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VOL. 10 • ISSUE 2

Feature Carl Grooms

2013 Agriculturist of the Year

Page

54

Cover Photo by: Stephanie Humphrey

Second Chance at a New Life

Farm to Table

Nights of Shimmering Lights

UF IFAS Extension

Market Watch

One-Handed Hunter: John Stewart

Page 10 Page 15

Page 17

Page 64

Page 67 Page 70

Tampa Bay Fishing Report

FREE Thanksgiving Dinners

Page 18

Page 74

Rocking Chair Chatter

Heritage Harvest

Page 22

Page 77

Pomelos

Page 35

Kenneth Parker

RMCA

Personal Water Number

Page 80

Page 38 Native Holly Days in Florida

Page 83

Mosaic / CF Industries

Page 43

Continued Community Support

Page 46

Tampa - Urban Planned Forest

Page 88

Health Care Reform Compliance

Page 94

Meals On Wheels Pet Service

Page 48 Recipes

Study on Copper for Tomato Bacterial Diseases

Hillsborough County Fair Results

Hillsborough Soil & Water Conservation Results

Page 50 Page 60

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

December 2013 December 2013

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Publisher/Photography Karen Berry Editor-In-Chief Al Berry Senior Managing Editor/ Associate Publisher Sarah Holt Editor Pasty Berry It seems that often time I get so busy I forget to enjoy life. Everything is full of hustle and bustle, especially during the holiday season. More and more people seem to attack, pushing and shoving like they are trying to get to the last piece of pie at the family gathering. I’m guilty. I get so busy doing “things” that time passes by and it seems all I have to show for it is fatigue. We fly from one holiday to the next, not taking the time to consider what the holiday’s are about. Seriously, when did you see the first Christmas decorations? It’s become a race to see who can decorate earliest, the most, the tackiest, then a race to get in line for the best sales. It’s time we slow down. Take each holiday as it comes. Cherish them, the time spent with family and the true meaning of the celebration. Luke 2:9-14: And behold, an angel of the Lord stood before them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were greatly afraid. Then the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid, for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy which will be to all people. For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this will be the sign to you: You will find a Babe wrapped in swaddling cloths, lying in a manger.” And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying: “Glory to God in the highest, And on earth peace, goodwill toward men!” Take the time to enjoy Christmas this year. Enjoy the time spent with family and loved ones. You will be better off for it, and perhaps a little more well rested to start of 2014. Merry Christmas to you and the most prosperous of New Years!

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December 2013

Office Manager Bob Hughens Sales Manager Danny Crampton Sales Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Melissa Nichols Creative Director/Illustrator Juan Alvarez Photography Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey Staff Writers Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Contributing Writers Woody Gore Les McDowell ABC Pizza..................................................19 Ace Air Conditioning & Electric...........93 Ag Technologies.......................................31 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers............52 Antioch Feed & Farm Supply..............109 Aquarius Water Refining......................103 Arrowhead Archery.................................57 Astin Strawberry Exchange..................93 Astin Farms..............................................96 Bankers South Group.............................76 Bill’s Transmissions.................................73 Bingham....................................................87 Brandon Auto Services, Inc...................85 Brandon Farms Market..........................92 Brandon Regional Hospital...................59 Brewington’s Towing & Recovery........44 Broke & Poor...........................................42 Cameron Financial Service...................23 Cecil Breeding Farm..............................30 CF Industries Enterprises, Inc...............81 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive...................34 Country Village Power Equipment.......21 Country Village Power Equipment......34 Cycle Sports Concept...........................104 Dad’s Towing............................................32

Dr. Barry Gaffney, O.D. PA...............................11 Dr. Pat Almerico.................................................13 Driscoll’s.............................................................73 Dean’s Ride......................................................102 East Coast Ag Products, Inc...........................42 Effective Edge Communications, Inc............98 Everglades Farm Equipment..........................112 Farm Bureau Insurance-Valrico....................90 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner............47 Farm Credit.........................................................71 Felton’s.................................................................51 Fischbach Land Co...........................................45 Fla Dpt of Ag & Consumer Svcs...................65 Florida Mineral, Salt & Ag Products...........108 Florida Strawberry Festival...........................12 Florida Strawberry Growers Asso................44 Forbes Road Produce........................................14 Fred’s Market Restaurant................................23 Gator Ford.........................................................40 Grimes Hardware Center.................................14 Grove Equipment Service...............................58 Grove Equipment Service...............................99 Gulf Coast Turf & Tractor...............................37 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply..............................3 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................93 Haught Funeral Home......................................72 Haystack Farms.................................................93 Helena Chemical-Tampa.................................69 Highland Corporation.....................................23 Hillsboro Bank..................................................24 Hillsborough Community College...................61 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau...............90 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau..............105 Home Protection Pest Control......................103 Hopewell Funeral Home..................................29 Huff Muffler..........................................................79 Hydraulic Hose & Cylinder, Inc.......................36 Jarrett-Scott Ford..............................................2 Johnson’s Barbeque.........................................64 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm................................93 Keel & Curley Winery......................................63 Ken’s Well Drilling & Pump Service..............74 Key Plex..............................................................66 Loetscher Auto Parts.........................................79 Malissa Crawford..............................................52 Mark Smith Excavating....................................93 Meryman Environmental.................................36 Mosaic..................................................................78 MST Sod Equipment, Inc...............................105 Myers Cleaners.................................................68 O’Conner Automotive.......................................16 Pathway BioLogic..............................................75 Patterson Companies.......................................49 Patterson Companies.......................................49 Plant City Homestyle Buffet.............................5 Plant City Tire & Auto....................................93 Platinum Bank..................................................62 Polk County Youth Fair....................................96 QLF Specialty Products..................................32 Railroad & Industrial Fed Credit Un............40 RCS Company of Tampa.................................79 Savich & Lee Wholesale................................26 Savich & Lee Wholesale................................27 Seafood Dive.....................................................86 Seedway..............................................................47 Shrimp & Co. Express......................................13 Silent Technology, Inc......................................45 South Fl Baptist Hospital..................................7 Southside Stores LLC......................................53 Southside Stores LLC.......................................91 Southwestern Produce....................................27 Stephanie Humphrey.......................................82 Super Service...................................................82 Syngenta............................................................97 The Hay Depot...................................................41 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort................61 Trinkle,Redman,Swanson,Coton,D................69 Verti-Gro, Inc....................................................68 Walden Lake Car Wash & Service..............42 Wasabi Japanese Steak House.......................9 Willie’s................................................................82 Zaxby’s................................................................111 WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

December 2013

7 BC1302267-0713


100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121 100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

Dear Readers:

AATIME BE THANKFUL BUSYTO TIME FOR YOUR FARM BUREAU A BUSY TIME FOR YOUR FARM marketing andBUREAU more. Overall, agriculture has a significant

The very best of this holiday season to each of you and your Dear Readers: families. As we enter this wonderful time of the year it also marks the conclusion of some very important initiatives of Dear Readers: Farm Bureau here in Hillsborough and across the country.

I am both humbled and honored to have been elected president of YOUR Hillsborough County Last month we concluded our three-part legislative tour I am both humbled and honored to have Farm Bureau. All of us owe a debt of gratitude program. This is an important activity for all of usbeen as itto gives elected president of YOUR Hillsborough County president Danny Aprile for his years of usoutgoing an opportunity to bring together lawmakers, regulators Farm Bureau. All of us oweItopromise a showcase debt oftogratitude service to our organization. do my and representatives of agriculture some very to interesting operations that reflect Aprile the broad swath of agriculoutgoing president Danny his years of best to continue the momentum he for carried forth. tureservice in the Tampa region from Iaquaculture, to ourBay organization. promise toberries do myand vegetables beef andthe dairy operations, as well as a forth. good totocontinue momentum he carried Asbest a sixth generation Florida farmer, I know the deal more. It is important for these stakeholders to see the many challenges and opportunities all of us have diversity and importance of our industry and what indisixth generation Florida farmer, I know the inAs thea agriculture industry and that is an industry vidual members are doing to sustain their operations and many challenges and opportunities all of us have that is global. Our major challenge is to continue to help assure we will continue to enjoy the abundant and the agriculture andAthat is an industry toinproduce the food our growing population must value-priced products ofindustry agriculture. special thanks to all thatwhile is global. Our major tocontinue continue the lands devoted to farming ofhave those who participated for thechallenge time they is devoted to this produce the and food our growing totodiminish. The good thing is that the market important endeavor the interest they population have shown. must have the lands devoted to farming for ourwhile products continues to expand. Ourcontinue task This overall and continuing educational process also diminish. The good thing that the market isto to effectively meet those dualis challenges while involved elementary students through the Ag-Venture for our products continues to expand. Our task protecting our precious environment. I am confident program, plus participation in the Heritage Harvestwhile in is are to effectively we up to thatmeet task those and I dual look challenges forward to event helping downtown Tampa as part of Farm Bureau’s national Farm environment. I am confident usprotecting all do ourour partprecious to assure that we do so. City program that helps to bring the story of agriculture to we are up to that task and I look forward to helping our friends in town. This is an important story for all. us me all do assure wenew do so. Let alsoour tellpart youto about thethat other officers elected yourplace board lastworld month. They are: enjoy There is nobyother in the where residents Let mearray alsooftell you aboutand the other new officers Vice President Will Womack, Treasurer Ray Wood, the broad high quality attractively priced goods asSecretary iselected the caseby in your our country. All our industry board lastaspects month. They are: Michelle Williamson andofMember-Atcontribute to Burnette. that abundance and work their Vice Bill President WillMy Womack, Treasurer Ray Wood, Large thanks to hard eachtoofsustain them and operations. We must all continue to work together to assure Secretary Michelle Williamsontoand Member-Atour board for their willingness serve. future generations will share in that abundance. As an indusLarge Bill Burnette. My thanks to each of them and try, agriculture is very important to the county’s economic board willingness toto serve. Asour I am surefor all their of you have come realize well-being. The most readily available annual sales figures vacation time is over. We are particularly busy for agricultural commodities reflect 2011 sales and theyatexAs I am sure all of you have come to realize Farm Bureau. This month we are completing the ceeded $832 million. Leading commodities were strawberries vacation is over.followed We are particularly busy at third of ourtime legislative tours during which we take and vegetable production, by ornamental plants, Farm Bureau. This month areseveral completing the elected and officials to of our aquaculture andappointed beef cattle. Our we industry generates a good deal of additional local economic supporting third of ourbusinesses legislative duringby we take agricultural intours thisimpact areas sowhich they can see related businesses such assome banking, legal services, elected and officials to several of our agriculture at appointed work, of the best management agricultural areas soand theylearn can see practices that businesses have been in putthis into place of agriculture at work, some of the best management practices that have been put into place and learn of

