities for families to have a good time, but each affords those of us in agriculture to help educate nonagriculture interests about our importance to the community. No Farmers, No Food focuses on our role in feeding not just the community, but the whole world. Additionally, we are an important economic factor in our communities, counties, states and nation. That’s today and tomorrow. Remember, those hard-working youngsters who compete at these events in various categories are the people who will be charged with feeding us all in the future. I am pleased to note that the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners will be recognizing the Strawberry Festival and various agricultural interests in a special proclamation it is issuing this month. This month also marks the annual Food Check-Out Week, an array of activities held throughout the state to remind Floridians that our farmers and ranchers produce an abundance of safe, nutritious foods and create the foundation of the quality of life we all enjoy. Here in Hillsborough County, we are once again

preparing and serving a special dinner for residents of Ronald McDonald House in Tampa. My thanks to each of the volunteers involved in this special activity. Let me also remind all Farm Bureau members that the Women’s Leadership Conference is set for March 1-3 at the Plantation Inn, Crystal River. If you plan to attend or want to learn more about this important meeting, please visit: www.hcfg.org. I would like to close by reminding those of you who are not yet members that Farm Bureau is an organization for any family – not just farmers and ranchers. We are a low cost, high value grass roots organization comprised of families across the country. Take a few minutes to visit our website: www.hcfb.org or call 813/685-9121. We would be pleased to have your family join us. Hope to see you at the Strawberry Festival.

Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

Board of Directors

Danny Aprile, President; Bill Burnett, Vice-President; Jemy Hinton Member-at-large; Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker,Jake Raburn, Alex Ritzheimer, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Ron Wetherington, Michelle Williamson, Will Womack and Ray Wood, Judi Whitson, Executive Director 8

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• The names of all the continents end with the letter they start with. • The oldest inhabited city is Damascus, Syria. • The people killed most often during bank robberies are the robbers. • Lady Peseshet of Ancient Egypt (2600-2100 BC) is the worldʼs first known female physician. • Adriaan van der Donck was the first and only lawyer in New York City in 1653. • It is strictly against the law in Bicknell, Indiana, for a man to leave his new bride alone and go riding with his pals on his wedding day. The penalty is a week in jail. • New Jersey," the Garden State," grows 150 types of fruits and vegetables. • The natural yellow color of butter comes mainly from beta-carotene found in the grass the cows graze on. • There are approximately 350 squirts in a gallon of milk. • More than 50 percent of the world's population is dependent upon rice for 80% of its diet. • In Costa Rica, 133 ant species, and 126 beetle species, were found in just one shade coffee tree. • Every year, North Dakota farmers and ranchers produce enough wheat to make 108 billion sandwiches. • Possums spread bovine tuberculosis to cattle.

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EVER BEEN SEA SICK? YOU’RE NOT ALONE.

Tara with Trout

by Captain Woody Gore WHAT

WHAT

IS

MOT ION SICKNESS?

Almost everyone is susceptible… at one time or another. If you’ve ever been sick to your stomach on a rocking boat or a bumpy airplane ride, you know the discomfort of motion sickness. Although it doesn’t cause longterm problems, motion sickness can make your life miserable. People can feel sick from the motion in cars, airplanes, trains, amusement park rides, or on boats or ships. Motion sickness is sometimes called airsickness or seasickness. Video games, flight simulators, and looking through a microscope also can cause motion sickness. In these cases, the eyes see motion, but the body does not sense it.

WHAT

ARE T HE SYMPT OMS OF MOT IONS

SICKNESS?

14

CAU SES MOT ION SICKNESS?

Motion sickness occurs when the inner ear, the eyes, and other areas of the body that detect motion send unexpected or conflicting messages to the brain. One part of your balance-sensing system (your inner ear, vision, and sensory nerves that help you keep your balance) may sense that your body is moving, while the other parts do not sense motion. For example, if you are in the cabin of a moving ship, your inner ear may sense the motion of big waves, but your eyes don’t see any movement. This leads to a conflict between the senses and results in motion sickness.

WHAT ARE MOT ION SICKNESS T REAT MENT S? The best way to treat motion sickness is to stop the motion. If you can’t stop the motion, sit or lie down in an area with the least motion. In an airplane, try to sit near the wings. On a ship, stay on the deck and look at the horizon. Or, if you are inside, move to the center of the ship.

Motion sickness may cause: • A general feeling of being un-well (malaise) • Nausea or vomiting, or both • Headache • Cold sweating, which means you sweat even though you’re not overheated • A pale appearance

You also can take prescription and nonprescription medicine to prevent or reduce symptoms of nausea and vomiting. Most medicines work best if taken before travel. The medicines work in different ways. Some are sedatives that minimize the effect of motion, others reduce nausea and vomiting.

Symptoms usually go away soon after the motion stops. Sometimes it can take a few days for symptoms to go away. You may become used to motion during extended trips, such as on a cruise. If that happens, your symptoms may subside. But when you are back on land, the lack of motion can cause symptoms to return for a short time.

The following medicines may help prevent symptoms of motion sickness: • Scopolamine (Transderm Scop) • Promethazine (Promethegan) •Antihistamines, including dimenhydrinate (such as Dramamine). Do not give your child antihistamines unless your child’s doctor has told you to. If the doctor tells you to give your child medicine, be

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2013

sure to follow the doctor’s advice on how to give it. People often try alternative methods of preventing motion sickness such as taking ginger or wearing acupressure bands. There is little scientific evidence that these methods work but there is no harm in giving them a try. The nice thing about fishing with Captain Woody Gore is you don’t have to worry about this problem because I’ve suffered with this problem since childhood and I don’t fish where I or my client’s will get sick. Folks wonder why I choose guiding as a profession. For me it’s only bad when I’m in rough offshore waters... that is why I fish mostly inshore, and only occasionally travel offshore on a calm day. Fortunately, I’m ok in planes and driving or in the passenger seat of cars, however amusement rides for me are out. Here’s what’s worked for me in recent years. Having tried all the others with no positive results and hearing for years about cinnamon and ginger, I found a couple of companies that produced products I was able to tolerate. They were: PIRAT ES’ GOLD CINNAMON-GINGER CANDY & PIRAT ES’ GOLD GINGER CANDY http:/ / ccbay.biz/ osCommerce/ catalog/ product_ info.php?cPath=26&products_id=31

Some further investigations revealed that cinnamon and ginger have been used for centuries as a natural remedy in the treatment of arthritis, sea sickness, nausea, taste stimulation, morning sickness and are W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


known for their aphrodisiac properties. These spices were so highly prized that fortunes were made and lost and empires were built around their import and export. Once more valuable than gold, these were two of the most profitable spices in the Dutch East India Company QU EASE EASE QU EASE EASE INHALER http:/ / soothing-scents.com/ index.php/

Essential oils which have been described as helpful for the relief of nausea include Peppermint, Ginger, and Spearmint. The four essential oils used in Quease Ease are Peppermint, Ginger, Spearmint, and Lavender. Ginger, spearmint, and peppermint are essential oils that have documented efficacy in reducing nausea and vomiting. Lavender is added as an anxiolytic and antispasmodic, both of which contribute to perception of nausea. Although there is no evidence for effectiveness of the collective combination of these essential oils, individual studies demonstrate efficacy for both inhalant and botanical forms of the essential oils. Both products have worked for me without any drowsy side effects. Now whenever I’m fortunate or perhaps unfortunate enough to get outside to fish deep water at least I have a couple products that seem to work for me, and I would recommend both.

“LET ’S GO FISHING” TAMPA B AY FISHING REPORT FEB RU ARY MARCH 2013 SNOOK: Fishing is one of those on then off again things in the cooler months and it also depends on the bait situation. They do seem to be making a strong recovery, but

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there is still no reason to open a season on them until we have some decent fishable numbers. The average size being caught is small, but if the season remains closed the larger fish will come. If you can get live baits you’re ahead of the game. Greenbacks off the flats usually run smaller during the cooler months, so downsize your circle hooks and leader. As temperatures drop, look for deep water canals, rivers, creeks with deep muddy-bottoms. REDFISH: The algaes die and the waters clear as cooler weather triggers good site fishing. Low tides and clear water make site fishing reds a shallow water anglers dream. We’re catching reds in mullet schools using cut and live bait and also artificial lures. Expect some exciting strikes when pitching soft plastics or top water’s around the mangroves on high in coming tides. Redfish are often more sporadic on their movement and patterns, so it’s sometimes hard to rate the health of the population. SPOTT ED SEA T ROU T: Incoming or outgoing tides and a top water lure produce awesome strikes on a calm early morning flat. The old standby, live shrimp under a popping cork, always results in fish. The trout population are strong and we have been landing some large trout. It really seems like there is a lot more trout around since the net ban. The 20 plus inch fish seem to be more plentiful than I can ever remember. Don’t forget to check out grass and rock bottoms with some artificial jerk baits. Many times you’d be surprised at the results.

is as hot as the offshore. However, you cannot keep any fish caught after October 31. Recreational Gag Grouper season is only open from July 1 through October 31. Lots of fish near shore and Tampa Bay, coming up with a few really nice ones, but they’ve got to go back. Some choice docks are also holding nice fish. The Skyway Bridge is also producing some good sized snapper and these fish are real fighters. COB IA: The cooler temps should push the fish into or near warm water run offs of local power plants. Be certain to adhere to the restricted areas. Don’t forget to check the shallow water beach edges adjacent to the runoffs they seems to hold some nice fish. Also check offshore for schools cruising south. SHEEPSHEAD: Sheepshead are found around bridges, oyster bars and deep water docks. Try using green mussels, fiddlers (if you can find them), small black rock crabs, shrimp or oysters and scrape the pilings to get them going. “Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

GROU PER AND SNAPPER: Offshore, with the tighter regulations, Grouper and Snapper fishing are very good. Going out and getting a lot of bottom fish action never seems to be a problem. The inshore grouper bite

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Plant City Photo Archives & History Center By Gil Gott Carnival Shows, bands, demonstrations with plants, flowers, and a variety of food, and of course fresh strawberries. By February 18, 1930, all the festival booths had been reserved. Announcements were made in the two local newspapers that nominations for festival queen were open and that any “maid” or “matron” (that is, single or married) who resides in East Hillsborough County was eligible. They could be nominated by clipping a form out of the newspaper, completing it, and submitting it. The last day to nominate someone for queen was Monday, February 24. Voting would continue into March, lasting about two weeks.

1930 - Charlotte Rosenberg

T

here are many stories about the Florida Strawberry Festival and its history over the years, but one of the most interesting parts of the festival has always been the crowning of the Queen. Nothing tops the stories of the Royalty – the Festival Queen – who becomes the Plant City community’s Queen of Hearts. Let us go back to the beginning...

It has been common, and even traditional, for agricultural societies to celebrate the fruit of their labors with a festival. As the strawberry grew in economic importance to East Hillsborough and, indeed, the greater Plant City area, it became only fitting that the strawberry have its own celebration. The Plant City Board of Trade, forerunner of the Chamber of Commerce, held a “Strawberry Day” as early as January 1, 1914. Residents were encouraged to promote Plant City’s crops and tourism by sending post cards to distant friends and relatives. At a meeting of the Plant City Lions Club, July 5, 1929, Albert Schneider, first and at that time current President and organizer of the Lions, suggested the members sponsor a festival that would involve Plant City and the surrounding communities. They accepted the idea and formed a committee to start planning. The City quickly got on board and City Manager John C. Dickerson was named General Manager of the emerging festival organization. The organization’s incorporating Charter was approved by the State of Florida and immediately, at a meeting at City Hall, the Strawberry Festival organization elected its officers and directors. The newly incorporated Strawberry Festival organization drew up plans for the inaugural Strawberry Festival, which would include the selection and crowning of a Festival Queen. The site ran north from Baker Street along the Seaboard Railroad tracks and Michigan Avenue. The dates chosen March 15, 1930. sponsored by the grand parade on grounds.

were Wednesday, March 12, 1930, through Saturday, The Festival Queen, to be selected through a contest Future Farmers of America, would be featured in the opening day and would be crowned at the festival

In addition to the parade and the queen contest, the festival group set plans for floats, vendors, a midway with rides, the Johnny J. Jones 18

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Ballot boxes for votes for the Strawberry Festival Queen were placed in stores about town to receive votes from the community. Each vote was one penny, and pennies for votes were placed in clearly marked envelopes. By February 24, the last day to nominate a candidate for Queen, there were 36 names submitted. Here are 34 of them. Minnie Lee Alderman Mrs. Charles Daniels Ewana Glaros Mabel Hilsman Mrs. Harry Lomison Stella Moody Ruby Pratt Helen Simmons Edna Smith Dorothy Sutton Irvine Wilder Viola Yates

Elizabeth Alsobrook Kathryn Dudley Annie Ruth Harvey Mrs. Edgar Hull Madie Lowry Louise Nettles Charlotte Rosenberg Nettie Simmons Leola Sweat Opal Clair Thomas Hester White

Mrs.Earl Barker Mrs. R. M. Fletcher Sarah Henderson Mrs. J. Edgar Knight, Jr. Alice Maxey Anna Mae Nettles Mamie Sapp Alice Sly Margaret Strickland Hazel Wiggins Daisy Woodall

The balloting for Festival Queen began in earnest Tuesday, February 25. Each paper, the Plant City Enterprise, and the Courier, would print the ten leading candidates on subsequent publication dates. The highest vote getter would be elected Festival Queen, the next five highest vote getters would make up the Court. It is reported that Nettie Simmons, a girl from Dover, was in the lead early, but was soon passed by Irvine Hopkins Wilder, of Midway. Irvine Wilder’s lead gave way to Charlotte Rosenberg. Charlotte Rosenberg’s vote totaled nearly 50,000 and she became the first Strawberry Festival Queen. Her court was comprised of the next five highest vote getters – Irvine Wilder, Nettie Simmons, Alice Sly, Kathryn Dudley, and Alice Maxey. On opening day, the first Strawberry Festival Queen and her Court led the parade of elaborately decorated floats, decorated cars, horse-drawn carriages, and marchers. The band struck up a march for the Queen and her Court as they promenaded to the throne. The platform was decorated with a red, white, and blue bunting background and an overdrape of blue material with a silver fringe. Potted palms and fern enhanced the throne in the center of the stage. Albert Schneider, Strawberry Festival President, introduced Mayor/Commissioner George A. Carey, who gave a brief speech before crowing the first Queen at 2:30 p.m., March 12, 1930. And ever since that time the queen and the members of her court and their assistants were the Royalty, and the queen was the community’s Queen of Hearts. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


There are a number of interesting stories about queens in later years and here are a few of them. The 1941 Strawberry Festival has another twist. A young lady named Jane Langford was “absolutely thrilled” when she was crowned by Catherine Fletcher (1940 Queen). The new Queen of Hearts captured the community and they loved her. Reportedly the Plant City newspaper, the Enterprise, led a campaign to get the state’s festivals involved with a State of Florida promotional booth at the September 1941 Miss America Pageant to be held at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Strawberry Queen Jane Langford, the Orange Queen, and the Watermelon Queen joined Miss Florida, Mitzi Strother, on an elaborate and beautiful float in the Miss America Parade. They won first prize and received national acclaim. Three months later the USA entered World War II. The Strawberry Festival was not held again until it was revived in 1948, and Jane Langford reigned as Strawberry Queen for seven years. In 1948 Jane, now married to Harrison Wall Covington, placed the crown on the head of Barbara Alley. Miss Virginia Young joined the Royalty as Queen in 1956, but before long she married Donald Beery and relinquished her crown to the Court’s First Maid, Mary Jane Jackson. The Plant City Jaycees then invited Mary Jane to participate in the Strawberry Days Festival in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, a national event which began in June of 1898. Mary Jane and her mother, Mildred Jackson, attended and received warm welcomes and Mary Jane was escorted by cadets from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Much to her surprise, Mary Jane Jackson, Plant City Strawberry Queen, was elected National Strawberry Queen at that festival in June 1956. The African American community in Plant City had not participated in the Queen Pageant until 1971 when the beautiful Marian Richardson entered the contest. In 1973 the demure Essie Cecille Dixon became the first African American to be elected to the Queen’s Court. Victoria Watkins (2011) is part of another story – that of sisters who became Strawberry Queen. Victoria’s older sister, Ashley Watkins, was crowned Queen in 2005, Erica Der served the community as Queen of Hearts in 2003 and her sister, Lauren Der, followed, being crowned Queen in 2009. That makes two grandmothers, a granddaughter, a mother and daughter, a National Strawberry Queen, and two sets of sisters. And there are more stories – but those are for another time. We hope you enjoy the Florida Strawberry Festival Queen Pageant, the wonderful festival, and the warm and friendly Plant City community.