impact at the dinner table and to our economic well-being and that multi-faceted story is something we want everyone to come to know and appreciate. We will continue to do our part to make that happen.

the challenges our local industry partners face as they to produce the high products You strive can help, too. You don’t have quality to be a farmer or rancher the challenges our local industry partners as our markets demand. Those tours are hardface work to belong to Farm Bureau. In addition to supporting our they striveindustry tomany produce theofhigh quality products and represent hours support from our Farm important and helping to assure our future, our markets demand. Those tours areits hard industry colleagues. Weyour thank them and those Bureau membership for family brings ownwork rewards. Those member “perks” runwho theofgamut fromfrom special and represent many hours support ourauto legislators and regulators take the time to purchase andWe communications specials to a range industry colleagues. thank them and those learn first incentives hand about agriculture in our area and of savings on car rentals, hotels and theme park tickets. legislators and take the time to If how and why weregulators need theirwho ongoing awareness, you haven’t checked out the benefits of belonging to Farm learn first hand about agriculture in our area and help and support. Bureau, please do. I believe the modest fee associated with how and why we need their ongoing awareness, family membership in Farm Bureau is a great deal. To learn help about and support. There’s more. Ag-Venture, ourjoins program for bringing more having your family ours through memberthe story of agriculture to children through school or ship in Farm Bureau, please visit: http://hcfarmbureau.org There’s more. Ag-Venture, bringing activities, is going onmore and information. weour willprogram again befor particicall 813/685-9121 for the story of agriculture children through school pating in Farm City Daystothrough which we bring This timeof ofisagriculture year is aon season of forbemany of our activities, going and wecelebration will again particithe story to our friends living in members. Christmas and Jewish people pating in Christians Farm Citycelebrate Days through which we bring Tampa. celebrate Hanukkah, also known as Festival of Lights the story of agriculture to our friends living in and Feast of Dedication. Many families traditionally celebrate Tampa. Lastly, if you are not a member of our Farm Bureau by sharing gifts and enjoying an abundance of food prepared family, please join us. It isn’t necessary that you be a from recipes that have been passed down through the Lastly,orif rancher you areofto not a member of our Bureau farmer Please visit generations. Each usjoin. has been blessed far Farm more than we http:// hcfarmbureau.org family, please join us. It isn’t necessary that you a or call 813/685-9121 forbe deserve. I am most thankful that 2000 years ago a child was farmer or rancherand to His join. Please visitThe perfect gift more information. born in Bethlehem name is Jesus. http:// hcfarmbureau.org orlife calland 813/685-9121 from God, Jesus lived a sinless died on a crossfor to pay for my sins soI am that honored I could have everlasting. Whatever more information. Once again, to life be your president and your reason is thisfamily. season take time to be my very bestfor tocelebration you and your thankful for what you have and do for those Once again, I am honored to bea little yourextra president andin need. my very best to you and your family. Again, the very best of this holiday season from the Farm

Thank Bureauyou, family to yours.

Kenneth Kenneth Thank you,

Kenneth Parker - President Kenneth Parker - President

Board of Directors

8 88 8

Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Vice-President; Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board members: Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, BoardRoy of Directors Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Greg Lehman, Erin Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Vice-President; Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Ron Wetherington, and Ray Wood, Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board members: Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Judi Whitson, Executive Director Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Greg Lehman, Erin Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Ron Wetherington, and Ray Wood, INTIN HE F IELD M AGAZINE N OVEMBER 2013 W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM INTTHE HE FFIELD IELDM MAGAZINE AGAZINE DDecember ecember 2013 2013 Judi Whitson, Executive Director INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2013

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A Second Chance at a New Life By Libby Hopkins

It has been said that saving one dog will not change the world but surely for that one dog the world will change forever. Bill Gray of Second Chance Boxer Rescue (SCBR) in Plant City has been giving many unwanted dogs a new look on life. Gray rescues the dogs that no other rescues will touch. The ones who are blind, crippled, have behavioral problems or serious health issues. He doesn’t see the dog’s problems, he just sees a dog that needs a second chance at a good life since their first one didn’t turn out so well. “Second Chance is not a second chance for dogs, because that would presume they had a first chance that failed,” Gray said. “The majority of the dogs we rescue never had any chances, first, second, or otherwise. The name of our rescue refers to giving humans a second chance to provide a safe, healthy, and loving home and environment for our dogs, since most of these dogs come to us after they have been abused or neglected by their owners.” The mission of SCBR is to rescue, rehab, and re-home dogs throughout Florida that would be otherwise euthanized. The rescue is a non-profit corporation that relies solely on volunteers to get the work done. No one at the rescue receives compensation for his or her work. SCBR receives no funding from the government.Their adoption fees and donations from other dog lovers cover 10 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE December

their costs. “Donations come from all over the country,” Gray said. “I think what helps us is we have a strong Facebook following and we do our best to tell our dogs’ stories.” Some of their dogs even have their own Facebook pages, like Circles (www.facebook.com/pages/SCBRs-Circles). Circles was rescued by SCBR. He was a victim of animal abuse that left him with a spinal cord injury and unable to walk properly. SCBR raised enough funds to send him to a dog rehabilitation center in New Orleans called Dag’s House. The rescue is working on finding him a forever home that will be able to care for a special needs dog since Circles needs a doggie-wheelchair to get around. SCBR will be hosting a special event for Circles on February 8 at Gray’s home in Plant City.

Bill Gray of Second Chance Boxer Rescue in Plant City, Fla. has been giving many unwanted dogs a new look on life. Gray rescues the dogs that no other rescues will touch. The ones, who are blind, crippled, have behavioral problems or serious health issues. 2013

Another special needs dog that Gray rescued was Phoenix. “When Phoenix came from a Florida shelter, she was a scared girl who was thought to be potentially aggressive and blind, but after a short time with our rescue she was able to see again,” Gray said. Through numerous Facebook postings and donations to SCBR, Gray was able to come up with the money to pay for the surgery to get Phoenix’s sight back. Now she is a sweet girl who loves all the attention she can get. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Graham came to SCBR from a Pasco County Shelter. He is now currently with the rescue and learning how to be a normal fun-loving dog.

Circles was rescued by Gray and his rescue. He was a victim of animal abuse that left him with a spinal cord injury and unable to walk properly. SCBR raised enough funds to send him to a dog rehabilitation center in New Orleans called Dag’s House.

Second

Chance

Phoenix came to SCBR blind. The rescue raised enough money for Phoenix to have eye surgery to restore her vision.

SCBR also has some dogs that Gray refers to as “Compassionate care dogs.” These are dogs that are forever fosters because they have serious health problems or they have other behavior issues. These are the dogs that are near and dear to Gray’s heart and the majority of them live with him and his wife, Lisa at their home in Plant City, while others are in foster homes Gray personally found for the dogs. “These are the type of dogs we get and we love them,” Gray said. “There are five Boxer rescues in Florida and they all do a good job, but if there is a pure bred in the shelter, they will take it. By them doing that, it frees me up to take the ones nobody will take or want.” Gray is grateful for his volunteers and supports, if it wasn’t for them, he could not keep his rescue going. He is most thankful for Dr. Christy Layton from Timberline Pet Hospital and Resort in Plant City. “She is our medical advisor and we collaborate with Dr. Layton in an effort to help us understand medical issues that sometimes arise or exist with the dogs we rescue,” Gray said. “She assists us with making decisions in regards to their care. Dr. Layton sees the importance of rescue, and we are appreciative of the time and resources she donates, not only to SCBR, but to other animal rescues as well.” Dr. Layton has know Gray since before he started SCBR and she believes he is the type of caring person who makes decisions based solely on the needs of the animals in his rescue. “This is the reason I agreed to be the medical advisor for his rescue,” Layton said. “While his passion is Boxers, he has taken in many other types of dogs such as Pit Bulls, American Bulldogs, mixed breeds and even a Jack Russell Terrier all because no one else wanted them and they needed a safe place to be cared for until they can find a forever home.” If you would like to learn more about Second Chance Boxer Rescue or if you would like to make a donation to the rescue, you can visit them on the web at www.saveaboxer.org or you can call Bill Gray at 813-263-6450. If you would like to learn more about some of the dogs at SCBR, you can visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SecondChanceBoxerRescueInc WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW! • www.flstrawberryfestival.com FEB. 27 - MAR. 9, 2014 • PLANT CITY, FLORIDA

FLORIDA STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

®

Florida’s Best Family Recipe!