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TRUE VALUES TURKEY CREEK 4-H BY GINNY MINK By Ginny Mink

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eople don’t seem to have a lot of respect for the South. There’s this assumption that intellect is lacking if the Southern drawl is apparent. While a true Southerner might sound a stitch challenged, there’s just something about that twang that strums the heartstrings. If you’re from South Florida or North Anywhere, there’s no doubt you noticed the distinct accent that can only be attributed to good ‘ole Plant City. You’re in luck if this brogue tickles your fancy because Kelli Messick embodies the Plant City dialect. She says, “I’m the youngest of the grandkids on my daddy’s side. My daddy lived in Sydney. I grew up from a long line of farmers. My grandma made her own butter and jams. She’d have homemade strawberry popsicles in the fridge. We grew up with watermelon eating contests, corn shuckin’s, and pea shellin’s. Kids don’t grow up with that anymore. My papa would grind his own sugar cane. Agriculture was just how it was for me. My nana would ring the chickens’ necks in the orange trees and we’d have fresh fried chicken. I don’t think our children know where the food comes from and how to appreciate that.” Indeed she is right, too many kids today are growing up with grocery store mentalities. She continues, “I think it instilled a lot of character in me, you learn to appreciate how much the farmers do for you. I remember goin’ to milk the cow with my nana and comin’ back to the house to strain the milk and drinkin’ raw cow’s milk. We grew up in a waste not, want not way.” Unfortunately we don’t live like that anymore, at least not on a whole. Think about the commercial that talks about how much money in food we throw away each year. You have to give Ziploc some credit for illuminating the $500 price tag on that waste, though chances are it’s an even greater loss. Sadly, everything is so easy to attain these days that our children are not exposed to the true value of things, especially food. Apparently Kelli wasn’t the only one to gain from her farm life, her husband, Greg has his own story. Kelli shares that Greg, “was born and raised in Plant City as well. Growing up Greg had cows, chickens, goats and swine. Everyday responsibilities included taking care of the animals. He learned at an early age to drive the tractor for the family business and he learned that hard work was the only option. He recalls he and his step-dad watching the temperatures on cold nights. When the temperature would get close to freezing they would go to the nursery and freeze-in. They would spray the plants with water to protect them from freezing. Staying up for all-nighters were common in the winter months. It was protect the business or go under.” This concept of hard work appears to be lost on the masses and thusly Kelli and Greg wanted to ensure that their children would not fall into that mentality.

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Kelli adds, “If someone doesn’t teach our children about agriculture they won’t grow up to appreciate it or want to get involved in it. Some children these days don’t understand what it takes to farm. We have three older children, 15, 13 and 12 and two younger children, 2 and 1. We wanted to teach our children showing swine, steer, poultry, rabbits and plants is not only hard work but it develops character within that child. It will also help them make better life decisions as well as develop leadership qualities they will carry with them throughout their lives. Our motto in our home is, nothing worth having is easy. If it was, everybody would do it!” This desire to instill character and an intrinsic drive towards hard work is what led Kelli and Greg to establish the Turkey Creek 4H Club. Kelli explains, “We started Turkey Creek 4H in August 2010 with two families, ours and one other family. So now we have about 30 members and the ages range from 6-18, mostly pre-teen and older kids. We don’t have a clover bud group. Our project groups are swine, steer, horticulture, poultry and rabbits. We meet at Lone Oak Baptist Church on Lone Oak Road in Plant City on the first Thursday of the month.” Thusly, anyone interested in joining can arrange to attend a meeting or get in touch with Kelli via email: turkeycreek4H@yahoo.com. As with all 4H clubs there is a focus on service projects so Kelli explains theirs. She says, “My son was the president last year and he started the adopt-a-road program on Sydney Washer Road. This year our group voted to help a couple of widows in the area clean up their yards and do light housework. We just kind of mow and pick up sticks, vacuum, mop and sweep if they need that. We call it the Widow Help Program.” Though their club is a relatively new one, they do have some claims to fame. “We won the hay bale decorating contest at the Hillsborough County Fair, it was a candy apple. That was so exciting! Right now is our busy time. We have some kids going to the state fair with their projects and some going to the Strawberry Festival with their projects and we’ve even got one going to the Osceola County Fair with her dairy cow. So we’ve got kids pretty much going everywhere. That’s exciting!” Before closing, Kelli wanted to make sure to share the names and positions of those in the Turkey Creek 4H leadership: Rachel Carter, President James Donnell, Vice President Reagan Messick, Secretary Landon Messick, Treasurer Naomi Donnell, Historian Roxanna Storms, Reporter Sarah Carter, Sergeant at Arms Rebekah Messick, Recreational Officer

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oming up as a youngster I was pretty active in sports. I loved sandlot football, baseball and basketball. In high school I managed to letter in track, and played a little football for the Plant City Planters. A few years back I hit the golf ball a little until I had a back operation and had to give it up. I learned to hit the golf ball pretty good. I was at a point in the game where I could almost hit the ball as far as I could throw the golf clubs. They say the word GOLF originally stood for: Gentlemen Only Ladies Forbidden. My neighbor, Mark Poppell, told me the story of Jim, one of his golfing buddies. He said Jim left work one Friday afternoon. It was payday, so instead of going home, he stayed out the entire weekend partying and playing golf with the boys and spending his entire paycheck. When he finally appeared home on Sunday night, the old fella was confronted by his angry wife and was verbally beat up for two hours about not coming home. Finally his wife stopped the nagging and said to him, “How would you like it if you didn’t see me for two or three days?” He replied, “That would be fine with me.” Monday went by and he didn’t see his wife. Tuesday and Wednesday came and went with the same results. But on Thursday, the swelling went down just enough where he could see her a little out of the corner of his right eye. A wife asked her husband, “Honey, if I died, would you remarry?” After giving it some thought he said, “I guess I would. You know we all need companionship.” “If I died and you remarried,” the wife asks, “would she live in this house?” He replied, “We’ve spent a lot of money getting this house just the way we want it. I’m not going to get rid of the house, so I guess she would.” “If I died and you re-married, and she lived in this house, would she sleep in our bed?” she asked.

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“Well, the bed is brand new, and it cost us $2,000.00. It will last a long time, so I guess she would.” “If I died and you re-married, and she lived in this house and slept in our bed, would she use my golf clubs?” “Oh, no,” the husband replies. “She’s left handed.” Some time back Forbes magazine ran a story of a Nike television commercial for hiking shoes that was shot in Kenya using Samburu tribesmen. The camera closes in on the one tribesman who speaks, in native Maa. As he speaks, the Nike slogan, ‘Just Do It’ appears on the bottom of the screen. An anthropologist at the University of Cincinnati, says the Kenyan is really saying, ‘I don’t want these. Give me big shoes.’ A spokes person for Nike said, “We thought nobody in America would know what he said.” Many cities such as Chicago have some pretty rough neighborhoods. The gangs are known to play basketball and baseball in their neighborhood streets. Confrontations are common with people passing by. There was one sweet old lady who would often do grocery shopping for the elderly in her church. On one hot summer day one of the women asked her to pick up a few things and bring them to her in a dangerous part of Chicago. The sweet old lady had second thoughts, but felt she could not say no, even though she was afraid of driving in that part of the city where shoot-outs and other drug violence was a regular occurrence. The woman went to the store and picked up her groceries and proceeded to the ladies house. As she entered her neighborhood she noticed a bunch of young hoodlums on just about every street corner. Even though she had no air conditioning in the car, she rolled up all of the windows in the car tightly as a safety precaution when she left the grocery store. She drove past a bunch of hoodlums and all of a sudden she heard a loud “POP” and felt a jolt to the back of her head. She reached to feel the back of her head and came back with a wet oozing mess that she was sure was part of brain. Knowing that she had been shot, the woman turned W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


around and headed straight to the hospital. Somehow she made it to the emergency room and had the strength to walk in. She told the attendant that she had been shot. Immediately she was rushed back to an examination room. Quickly the doctors came in and asked where she had been shot since they saw no blood. She said, “my head,” and the doctors found a mass of the oozing white substance the woman had first noticed. Upon inspection the doctors realized the white substance wasn’t part of her brain, but was instead a lump of biscuit dough that had exploded from its container from the heat. I remember years ago the late Paul Harvey told the story of a little boy standing alone on the baseball field engrossed in throwing the ball up in the air and swinging at it. Each time he pitched the ball in the air, he would swing, but the ball would fall to the ground right in front of him. The little fella would pick the ball up and toss it in the air again and swing. A man who had been watching this sad exhibition had to speak up. “Not having much luck, are you, little man? I’ve been watching you for 15 minutes, and you haven’t hit one ball.” “Shows how good I am!” the boy snapped back with a big grin. “I’m the pitcher!” Remember, the irony of life is that, by the time you’re old enough to know your way around, you’re not going anywhere. •

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Home schooled through high school, Laura attended Brandon Academy for seven years prior to high school. Appropriately, her extracurricular activities included dance, as her mother owns and has operated Kim Hall’s School of Dance for three decades, and racing go karts. “I spend a good deal of time at the dance studio with the kids enrolled in classes and I competed on the competition team for over 10 years,” she said. “Though I am an only child, I consider myself blessed to have over 200 ‘extended siblings’ at my mother’s dance studio.” In addition to dance, Laura follows auto racing with her family and that includes annual attendance at the St. Pete Grand Prix.

2010 Harvest Queen SELECTS FLORIDA COLLEGE By Jim Frankowiak

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aura-Lorenza Perez, the 2010 Hillsborough County Fair Harvest Queen, has chosen to use her Roland and Olive Lewis Scholarship to attend Florida College in Temple Terrace. “Laura’s decision also makes her the first Harvest Queen Scholarship recipient to take advantage of the matching scholarship offer from Florida College,” said Hillsborough County Fair Scholarship Chairman Myke Morris. Dr. and Mrs. Roland Lewis were chosen as the namesakes for the scholarship in recognition of Dr. Lewis’ tenure and leadership on the Hillsborough County School Board for two decades from 1968 to 1988. During that period, he served as Board Chair for three, separate one year terms. Lewis Elementary in Temple Terrace was named to honor his service to the community and to education. “Dr. Lewis’ efforts on behalf of Hillsborough County were made possible by the loving support of his wife, Olive,” said Ralph Walker, Florida College Director of Public Relations. Both Roland and Olive are now deceased.

“The Lewis Scholarship and matching scholarship from Florida College are very important to me and to my future plans,” said Laura. “In a time like this, college can be a huge financial burden. The two scholarships are lifting some of the financial stress. I plan to graduate without debt, and this will help.” Laura plans to study liberal arts at Florida College. Her long term goals include “working in the entertainment industry in some capacity, acting and Broadway, perhaps. Eventually, I want to use my education and love of entertainment arts to work in producing or management in Hollywood or New York City,” she said. Located in Temple Terrace, Florida College is a private liberal arts college, offering both two-year associates and four-year bachelor degrees. It is the second oldest institution of higher education in Hillsborough County, opening to students in 1946. The school seeks to enrich the spiritual, social, physical and mental character of students and all students are instructed in the Bible for academic credit and attend chapel devotions every weekday. More than 500 students are currently enrolled at Florida College, coming from across the U.S. and several foreign countries. “We are very pleased that the scholarship funded by the Brown’s honors both Dr. and Mrs. Lewis and gives Florida College the opportunity to participate in furthering the education of worthy students in Hillsborough County such as Laura,” said Dr. H.E. “Buddy” Payne, President of Florida College. “We take pride in being a Friend to Youth.” The annual Hillsborough County Fair Harvest Queen competition takes place during the fair and is open to girls who are residents of Hillsborough County. The competition’s Senior Division is for competitors age 16 – 19, while the Junior Division is for young lades ranging in age from 13 – 15.

The $1,000 scholarship award given by the Hillsborough County Fair to the annual Harvest Pageant Queen is made possible by the generous funding of Marvin and Linda Brown of Dover. The scholarship is awarded annually to the senior division winner of the pageant competition. “The scholarship may be used at any post secondary school in Florida,” said Bob Der, Fair Board Chairman. The Harvest Queen is chosen by a panel of judges with selection based on personality, appearance and poise, as well as performance during an interview with the judges. Should the Queen choose to attend Florida College, where Dr. Lewis was Registrar and a professor from the school’s origination in 1946 until he retired in 1981, the college matches the amount of the scholarship. The daughter of Victor and Kim Hall Perez of Brandon, Laura, who has completed high school since winning the pageant, took the following two semesters off from school “to travel and work with Starpower Talent, Inc., a dance and talent competition,” she said. 24

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Community Garden Gives to Needy

We are eco-gardeners devoted to teaching others the sustainable benefits of organic gardening. To our surprise, God delivered gifts in the form of two giant Calabaza squash we never planted but miraculously grew out of the bed compost. We think of the 32 lb. and 46 lb. squash as something like the loaves and fishes of the bible mentioned in Matthew,” said Karen Elizabeth, coordinator of Plant City Commons Community Garden (PCCCG) located at 309 N. Carey St.

By Cheryl Kuck

would especially like to thank Buddy Bass of Manna on Wheels, Pastor Julio Santana of Bread of Life Mission and the Evangelical Presbyterian Church for their considerable contributions,” said Nancy Chaney, cafe board chair and associate pastor of First United Methodist Church.