Artists Appearing on the Soundstage:

Shoji Tabuchi

Thu. Feb. 27, 3:30 $15 & $20

Love and Theft Sat. Mar. 1, 3:30 $15 & $20

Charley Pride Mon. Mar. 3, 3:30 $15 & $20

Lee Brice Wed. Mar. 5, 7:30 $20 & $25

STYX

Thu. Feb. 27, 7:30 $25 & $30

Little Big Town Sat. Mar. 1, 7:30 $40

Josh Turner Mon. Mar. 3, 7:30 $20 & $25

Ronnie Milsap Fri. Feb. 28, 3:30 $15 & $20

Thompson Square Sun. Mar. 2, 3:30 $25

Brenda Lee Tue. Mar. 4, 3:30 $15 & $20

Oak Ridge Boys 40th Anniversary Tour Thu. Mar. 6, 3:30 $15 & $20

Colt Ford

Fri. Feb. 28, 7:30 $15 & $20

Rascal Flatts “LIVE & LOUD” Tour 2014 Sun. Mar. 2, 7:30 $55

Kellie Pickler Tue. Mar. 4, 7:30 $15 & $20

Third Day Thu. Mar. 6, 7:30 $15 & $20

Crystal Gayle Wed. Mar. 5, 3:30 $15 & $20

John Anderson Fri. Mar. 7, 3:30 $15 & $20

Visit www.flstrawberryfestival.com or call 813-754-1996 now and get your tickets for the best seats available!

Free Grandstand Boyz II Men Fri. Mar. 7, 7:30 $20 & $25

Dustin Lynch Sat. Mar. 8, 3:30 $15 & $20

Jerrod Niemann Sat. Mar. 8, 7:30 $20 & $25

Easton Corbin Sun. Mar. 9, 3:30 $15 & $20

The Band Perry Sun. Mar. 9, 7:30 $40

Seating at 3:30 & 7:30pm is on a first come, first seated basis. Concert dates and times are subject to change

Mobile App

Alessi Bakery • Verizon Wireless • Florida’s Best • Images Everywhere! • CF Industries • Bionic Band AMSCOT • TECO • Stingray Chevrolet • Carolina Carports • Good Health Saunas • Netterfield’s Concessions HERSHEY’S ® • Southern Ford Dealers • Astin Farms • Candyland Warehouse • Florida Blue 12

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December 2013

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NOVEMBER 30 – DECEMBER 29

NIGHTS OF SHIMMERING LIGHTS SET FOR THIRD SEASON AT HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS By Jim Frankowiak

For the third consecutive year, families in the greater Tampa Bay area will again have the opportunity for a special holiday treat, a “Drive Thru” Holiday Light Show at the Hillsborough County Fairgrounds in Dover. Nights of Shimmering Lights season #3 will be lighting the night with a million twinkling lights from November 30 through December 29 as viewers drive through the one and one-half mile lighted trail with more than 1,000 lighted elements.  New for this year is the Light Express ride through the “mini” park in the Holiday Village.  “Visitors can watch the Rays and Sox slug it out in lights in our new baseball field,” said Stephanie Martin of Sunshine Illumination, producers of the show. “Children are sure to delight in the Story Book area with our new additions and we are urging all to plan some extra time to spend in the Holiday Village for a digital picture with Santa.”  There will also be an opportunity to watch a holiday movie “under the stars” while enjoying fresh, hot donuts or popcorn.

clude a labeled 25-foot outdoor extension cord,” she added.

The brainchild of two county residents – Stephanie Martin and her daughter, Amanda Yoke -- who “enjoy Christmas lights and spending quality time with our children,” the pair wanted to use the skills developed through nearly a decade of doing computerized animated lighting “to bring a new, lost-cost family entertainment option to the Tampa Bay area.” The over one mile, familyfocused drive takes visitors through 1,000 dazzling illuminated tunnels, wireframe displays and dancing Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lights. “All ages can enjoy the various themed areas at a leisurely pace in the comfort of their own vehicles,” said Martin.

The Christmas Village is also a drop off point for Toys for Tots and is filled with vendors and food options, including fresh donuts, popcorn and hot chocolate. The Village also serves as the departure point for Light Express tours through a special area.

This year the show will include the Field of Deer and Forest of Trees additions. The display is open to anyone in the community who would like to place a lighted deer or tree in memory of a departed loved one, friend or to honor someone. “Your loved one’s name will be added to the dedication banner located in the field/ forest area. There is no cost to add your deer or tree display,” said Martin. The displays were be placed Saturday, November 23 between noon and 4 p.m. A Nights of Shimmering Lights representative will assist in the placement of personal displays. “Trees or deer can be dropped off anytime at the fairgrounds. “We ask that they be tall enough to be seen from the show path and inWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

“This year we are also encouraging visitors to enter the Kris Mouse Hunt,” said Martin. Visitors must count how many times they see Kris during their visit and then enter the competition via the show’s website.  There will be a drawing January 10 to pick the $50 winner. The show is a “green” event in addition to an entertaining one, noted Martin. “We are proud to report that 98 percent of our displays and illuminations are presented with low power usage LEDs, which require only six percent of the power that a standard incandescent mini light uses. We also use two-dimensional wireframes which require 60 percent less lights than three-dimensional displays of the same size without any loss of enjoyment.”

Nights of Shimmering Lights opens at dark beginning November 30 through and runs through the holiday season, ending December 29. Sunday through Thursday nights the Light Park opens at 6 p.m. and closes at 9 p.m. The hours are extended to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights. The cost per vehicle is $15 Monday through Thursday and $20 Friday – Sunday.  There is no limit to the number of occupants per vehicle.  In addition to visiting the show’s  website: www.NOSL-TB.com, Checkout their link on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nights-of-Shimmering-Lights/114833988548675 for a behind the scenes look at the show set-up. The Hillsborough County Fairgrounds, site of Nights of Shimmering Lights, is located in Dover west of Brandon on State Road 60. The entrance to the fairgrounds is on Sydney-Washer Road just north of State Road 60. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Market Watch:

Duckweed Urban Market

By Libby Hopkins

I am always on the hunt for new and different markets. I feel they have that one of a kind shopping experience I don’t get from big box stores. On a recent trip to downtown Tampa, I stumbled upon the Duckweed Urban Market. Once I stepped inside, I knew I was in for a great shopping experience.

creatures like ducks and geese. Some species are even considered attractive, making them potentially appealing as ornaments in the garden.” Trombley-Owens said the couple just liked the way the plant looked and it’s indigenous to Florida, so they named the store after it.

I was immediately greeted as I walked in the door. I was taken by this quaint little market smack dab at the bottom of The Element high-rise apartment complex in downtown Tampa. I thought to myself that I had found an urban oasis and I did. The market offers local, organic produce, grass-feed beef, beer, wine and other local products, as well as art. If you are a Locavore like me, this is the place to be for all things local. The honey they stock comes from a neighbor who lives around the corner from the market.

The store is decorated with art from local artist and the Deatherage’s don’t charge the artist a fee to display and sell their art. “We try to keep everything local to the community so a lot of the artist we have featured in the store are people from the community,” Trombley-Owens said. The same goes for all the produce the store carries. It comes from local farms within a 50-mile radius of the store. “We try to stick to the Dirty Dozen concept,” said Jessica Moore, an employee at the market. “If it’s on the Dirty Dozen list, then get it from an organic farmer.”

I had the opportunity to talk with the market’s marketing manager, Jessica TrombleyOwens. She and her husband live in The Element and the market is one of the reasons they decided to live in downtown Tampa. “My husband and I moved here from Baltimore about a year ago and we loved the feel of the downtown area,” Trombley-Owens said. “The market was one of the reasons we decided to live in downtown Tampa.” They loved the “Mom and Pop” feel to the market.

Both Moore and Trobley-Owens feel the market is making a positive impact on the downtown area. In the current hustle and bustle society we live in nowadays, the mom and pop grocery stores have fallen by the way side, but things age changing. People are becoming more aware of what they are putting into their bodies and they are interested in where the food is coming from and how it’s produced. Duckweed Market is part of this growing awareness and they also feel very strongly about shopping local and putting money back into the local economy. “We have to support each other,” Trombly-Owens said. “It has to be this cumulative group that rises Ron James is the creator and baker of Sugarbuzz together because as a community, we have Deserts. He brings his delicious deserts from Orlando gotten so far away from that aspect.”

The market does have a mom and pop. They are the owners Brent and Michelle Deatherage. They originally opened the market on Polk Street in downtown Tampa back in 2011. The original store was only 600-square-feet which made shopping a difficult challenge in such a small space. The couple decided to to the Lakeland Downtown Farmer’s Curb Market every Saturday. His best seller is his chocolate relocate the store to its new home at The Duckweed Market has many new things chip cookies lightly sprinkled with sea salt. Element. Now they have 2500-square-feet planned for the upcoming year. They are of space to offer a juice bar, an a la carte currently hosting Wine Wednesdays every menu of ready to eat breakfast items, wraps, sandwiches, salads Wednesday which is a wine tasting that includes a 10 percent disand entrees. They are also planning on offering bulk food and count on any of the wines featured at the tasting. They are also expanding their freezer section in the near future. going to have live music each month and they are looking into starting a running club on Mondays. “People love us,” Moore said. So how did they come up with the name “Duckweed?” Because “Once people find us and they see all the cool stuff we have, they it is kind of an odd name for a market and not to mention, what are hooked.” She was right, because now I am hooked on Duckis Duckweed? I did some research and according to the Wise weed Market. If you would like to learn more about Duckweed Geek website (www.wisegeek.com), “Duckweed is a free-floating Market and the different events they have, you can visit them aquatic plant that grows in both still and running freshwater. on the web at www.duckweedurbanmarket.com or their Contrary to what one might expect from the name, no ducks Facebook page www.facebook.com/DuckweedUrbanare involved in the growth habits of the plant, although ducks Market. You can also call the market at 813-221-3825. undoubtedly feed on it when they find it growing. It provides Duckweed Market is located at 803 N. Tampa St. shelter for aquatic animals, in addition to nutrition for larger WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Winter Wade Fishing

Dan Shaw and his friend Jimmy Fitzgerald who is pictured with the 26 inch trout fished with Captain Woody Gore and trolled up a couple of nice Tampa Bay gag grouper: they also caught a good sized goliath and had one break us off on 85# leader.

December 2013 Fishing Report It’s that time of the year when we get those negative tides. You know the ones I’m talking about, where you can barely get the boat off the trailer. How about trying something different this winter? If you’ve never experienced this thing called Wade Fishing you’re in for a special treat. I’ve spent many hours wading Tampa Bay and catching plenty of fish. Just go to your favorite grass flat and get out of the boat or wade in from shore. Winter’s negative low tides create the perfect opportunity to catch plenty of fish and experience another world of fishing. Depending on the weather you might want to invest in a pair of wader’s or at least some hard soled dive boots to protect your feet. Other than that it’s just get in the water and go. One other piece of wading equipment I always found handy was one of those inexpensive, small, blow up boats. I’d load up an extra rod or two, my tackle box, and a small cooler, tie it to my waist with a small piece of nylon rope about 25 feet long and head out. The reason being, inevitably I’d get a half mile down the flat and something would happen to my rod or reel, but the small rubber boat saved the long trip back to the truck. Over the years, I’ve wade fished the South Shore of Tampa Bay from the Little Manatee River down past Port Manatee. These flats trap loads of trout, redfish, sheepshead and flounder. Many times you’re only walking in ankle deep water, but you’re pitching your lure or baits into deep depressions in the sandy holes and inner oyster bars, which are normally covered with water on higher tides. Many folks have good success with live shrimp, but as most of you know I’m an artificial guy. For me, I’ll always tie on a jig head and use a soft plastic tail. The simple reason for using an artificial lure is I can cover twice the area and, many times, catch twice the fish. With the negative low tides beginning to show up it’s a good time take advantage of some great wade fishing. Fortunately Tampa Bay and the surrounding areas offer some excellent shallow water to drop a line. 18

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Fort De Soto and Joe Island flats on the south end of Tampa Bay, or check out my old stomping grounds around the Cockroach Bay flats, but if you live north there’s always Weedon Island, Fourth Street, and the shallow waters north of the Courtney Campbell Causeway that offer great opportunities for wade fishing. SNOOK: Moving water and a livewell full of pilchards and pinfish will work, but don’t be surprised if you drag a redfish or gator trout off the same broken bottom grass flats. But if you’re looking to snag that snook of a lifetime, with the heart stopping action of a topwater lure, just tie on MirrOlure Top Dog Jr. and walk-the-dog, letting it rattle across that same broken bottom grass flat. Soon you’ll witness the most incredible strike as a giant snook crashes your lure. Always remember big snook are females and probably full of eggs so handle with care. Snap a quick photo, get her back in the water and revive her slowly. SPANISH MACKEREL: For those who love the drag screaming action of mackerel fishing, this is the time of year. If kingfish are your thing, hit the beaches and hard-bottoms close to shore for action that is sure to pick up as water temps come down. Anchor up and chum, or slow troll live baits or spoons. There are resident fish, but most of the giants are pelagic and follow the baitfish schools north in spring and south in fall. However, there are more big mackerel around Tampa Bay now than there have been in many years thanks to the gill net ban and commercial harvest regulations. These fish are huge for the species. Fish are five to six pounds and when they get to this size, they have tremendous speed, power and endurance, almost like small king mackerel. Finding them is fairly simple, just locate a spoil bar or inshore reef within five to eight feet of surface, surrounded by deeper open water of 10 to 20 feet. These are natural feeding areas that attract mackerel. Once you’re anchored up-tide from the reef or bar, start pitching a few sardines or greenbacks into the water. It they are close by it won’t take long before the feeding frenzy begins. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


On the second day of Dan Shaw and Jimmy Fitzgerald’s trip we fished for reds and caught several along with some nice trout up to 26 inches.

a and and had with her husb many topd he fis is av D rel with Jennifer Spanish macke banner day on 4 to 5 pounds. at ping the scale

Now put a live threadfin or greenback, nose hooked on a 2/0 longshank hook on a 50# hard leader tied to your 15# braid of your spinning reel. Mackerel are good table fare. For those you keep, bleed them promptly and get them on ice quickly. I put mine in a large heavy duty trash bag before putting them in my cooler. It keeps the cooler cleaner. At the cleaning table, fillet them and remove the skin or fillet them and leave the skin on for smoking. REDFISH: Redfish and oversized redfish are everywhere in the Bay. But if you’re having difficulty finding them, I tell you once again, simply locate a school of big mullet and fish right in the middle of them. The redfish bite for the last two months remains one of the best I have seen in three years. Every part of the Tampa Bay seems to hold multiple schools. Live greenbacks and of course cut baits and a circle hook seem to be the bait of choice, also threadfin herring, cut large greenbacks, cut pinfish, cut ladyfish, cut mullet. SPOTTED SEA TROUT: The big trout have started to show up on our flats along with plenty of slot fish. I like to find a good grass flat with plenty of potholes. Start by working the edges of as many potholes as possible and you are sure to find some worthwhile fish. Trout are a good species to work on your artificial bait skills, because they are

not too picky when it comes to food. One good artificial is a Gulp shrimp under a popping cork. Hook the shrimp just like you would a live one, which is through the carapace or head. Just cast out and pop the cork. The popping sound will draw the trout’s attention and you are sure to hook up. Trout no longer have a closed season. So, only take what you plan on eating for supper as they do not freeze well. Remember they are a fragile species and have a delicate slime coat, so please use a de-hooker and not your hand or net for the ones you release.

“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years, he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com

or give him a call at 813-477-3814

The Gill Net Ban: Which now appeared to be in jeopardy when Leon County Judge Jackie Fulford ruled that Amendment Three of the Florida Constitution, otherwise known as the net ban, was approved by a voter referendum in November 1994 by 73% of Florida’s voters. The amendment made it unlawful for the use of entangling nets (i.e., gill and trammel nets) in Florida waters. The use of other forms of nets, such as seines, cast nets, and trawls, was restricted, but not totally eliminated. For example, these types of nets could be used only if the total area of net mesh did not exceed 500 square feet. According to the Pensacola News Journal, the order issued the week of November 7th from the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee shuts down the gill netting, while the court considers the claims by net fisherman during the life of the WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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FIREPLACE FUEL AND SAFETY TIPS; REGULATIONS By Jim Frankowiak

This is the time of year when many families begin to use their fireplaces and burn wood to help offset the cost of heating fuel and electricity. Hillsborough Extension Forester Robert J. Northrop has a few safety tips and other advice to keep in mind while preparing to enjoy and savoring the warm glow of your fireplace: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Be sure the chimney and stovepipe were installed correctly in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and in compliance with local codes. Minimize creosote* formation by using proper stove size and avoid using low damper settings for extended periods of time. Have the chimney checked and cleaned routinely by a certified professional at least annually. Inspect it frequently, as often as twice a month if necessary, and clean when a creosote buildup is noted. Always operate your appliance within the manufacturer’s recommended temperature limits. Too low a temperature increases creosote building, while too high a temperature many eventually cause damage to the chimney and result in a fire. Check frequently for signs of structural failure. Always use a fireplace screen. Keep a fire extinguisher available and nearby. Clear the area around the fireplace and chimney of books, newspapers, magazines and other potentially flammable materials. Install a smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector in your home, maintain them properly and test them monthly.

*(Creosote is produced in some quantities from the burning of wood in fireplaces when the wood does not burn completely.)

If you plan to buy firewood, Northrop offers the following buying tips: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9.