As a result of the amazing appearance of these Calabaza’s, the commons group knew they had to give this bounty back to the community.

The commons group successfully works under a master plan combining public participation with continuing education involving not only sustainable food sources but sustainable energy sources as well. It’s all about returning to individual independence and control of our natural resources as an agriculturally productive and diverse local eco system.

Through the suggestion of Harry West a commons director, it was decided to donate the squash to Christ’s Community Café, in the Wesley Annex of the First Methodist Church at 303 N. Ever St., where he is also a member of the kitchen staff. Although located on the Methodist property, the café is a non-denominational venture with five denominations participating in the weekly Friday mission to feed those in need.

“With the economy and legislation putting our natural resources at risk, we feel the public needs to learn how to care for themselves, individually and collectively. We are working to inform through instructive training in Permaculture (permanent agriculture) – planned design and self-maintenance including; classes, workshops, movies and demonstrations at various area farms and gardens,” said Elizabeth.

“These gifts from the commons garden are truly ‘Manna from Heaven’… as we celebrate our second year feeding the homeless, the hungry and those needing fellowship and the blessings of the Word. We prepare table-served meals and are open from 11:00 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. every Friday. Once a month we give communion after lunch and once a month we celebrate birthdays. We

To that end, the group is challenging local churches and other charitable groups to sponsor a bed for growing fruits and vegetables that will supply their own kitchens. The cost is only $25 per bed but, for the privilege of growing their own produce, the group must supply workers who will volunteer service hours to maintain their garden. Plots, mulch and soil are provided.

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Commons eco-gardeners; Bob Abbenzeller, Tom Carroll, Rosalind Baker and Karen Elizabeth are happy to take interested groups through the gardens, explain what they will do to help accomplish goals, as well as, tour the church or charity properties if they wish to utilize their own land to develop organic permaculture gardens. Any individuals, churches or charitable organizations who feel they may benefit from participation, call Elizabeth, (813) 4358111 or Rosalind Baker at (352) 804-9246.

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Dry Creek

Young Love By Les McDowell Photos Courtesy of Linda Constant

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ry Creek just finished it’s 14th episode called Reap What You Sow. This episode took six months to complete. But boy was it worth the time. The Parrish Civic Association sponsored a Dry Creek movie night to show “Reap What to Sow “to the community. The cast came out in costume and it was standing room only at the YMCA.

Now Dry Creek is gearing up to shoot another episode called, First Love. As I wrote this script my mind played out events and things that had happened in my life, the awkward times as a young boy being hit with Cupid’s arrow, not knowing what changed overnight that made me look at Susie Bond as not just a girl, that had me riding my bicycle in front of her house hoping to get a glance at her, not wanting her to know I cared about her. I could smell the sent of Jasmine that grew on her fence. Thinking to myself, is this what love smells like and being afraid to talk to her. When I did the words came out wrong and I’d go over and over my words in my mind to see where I went wrong. Being embarrassed to eat in front of her? Boy was I a mess. To this day whenever I smell jasmine I go on a bike ride to Susie Bond’s house and the butterflies come back. In writing First Love, my mind went to my parents, a couple that had gone through so much, family, heartbreak, grandkids, but survived life and who’s love grew stronger with each passing year. Their love reminded me of a wagon wheel. The spokes were the things they lived through that made the wheel stronger. The fellers (the wood) that make the circle were us three kids. The steel around the wheel was their ring that held everything together. There were bumps and pot holes that they went through but their wheel stayed strong. 28

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I also thought of a love that never was. That life took them down different paths. Their paths meet up years down the road and their hearts rerun where they started and how life turned out. Well it's time to end this talk of love. It’s getting kind of mushy around here. I might lose my guy card. But love has always been around and in 1882 in Dry Creek it is still being remembered. Everybody knows where Dry Creek is... it’s inside each and everyone of us. Watch Dry Creek on BlueHighwaysTV, Channel 246 on Verizon Sat nites at 7:30. Go to DryCreekT V.Com for more information. Check us out at drycreektv.com

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SHOPPING LOCAL

AND

EATING HEALTHY

Under the Stars By Libby Hopkins

E

ating healthy, shopping local, sustainability, green practices and convenience don’t always go hand in hand. In our fast paced society, we don’t have time or it’s often difficult to find a “onestop shop” that provides healthy options. Those of us who work Monday through Friday dread the thought of having to stop at the grocery store to buy something healthy for dinner, so instead we pull up to the drive-thru window and find something that is quick, but that is far from healthy! Tiffany Ferrecchia of Tampa, realized this dilemma and wanted to offer the 9-5 crowds a healthy alternative. Ferrecchia is the president of the non-profit, Urban Coalition of Tampa Bay and she’s the owner of Tampa Bay Markets, which hosts six open- air fresh markets in the Tampa area. This past January, Ferrecchia started The Twilight Market at Ybor City. “Most of my markets are held on the weekends or once a month, so there really hasn’t been a night market for people who work during the day,” Ferrecchia said. “In Ybor, there really aren’t that many people around during the day because they are working, so at night they are getting ready to come and that’s the crowd we are targeting with this market.” It’s Ybor’s first evening market and it’s held every Tuesday night from 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. at The Roosevelt 2.0, which is community space that focuses on social change and urban sustainability. “The Roosevelt 2.0 is really focused on sustainability, green practices and they have a lot of goals for the future,” Ferrecchia said. “They really need to support the rent for the building in order to survive, so this market not only will contribute to that, but also to the Urban Coalition of Tampa Bay.” Of the market’s profit, 60 percent goes to The Roosevelt 2.0 while the other 40 percent will go to the Urban Coalition of Tampa Bay to fund a community kitchen. “I am trying to build a community kitchen that will allow vendors to come in and prepare food and sell it to the public,” Ferrecchia said.

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The market offers local producers and vendors in a friendly indoor/outdoor setting that promotes the economic well being of local food, health and wellness. It also has live music, fresh baked goods, soaps, hand-made crafts and ready-to-eat dinners. “The thing about this market is that it’s small and it allows me to focus on organics, green and natural,” Ferrecchia said. “The other markets that I operate have that category, but they also have five other categories, so with this one, I can hone in on what is important to what I really want to do in this location.” Christa Leonard is one of the vendors at The Twilight Market. She also runs an organic market in St. Petersburg called EDGE District Farmers Market. EDGE is an acronym for Entertainment, Dining, Galleries, Etc. Leonard wanted to be a part of The Twilight Market because she feels that Ferrecchia is on the same mission she is, which is to promote a healthy and sustainable lifestyle, while finding more ways to improve the local economy and environment. “We are trying to alleviate our carbon footprint as well as support our local community,” Leonard said. “We really like to support local farmers who work hard on a daily basis.” All of the vendors at Leonard’s market live within a 50 mile radius of the market and all of the produce comes from small farms, community gardens and backyard growers. Both Ferrecchia and Leonard hope that The Twilight Market will attract people, not only from the Ybor area, but from Tampa as they make their commute home from work. “My hope is that we will get a lot of people on a Tuesday night that want to eat good food, listen to some good music and pick up some organic produce or fresh bread,” Ferrecchia said. For more information on The Twilight Market or any of the other markets Ferrecchia operates, or if you would like to become a vendor at one of her markets, you can visit her website at www.tampabaymarkets.com or call 813-248-1904. The Roosevelt 2.0 is located at 1812 N. 15th Street in Ybor City, Fl. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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2013 In The Field Massey Ferguson is pleased to introduce the MF4600 Series line of capable utility tractors. The new series features three models, MF4608, MF4609 and MF4610, with power ratings ranging from 75 to 95 engine horsepower. Powering these tractors is an all new 3 cylinder engine from AGCO power that offers impressive fuel econoy, power and torque.

MF4600 Series Tractors

Designed as a direct replacement for the MF2600HD tractors, the new MF4600 tractors are an ideal fit for loader work, hay production and general on the farm use. Each model is available in an open station or cab configuration. Initially, all models will be 4WD only, but a 2WD front axle will become available in later production. Built for comfort, versatility and efficiency on the farm, all MF4600 models will offer a power shuttle transmission as standard equipment to compete in the market place.

Mahindra’s New mFORCE Series Tractors Introducing a new standard of high horsepower tractors, heavy-duty and powerful, 100 engine hp, 88 pto hp, full size utility tractor • Your choice of 12x12 Power Shuttle Transmission (100S) or 24x24+8 Creeper Power Shuttle – Power Shift Transmission (100P) • 2 door roomy cab with superior visibility and all-season comfort • Heavy-duty loader with 4,129 lbs lift capacity • Powerful 3-point hitch with 6,856 lbs lift capacity – standard • Electronic 3-point hitch control with fender switches for easy hookup • Independent and electronic hydraulic PTO • Front/Rear radial tires – standard

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Tractors in Review John Deere Expands 6 Series Tractor Lineup with 12 New, Updated Models

 John Deere has expanded its 6 Series Tractor family with the introduction of 12 new models in the 105 to 170 engine horsepower range for 2013. These new models are designed to provide the power, comfort, and performance that meet the needs of a wide range of crop and livestock producers and governmental agencies. Kubota M9960 has replaced the popular and praised M9540 model, to meet the more stringent environmental protection regulations and to answer the opinions of users of previous models. This tractor features numerous improvements suggested by customers, including improved gearshift precision and overdrive for transport purposes. ENGINE The 101,4 HP engine of the M9960 features Kubota’s Tier IIIB compliant technology. The 4 cylinder, 16-valve, turbocharged powerplant with intercooler is equipped with a catalytic converter and DPF, so no urea-based additives are required to meet the stringent environmental norms. SHU T T LE Hydraulic Shuttle is fitted as standard, so the direction of movement can be changed without touching the clutch. This features is most useful when operating the font loader, as forward-backward sequences may be completed quicker. FRONT AXLE Engine power is transferred to front wheels via a bevel gear shaft in oil bath and installed in a dust-tight casing. This results in an extremely low turning radius: 3,8 m. without braking. The front axle is equipped with a limited slip differential (LSD). 4WD can be engaged in motion. T RANSMISSION The M9960 is fitted with a mechanical 6-speed gearbox and a reduction box that offers 3 speeds as standard. In each of the 6 main speeds, the operator can select 1 additional power shift without engaging the clutch. In total, the operator can choose from 36 speeds in each direction. PT O Standard features include two speeds of the PTO: 540 and 540E. In the 540E mode, the revolutions of 540 rpm are achieved at lower engine rpm. As an option, the PTO can be replaced with the 540/1000 rpm version. CAB The M8560 is another model from Kubota where particular attention was devoted to operator’s comfort. Great visibility in all directions, including upward view on the front loader plus standard air conditioning with air outlets in the dashboard cater for easy and pleasant operation of the machine.

The all-new John Deere 6M Series Tractors include six models (6105M, 6115M, 6125M, 6140M, 6150M and 6170M) from 105 to 170 engine horsepower and replace the standard 6030 and 7030 Series Tractors. According to Rachel Wayson, John Deere Tractor Works, the 6M Series Tractors are ideal for livestock customers looking for a mid-spec tractor with higher horsepower options. “The new 6M tractors have additional transmission options, increased hitch and hydraulic capacities, and provide IT4 emission compliant engines,” Wayson says. “The new 6170M model, for example, offers customers a higher horsepower tractor at a mid-range specification level.” In addition, John Deere has updated its economical 6D Series Tractor lineup that was introduced in 2008. The new 6D Series include 4 models ranging from 105 to 140 engine horsepower (6105D, 6115D, 6130D, and 6140D). “The new 6D models provide all the power, performance and comfort customers demand to complete a broad range of jobs on the farm and ranch,” Wayson adds. “Enhanced features over the previous 6D models include easy-to-use right-hand cab controls, an optional instructional seat, easy-to-access service. “The small ag tractors in the 6 Series family provide the versatility required by customers needing a tractor to handle diverse applications,” Wayson adds. “They provide the performance, ease of operation and optional features that customers can depend on for years of reliable service in the field.” FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 17215 HIGHWAY 27 NORTH MINNEOLA, FL 34715-9273 (352) 394-7181

HYDRAU LICS AND REAR HIT CH Hydraulic pump output of 64,0 L/min (only for the rear hitch and hydraulic outlets), 2 pairs of hydraulic outlets and lifting capacity of 4100 kg.

FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 3203 HAVENDALE BLVD WINTER HAVEN, FL 33881 (863) 967-0602

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FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 3440 US HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH ZOLFO SPRINGS, FL 33890-0837 (863) 735-1122 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Farm Bureau Membership MORE THAN YOUR MAY REALIZE! A SPECIAL GM PRIVATE OFFER By Jim Frankowiak

There’s an old familiar adage about not “being able to see the forest because of the trees” and that may apply to the many benefits of belonging to Farm Bureau. “Members sometimes don’t take the time to find out what benefits they have and simply limit their knowledge to the primary reason they joined,” said Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board Member and Membership Chair Ray Wood. “That is truly unfortunate since membership means more – much more – than just that reason a family decided to join Farm Bureau.” A case in point is the current “GM Private Offer.” “GM is offering Farm Bureau members a $500 incentive for any new Chevrolet, GMC or Buick vehicle,” said Wood. There are only two considerations associated with the offer: the incentive does not apply to the Chevrolet Volt model and the Farm Bureau member must be in good standing and a member for at least 60 days prior to the date of delivery of the vehicle selected. “The special offer applies to however many vehicles a qualified member decides to buy – from one to a fleet,” said Wood. Also, this offer is available at any Chevrolet, GMC or Buick dealership. More information is available by contacting the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau at 813/685-9121 or by visiting the Florida Farm Bureau website: www.floridafarmbureau.org. Once on the site, check the “Member Benefits” area. Although offered at any Chevrolet, GMC or Buick dealership, Rivard Buick GMC in Brandon has had a number of transactions, both individual and multiple vehicles, in which the Farm Member buyer has enjoyed the GM Private Offer. Located at 9740 Adamo Drive west of I-75 in Brandon, the dealership is family-owned and has been serving the area since 1991. “The Farm Bureau GM Private Offer is a nice incentive for members,” said Rivard General Sales Manager Eric Judd. “We take pride in our many repeat customers and the fact that we are one of the largest GMC truck dealerships in the area. 36

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“As a matter of course, we work closely with each of our customers to determine what types of incentives are available to them, including the Farm Bureau offer,” he said. “Looking out for each of our customer’s best interests, including all applicable incentives and special offers, reflects the way we have always done business. We have found that this type of approach leads to long term relationships that are beneficial to our customers and to our dealership.” Judd encourages anyone interested in a GMC, Buick or a preowned vehicle to visit the dealership. “We also welcome visits to our website – www.jamesrivard.com. There’s a good bit of information on our new and used vehicle inventory, as well as special offers,” he said. Farm Bureau members seeking to use the GM Private Offer can access the required verification information that is available at www.floridafarmburea.org. Once at the site, visit “Member Benefits” and follow the instructions for membership verification. “It is a very easy process,” said Wood. “Farm Bureau membership is like the gift that keeps on giving,” said Wood. “Competitive pricing for insurance products and a host of benefits like the GM Private Offer and many others. I encourage members and those thinking about joining Farm Bureau to visit our county office or the state website to learn about the many ways members and their families stand to gain from our ever-growing selection of benefits.” Next month, IN THE FIELD will take a look at another Farm Bureau member benefit, the discounts available through Grainger, including free shipping on any online offers. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Florida

5% for potassium, magnesium, riboflavin, iron, and copper. Kumquats also contain other nutrients including vitamin B6, folate, thiamin, omega 3 fatty acids, and phosphorus.