Most firewood sold is green or freshly cut, which means it could have a moisture content of 100 percent or more, meaning half of its weight is water. Try to buy your firewood at least a year before you intend to use it. Upon delivery split wood to lengths that meet your wood stove or fireplace’s dimensions Stack the split firewood to get and to stay dry (20 per cent moisture content). Keep it a small distance from your home since rodents and bugs like to live in and around piles of firewood.  Many people store a small amount in or next to the house they can draw from as needed and replenish regularly and easily. Always stack firewood off the ground.  Pallets make a good first layer.  Loosely stack the word no more than two layers deep.  End caps building up with alternatively stacked firewood or using 2x4s will keep the pile together.  Cover the top to keep rain off the wood, but keep the sides open to allow air circulation and drying. Burning wood with higher moisture content creates more smoke, which contains harmful chemicals and particulates and forms creosote on your chimney. It takes 1 to 2 years of drying to season live oak properly. How to recognize seasoned wood whey you see it.  The bark has loosened and falls off with handling.  The log ends have dried out and have begun to crack or “check”.  Seasoned wood also has a distinct sound – knock two pieces together and you’ll get a crisp, solid sound.  Green wood will make a duller, muffled sound.  Over time, you’ll gain a feel for telling dry from green wood.  Well-seasoned firewood is lighter in weight than a partially-seasoned piece of the same size and species.  When seasoned appropriately, expect to pay more for your firewood. Refer to the Ease of Splitting/BTU’s per Cord chart whether you’re buying read-split or logs BTUs per Cord

Ease of Splitting

Overall Rating

Live Oak Medium 25.0 Excellent Hickory Medium 26.7 Excellent Pecan Medium 27.0 Excellent Dogwood Difficult 24.3 Excellent Black Cherry Easy 18.6 Good Sycamore Difficult 18.5 Fair Gum Black Difficult 18.1 Fair

BTUs per Cord

Ease of Splitting

Overall Rating

Gum Sweet Difficult 18.7 Good Yellow Poplar Easy 16.0 Poor Southern Yellow Pine Easy 17.0 Good Cypress Medium 17.0 Fair Mulberry Easy 25.8 Excellent Eastern Red Cedar Easy 17.5 Good

If your firewood comes from more than 50-miles from where it was harvested, be certain the shipper has a state-issued permit. Firewood can transport many invasive pests and diseases.  You can help control the spread of these invasive insects and diseases by limiting the movement of firewood, especially from out-of-state.  The best way to protect your forest is to use firewood from the area where you plan to burn it. 20

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Interesting Emails From My Readers. Since writing this column each month I receive many interesting emails from my readers. I have selected a few to share with you that I classify as classics. I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I did. The first one comes from my Lions Club friend, Bob Fulks. Bob writes, you are on a horse, galloping at a constant speed. On your right side is a sharp drop off and on your left side is an elephant traveling at the same speed as you. Directly in front of you is another galloping horse but your horse is unable to overtake it. Behind you is a lion running at the same speed as you and the horse in front of you. What must you do to safely get out of this highly dangerous situation? ANSWER: Get your drunk fanny off the merry-go-round. I think you’ll enjoy this story from Dave Davenport. Dave sent me a letter from his uncle with a bit of advice from a retired husband. His uncle writes, it is important for men to remember that, as women grow older, it becomes harder for them to maintain the same quality of housekeeping as when they were younger. When you notice this, try not to yell at them. Some are over sensitive, and there is nothing worse than an over sensitive woman. Let me relate how I handled the situation with my wife, Jo Ann. When I retired a few years ago, it became necessary for Jo Ann to get a full time job, both for extra income and for the health benefits that we needed. Shortly after she started working I noticed she was beginning to show her age. I usually get home from the golf course about the same time she gets home from work. Although she knows how hungry I am, she almost always says she has to rest for at least a half hour or so before she starts dinner. I don’t yell at her. Instead, I tell her to take her time and just wake me when she gets dinner on the table. I generally have lunch at the men’s café at the golf course, so eating out is not an option in the evening. I’m ready for some home cooked grub when I hit the door. She used to do the dishes as soon as we finish eating. But now it’s not unusual for them to sit on the table for several hours after dinner. I do what I can by diplomatically reminding her several times each evening that they won’t clean themselves. I know she really appreciates this, as it does seem to motivate her to get them done before she goes to bed. I have noticed she has another symptom of aging. She has started complaining. Lately she will say that it is difficult for her to find time to pay the monthly bills during her lunch hour. I take it for better or 22

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worse and just smile and offer encouragement. I tell her to stretch it out over two, or even three days. That way she won’t have to rush so much. I also remind her that missing lunch completely now and then wouldn’t hurt her (if you know what I mean). I like to think tact is one of my strong points. When doing simple jobs, she seems to think she needs more rest periods. She had to take a break when she was only half finished mowing the lawn. I try not to make a scene. I am a fair man. I tell her to fix herself a nice, big, cold glass of freshly squeezed orange juice and just sit for a while. And, as long as she is making one for herself, she might as well make one for me too! I support Jo Ann. I’m not saying that showing this much patience and consideration is easy. Many men will find it difficult. Some will find it impossible. Nobody knows better than I do how frustrating women get as they get older. However I have learned if you just use a little more tact and less criticism of your ageing wife because of this article, I will consider that writing it was well worthwhile. After all, we are put on this earth to help each other. Two weeks after receiving this story from Dave I got this e-mail from him: My uncle died suddenly last week of a perforated rectum. The police report states that he was found with a Calloway extralong 50-inch Big Bertha Driver golf club jammed up his rear end, with less that five inches of grip showing, and a sledge hammer laying nearby. Jo Ann, his wife, was arrested and charged with murder. The all-woman jury took only 10 minutes to find her not guilty. The jury felt that somehow, without looking he accidentally sat down on his golf club. Don Humphrey sent this classic story to me: According to a Fort Lauderdale newspaper. Nathan Radlich’s house was burglarized. Thieves left his TV, his VCR, and even left his watch. What they did take was “a generic white cardboard box filled with grayish-white powder.” (That at least is the way the police described it.) A spokesman for the Fort Lauderdale police said, “that it looked similar to cocaine, and they’d probably thought they’d hit the big time.” Then Nathan stood in front of the TV cameras and pleaded with the burglars, “Please return the cremated remains of my sister, Gertrude. She died three years ago.” Well, the next morning the bullet-riddled corpse of a drug dealer known as Hoochie Pevens was found on Nathan’s doorstep. The cardboard box was there too with about half of Gertrude’s ashes remaining, and there was this note that read, “Hoochie sold us the bogus coke, so we wasted Hoochie. Sorry we snorted your sister. No hard feelings. Have a nice day.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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A Critical Resource Florida for Ornamental Fish Farmers By Jim Frankowiak

The vast majority of domestic aquarium fish production – some 95 percent – takes place in Florida thanks to the state’s climate, geology and international shipping hubs. Though production occurs statewide in 38 of Florida’s 67 counties at more than 200 farms, the heaviest concentration of ornamental fish farms is in the Tampa Bay region, specifically Hillsborough and Polk counties with 89 and 28 certified ornamental fish farms, respectively. Miami-Dade County has 13 farms.  Collectively, these farms culture more than 800 varieties of freshwater fish and a growing number of marine fish. Some of the more common families of freshwater tropical ornamental fish cultured in the state include the minnows, tetras and other characins, corydoras catfish, plecostomus, rainbowfishes, livebearers, cichlids and labyrinth fish. Most recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service cooperating with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) pegs the 2012 value of ornamental fish at $27,269,000, while the grand total for aquaculture sales was just shy of $69 million. In addition to ornamental fish, aquaculture in the state, which by Florida statute is considered part of agriculture, includes mollusks, alligators, aquatic plants, other food fish, tilapia, catfish, live rock and other aquaculture. Since the heart of Florida’s tropical ornamental aquaculture industry is in the Tampa Bay region, it makes sense for the University of Florida School of Forest Resources & Conservation Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory (TAL) to be located in Ruskin.  Through the cooperation of UF and federal, state and county representatives, an industry-driven initiative resulted in the Laboratory’s creation in 1996. “Prior to that time we had Extension programs out of Gainesville and the Hillsborough and Dade county Extension offices with limited research projects taking place in Gainesville and on farms,” said TAL Director Craig Watson.  “Disease diagnostics were done in Gainesville, the FDACS Kissimmee lab and at the Hillsborough County Extension office with rudimentary equipment.” “The establishment of TAL at Ruskin and the creation of a Division of Aquaculture within FDACS are two very significant milestones for our industry,” said Florida Tropical Fish Farms Association (FTFFA).  “I hate to think what would have happened to our industry without those two achievements.”  Watson relates the establishment of TAL at Ruskin is due in part to a natural occurrence plus the support of the industry. “The serious no-name storms of the early 90 have prompted government leaders to revamp the National Weather Service.  That action placed the former weather station at Ruskin (now the TAL main building) on a list of surplus buildings and that plus the hoped for sale of an adjacent fish farm were the two events instrumental in the establishment of TAL.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

The property includes a 4,000 square foot office and diagnostic laboratory, a two-bedroom, bunk-style, fully furnished dormitory, an 800-square-foot quarantine building, five, 2,100-square foot greenhouses, a 5,000-square-foot hatchery/nutrition laboratory and over 700-square-feet of storage. The hatchery includes three replicated rooms that can house several hundred small aquaria with each room on a separate light and climate control system. Additionally, these rooms are each supplied with three separate water sources (well, rain and reverse osmosis), allowing for easy manipulation of water quality, temperature and photoperiod for spawning trials. The main office building is located on federal property and belongs to the National Weather Service. UF, Hillsborough County and the National Weather Service have a long term agreement to utilize this building for its current purpose. “That building houses a full-service fish disease diagnostic laboratory which serves the ornamental aquaculture industry,” said Watson. The TAL adjacent fish farm has 50 ponds, two of which serve as retention ponds. The ponds are in ground and typical of existing Florida ornamental aquaculture industry ponds. All ponds are equipped with aeration and well water. Currently, 24-ponds are covered with greenhouse structures which serve both for birdnetting and winter cold protection. All farm tank systems include recirculating and flow-through water supply with access to well water, softened water and reverse osmosis water. “The variety of water allows for manipulation and testing of varying water quality parameters during research, noted Watson. The mission of the TAL is to enhance the understanding of tropical, ornamental aquaculture through research and education. The Laboratory performs applied research, fish disease diagnostic services and Extension education programs and promotes professionalism in Florida’s tropical aquaculture industry. “Our spawning and pesticide training classes are especially well attended,” said Watson. “The same is true of our two-day fish health management classes.” TAL is also home to a Hillsborough Community College greenhouse where student interns spend two semesters as part of the HCC aquaculture associates degree program. The facility maintains strong working relationships with the FTFFA and the Florida Aquaculture Association (FAA), as well as other producer-based organizations. “All of our research and Extension programs can be traced to an identified need of our Aquaculture Advisory Committee, which is composed of Florida producers,” said Watson. “TAL is one of the most important resources available to the aquatic farmer in the state,” said FAA President Marty Tanner. “Continued research on new species is the cornerstone to our increased market share in the U.S.” For more information about the Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory, visit: http://tal.ifas.ufl.edu. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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• It is illegal to plow a field with an elephant in North Carolina. • You can prevent an apple slice from turning brown by brushing it with lemon juice. • In Alaska it is illegal to feed or give alcoholic beverages to a moose. • Rubber bands last longer when refrigerated. • The 57 on Heinz ketchup bottles represents the number of varieties of pickles the company once had. • George W. Bush was once a cheerleader. • Hippo milk is pink. • The gestation period of an elephant is 22 months. • It’s possible to lead a cow upstairs, but impossible to lead it down the stairs. • Russia is a vast country spanning over eleven time zones. • You share your birthday with about 9 million other people. • If you have 3 quarters, 4 dimes and 4 pennies you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in coins without being able to make change for a dollar

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I love to set out at the Dry Creek set this time of the year. It’s a great way to get away from the busyness of the season, to look down the dusty streets of a 1880’s old Florida Cow town and have your mind go back to a simpler time. A time when Christmas was in your heart. Long before the crowed malls and long lines. When the joy of Christmas would bubble up from your soul. When you’d make a gift to hand over to a loved one or friend. Dry Creek is a television show but it represents the feelings I was just talking about. Family, love, friends and that little voice inside of us that guilds us. To best describe Christmas In Dry Creek I’d like to share a poem from our Dry Creek Family to yours. Christmas Before Old Master Card Today buying presents and spending money seems to be the Christmas way. But I remember a simpler time, for Christmas spirit you really didn’t have to pay. Toys of plastic we soon discard. But the Christmas’ I remember are way back before Ole Master Card. Like the smell of kerosene, used to light the wagons way. A team proud snorting steam, heading for the lights of home, Christmas tree in tow they would not stray. 28

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The looks on faces as they handed over a hand made gift, a sign of your love to share. The smell of wood smoke and cold pine air. Mommy telling stories about baby Jesus nestled in the hay, his birthday the real reason we celebrated the day. Stringing popcorn, making a handmade angel using just plain old tinfoil, The flicker of a flame and the sweet smell of lamp oil. Outside it was cold but inside our hearts where warm, the warmth only being close together would bring. Hay rides down the country lane, from neighbor to neighbor sipping hot cider we’d try our best to sing. Well today as I stand in this crowed mall, I’ll just put Ole Master Card away. Maybe make an angel out of just plain old tinfoil, and celebrate this Christmas the old fashioned way. Merry Christmas from Dry Creek America’s First Frontier. Stop in and see us sometime. We’re on Bright House, Saturday nights at 7:30 Eastern Time. Or at DryCreekTV.com all the time.

Everybody knows where Dry Creek is.....it’s inside each and every one of us. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Photo courtesy of Jim Burgess Farm Credit of Central Florida Member & 2012 SE Ag Expo Farmer of the Year, Dale McClellan (Right), was honored at the University of Florida’s homecoming football game against Vanderbilt. Dale was involved in the coin toss before the kickoff as well as being recognized on the field prior to the game. Joining in the ceremony, are L-R, Adam, Putnam, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs, Dr. Nick Place, Dean and Director of the University of Florida’s IFAS Extension program, and Aaron Dean RAM Brand Advocate Manager.

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RY FESTIV AWBER AL R T D i S r n e n e t e r n u l Vo

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Tommy War unteer Apprenock, left, served as emce and was assi ciation Dinner at the Fle for Thursday night’s V olorida Strawb member Madsted in drawing door prize erry Festival ison Astin, m w in n er s by ab Fe eth Padilla, ri iddle, and Ju ng nior Royalty stival Court ght. stival Ticketi Queen Elizured with Fee $400 VISA gift ct pi , ft le a, iz ng Nancy PlanteHarvey, won the grand prreciation Dinner. Manager Jill day night’s Volunteer App card at Thurs

About 900 volunteers from the 2013 Florida Strawberry Festival attended Thursday night’s Volunteer Appreciation Dinner at the Festival grounds in Plant City.

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FLORIDA

POMELOS

The Heart-Healthy Holiday Sweet By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science

F

resh Florida pomelos and other citrus fruits are now in their peak season. Pomelos resemble giant grapefruits, and each fruit weighs on average about three pounds. Sweet and juicy, pomelos lack the bitter notes found in grapefruit. Compared with grapefruits, pomelos have a lower acid level, milder flavor, and a thicker skin. This pear-shaped fruit can be yellow or green on the outside and white, pink, or red on the inside, with segments surrounded by a tough, inedible membrane. Popular in Asian cultures, pomelos are grown in China, Japan, India, Malaysia, and Thailand. In the United States, this citrus is produced mainly in Florida and California from November through March. The grapefruit is the hybrid product of a pomelo and an orange. The tangelo is a hybrid between the pomelo and the tangerine, and the oroblanco is a hybrid between the pomelo and the grapefruit.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE

An excellent source of Vitamin C, one serving of pomelo contains over 100 percent of the daily value for this vitamin. Pomelos are also a good nutritional source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and antioxidants. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one third of an average pomelo (200 g) contains 76 calories, 1.56 g protein, 0.08 g fat, 19.2 g carbohydrate, and 2 g of dietary fiber. It also provides 146% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for Vitamin C, 8% for dietary fiber, 10% for potassium, 6% for thiamin and vitamin B6, 4% for riboflavin, magnesium, and phosphorus, and 2% for niacin, iron, manganese, and zinc.

Vitamin C

One third of a fresh Florida pomelo contains more than 100 percent of your vitamin C requirements for a whole day! This vitamin is important for a healthy immune system, cancer prevention, healthy blood circulation and wound healing. This vitamin acts as a potent antioxidant in the body, neutralizing harmful free radicals and preventing its damaging effects in cells. By fighting cell and tissue damage, Vitamin C protects against cancer and other diseases, such as the common cold. This vitamin also helps the body absorb more iron, and aids in the development of strong bones and teeth. Current research findings support that vitamin C’s benefits come from consumption of whole fruits and vegetables. A high intake of produce is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes, including heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Taking supplements does not seem to provide the same protective benefits as eating the whole fruit.

Fiber

Pomelos and other citrus fruits contain a significant amount of dietary fiber, which can assist with digestion and prevent constipation. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in fiber may decrease the risk of several types of cancer including coWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

lon, rectum, breast, and pancreas. Foods like pomelo that are high in fiber and low in calories are a valuable component of a weight-loss diet. A third of a pomelo provides 8 percent of the daily value for fiber, an important nutrient that lowers high cholesterol levels, which helps to prevent atherosclerosis. Fiber can also help maintain steady blood sugar levels, as can fructose, the naturally occurring type of fruit sugar found in oranges.

Potassium

Pomelos are a good source of potassium, as are many fruits and vegetables. One serving of pomelo provides 10 percent of your daily potassium needs. Potassium is an important mineral and electrolyte in the body, which is critical to heart function, digestion, and smooth and skeletal muscle contraction. Research studies have shown a link between bone health and consuming a potassium-rich diet. The findings suggest that eating plenty of foods high in potassium may help prevent osteoporosis. Potassium may also help lower blood pressure.

How to Select and Store

Choose a pomelo that is heavy for its size with a smooth, thin peel. When squeezed, the fruit should yield slightly, but still feel firm. At room temperature, the fruit should have a faintly sweet smell. Avoid fruits with soft spots or wrinkly skin. Fruit Pomelos that feel light for their size may have a drier flesh inside. Pomelos can be stored at room temperature for up to a week. For longer storage, refrigerate for up to three weeks.