VITAMIN C

Small on Size...

Big on Nutrients By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

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intertime in Florida means a bountiful supply of juicy, delicious citrus fruits in their peak season. Florida is the second largest citrus producer in the world, behind Brazil. In 2005-06, Florida accounted for 68% of the U.S. citrus production, California for 28%, and Texas and Arizona for 4%. Right now, farmers’ markets and grocery stands are overflowing with oranges, tangerines, grapefruits, and kumquats. From the four pound pomelo to the grape-sized kumquat, fresh Florida citrus is bursting with vitamins and minerals. Florida kumquats are harvested between November and March, so now is a great time to try them. Kumquats resemble miniature oranges, and are roughly the size of an olive. Their name is derived from the Cantonese word for “golden orange.” The most popular types of kumquats are the Maruni, Nagami, and the Meiwa. The entire kumquat, including the peel, is edible. In fact, the thin peel is usually sweet and offsets the tartness of the flesh. This tiny fruit is also frequently used as an edible decoration. While kumquats are delicious eaten out of hand, they can also be enjoyed in salads, entrees, and desserts, or made into jam.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Like oranges, Florida kumquats are very nutritious and high in vitamin C and potassium and low in calories. A serving of about five kumquats (100 g) contains 71 calories, 2 g protein, 1 g fat, 16 g carbohydrate, and 6.5 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 73% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for vitamin C, 26% for dietary fiber, 7% for manganese, 6% for vitamin A and calcium, and 38

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Kumquats are a fantastic way to get your vitamin C for the day – just five small fruit meet three quarters of your daily requirement. Vitamin C is important for a healthy immune system, cancer prevention, healthy blood circulation and wound healing. This vitamin acts as a potent antioxidant in the body, neutralizing harmful free radicals and preventing its damaging effects in cells. By fighting cell and tissue damage, Vitamin C protects against cancer and other diseases, such as the common cold. This vitamin also helps the body absorb more iron, and aids in the development of strong bones and teeth. Current research findings support that Vitamin C’s benefits come from consumption of whole fruits and vegetables. A high intake of produce is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes, including heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Taking supplements does not seem to provide the same protective benefits as eating the actual kumquat or consuming the juice.

FIBER Kumquats and other citrus fruits contain a significant amount of dietary fiber, with one 100 gram serving meeting over a quarter of your daily fiber requirement. Fiber can help lower cholesterol, which helps to prevent atherosclerosis. It also assists with digestion and is well known for preventing and treating constipation. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in fiber may decrease the risk of several types of cancer including colon, rectum, breast, and pancreas. Fiber can also help maintain steady blood sugar levels, as can fructose, the naturally occurring type of fruit sugar found in kumquats and other citrus fruits. Kumquats also contain pectin, a water-soluble fiber that helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and aids in satiety.

MANGANESE Manganese is not as often talked about as other minerals, such as potassium, but nevertheless has multiple essential roles in the body. It is a part of metalloenzymes and also activates enzymes so that proper metabolism of protein and carbohydrate can occur. Manganese is essential for nutrients such as biotin, choline, thiamin and vitamin C to be used by the body. Additionally, this mineral

activates enzymes involved in bone formation and thyroid hormone production.

POTASSIUM One five piece serving of kumquats contains five percent of the Daily Value for potassium, which is needed for proper electrolyte and fluid balance. Potassium can help lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke and cardiac arrhythmias. It also plays an important role in muscle contraction and nerve transmission, and people with low levels may experience muscle cramping. Having many important functions in the body, potassium may also help prevent or slow down bone loss from high-sodium diets.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE Look for kumquats that are brightly, uniformly colored, free of wrinkles or discolored spots. Lightly squeeze to feel firmness and pick those that are firm and bouncy and heavy for its size. Avoid those that are soft or mushy. Kumquats may be stored at room temperature for several days or refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to two weeks.

HOW TO ENJOY Kumquats are delicious eaten out of hand--peel, flesh, seeds and all! The peel can also be zested and used to season vegetables and meat. Use it as an edible garnish for drinks, appetizers, and platters. Other ways to enjoy kumquats include: • Toss sliced kumquats into a fruit or veggie salad. • Squeeze the juice into a pan, allow it to thicken over heat, and use it as a sauce for fish or chicken. • Add kumquat juice to baked goods or icing for a bright refreshing twist. • Slip a few slices of kumquat into a pitcher of water for a refreshing low-calorie beverage. • Boil kumquat slices with your teabag or add slices to boiled tea. • Dice kumquats and used in salsa and chutney. • Juice kumquat and make into jam. • Alternate chicken and whole kumquats on a skewer and grill. • Freeze whole kumquats and use as decorative ice cubes. • Use kumquat juice in cakes and cookies. Enjoy sweet, juicy Florida kumquats in their peak season today and get plenty of vitamins and minerals in these tiny fruits. SELECTED REFERENCES http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ http://sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu/ http://www.whfoods.com W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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agriculture could most easily be compared with that of the Midwest. The farmers here had a heavy emphasis on corn and soybeans along with beef and dairy production. Although they use simpler techniques and not as much mechanical emphasis these farmers are still able to produce at a rate comparable to that of many top agricultural countries. We learned that the biggest impediment to agriculture in Argentina is the fact that the government does not support the farmers. Whereas our government provides our farmers with subsidies in order to help them survive, the Argentine farmers instead pay some of the highest tax rates in the country, as well as having to foot the bill for the tariff rates on crops that get exported. It should be noted though that one other substantial difference between American and Argentine farmers is that Argentine farmers are not held back by the same amount of restrictions and regulations that American farmers have to deal with. Along with experiencing the agricultural side of Argentina our group also got to

Contests and More

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ello again everybody! A lot as happened since I last talked to you. In January we crowned our district contest champions and I traveled with my team to the country of Argentina to learn about international agriculture! In mid-January the Florida FFA state officer team traveled to Argentina with 64 other state officers from 25 states around the country. On this trip we experienced many new things including learning about the agriculture of the country and immersing ourselves in the Argentine culture. In the region of Argentina that we traveled to, the

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experience the city and the rainforest regions of the country. The rainforest area we traveled to was called Puerto Iguazu. This region is in the Northeast part of the country and is part of the border between Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay and home to the Devil's throat falls, one of the 7 new natural wonders of the world. This trip was once in a lifetime and I enjoyed every minute of it! The second big event of January was the District Contests held across the state. These contests are some of the most competitive each year as they decide which students will get to compete at State Convention in June. Hillsborough County was as well represented always with students from the county sweeping their respective contests. Good luck to those winning students as they move on to state! We are in one of the busiest times for our team as we enter the second half of our year. As always if you have any questions comments or concerns feel free to email me at David.Walden@FLAFFA.org and I will respond to you as quickly as I can.

David Walden

Area 5 State Vice President

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Growums For Children

“It’s fun to pick basil and peppers from my plants. We make good food out of it!”

to grow their own food. Founded in 2009, Growums combines real-life gardening with entertaining online education at www.Growums.com, all created by a talented team of horticulturists, educators and e-commerce professionals. Today the company’s passion has grown into a remarkable opportunity for parents, grandparents, schools, fairs and national organizations to fight childhood obesity, promote healthy living, help the environment and bring families closer together – all through the joys of gardening.

~ Gracie, age 5

And the timing couldn’t be better. As In the Field Magazine Senior Managing Editor/Associate Publisher Sarah Holt mentioned in the December 2012 issue, childhood obesity has taken an alarming turn in our country. With the American Heart Association reporting that “about one in three American kids and teens is overweight or obese, nearly triple the rate in 1963,” encouraging healthy eating habits is more important than ever.

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p until she grew her first pepper plant in her suburban back yard, Gracie was like millions of other children in America, she thought all food came from the grocery store. Thanks to a unique gardening program called Growums®, this now 8-year-old green-thumb harvests more than her weight in vegetables every growing season and is nurturing a valuable skill that will last a lifetime. Cultivated by a passion for helping children lead healthy lifestyles, Growums is the children’s gardening division of Preferred Commerce, Inc., a family-owned company in West Palm Beach, FL, dedicated to showing kids how fun, easy and rewarding it is

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Of course, as nearly any parent can attest, telling a kid to eat his vegetables is often easier said than done. But Growums believes that by providing children with a remarkable growing experience – and helping them be successful every step of the way – kids will discover a new relationship with food that will change their lives for the better.

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parents. This well thought out program makes learning fun, as well as helps to ensure kids’ success in growing their own healthy vegetables and herbs. Growums is the only gardening program for kids known to offer such an interactive platform. The online characters enhance the entire gardening experience with a fun and entertaining approach that instills an appreciation for the environment and encourages the healthy eating habits so important in today’s struggle against childhood obesity. Nowhere else can kids grow a real garden with virtual-world fun. But the company doesn’t stop with its kits. In addition to its entire line of themed garden products, Growums offers a range of community programs, including school and association fundraisers that allow organizations to meet their financial goals – all while promoting the importance of healthy living and helping the environment. The company also offers growing contests and sponsorship opportunities at state and local fairs, discount purchases for education, fun online and iTunes games, free character coloring pages and more. What’s more, a portion of all Growums’ revenue is donated to help feed needy children in America. Growums believes that healthy bodies start by eating healthy food. What better way to get that message across to kids than by showing them that food comes from a seed – and that they have the power to make it grow! By promoting the benefits of gardening through this fun, engaging program, Growums captures kids’ interest, introduces them to healthful foods and a healthy lifestyle, teaches nurturing skills, gives children a sense of pride in their So how does Growums do it? It all starts with a Growums Garden accomplishments and helps create a greener world, one healthy Kit, which contains everything a child needs to start a real garden body at a time. Gracie’s family has certainly learned that firsthand – whether it’s in the ground or in containers on a patio or balcony. – hopefully a few million more will follow! • Each kit comes with a fun theme (kids choose from Pizza, Taco, Ratatouille, Stir-Fry, Salad and Herb), four types of seed, representing a particular theme’s ingredients (the Pizza Garden, for example, comes with tomato, bell pepper, oregano and basil seed), seed-starting pellets, a watering tray, and colorful plant tags. It may sound like your standard garden-starting package, but what makes Growums Garden Kits so unique are the special growing instructions like no other – ones that come to life online when families register at www.Growums.com. Once registered, Growums characters representing each vegetable in the garden kits come to life in a series of short, step-by-step animated videos that guide children through every step of the growing process – from starting the seeds and transplanting to watering, mulching, checking for pests and harvesting. With a little help and information from clever characters such as Tomicio the tomato, Frank Cilantro, Belle Peppa, Ice Berg the lettuce wrapper, Elvis Parsley and more, in a matter of weeks, kids will be able to harvest fresh vegetables and herbs to create nutritious meals with their

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FEBRUARY 26: Goal-based Investing. The discussion will focus on how to use a goal-based investment strategy to achieve financial goals and will include guidance on effectively developing a financial plan and selecting investment accounts that work for specific goals. Access is via: http:/ / bit.ly/ U FINVest FEBRUARY 28: Tips for Tax Preparation & Filing. This session will include options for free tax filing, tax credits and tax deductions and how to analyze your return to help with financial decisions. Access: http:/ / bit.ly/ TaxFil MARCH 21: Building a Strong Credit History. Discussion will center on credit scores and steps consumers can take to build a positive credit history. Access: http:/ / bit.ly/ StrongCred

EXTENSION OFFERS BROAD PALLETE OF PERSONAL FINANCE PROGRAMS, GUIDANCE AND SERVICES

TIMELY TAX HELP NOW AVAILABLE

By Jim Frankowiak

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s an important part of its overall educational mission to provide information to the public, UF/IFAS Extension offers a broad range of educational programs to help enable individuals and families to increase their financial stability. “While this is a year round, multi-faceted initiative, we are also pleased to offer tax preparation help at this important time of year,” said Lisa Leslie, Family and Consumer Services Extension Agent.

Tax preparation guidance is available in a variety of ways. “We offer free guided tax preparation help at the Extension office by appointment,” said Leslie. This service is offered at no charge to households with an Adjusted Gross Income of no more than $57,000. “Guidance in the completion of tax returns is provided by IRS-trained volunteers. We suggest that county residents opting to file this way should have access to email so they can monitor the progress of their return.” Leslie said appointment times are available Tuesday-Thursday from noon – 4 p.m., and appointments can be made by calling Extension at 813/744-5519. In addition to guided tax services, Extension has a tax preparation webinar slated for February 28 from 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. EST. “This webinar has been scheduled as part of America Saves Week http:/ / americasaveweek.org) with which we are partnering on with (h http:/ / tampabaysaves.org). This webinar is live Tampa Bay Saves (h and interactive, permitting participants to pose questions during the session,” she said, noting web access and a speaker is all that is required to participate. “For those seeking free tax preparation services, they should visit http:/ / www.irs.gov/ uac/ Free-File:-Do-YourFederal-Taxes-for-Free or the United Way site: http:/ / myfreetaxes.com/ pchchce for a guide to various locations in the county where such services are available.” Extension financial management programs, which are offered throughout the year, include a series of webinars presented by Extension in partnership with the University of Florida and Lake, Okaloosa and Duval County Extension offices. “This is a very comprehensive series with infield experts,” said Leslie. Participants have the option to ask questions during these live sessions. Here is information on upcoming webinars:

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Leslie noted that each of these webinars will take place from 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. EST. Additionally, Extension educational outreach, which takes place at its office or locations of convenience to groups of interested residents, covers a broad range of subject matter all designed to foster financial stability. “Among the topics these sessions discuss are developing a financial plan, managing in tough times, credit scores, senior financial safety, automobile buying, small steps to health and wealth, using credit wisely, debt management, using financial institutions and much more,” said Leslie. “For those county residents seeking one-on-one guidance in these subject areas, we offer the Florida Master Money Mentor Program, which is a coordinated referral network of certified volunteers that provide financial mentoring,” she said. There is no charge for the services of this program. “Ultimately, we would like to have interested residents enroll in http:/ / tampabaysaves.org) so they can receive Tampa Bay Saves (h new information, classes, webinars and other offerings all designed to help them achieve and maintain financial stability,” said Leslie

FLORIDA MASTER MONEY MENTORS SOUGHT

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illsborough County Extension Service, a cooperative service of the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners and the University of Florida, is recruiting volunteers to mentor residents of the county about basic personal financial management.. “This program is a wonderful way for people to broaden their life experiences and give back to the community,” said Lisa Leslie, Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences. “Volunteers do not have to have previous financial education or a background in financial services. They must be willing to take approximately 20 hours of training in basic financial management and mentoring techniques,” she said. “They should also be able to volunteer at least two hours a week and follow established protocols for reporting, client confidentiality and providing research-based, unbiased information. Leslie said training takes place at the Extension office. University of Florida Extension provides the infrastructure for this program throughout the state thanks to a gift from Bank of America. Those interested in becoming a Florida Master Money Mentor are asked to contact Leslie at 813-744-5519, Ext. 54143 or email her at lesliel@hillsboroughcounty.org.