How to Enjoy

Pomelos are delicious eaten out-of-hand. Simply cut the fruit into quarters, remove the peel and membranes, and eat the segments. Other ways to enjoy this fruit include: • Toss peeled pomelo segments into any salad or stir-fry. • Squeeze the juice into a pan, allow it to thicken over heat, and use it as a sauce for fish or chicken. • Add pomelo juice to baked goods for a bright refreshing twist. • Slip a few slices of pomelo into a pitcher of water for a refreshing low-calorie beverage. • Use the whole fruit and peel to make citrus marmalade. • Sprinkle sugar and butter over pomelo halves and broil. • Slice the peel for candied rinds. Enjoy fresh Florida pomelos today. With its sweet, juicy flavor, pomelos are delicious as well as healthy!

SELECTED REFERENCES http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium http://www.honeypomelo.com INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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THE

By Ginny Mink

They often get the short end of the stick, a raw deal and a bad rap. Choose your own idiom, but the truth is, migrant workers are not only disenfranchised, discouraged and nearly indigent, but their children are frequently unsuccessful in the educational sphere. This is a heart wrenching problem, one that a group of Mennonites endeavored to rectify. They started Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) in 1965 to provide assistance to the children of migrant workers. During that time, impoverished farm workers were forced to bring their wee-ones into the fields. Sadly these precious little kids were subjected to great travesties. Since their parents had to work, these children were left to their own devices running haphazard through the fields. Thusly, some drowned in irrigation pits while others were crushed or dismembered by farm equipment. The Mennonites were appalled by such horrendous conditions and given their Biblical devotion, they chose to reach out to those in need. To their astonishment, very few children actually attended the two childcare centers they opened in South Florida.

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to create an atmosphere conducive to educating and protecting the children of the migrant workers and yet they still didn’t entrust their children to the RCMA’s care. Where had they gone wrong? Seeking to solve the issue, they enlisted Wendell Rollason. At the time, Rollason had advocated for immigrants, RCMA changed his focus to migrant workers. Unfortunately, little changed. They were all bewildered. However, Rollason noticed that the days when the center was most populated were the days that migrant moms volunteered to assist. Apparently, the migrant moms were only comfortable leaving their children with other migrant moms. This revelation changed the RCMA for good! Rollason use this pivotal moment to change the futures of countless migrant children and their mothers. He started hiring them to work in the childcare centers. This allowed the moms to get out of the blistering heat and begin new careers in the childcare industry. Doors, both literal and figurative, were opened and the centers started filling to capacity. Those two centers have since grown to 70 centers in 21 Florida counties! Rollason’s innovative thinking spurred the current business model which allows that the centers and regional offices are headed by a member of the culture being served. Thereby making a new immigrants first contact someone who’d been there and done that. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Meet Bill Coats We had the opportunity to speak with Bill Coats, the Director of Communications and Marketing for RCMA. He said, “I am in a second career, my first career was as a newspaper journalist. My college degree is a bachelors of journalism from the University of Missouri. I kind of wanted to do something in the way of charitable service as a second career. The more I thought about it, the more I thought that the plight of migrant farmworkers was one of the greatest injustices going in our country. I thought if I could find a way to help them that was what I wanted to do and that led me to RCMA.” Bill proudly explains, “We are now 85 percent Hispanic in our staff. We have staff who were basically rescued from the field and now they’re helping rescue children from the fields. They all feel like this is a cause, they love what they do. It transforms the lives of the women who get hired. One week you’re picking okra, or whatever there is to pick in the sweltering heat, and the next week you’re rocking babies in an air-conditioned childcare center. You’re being paid to do it and being told that your education, which you probably abandoned long ago in middle school or high school, is getting a jump start. You’re going to get your childcare certification, you’re going to get your GED, you’re going to learn to read and write adequately. You might even go to the community college and get an AA and RCMA is going to push you along and help you get it. Every year we have a big loud celebration where everybody dresses in their Sunday best and gets cited for whatever they got: childcare certification, an AA or a BA. Many dozens of staff members get cited every year. We wish a lot more could.”

How can we help? RCMA is no longer a “Christian” organization due to the fact that it is 90 percent government funded through Head Start and School Readiness programs. While it cannot dictate or support one faith base it does adhere to traditional Christian concepts of helping those in need. It is still focused on assisting migrant workers and their children. Yet, due to government cutbacks and increased childcare demand, the RCMA is in need of your assistance.

several years ago fronts Martin Luther King and we don’t want our traffic coming out on the busy boulevard.” Safety for children and their families is of course a big concern. Therefore, Bill says, “The problem is, the logical place to run a driveway from our property straight on to San Jose Mission Drive is a place where the bus often stops, a place where parents park to put their children on the school bus. So we agreed to build them a bus turnaround and that has turned out to be an $80,000 project. It is not covered by our normal funding sources. The USDA is going to lend us over $1 million for the childcare center, but we’re trying to raise the $80,000 separately. So the big news is we’re trying to triple our childcare capacity and the fundraising effort is for the bus turnaround and parking area that we are going to build for the San Jose Mission. The diocese has, I think, 122 apartments and townhomes for workers back there, so it’s a nice little community. Our current center was the first thing built back there; when they conceived the plan they brought us in.” In closing Bill added this tidbit, “I’ve talked mainly about childcare but RCMA does operate two charter schools in Wimauma; it’s a middle school and an elementary school. Together they have about 250 children. The elementary school is 13 years old and it is named RCMA Wimauma Academy. The middle school has just begun its second year and it’s named RCMA Leadership Academy and they basically share two ends of the same campus. They also share the same principal, we call him a director and he calls them the Academies of RCMA. We have one more charter school in Immokalee, next to the state headquarters, it’s called Immokalee Community School; it’s K-6 and has about 240 students.” The RCMA is far reaching and hugely beneficial, help them change a child’s fate!

If you’d like to assist the RCMA in their endeavors you can contact Bill at bill@rcma.org or visit their website at:

www.rcma.org

Bill elaborated on the issue at hand, “Now RCMA’s most intense area of operation and newest initiative is in Hillsborough County. We operate a childcare center in Dover on Martin Luther King Blvd. It’s in the San Jose Mission, operated by the diocese of the Catholic Church. From the parent’s perspective, it is the most popular of all RCMA childcare centers. Dover is a migrant head start center. By spring it is not uncommon for them to have a waiting list as long as 100 names. So we are trying to have a second Dover childcare center within walking distance of the first. We are trying to triple the size out there. Fundraising efforts that we do in Hillsborough are aimed at that, the golf tournament that we recently had (which we project will raise several thousand dollars) will benefit one aspect of the Dover project. The Dover property which we bought from the diocese WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Native Holly Days in Florida

By Shannon Mitchell - The Readheaded Gardener

The holidays in Florida don’t always “feel” like the holidays should. One of the reasons we all live here is the wonderful temperate weather that occurs year round and for Florida gardeners that’s especially fortuitous, unless you’re seeking a little bit of that traditional cool weather spirit. Our growing, flowering and fruiting seasons are longer and can provide lovely color in the garden year round even if the cooler temperatures are nowhere to be found. This year think about introducing some native hollies to your landscape to capture some of that wintery feel and color. According to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, there are 11 holly species native to Florida, with Dahoon Holly or Ilex cassine being the most prolific throughout the state. They come in tree, shrub and groundcover form all of which can work to bring color, shape and wildlife to your home landscape. Another key aspect to remember about hollies is that they are either male or female. To get the glorious color from the berries that are produced, you will want to purchase female forms. Usually there are enough nearby native hollies that you won’t need to purchase male forms for pollination. Natural habitat pollinators like bees and other insects will do the work for you. A good choice for the beginner, Dahoon Holly tends to prefer wetland areas in its natural habitat but once established in your landscape can be drought tolerant. Form and growth lean towards large shrub or small tree habit with heights up to 20’ to 30’ tall. Bright red berries and glossy, evergreen leaves grace this tree in the autumn and winter. Flower appear in the spring. This tree requires little to no maintenance once established, but keep it well watered once first planted in order to give it a good strong root system. The more common species that you see in most home or commercial landscapes is East Palatka Holly, Ilex x attenuata. It is a hybrid of Dahoon holly and American holly (I. opaca). Easily cultivated, it has a vigorous growth habit up to 20’ high and is widely adaptable to various growing conditions. You will often see these in comWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

mercial plantings because of their propensity for uniform growth and berry productivity. The female trees of this variety produce copious amounts of brilliant red berries. Leaves can be slightly toothed and display rich glossy green color. It highly resembles its parent Dahoon, but growth habit is more regular and uniform. Another lovely native selection is Yaupon holly or Ilex vomitoria. Yes, the name is a little off-putting but herbal history can be thanked for that. Native Americans used it to create a purge concoction, hence the vomitoria portion of the name. Despite its rather distasteful name, this native is adaptable to many cultural conditions in Florida including salty coastal, alkaline soil or drought prone areas. It has a white-tinged bark and small, crimson berries that are a good food source birds and small mammals during winter months. There is even a yellow berry variety in cultivation. It reaches a height of about 10-20’. Because the foliage is similar in shape and size to boxwood leaves it can be used as a hedgerow along fences or borders and can be readily pruned or trained. Multiple cultivars are available including a lovely weeping form, heavy berry production varieties and some forms with a dwarf growth habit. Versatility in the landscape is its main asset. Foliage and berries from any of these varieties can be used indoors to decorate for the winter festivities. Because they are evergreen, their glossy leaves hold up well after being cut and many of them lack the sharp toothiness of their cousin American holly and so are less likely to be difficult to work with in arrangements or in wreaths. A large bouquet of holly leaves and berries also make a great centerpiece for the holiday table. So bring a little more winter merriment into your garden, your heart and your home during December with these great additions to your Florida landscape repertoire. Merry tidings to you and yours. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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HEALTH CARE REFORM COMPLIANCE: Not a Do-It-Yourself Task; Changes Continue By Jim Frankowiak