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Florida FFA To Host

Beast Feast And Auction

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he Florida FFA is serving up a variety of wild game and seafood at the 10th Annual Beast Feast & Auction on Saturday, March 23 to benefit the Florida FFA Foundation. Along with feasting on venison, pork, gator, shrimp, turkey, swamp cabbage, fried dill pickles, Jambalaya, chicken fingers, boiled corn, peanuts, homemade ice cream, strawberry shortcake, and many other foods, guests can enjoy raffles, silent and live auctions, exhibits and entertainment. Items to be auctioned include vacation trips, airboat tours, fishing trips, hunting trips, park admissions, framed prints, grills, gift baskets, livestock feed, fishing and hunting equipment, gift certificates to local stores and restaurants and a wide variety of other exciting items. As a special addition to this year’s event there will be drawings from the admission ticket stubs worth $2,500. The person drawn for the winning tickets must be present to win. Food will be served 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Beast Feast and Auction will be held at the Florida FFA Leadership Training Center at 5000 Firetower Road, off Highway 542 (Hatchineha Road) near Haines City from 11:00 to 2:00 p.m. Annually the LTC hosts a variety of meetings, conferences and workshops for FFA and other organizations. Many “friends” of FFA and Florida Agriculture are stepping forward with efforts

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to help out the organization that benefited them as students. The foundation provides the resources necessary to recognize the leaders that our organization is known for, while the FFA Association provides the paths for students to succeed. As an avid supporter of FFA, “we take great pride in being a part of this fundraiser,” states Fred Williams, Southern Coast Manager, Purina Animal Nutrition, LLC. “As a business owner, I am amazed at the many different skills these students gain as part of their agriscience education classes and their involvement with FFA,” states Bill Hamm, William E. Hamm & Associates, Florida FFA Foundation President. “I would like to encourage all of you to become a sponsor or get involved in some way so the FFA Foundation can continue to provide services and facilities to support these outstanding young people.” Anyone wishing to help Florida FFA can do so by becoming an event sponsor, donating items for the silent or live auction and by purchasing or selling tickets. For tickets or more information about this event, contact Gary Bartley at (863) 4397332 ext 6321. You may also visit the website at www.floridaffafoundation.org and click on Special Events/Beast Feast.

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Specialty Meats Ducks, Capons, Fresh Ham, Rabbits, Quail, Fresh & Smoked Turkey Wings and Drumsticks, Beef and Pork Kidneys, Hog Heads, Hog Maws, Pork Skin, Tripe & Honeycomb Tripe, and Alligator Meat. • We Accept TECO Payments • Western Union Money Orders 49¢ each

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AVAILABLE

US HWY 17 160 ACRES ARCADIA

LITHIA PINECREST 32 ACRES LITHIA

Ideal property for Farm or Ranch! Frontage and access along US Hwy 17. 12 inch, 10 inch and two 6 inch wells already in place! $1,600,000

Beautiful country lots with Oaks and Hammocks! Road Frontage on Lithia Pinecrest. Road excellent site for investment! $400,000

IDEAL PASTURELAND AND EXCELLENT FOR HOMESITE!

80 ACRE FARM SWEAT LOOP WIMAUMA

19 ACRES BONITA DRIVE WIMAUMA

Country living that is centrally located and minutes to I-75. Bank owned $179,000

Turn-key! Property is fenced and crossed with 4 inch well. $110,000

OLD WELCOME 40 ACRE HORSE FARM LITHIA

11.72 ACRES FARMLAND/HOMESITE LITHIA

Incredible opportunity to own a turnkey horse farm. Two homes, 50 x 100 horse barn, lighted arena, rolling lush land! $800,000

Perfect Homesite. Well and septic are on site and property is already fenced and cross fenced. Completely high and dry. $150,000

Reed Fischbach, Broker Fischbach Land Company

813.546.1000 P.O. Box 2677 • Brandon, FL 33509 Note: While every attempt is made to provide as accurate information on the property offering as possible, FISCHBACH LAND COMPANY, LLC does not guarantee the accuracy thereof. Buyer shall rely entirely on their own information and inspection of property and records.

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Viruses Hit Several Plant City Area Strawberry Growers Sources, Corrective Steps Determined, Minor Impact by Jim Frankowiak

O

nce again the risk associated with being a strawberry grower surfaces as two viruses have stunted strawberry plants at several strawberry growers in the Plant City area. However, officials report the incidents have involved only a few growers and the overall impact on strawberry volumes for this season is expected to be limited as the problem likely will not spread to other fields and will not continue into next season. That was the essence of information provided to strawberry growers at a special meeting held in mid-January at the Florida Strawberry Growers Association (FSGA) offices in Dover. The meeting was organized by Dr. Natalia Peres, Associate Professor, Plant Pathology, University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center and Extension Agent Alicia Whidden. Both had been in the forefront of this new grower challenge since it was first reported early during the current season. In addition to hosting the event, FSGA sponsored the participation of Dr. Bob Martin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agriculture Research Service based at Corvallis, Oregon. Dr. Martin is recognized as a world expert on virus diseases of small fruits and the analytical services of his laboratory, as well as those of a California-based independent testing laboratory, pinpointed the viruses that surfaced locally among select strawberry fields this season. “Testing of the type needed in this instance is not available in Florida,” said Dr. Peres. “Consequently, samples were sent to California and Oregon for analysis.” Symptoms associated with the virus, according to Dr. Martin, “included stunted growth, very limited productivity and small fruit.” “Though an exceptional situation, especially for Florida, there was a similar situation in California that took place about 10 years ago,” said Dr. Martin. “We had the benefit of lab tests developed at that time to guide our analysis.” He said the viruses, both of

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which are transmitted by aphids, are the strawberry mild yellow edge virus and strawberry mottle virus. “The incidences of viruses such as these are usually more of a problem on the west coast where aphid populations are high, while this has not been a problem on the east coast.” Dr. Martin and his colleagues were also able to determine the source of the viruses was in plants purchased from two nurseries in the “Great Village” area of Nova Scotia. “These viruses should not be a problem next year since they can only be transmitted by aphids, the viruses only infect strawberry and the primary aphid vector only feeds on aphids and that is not possible during the strawberry free period in Florida.” Though plants purchased from nurseries in various locations in the U.S. and Canada are certified to be virus free, “that final inspection is limited to a visual inspection as opposed to a laboratory analysis,” said Dr. Martin. “This incident has prompted all stakeholders to come together to address what has taken place and highlights an effort to adopt the same type of testing and quality assurance in the U.S. and Canada so we achieve uniformity in rules and certifications,” he said. “There is also a concern about fruit production taking place close to nurseries and the need to for better aphid control. There is also the need to carefully monitor aphid movement in the Great Village area and manage accordingly.” He also said steps must be taken to isolate fruit from nursery production. “Although the negative impact for growers that have these plants is significant, Florida strawberry growers are fortunate that the incidence of these viruses has been small and the prospect of impacting plants next season is virtually impossible. Perhaps the prospect of such incidents taking place in the future will be further reduced as a result of current discussions regarding uniform and mandatory virus testing as opposed to visual inspection.”

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A Pretty Face, Pleasing Personality and So Much More By Jim Frankowiak

Photos by Stephanie Humphrey

Strawberry Festival Queen – Kelsey Fry

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lant City native Kelsey Fry is the queen of the 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival, but there’s a great deal more to this 17-year-old senior at Plant City High School than her good looks and charming people skills. “This was my second time in the competition,” said Fry. “My parents initially said I could try one time and I did last year, finishing among the top 10.” She had a great time, but did not do as well as she could during the impromptu question, “so we thought about that a good deal and decided to let Kelsey try again, if she wanted,” said her mother, Kendra Harrell. “That was a rare move for Glenn and I, since

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once we make a decision we typically stick to it.” Kelsey has two younger sisters, Emily and Taylor, who are extremely proud of Kelsey and her crown! “I really enjoyed my first competition. The preparation and competition was a lot of fun,” said Kelsey. It should be noted preparation included shopping and getting her hair done, as well as pageant coaching. “I’m glad Kendra and I decided to offer Kelsey the chance for a second time in the competition,” said her dad, Glenn. “I knew that if she made it into the court, there were experiences before her that few young women get to enjoy. Activities such as trips and appearances on behalf of the festival to different events and cities here in Florida, as well as outside of the state.”

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“Being picked to be the queen was a treat for me,” said Kelsey. “I feel blessed and look forward to the coming year and spending time with my court. They are my friends, and I know we will have a great time.” Her court includes First Maid Ericka Lott, Jamee Townsend, Maddy Keene and Madison Astin. “Typically the queen and her court ask for nothing, but accept the majority of invitations,” noted Kelsey. Invitations of the recent past have included trips to New York City and Tallahassee and special events such as throwing the first pitch to open the Plant City Little League season. When asked why she felt the judges picked her, Kelsey said, “I think they saw something different in me and they liked my responses to their questions during the interview. When I look back on the pagW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


eant last year, I realize that I have matured a great deal and was able to exude the level of confidence the judges were looking for.” But there’s quite a bit more. From a community service perspective, Kelsey has done a variety of things. “I have developed a program that teaches senior citizens how to navigate the world of Facebook. It is a great way to reach out to the elderly in my community and help them connect with their family and friends. I am also involved in my church (First Baptist Church of Plant City), where I am a member of the CORE leadership group. Being active in my church’s youth group is very important to me because it’s crucial to help other teens that are lost. Kelsey is also the founding president of Plant City High School’s Ronald McDonald House Club. It’s a service club that works with the Ronald McDonald Hospital in Tampa. Kelsey said, “We make cards, decorations, dinners and desserts for the families who are residing there while their child is in the hospital. It’s very rewarding for all of us. The families staying at the home are always very grateful.” You would be hard-pressed to find a 17-year-old female who has no makeup, but that is the case with Kelsey. She is extremely low maintenance! Among her extracurricular activities is a multi-year commitment to competitive swimming, which requires workouts six days a week during which she swims from 4-7 miles each day she trains. “The joke among my family and friends is that my perfume is primarily chlorine.” She is captain of the Plant City High School Varsity Swim Team and ranked in the top 5 percent of her class with a 5.48 grade point average. Kelsey plans to continue her competitive swimming activities as part of the inaugural swim team at the University of West Florida in Pensacola. Scholastically, she plans to pursue an honors curriculum, majoring in marketing. “I would love to return to Plant City after college working in agri-marketing,” she said. And that’s not unusual for someone who has belonged to FFA and 4-H, competing and winning in public speaking competitions at the local level and beyond. She has also competed and won in the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau speech competition, proceeding on to regional and state levels. In addition to public speaking competitions, Kelsey has participated in horticulture events at the Strawberry Festival, winning both Reserve Grand Champion and Award of Distinction honors the last two years. Kelsey and her family also operate a horticulture business, Hi-TEK Liners, through which they propagate various ornamental plants and sell to nurseries. TEK stands for the Harrell sisters Taylor, Emily and Kelsey. Their father, Glenn, was instrumental in the formation of the company, as he is Production Manager for Harrell’s Nursery and an environmental horticulture alumnus of the University of Florida. “We began the family business two years ago with 30,000 liners and doubled that figure this year,” he said. “Both Kendra and I firmly believe hard work is a good thing for our family, and it helps to generate spending money for our daughters because they are paid employees of the company.” Hi-TEK has operations at Lithia Pinecrest and Plant City. As Kelsey was looking at different collegiate options, she learned that achieving the Bright Futures Academic Scholar Level could prove beneficial from a scholarship standpoint. “Though she didn’t have to, Kelsey worked hard on that and took her college entrance exams several times to attain that level,” said her dad. Parents Kendra and Glenn are still trying to absorb Kelsey’s selection as queen of the 78th Florida Strawberry Festival. “It’s surreal,” said Kendra. “I could not be more proud. Kelsey has never been any trouble. She loves Jesus and is not ashamed to proclaim that fact. I know, and I have been told by others, that Kelsey will never compromise her integrity for anyone. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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“Glenn and I were so pleased the way she handled her first time in the Strawberry Festival competition. While others cried, Kelsey simply moved forward,” said Kendra. “In some respects Kelsey and I are more than father and daughter, we are also like my golf buddies, kidding one another and having a good time. She can take it and give it back. What you see is what you get with Kelsey and I am very proud of her for what she has achieved and the example she has been, and continues to be, to her sisters. She always plays by the rules,” said Glenn. Kelsey gives a great deal of credit to her parents for her achievements and the way she conducts herself. “My dad has always been there for me, working hard for our family and encouraging me to be a good person all of the time.” When not at school, competing, practicing or working the family business, the Harrell family likes to fish, go to Gator games and play board games. Yes, that’s right, the current Florida Strawberry Festival Queen likes to go fishing. As noted at the outset, there’s so much more to her than her good looks and pleasing personality. She’s a wonderful representative of Plant City and the area’s agricultural industry. “I can’t wait to return to Plant City after college. I love living here,” she said. •

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Sand Art By Sean Green

The weather is getting cooler and the beaches will become less crowded soon, at least for a short time. If your anything like me, you probably have a collection of seashells, sand dollars, sea glass, and other small treasures that have been collected at the beach over the summer. This simple project can help thin the collection and perhaps result in a tasteful work of art that is appropriate for any Florida wall.

Materials: Stretched Canvases Inexpensive Paint Brush Adhesive (Modge Podge, Elmers, etc.) Sea Shells (or other light weight objects) Acrylic Paint (optional) Sand (natural or colored) Texturing Tools (Paper Towels, sponges, fabric) Plastic container (to hold sand) Prepare your work area with plenty of newspaper (or work outside)

GLUE

SEA SHELLS OR OTHER OBJECTS TO STRETCHED CANVASES IN A PLEASING COMPOSITION

(not too crowded). Using an inexpensive paint brush, apply a generous coat of Modge Podge or glue to the area of the canvas where you will glue the sea shells, the glue will dry clear and later will be covered with sand so you do not have to be really neat about this. Let the object dry long enough for the glue to set so the objects do not fall off the canvases.

PAINT

the Modge Podge or glue and move on to the next step with colored glue.

GLUE

SAND TO THE CANVASES

Paint the remainder of the canvas with a generous coat of Modge Podge or glue, no need to be precise; it actually looks great when glue and sand get on the edges of the seashells. While the glue is still wet, coat the canvas with dry sand. Allow the glue to dry and shake the extra sand off the canvas, use the newspaper to funnel the sand back into a container to be used again.

TEXTURING

THE SAND

You can build up random mounds in the sand by dipping a crumpled paper towel into the glue and dabbing the canvases generously but with a light touch, this will create globs of glue that will look like natural mounds when covered with sand. Play around with the possibilities, if you choose to use colored sand, geometric shapes can be painted onto the canvas and sprinkled with colored sand for a Native American sand painting theme. We would love to see pictures of your finished project!

THE REMAINING CANVASES

As an option, you can paint the remaining canvas with acrylic paint, remember, sand will be placed on top of this later. The idea here is to create color that will show through parts of the sand and look more like water. Let the acrylic paint dry to the touch before the next step. Alternatively, you could add acrylic paint to 72

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DARYLE WAYNE HALL, 50 of Plant City died January 30, 2013.Born May 14, 1962 in Elkhart, Indiana, he was the son of the late Niles Hall and Yvonne Woodworth Hall. He served in the U.S. Army from 1982 until 1984. Surviving are daughter, Melanie Ann Brock; brothers, Jeff (Trish) and Randy (Shayne) Hall; 2 grandchildren, Zachary Brock and Ethan Samson. LLOYD ALOYSIUS JARBOE, 84 of Plant City and Lupton, Michigan died January 29, 2013, at his home in Plant City. Born May 22, 1928 in Flint, Michigan, he was the son of the late Charles Jarboe and the late Winifred Brockriede Jarboe. He was the husband of Helen Frey Jarboe.

MARIA ALAO HYDE, 65 of Lakeland died January 27, 2013. Born March 12, 1947 in Manila, Philippines, she was the daughter of the late Dale Williams and the late Anita Alao Williams. She was the wife of the late John Hyde.Surviving are sons, John Hyde and James Hyde; daughters, Jennifer Bochis, Justine Hyde and Jacqueline Hyde; sisters, Patricia Williams, Barbara Flood, Dellia Pierce and Ann Alao; and 2 grandchildren.

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MILLARD FRANKLIN BRUNTY, 85 died on Friday, January 25, 2013 Born Monday, May 21, 1927, he was the son of the late Kennie Brunty and the late Catherine Varney Brunty. He was the husband of the late Patsy Brunty. ATHELEE "LEE" TERRELL went home to be with The Lord January 25, 2013. Born September 3, 1940 in Pocahontas, Arkansas. Preceded in death by his parents, A.C. and Marie Terrell and infant daughter Tami. Survived by his loving wife Carol (married 51 years).

BILLY RAY GRACE, 82 of Plant City and Lakeland died January 25, 2013. Born December 21, 1930 to the late Ulysses Vernon Grace Sr. and Lassie Lou Duffer Grace. He was the beloved husband of Joanne Salter Grace for 62 years. GENEVIVE WYLIE, 74 of Plant City, Florida died on Friday, January 25, 2013. Born Wednesday, January 26, 1938 in Zenia, Ohio. She is survived by a friend Diane Knight and many other friends.

JESSICA LYNN WARREN, 28 of Seffner died January 23, 2013, at her home. Born March 26, 1984 in Tampa, Florida, she was the daughter of James Warren and Donna James.

WILLIS FRANK EKHOFF, 94 of Plant City died January 23, 2013, in Brandon. Born December 1, 1918 in Nokomis, Illinois, he was the son of the late Richard Ekhoff and Emma Bald Ekhoff. He was the husband of Hazel Vaudine Ekhoff and she survives. NINA L. HIGLEY, 86 formerly of Plant City died January 22, 2013 in Maine. Born February 24, 1926 in Manassas, Georgia, she was the daughter of the late Walter Jones and the late Gennie Calloway. She was the wife of the late Graham Higley.

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USDA Institutes New Animal Disease Traceability Program, Applies to

All Livestock Moving Interstate Including Horses

INT RODU CT ION

EFFECT IVE DAT E

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has instituted its Animal Disease Traceability Program (ADTP) to improve its ability to trace livestock, including horses, in the event of a disease outbreak. The new system applies to all livestock moving interstate.

The new rules will be effective March 11, 2013. We expect that there will be a transition period during which USDA has suggested it will not enforce the new rule. This is to give livestock owners time to understand the rules and make any changes necessary to comply. We don’t know how long that period might be.

Under the new federal regulations, horses moving interstate must be identified and accompanied by an Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (ICVI). The new system is built on methods of identification and movement documentation that are already employed in the horse industry, e.g., written descriptions, digital photographs, brands, tattoos, electronic identification methods, and interstate certificates of veterinary inspection. The person or entity responsible for moving the horse interstate must ensure that it has an ICVI or other document required by the new rule. The ADTP will be administered by the states with federal support. The new rules also apply to movements to and from a Tribal area. In those cases, the Tribal authorities are involved in the system.

B ACKGROU ND The horse industry has been dramatically affected by serious disease outbreaks in the last ten years, which have halted or restricted the movement of horses and the commerce surrounding the horses. The new program is intended to help the Department, state authorities and the horse industry better deal with such disease outbreaks and to minimize disease effects on horses and economic effects on owners and the industry. This new rule is based on the previous National Animal Identification System (NAIS), which was the original voluntary system proposed by USDA to deal with disease outbreaks and traceability. Since the prior rule was voluntary and generated significant concerns over complexity, confidentiality, liability, cost and privacy, it was not supported and was rethought. USDA reconsidered its approach and decided that rather than attempting to identify every animal, every premise, and every movement to achieve traceability within 48 hours of a disease outbreak, it would develop a more limited and simpler system. The ADTP just adopted is the result. The new system does not require the registration of premises housing livestock or the specific reporting of individual movements of horses. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

SPECIFIC REQU IREMENT S FOR HORSE OWNERS Under the new regulations, horses moving interstate must be (1) identified prior to movement and (2) accompanied by an Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (ICVI) or other state-approved document. All states now require an ICVI to accompany any horse entering their state. This should make for a smooth transition to the new traceability rule since most horse owners moving their horses interstate for breeding, racing, showing, recreation, etc. should already be in compliance with the provisions in the new rule.

IDENT IFICAT ION

OF

HORSES

Horses that are required to be officially identified under the new rules may be identified by one of the following methods: • A description sufficient to identify the individual horse including, but not limited to, name, age, breed, color, gender, distinctive markings, and unique and permanent forms of identification, such as brands, tattoos, scars, cowlicks, blemishes, or biometric measurements). In the event that the identity of the horse is in question at the receiving destination, the state animal health official in the state of destination or APHIS representative may determine if the description provided is sufficient • Electronic identification (Animal Identification Number) that complies with ISO 11784/11785 • Non-ISO electronic identification injected into the horse on or before March 11, 2014 • Digital photographs sufficient to identify the individual horse • A USDA backtag for horses being transported to slaughter as required by the Commercial Transport of Horses to Slaughter regulations. Animal Identification Numbers and microchips are an option, but not a requirement for horses. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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ICVI REQU IREMENT S Under the new rules, horses moved interstate must be accompanied by an ICVI or other document acceptable to the states involved. The person or entity responsible for moving the horse interstate must ensure it has an ICVI or other document. The APHIS representative, state representative or accredited veterinarian issuing the ICVI or other document must forward a copy to the state health official in the state of origin within seven days of issuing the document. The state representative in the state of origin must forward a copy to the state representative in the state of destination within seven days of receiving it. In the event of a disease outbreak, these documents will be used to trace horses that are or have been at the site of the outbreak and horses that have come into contact with them. The new regulations give states the discretion to approve other methods of movement documentation, which may include an EIA test chart, when agreed upon by the animal health officials in the states involved in the interstate movement. While not specifically referenced, movement documents could also include an event passport. USDA has maintained options in the final rule to support the use of other movement documentation, for example an owner-shipper statement or brand certificate, if agreed to by the state animal health officials involved.

RET ENT ION

OF

RECORDS

Currently, states bear the responsibility for the collection, maintenance, and retrieval of data on interstate livestock movements. These responsibilities will be maintained under the new rules. The animal health official or accredited veterinarian issuing or receiving an ICVI or other document must keep a copy for five years to ensure horses can be identified and traced if a disease manifests itself at or after an event.

EXCLU SIONS There are exclusions to the new requirements for the following horses: • Horses used as a mode of transportation (horseback, horse and buggy) for travel to another location that return directly to the original location. • Horses moved from a farm or stable for veterinary treatment that are returned to the same location without change in ownership. • Horses moved directly from a location in one state through another state to a second location in the original state. • Horses moved between shipping and receiving states with another form of identification or documentation other than an ICVI, e.g., a horse infectious anemia test chart, as agreed to by the shipping and receiving states or tribes involved in the movement.

You can download a PDF of the final rule at http:/ / www.gpo.gov/ fdsys/ pkg/ FR-2013-01-09/ pdf/ 201231114.pdf NOTE: All horse owners or anyone moving horses interstate or involved in that process should review the new requirements to ensure they are complying with them. If you have any questions, please call the American Horse Council.

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79.39± Acres at 7307 Knights Griffin Road, Plant City — Reduced Further The site is fenced and is currently being used for grazing. The property is located in east Hillsborough County. It is north of Interstate 4 and east of U.S. 301. Knights Griffin Road is also known as CR582 and can be accessed via Macintosh Road from I-4. Reduced from $899,000 to $699,000 MilkAWay Farms, 440.33± Acres, US Highway 41 and Croom Road, Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida — Reduced The property is located at the Northeast corner of U.S. Highway 41 and Croom Road, Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida 34601. Under the DRI Threshold, this site’s proposed plan consists of 657 Single Family Residences, 102 Town homes and 240 Multi-Family Units, for a total of 999 total units. The proposed site plan also include 120,000 SF of highway commercial. Reduced from original listing price of $4,375,000 to $3,950,0000 Bank Owned. Throgmartin-Henke Ranch in Citrus County, Floral City, FL — Reduced Property consist of 1,736± acres on 7 separate properties suitable for development. Zoning varies from MDR (medium density residential) to LDR (low density residential) to Agricultural. Property includes a 2,750 SF, 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom home build in 2000. Other improvements including fencing on most of the property and 5 wells. Has produced peanuts, melons, and grazed up to 600 head of cattle. Reduced from $17,255,400 $10,000 per acre to $16,492,000 or $9500 per acre.

William Eshenbaugh,ALC, CCIM (813) 287-8787 x 1 or cell (727) 430-0306 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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THE EXCITEMENT IS ABOUT TO

BEGIN!!!

THE FLORIDA STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL® FEB 28 - MAR 10, 2013

Each spring, the Florida Strawberry Festival® rolls out the red carpet to welcome visitors from throughout the Sunshine State and around the world,” says General Manger, Paul Davis. Celebrating its 78th anniversary, February 28 – March 10, 2013, the Festival’s theme this year is “Our Masterpiece of Fun!” Guests come from near and far to enjoy the masterpiece that is displayed through exhibits of agriculture, commerce, industry, livestock, fine arts, horticulture, and crafts. Davis notes the Festivals “Masterpiece of Fun” includes everything from social events and contests to youth developmental programs, top-name entertainment, and parades with glorious floats and high-stepping marching bands. “The Florida Strawberry Festival is a great time to discover the charm and allure of Plant City,” says Davis, “and it's the perfect time to enjoy eating ripe, luscious strawberries alongside the local berry farmers that have worked hard to bring them to market.” More than 10,000 acres of strawberries are planted annually in the local area. “The Florida Strawberry Festival is honored to be able to celebrate a harvest that is so dear to this community,” says Davis. A day at the 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival will bring great excitement to kids of all ages. Adult advance ticket prices are $8 for ages 13 and up while youth tickets purchased in advance are $4 for 6 – 12. Children under 5 are admitted free when accompanied by a ticketed adult. Advance general admission and show tickets can be purchased on the Festival’s website, by calling the ticket office at 813-754-1996 or visiting the Amscot Main Ticket Gate at 2209 W. Oak Avenue in Plant City. Group Sales are available by calling 813719-6680. The Florida Strawberry Festival is hosting 26 headline acts on the Wish Farms Soundstage during the 78th annual event and will also have free daily, family-oriented entertainment, nearly 400 vendors, exhibitors and food concessions. For all the headline concerts on the main soundstage -- which take place at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. each day -- there are about 3,000 free seats available for all shows. The EYE EXPRESS Free Grandstands are filled on a first-come, first-seated basis as part of your paid gate admission. Reserve seat tickets are available for $15 and up (varies by show), while supplies last. There are several special entertainment values on the midway with Ride-A-Thon Days and Moonlight Magic. Monday, Tuesday, 82

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Wednesday and both Thursdays are Ride-A-Thon Days from Noon until 11:00 pm with Monday March 4th starting at 10 am. Guests can purchase a wristband to ride most mechanical rides for one low price. Both Fridays nights are Moonlight Magic from 10 p.m. to 2:00 a.m., where guests purchase a wristband to ride most mechanical rides. Both Sundays are Mountain Dew Family Days where guests bring a Mountain Dew can to receive a voucher for $5 off the $25 wristband and ride all day. Be sure to check out the Festival Website for more midway specials brought to you by Sweetbay Supermarket, The Tampa Tribune & TBO.com. “The Florida Strawberry Festival is again teaming with Sweetbay Supermarkets where advance gate admission tickets can be purchased from now through March 10,” said Davis. The full listing of participating Sweetbay Supermarkets locations is on the Festival’s website. From Senior Citizens' Days to Ride-A-Thons, there are budget relieving ways for everyone to enjoy this year's Festival. “The Festival’s Special Days which run throughout the annual event where members of select groups are admitted free or with a discount such as Florida Blue Senior Citizens’ Day, American Heroes Day, Farm Worker Appreciation Day and Free Kids’ Day,” said Davis. “We offer additional specials on our midway such as Mountain Dew Family Day, Tampa Tribune Day and Sweetbay Supermarket Day in addition to our annual Moonlight Magic Nights,” he noted. New to the festival this year is JUMP! The Ultimate Dog Show. JUMP! Is a nonstop, action packed, Canine Thrill Show that showcases Incredible Dogs and their Handlers performing amazing stunts to upbeat music that will thrill audiences of all ages. “I have been told that most of the performing Pet Stars have been adopted from various Animal Shelters throughout the US,” says Davis. We are also excited to be welcoming The Sweeney Family Band, a Country Comedy Revue that is sure to keep you entertained. Exciting news! The Florida Strawberry Festival now has its very own APP! And it’s FREE! The Florida Strawberry Festival App can be found on both the iTunes and Android Markets by searching “Florida Strawberry Festival.” The app not only puts valuable information at your fingertips but can help you make your day at the Festival a true masterpiece by scheduling reminders of the exciting events taking place on our grounds! And don’t forget, the app is your GPS! When you park your car, be sure to set the app to remember your location so when you’re ready to head home, the app will navigate you back to where you started! Today, the Florida Strawberry Festival is ranked among the top 50 fairs in North America. The Florida Strawberry Festival is primarily an agricultural fair, formed to celebrate the bountiful harvest of the strawberry. The founding principles of the Festival continue to be the guiding purpose while striving to enrich the lives of thousands of our areas youth. “I am proud to say that over the last two years, more than 3,400 students who participated in agricultural contest at the Florida Strawberry Festival received more than $1.5 million in funding through premium awards, scholarships and sales. Make plans now and mark your calendars for the 78th annual Florida Strawberry Festival, February 28 – March 10, 2013 where we are creating “Our Masterpiece of Fun!” in beautiful Plant City, Florida. For more information on all the Florida Strawberry Festival events, log on to www.flstrawberryfestival.com or call 813-752-9194. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter! W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Our Services Include: Cosmetic Crown and Bridge Dentures Xrays • Cleanings • Root Canals Whitening • Denture Repairs - while you wait • In-Office BOTOX Now Offering LASER PERIO SURGERY (A more effective way to treat gum disease)

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Some Things You Should Know About The HCSO By Jim Frankowiak

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f you are one of the 1.2 million residents of Hillsborough County, there is a very good chance you rely on the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) to serve, protect and defend you since the HCSO does so for the approximately 850,000 people who reside in the unincorporated areas of the county. The HCSO is an agency of about 4,000 law enforcement officers, detention deputies and civilians under Sheriff David Gee with an annual operating budget of $373 million. A lifelong resident of Hillsborough County, Sheriff Gee has served the HCSO and community for more than 34 years through a series of positions including homicide investigator, Internal Affairs supervisor, public information officer, chief financial officer and chief deputy. He was elected Sheriff in 2004, re-elected in 2009 and again in 2012. Sheriff Gee sees no change in his plans for the foreseeable future. The Gee family traces its roots back five generations in the county. Sheriff Gee holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Tampa. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy, a graduate of the United States Secret Service Dignitary Protection School and he is a law enforce-

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ment aviator rated in fixed-wing aircraft and turbine helicopters. Sheriff Gee believes that law enforcement can only be effective if it provides service and protection based on the highest standards of integrity and professionalism. A quiet and effective leader, Sheriff Gee is rightly proud of the achievements of his agency and his staff, especially if you consider some very important and telling facts. “In the unincorporated areas of Hillsborough County, our agency has responsibility for law enforcement in nearly 1,000 square miles,” said Sheriff Gee. “That compares to about 125 square miles of area for the city of Tampa.” Additionally, in Tampa the ratio of officers to 1,000 residents is 3.0 while in the area of the county overseen by the HCSO that ratio is 1.55 deputies for every 1,000 residents. Currently the HCSO has openings for about 200 additional deputies, but “I believe it is important and prudent to move cautiously in this economy,” he said. “In addition we work very hard and diligently to attract only the most qualified applicants who will benefit our citizens and our agency.” The starting annual salary for a deputy is $44,000.

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One of the key tools used to measure the effectiveness of a law enforcement agency is the crime rate. “We closely follow the Uniform Crime Reporting Guidelines as set forth by the Federal Bureau of Investigations,” said Sheriff Gee. “Our agency takes deep pride in the fact that we most recently reported the lowest crime rate in Hillsborough County on record. That is 23.65 incidents of Part 1 crime per 1,000 residents.” That figure was 52.98 per capita in the year prior to Sheriff Gee’s initial election to office. “We have recorded double digit reductions in criminal activity over each of the last four years,” he said. That performance ranks the HCSO among the very best performing sheriff’s agencies in the U.S. Keeping those statistics moving in a downward direction requires continued vigilance and the application of new techniques. “Among those is Intelligence Lead Policing whereby we continuously monitor the top 10 most prolific offenders each week,” said Sheriff Gee. This is both an art and science that has enabled us to prevent crimes before they occur through ongoing high vigilance of these targeted offenders.” Another aspect of pride for Sheriff Gee is the working relationship his agency has with the citizens of Hillsborough County. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


“Citizen complaints dropped by more than 60 percent during my initial three years as sheriff,” he said. “We continue to work to provide our services in a professional manner to the residents of the county. I would urge any citizen who has concerns about the services of any deputy to politely ask that deputy for the name of his or her supervisor. Contact that supervisor and explain the nature of concern in order to resolve the issue. “I am pleased to note that we receive far more letters of thanks than those of criticism,” Sheriff Gee said. When off duty Sheriff Gee enjoys involvement in a range of outdoor activities and community services. “I like to hunt, as well as participate in competitive shooting and fast draw competitions.” Sheriff Gee and his wife, Rhonda, have four children, including a son who is a Florida State Trooper. Sheriff Gee is a board member of A Kids Place of Tampa Bay, board member of the Hillsborough County Head Start Program, board member of the Judeo Christian Health Clinic and an active member of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. For additional information about the HCSO, visit: http:/ / www.hcso.tampa.fl.us A note of thanks to Sheriff Gee and the men and women of the HCSO. Keep up the good work!

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Vince Costa and Allen Inlow at

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“THE BOTTOM LINE”

DOUG BELDEN HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR By Jim Frankowiak

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lthough he has been Hillsborough County Tax Collector since 1998, you can still sense the enthusiasm and drive Doug Belden has for the position and its varied services to the residents of the county. Perhaps his take on an old saying best captures it: “If it ain’t broke, improve it.” An added cornerstone for Belden are his colleagues in the office, the men and women who provide the services to the residents of the county at one of eight locations plus a satellite facility at the AAA office on Westshore Blvd. in Tampa. Established by the Florida Constitution, the Hillsborough County Tax Collector’s Office, like its counterparts throughout the state, is an independent government agency and Belden is a constitutional officer. County tax collectors are elected for a four-year term every Presidential election year. Belden was first elected in 1998, taking the place of Melvin Smith who had retired. The independence of the Tax Collector’s Office is necessary to serve citizens and both local and state agencies as it: • Collects property taxes for every local government agency that levies taxes • Issues Florida Driver Licenses and ID cards, and processes motor vehicle registrations and titles on behalf of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles • Issues hunting and fishing licenses on behalf of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission • Manages local revenue programs, such as issuing business tax licenses and collecting tourist development taxes.

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Belden recently fought a state initiative to privatize the centralized distribution of license plates, a move that would have cost motorists more money while decreasing service. The customers served by the Tax Collector’s Office include residents, business owners, and government agencies such as schools, libraries, and local port and transit authorities. “Consequently, we are a vital link between citizens and the many different programs that affect them,” he said. Annually, Belden’s office collects and distributes more than $1.5 billion and processes over 2.5 million transactions, a significant responsibility requiring multiple offices throughout the county, more than 325 skilled staff members and data systems matched to the scope of its responsibilities. Despite those significant revenues, the Tax Collector’s office is not funded from tax dollars. “We are a fee-forservices office,” said Belden. “The fees and commissions we collect for services provided are used to fund our operating budget, which is approved by the Florida Department of Revenue. I am proud to note that the volume of our work combined with cost-effective operations results in fee revenues well beyond our approved budget. These ‘unused’ fees are returned to local government agencies to fund vital county services. This means “we offer tax collection services at the lowest possible cost to taxpayers,” said Belden. The Tax Collector’s current budget is $25 million. A major portion of taxes collected come from real estate property taxes.

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“Valuations have been reduced over the last few years as a result of economic conditions and that has been a significant factor in the reduction of fees returned from a high of $22 million to $11 million most recently, but that is still a noteworthy figure,” he said. It’s interesting to note that it was the ups and downs of the real estate market that were a factor in Belden’s decision to seek public office. “I was involved in real estate development in the area with a number of partners, and while we were successful, there were risks,” said Belden. “As a married man with a family, that was a concern. On the other hand, the private sector experience gave me the skills that have helped me make our office even better.” Belden also notes his post is one not associated with controversy, an added attraction for him. Public service was another factor. “I come from a family of over-achievers and people concerned about helping others.” A Tampa native, Belden has three sisters, including Sharon Belden Polo, who was Miss Florida in 1991. While attending University of Florida, Belden’s father, Doug Sr., was a four-sport letterman - the only one noted at that time. In addition, he was elected to Tampa’s City Council at the age of 26. Doug Sr. died at the age of 45 when young Belden was only 17 years old. His mother died when he was 28. “My grandfather, Dr. Edward L. Flynn, was the most influential person in my life.” Dr. Flynn became the first fighter in history to win three championships in one year - the national Golden Gloves, the national Amateur Athletic Union, and the W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


Olympics. He was the first Olympic gold medalist from Florida, taking that honor in 1932. Dr. Edward Flynn was an oral surgeon and his brother was an obstetrician. They shared an office and often provided free medical services to people in the community without insurance, including police officers, firefighters, nuns, and the poor. “My father and grandfather taught me the importance of leadership and diversity – and the importance of getting along with everyone regardless of color, gender, or socio-economic level.”

As to the future, Belden will probably run for one more term and then dedicate his time volunteering for charitable organizations. He hopes to be remembered “as a good leader who was fair and treated his employees well. I hope people will recognize that I accomplished what I promised the citizens of Hillsborough County.” For additional information about the Hillsborough County Tax Collector’s office, visit: http:/ / www.hillstax.org

Growing up in South Tampa, Belden counts many notable Tampa families among his friends and business associates. His lifelong friends include Steve Swindal, John Twomey, Ed Flom, Joe Cordell, Jr., Howard Frankland, Mackie Paniello, and others. Belden was also business partners with the late industrialist Jim Walter and his son, Robert. Belden takes particular pride in the accomplishments of his office. “What I promised the people of Hillsborough County during my first campaign has taken place and we continue to work hard to improve,” he said. Attesting to the success of the Tax Collector’s office is the Governor’s Sterling Award in 2008 and the Governor’s Sustained Performance Excellence Award in 2011. Belden is quick to note the efforts of his staff for these honors and their ongoing commitment to service. “We continually seek input from customers and employees on how we’re doing and what we can do better,” he said. Keeping staff motivated and engaged has been a challenge in the last several years in the midst of no pay raises due to a poor economy. However, Belden tries to keep his employees enthusiastic about their jobs. “I make it a point to reach out to my staff and do things that reflect my appreciation for their hard work and commitment to our office. Though we cannot provide pay increases at this time due to budget constraints, we offer semi-annual performance days off for employees if the organization achieves our customer satisfaction performance targets,” he said. Belden’s staff is 74 percent female, and the diversity of his workforce mirrors the diverse population of Hillsborough County. Belden credits his son as being the most motivating factor in his life. “My pride and joy is my son, Doug, 21. He is my heart and soul and my best friend,” he said. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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2014 Forms Available April 1st

WW W.IN THEFI EL DM AG AZ INE. COM

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Growums at Springhead by Sarah Holt

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etting youngsters to eat their vegetables can often try the patience of the most saintly parent. Many children don’t want to try new things, the offered food doesn’t look appealing to them, they just don’t want to eat it, the excuses go on and on. Now, I’ve got a secret for you. Ready? Let them grow their own food! To begin, In The Field and Growum’s staff headed to Springhead Elementary to work with third grade students, assisting them in the set up of their gardens. A variety of gardens are available, including the Taco Garden, which includes jalapeno pepper, iceberg, tomato and cilantro seeds, the Salad Garden that includes romaine lettuce, carrots, cucumber and Roma tomato seeds, the Pizza Garden, with Roma tomato, basil, oregano and bell pepper seeds, the Ratatouille Garden has eggplant, tomato, bell pepper and zucchini seeds, the Herb Garden has oregano, cilantro, parsley and basil seeds, and finally, the Stir-Fry Garden includes broccoli, Bok Choy, carrot and sugar snap pea seeds. Armed with a number of Growums “Garden in a Boxes,” it was our mission to get these children involved in the preparation and planting of a garden. The first thing was to prepare the boxes for the transplanting of the seedlings so they will be ready to go. Warm water is added to a plastic bag that contains block of Growum’s magic soil. Then the fun begins. The students had to break the magic soil up into a useable form to put

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in the box so it would be ready to go. The adults seemed to be having just as much fun as the kids! Once the boxes were set up it was time to plant the seeds in the specially prepared tray. Water was used once again, seeds were planted and markers added. Then the waiting began. I’m sure the students are checking their trays regularly to watch the sprouts emerge from the soil. The learning doesn’t end there. You can register your garden on the Growums web site and the characters come to life! Duke the Cuke, Carin the Carrot, Frank Cilantro, Elvis Parsley and a host of others make learning about gardening and vegetables so much fun! And what child will be able to resist trying the vegetables they had a hand in growing and nurturing? The students are also learning an invaluable lesson. They are learning where their food comes from. They also learn responsibility. From its inception in 2004, In The Field magazine has been reaching out to those involved in agriculture, as well as those who are generations removed from farming and ranching. It has never been more important than it is today to teach the population how there food is grown. These third graders will learn a new appreciation for the dedication it takes and hopefully learn to like a new vegetable. •

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Extension Service Cover-Up

What’s The Story? Lynn Barber, Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Agent Hillsborough County and UF/IFAS Extension

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any people last winter asked: What is the Hillsborough County Extension Service trying to cover-up? The answer is simple. We’re trying to protect plants in the Bette S. Walker Discovery Garden we think we can’t live without! We’re certain you will see our ‘Cover-Up’ again this year, too! Plant coverings are frost protection versus cold protection. Covers can be sheets, quilts, or frost/freeze cloth and should be in place before the sun goes down. Other than frost/freeze cloth, the covers must be removed during daylight. Frost/freeze cloth may remain in place for several days as air and light flow through the cloth. Plastic is not a good choice because it transfers the cold onto the plant. You can, however, put plastic on top of the sheet or quilt during windy freezes or on very cold nights. The covering you select must extend to the ground to capture heat from the soil and provide wind protection. You can make a frame over the plant you are covering, then place the covering on top of the frame. This way, nothing touches the plant itself. A cardboard box large enough to fully cover the plant is another option. Even though you have covered your plants, an additional source of heat may be needed. Christmas tree lights—not LED because they do not provide heat—or a light bulb may provide enough heat to protect your plant from freezing. Covering tropical plants in your landscape and those not hardy in your zone may help those plants survive cold weather. If you can’t live without tropical plants and they have not survived the past few winters, you may need to plant them in containers so you can move them from your landscape to your porch, lanai, or garage. Your garage may well be 10-plus degrees warmer than the outside temperature, which is another option for plant storage during freezing temperatures. Container plants can be covered to the ground or grouped together and covered. Don’t encourage new plant growth by pruning or fertilizing because the plant will be more prone to cold damage. Pruning alters the hormone balance resulting in a growth flush. There are two options on pruning. The first is to delay pruning post-freeze until you see new growth and after the risk of a future freeze passes. Then prune beyond the point of black or brown stem colW W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

oration. The damaged plant material insulates and protects the live parts of the plant. The second option is to prune all dead plant material and freeze damage after the freeze. This makes it easier to cover and protect the plant if a freeze occurs before spring. Healthy plants are less prone to cold damage and more resistant to insect damage or disease. Landscape plants need less fertilization in the fall because their nutrient intake is smaller that time of year. Slightly moisten the soil before a freeze or near-freeze because moist soil releases more heat than dry soil. Hand watering the ground beneath the plant helps. This is a great time of year to mulch now that it has cooled off. Maintain a three-inch layer of mulch after it settles. Mulch helps regulate the soil temperature and protects the plant roots. After a freeze you should check to determine if your plant needs water. The leaves could be losing water while frozen water remains in the soil. Applying water to the soil will provide both a thaw and water for your plant at the same time. Practice the first principle of Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM, which is Right Plant, Right Place. Consider sun/shade, wet/dry, mature size, soil type and pH. Cold sensitive ornamentals should be planted in an area where air flows freely. Use screening, fences, and landscape design where multiple plants are located strategically for protection. Well-drained soil enhances root growth and stability. Plants in the shade become dormant earlier in the fall and stay that way until later in the spring. You can reduce the cold injury the plant will suffer if you plant it under a tree canopy because the evening temperature is higher. Shade-thriving plants have less moisture loss than full sun-loving plants. Sun-loving plants living in shady conditions are less cold tolerant. Most perennials are root hardy. While the foliage will die back to the ground, new growth will appear in the spring. Be patient because it can take several months before shoots are visible above the ground. For assistance with horticultural questions, call: 813-744-5519 or visit us at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, 5339 County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. More gardening information is available at: http:/ / hillsborough.ifas.ufl.edu and http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Remember to reuse, reduce and recycle.

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A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Predatory Flatworm (Bipalium kewense)

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ardening in Florida is a cherished yearlong pastime in. For many gardeners, the creation of a private paradise is alluring enough, for others, it is regaining a connection with the earth. If you’re anything like me, the enchantment results from the variety of creatures that can be discovered while tending the garden. The predatory flatworm (Bipalium kewense), is commonly called a hammerhead worm because its head resembles that of a hammerhead shark. A closer look at this extraordinary worm exemplifies the amazing adaptations of even the simplest of animals. Bipalium kewense is a species of predatory land flatworm of the family Geoplanidae, which as a group, play an important role in the soil ecosystem by feeding on earthworms, snails, slugs, termites and other invertebrates. Unable to retain water, flatworms are vulnerable to humidity and environmental variations and by their virtue, an important indicator species for monitoring environmental changes. Because flatworms are limited in their natural ability to spread, specific species are associated with corresponding fauna or groups of animals found together in an ecosystem. Monitoring flatworm populations can give scientist a heads up on environmental changes that can affect the flatworms associated fauna. The nature of this beast will fascinate some and horrify others. Over half of the known flatworm species are parasitic to human and livestock populations. Fortunately, Bipalium kewense is excluded from the parasitic population and is every bit the hunter as the largest of predators. Predatory flatworms have chemical sensing organs under the head or along its underside. The predatory flatworm tracks its prey at night using chemical sensing organs located under its head. It stalks slugs, snails and worms by following the mucus path they have left behind. Once found, Bipalium kewense pins its prey to the ground and entangles it in a slimy discharge. The pharynx is an extensible tube located about in the middle of the body that connects the mouth to the intestine and comes into play next by releasing an enzyme for external digestion and later to consume its liquefied meal. The half moon shape of the head is the distinguishing feature of Bipalium kewense that gives it the common name of hammerhead worm, on it are pigmented eyespots (ocelli) that function as photoreceptors to help the worm avoid light. The widest section of the head

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terminates with the auricles which provide a sense of touch as well as detect certain chemicals. The apparent gliding movement of the flatworm is a result of tiny cilia (hair like structures) moving to propel the flatworm over a thin stream of mucus. The mucus is thick enough that it is sometimes used to lower the worm down from plants as if it were a rope. The ability of flatworms to regenerate makes it essentially immortal and has attracted scientists to study this animal in research related to human aging. Flatworms are asexual and reproduce by shedding fragments of their body. Each fragment matures into a clone of the parent. If a flatworm is wounded or even cut in half, the existing cells at the wound site will multiply to create blastema, a group of cells capable of regeneration. The blastema will differentiate to regenerate any body part or organ needed. Reportedly, a complete organism can develop from a fragment of only 1/279 the parent’s size. If the head of the flatworm is sliced in half down the center, a second head is likely to grow. Interestingly, these worms are even known to consume their own tissue as a food source when other resources dwindle. In nature, these worms live in shaded humid environments such as leaf litter or under large rocks and logs. You may see them on concrete surfaces after a heavy rain. Natural fragmentation occurs a couple times per month causing exponential population growth in small gardens and nurseries that can easily overwhelm a soil ecosystem. Because earthworms seem to be a favored meal for the predatory flatworm, these worms can quickly become a devastating threat, especially for worm farmers. Commercial horticultural practices and the distribution of potted plants is the biggest contributor in the dispersion of the predatory flatworm. Once established these populations are difficult to eradicate without significant damage to other soil organisms. An easy way to attract flatworms to a central location for manual removal is to provide a habitat for them, a burlap sack or large sheet of plywood works well if the soil is kept damp. Flatworms can be collected during daylight hours for a rewarding observation experience at night. If your ambition is to eradicate the flatworm from your garden paradise so it will benefit from the earthworm population, coating flatworms with diatomaceous earth should do the trick, remember cutting them in half will be counterproductive. • W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Powered by

Eggrolls By Libby Hopkins

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ggrolls, fried chicken and French fries, is your mouth watering reading those few words? Does the smell of these foods bring back memories of family gathering and good times or does it remind you of being stuck in traffic? That’s right, I said stuck in traffic. Well, that’s what some commuters have told Bill Short of Tampa. They tell him that the exhaust from his 2003 VW Jetta TDI smells like eggrolls or French fries frying. Motorcyclists especially dislike being stuck behind him in traffic. “They don’t typically like the smell of French fries or eggrolls right in their face as we travel down the road,” Short said. You see, his Jetta doesn’t run on gas, it runs on grease! Grease he gets from restaurants or churches. “I have been fortunate to get the oil I use from churches that do Friday night fish fries and a couple of restaurants that believe in the green message I preach,” Short said. For the last five years, Short has owned and operated Gulfcoast Dental Repair, a small business that repairs the drills and instruments of dentist and dental hygienists. Part of Short’s business was driving around to the different dental offices in the Tampa Bay area to pick up and deliver the drills and instruments that needed repair. With gas prices edging on $4 a gallon, this was a huge expense that affected his profitability. He started looking for more economical ways to handle the deliveries. “I looked at hydrogen add-ons to my gas vehicle, converting to natural gas powered cars and even swapping computer chips in the car,” Short said. “They all seemed to be pipedreams or too expensive to make a conversion or even toxic.”

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fied ads for $300. According to the Greasecar website, a converted car runs off of a two tank fuel system. “The vehicle’s existing diesel tank and filter will supply diesel fuel to the engine at start up and shut down. After start up, radiator fluid will transfer heat from the engine to the heat exchange in the Greasecar fuel system. These heat exchanges will heat the vegetable oil in the fuel filter, line and fuel tank. The heat will reduce the viscosity of vegetable oil so that it’s similar to diesel and can be injected into the engine properly. When the vehicle is being shut down for a period long enough for the fuel to cool, the vegetable oil must be purged from the fuel system and replaced with diesel for the next start up. Purging generally takes around 30 seconds and can be done while driving with the push of a button on the Greasecar controls.” This system is designed to work with many diesel cars and trucks. The most common vehicles used for conversion are Volkswagens, Mercedes, Chevys, Fords, GMC and Dodges. The exhaust from a car that runs on grease or vegetable oil is less harmful as well. If the fuel your car runs on is derived from fossil fuels, all carbon contain in the fuel eventually ends up as excess carbon dioxide. If your car runs on vegetable oil, you are emitting c02 that has already been removed from the atmosphere.

He even thought a diesel car may be an answer. “I figured that diesel is 20 percent more expensive but you get as much as 40 percent in better mileage,” Short said. “If I switched to a diesel car, I would save $2000 a year in fuel cost, but then again the cost to switch cars from gas to diesel became prohibitive.”

Short said conversion kit cost him roughly $1200-$1500, but he gets his grease for free, so he’s ahead of the game. “For 8000 miles I use one tank of diesel and multiple tanks of free oil, I actually get 177 miles to the dollar and I calculated I saved over $4000 in fuel,” Short said. “ But the real reward is the bottom line for my business.” He has also found more ways to save money with his converted car. He has learned how to recycle the oil and makes his own filters. “I look for really frugal ways to filter the oil,” Short said. “One example is instead of buying premade filters that can run $10 a pack, and I use old jeans I buy from thrift stores for $2, which works great!”

That’s when he found Greasecar.com, which is a website that sells kits to convert your car to run on vegetable oil. The site was started in 2000 by a Hampshire College student named Justin Carven after he converted a 1983 VW Quantum Turbo-Diesel he found in the classi-

Short hopes to set up a co-operative with other like minded people and share the benefits of waste vegetable oil. For more information on how to convert your car to run on vegetable oil, you can visit the Greasecar website at www.greasecar.com.

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WE’VE

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PREPARATION

RECIPES

No-Bake Strawberry Cheesecake

Beat cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Fold in whipped topping. Spoon mixture into graham crumb crust. Refrigerate for 2 hours. Once the cheesecake has set, garnish with sliced strawberries and serve. For even more strawberry flavor, try adding our strawberry syrup to the top of the cheesecake while it chills in the refrigerator. Don’t forget this recipe in the summer months when you don’t want to heat up your kitchen. In that case, substitute the sliced fresh Florida strawberries with thawed and macerated Florida strawberries for that familiar Florida taste!

Strawberry-infused Bourbon Fresh strawberries Bourbon Pretty much everyone loves cheesecake. Its rich flavor and velvety smoothness is probably only bested by a great crème brûlée. The problem with cheesecake, and coincidentally crème brûlée, is the difficulty found when trying to make one. The oven has to be the perfect temperature and the humidity has to be just right or else you end up with a dry, cracked and ugly cheesecake. It might all taste the same but it sure won’t look all that appetizing! Baking the cheesecake in a water bath can help but it isn’t a sure-fire solution. Once out of the oven you have to wait overnight for it to cool before you can give it a taste. You know what the solution is? A no bake cheesecake! This recipe comes from the great Allrecipes.com, requires just five ingredients and can be ready to share with you and yours in a short two hours!

1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened 1/3 cup white sugar 1 (12 ounce) container frozen whipped topping, thawed 1 (9 inch) prepared graham cracker crust 1/2 pint sliced fresh Florida strawberries

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PREPARATION The strawberry to bourbon ratio is up to you. The more strawberries you have, the stronger the strawberry flavor. Just make sure you have enough bourbon to cover the berries. Rinse the strawberries, then chop off the leafy tops known as calyx. Next, slice up the strawberries into small pieces and place into whatever air-tight vessel you choose. An old alcohol bottle or mason jar works best. Fill the vessel with your bourbon, making sure it covers the top of the berries with a little room to spare. Affix an airtight lid on the container, give it a little shake and put in a cool, dark space. No need to refrigerate or freeze, a cupboard or cabinet will work just fine. Give it a little shake once a day. After the bourbon has soaked up enough of the delicious Florida strawberries, about a week, it’s time to strain the strawberryinfused bourbon. If you have a chinois sieve, go ahead and give that a go. Otherwise a colander or funnel lined with cheesecloth or a coffee filter will work just fine. You can either discard the strawberries or use them as a tasty garnish for a Strawberry Shortcake or Strawberry Cheesecake. The strawberry-infused bourbon will keep in your refrigerator or freezer for up to a month.


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3315 ENGLISH RD., PLANT CITY, FL 33567 • WINFRED M. HARRELL - OWNER

P O Drawer L Plant City, FL 33564

12880 E US Highway 92 Dover, FL 33527

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Classifieds

Tel: 813.759.6909 NEW HOLLAND TC18 2001, 525 actual hours, 4X4. $4,950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

ANIMALS & NEEDS NUSIANCE HOG PROBLEM? Call 813-703-2330 ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. (813) 752-2230. Call Don Ammerman. www.ammermans.com Swaps July 14, 2013 and December 1, 2013. CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232 DOVE HUNTS Lithia area limited number of memberships still available. Call Fish Hawk Sporting Clays. 813-689-0490.

BUILDING SUPPLIES DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378 WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 T1-11 4 X 8 SHEET 5/8-INCH THICK B-grade $22.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378 NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378 MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378 $145.00

FARM EQUIPMENT JCB WORK MAX 800D UTV, less than 50 miles, 4X4, diesel. Used. $9,750. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY SHOP BUILT 14 FT TRAILER New tires & wheels $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MASSSEY HARRIS FERGUSON NO. 16 PACER With belly mower $1950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 KUBOTA L345 TRACTOR 34hp, 2wd. $4,250 Call Alvie (813)759-8722 KUBOTA Mid-Mount Mower Deck. Model RC 60-21B, 60 inch cut. Excellent condition! $595 Call 813-759-2348.

MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722 SNAPPER PRO 50 Zero turn mower, 36" cut, kawasaki engine, 43 hrs. $3,250 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 SHAVER 5O STUMP GRINDER 3pt. lift. Excellent condition. $2,950 Call Alvie 813-8722

FOR SALE KITCHEN CABINETS All wood kitchen cabinets. Call Tedd 813-752-3378 14KT GOLD AMMOLITE RING Unique Multi-colored fossil gem with unique mounting. Size 8 $250 or best offer. Call 863-370-8891 HORSE ACTION PAINTINGS Set of six delightful watercolor on ink paintings of horses in action by Burdick. Three mostly bluish and three goldish/brown. Various sizes. Professionally matted and gold framed. Asking $525 for the set. 863-326-9845 HAY FOR SALE Round bale, 100 available. Call 863-287-3091 TOP GRADE TANZANITE RING 18KT GOLD Top grade, 18kt. Beautiful piece of jewelry. 1.05kt round nice blue gem with channel side diamonds. Size 7-1/2 $1,100 Call 863-370-8891

JOBS CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In T he Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

HUSTLER X1 Zero Turn mower. Loaner, 88 hours, 60” cut, 31hp Kawasaki. $8,100 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

MISC. PRIVATE INVESTOR Will consider any situation. 813-986-9141

REAL ESTATE WALDEN LAKE EAST Desirable Walden Lake home! 3/2, NEW Kitchen all stainless steel appliance’s. Ready to sell. Call Malissa Crawford @ 813-967-0168 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 FOR LEASE 24 Acre Farm 5" Well Gulf City & Willis Road. Ruskin FL. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 FOR LEASE 15 acre for hay. State Road 70 & Vernon Road. Manatee County. Call or email Lee@leepallardyinc.com 813-355-6274 MOUNTAIN HOME Located in Blairsville Georgia! Private home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, unfurnished basement, nice kitchen, sunroom, back deck for cooking out. Nestled in the trees, cool enough that there is no AC. Lots of outbuildings. A must see! MLS#212679, $180,000. 2.47 acres wooded, low maintenance. Call Jane Baer with Jane Baer Realty 1-800-820-7829 38+ ACRE PROPERTY Perfect for ranch or fish farm. Zoned Ar, Zoning allows division. Located close to Sun City Center and small airport. Possible seller financing. Call Barbara Hutcheson 813-505-1769

LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES

FORD 3400 INDUSTRIAL TRACTOR With loader, skid steer attached. $7,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

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