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), which was signed into law by President Barack Obama in March of 2010, is making major changes to the health care system in this country, changes that will take place over a number of years. The act’s health care reforms are primarily focused on reducing the uninsured population and decreasing health care costs. It impacts both individuals and employers. Since its passage, the legislation has undergone changes and more are anticipated. To help employers understand and comply with various aspects of this new legislation, the Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association (FFVA) has conducted a series of seminars across the state, partnering with BB & T – J. Rolfe Davis Insurance (BB&TJRD), one of the top ten largest brokerage firms in the U.S.  FFVA is an association of specialty crop growers here in Florida, including vegetables, citrus, berries, tropical fruit, sod and sugar cane. “These statewide seminar sessions are designed to help FFVA members understand the legislation and to enable them to comply,” said BB&T-JRD Vice President Charles Cook.  Attendees, whether FFVA members or not, were given the opportunity “to receive a preliminary analysis of their current health benefit offering to help them better understand what they need to consider as they work to comply with the very complex and ever-changing requirements,” said Cook, who has worked with FFVA since 2005 and has been involved with employee benefit programs since 1989.  One of the key steps in determining compliance involves determining if employers are considered either large or small, according to the regulations.  Beginning in 2015, employers with 50 or more employees (including fulltime equivalents (FTEs), a threshold that when reached designates them large employers), that do not offer minimum essential health care coverage to substantially all full-time employees and their dependents are subject to a penalty. Under ACA, full-time employees are those working an average of 30 or more hours per week. The number of full-time employees excludes full-time seasonal employees who work for less than 120-days during the year.  The hours worked by seasonal parttime employees are included in the calculation of a 46

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large employer on a monthly basis by dividing their total number of monthly hours worked by 120. Large employers that offer coverage may still be liable for a penalty if the coverage is unaffordable or does not provide minimum value. ACA’s employer penalty is often referred to as a “pay or play” penalty or an employer shared responsibility payment. Employers will be required to report to the federal government on the health coverage that they provide. “For growers it may be difficult to determine whether or not they are large or small employers since they typically have seasonal crops with significant changes in the number of employees they have at different times of the year,” noted Cook. BB&TJRD offers interested employers a Health Care Reform Preliminary Analysis, a single page questionnaire that when completed enables Cook and his colleagues to determine what actions the employer should take for compliance, as well as options available to them going forward. “There is no charge or commitment required for this initial analysis,” said Cook.    Cook said that each employer’s situation is different with respect to ACA.  “The variables and subtleties that come into play when conducting the preliminary analysis and options available to an employer are complicated. And, the rules and regulations, as well as their interpretation are constantly changing. This adds a continuing challenge to this process.  As a consequence, I urge employers to seek guidance from organizations that have the depth of understanding and resources to correctly interpret the requirements and guide them through to compliance. Given the potential and costly penalties that may come to bear, this is not the time to try to do-it-yourself or engage advisors without sufficient expertise or the resources to provide the most appropriate options to an employer seeking compliance with the ACA.” For those interested in additional information on the ACA, visit: HHS.gov or IRS.gov.  The Health Care Reform Preliminary Analysis form may be received by contacting Cook via email: cpcook@bbandt.com or by calling 407691-9802. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Wild Horse Ministries will be holding their next event on Sunday, January 19, 2014. The event will be held at the Hillsborough County Fairgrounds on SR 60 and Syndey Washer Road, east of Brandon. The event will start at 10:30 AM with Cowboy Up Ministry Service by Skipper Calder. A free BBQ dinner will be served at from 12:30 – 1:30. At 2:00 PM there will be a Wild Horse Ministry Demonstration with the training of unbroken horses to surrender to leadership and rides. Following the demonstration, at 4:30 PM an auction of the horse used will take place. More demonstrations will follow the auction. There will be activities all day including food, fun, silent auctions and fellowship. All proceeds will go to Wild Horse Ministries (www.wildhorseministries.com, Front Line Ministries and Cowboy Up Ministry (www.cowboyupministry.com. For more information on the event call 813-7648064 or 863-559-3093.

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Becky and Dave Burns hold their rescued pets; Bella and Bentley wearing their holiday collars. Becky is a regular office volunteer for Meals on Wheels and their pet counterpart Meals on Wheels for Pets. Dave takes food to the pet companions of Meals on Wheels recipients on Christmas Day.

Meals on Wheels Celebrates 4th Year of Pet Service By Cheryl Kuck

This is the season of good cheer, hope and the fulfillment of dreams. What happens if we or a loved one can no longer adequately provide themselves with the daily essentials of a single meal through a shortterm or long-term illness and/or loss of income stability? What if we are alone and desperately need the companionship of a pet but find we can’t afford to adequately feed ourselves, let alone consider undertaking the cost of feeding a dog or cat that would help to stave off loneliness and depression? These ongoing issues and concerns of many seem so much worse during the holidays. Fortunately Meals on Wheels of Plant City has undertaken the role of helper to those in need, the elderly, i n firm, the homebound…and their pets. Not just during the holidays but throughout the year. Simply contact them by phone (813) 754-9932 at their new downtown offices in Suite C at 1304 E. Baker Street and a volunteer will discuss individual needs to see if the organization is able to be of assistance. The offices are open from 9:00 am to 12:00 noon Monday through Friday with deliveries on Thanksgiving and Christmas. “We have had instances where clients (Meals on Wheels) feed pets the food we were bringing them and not nutritional pet food. When we discovered that was happening, it was just a natural progression to add Meals on Wheels for Pets to the program in 2009. “First we asked our drivers delivering food to shut-ins to take a count of pets existing in each residence and found most could not afford the 48

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Nancy Driscoll, a founding volunteer for Meals on Wheels for Pets, holds samples of the pet food given out monthly to pet owners who are regular recipients of Meals on Wheels

cost of pet food and so the program evolved,” said Nancy Driscoll, a founder of the pet service. Becky Burns accepts donations and meets with potential clients on Mondays at their Baker Street office and says they are pleased to learn that their dog or cat can receive a free monthly (approximately four pound) supplemental supply of pet food in addition to the single meal of “people food” that is delivered daily. Their goal is to make sure that even though an owner may have fallen on hard times, e a c h animal gets the food they need and remains a happy and healthy home companion. “Some may not need the service on a long-term basis. Our concerns also extend to those who may just have come home from the hospital and need temporary help,” says Burns. “We are always grateful for pet food donations and presently are in need of more volunteer drivers who are able to regularly deliver food, as well as, drivers who would like to stand-by in case a regular driver is unable to take their route for that day.” “This is a coordinated effort by all of us who love animals and want to help insure the quality of life for both shut-ins and their pets is aided through nutritious meals and the friendly assistance of folks who genuinely care.”

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RECIPES

Arugula and Florida Berry Salad with Candied Pecans Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agriculture

DIRECTIONS In a medium-sized mixing bowl, add arugula, lemon juice and olive oil. Lightly toss the arugula to coat and season lightly with salt and pepper.

INGREDIENTS Salad: 16 ounces arugula, rinsed and drained 1 dozen Florida strawberries, rinsed, hulled and sliced 1 cup Florida blueberries 2 oranges, peeled and segmented 8 ounces goat cheese, crumbled 1 lemon, juiced 1 tablespoon Olive oil Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Candied Pecans: 2 cups Florida pecans 3/4 cup natural Florida sugar 1/2 teaspoon sea salt Heat oven to 400째 F.

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Serve on four chilled plates. Add an even amount of the dressed arugula to the center of each plate. Arrange an even amount of citrus, blueberries and strawberries in a decorative manner on each plate. Evenly distribute the crumbled goat cheese over the top of each salad. Garnish each salad with a few of the candied pecans. Serve salad chilled.

Heat oven to 400째 F. Spread the nuts on a baking sheet and toast, tossing once, until fragrant, 6 to 8 minutes; transfer to a bowl. Once the baking sheet is cool, line it with parchment paper. In a large skillet, combine the sugar, salt, and 2 tablespoons water. Simmer, swirling the pan occasionally (do not stir as it will crystallize the caramel), until the liquid is amber colored, 12 to 15 minutes. Stir in the nuts, and then spread the mixture on the prepared baking sheet, separating the nuts as much as possible. Let cool. Break up any large clusters before serving.

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By Jim Frankowiak

“A humbling experience and a privilege to be recognized by others. It makes me thankful for what I have.” Those were the words of IN THE FIELD Magazine’s first ever Hillsborough County Agriculturist of the Year – Carl Grooms, when asked what this recognition means to him. While the competition for this inaugural honor was strong, Grooms, who is the co-owner of Fancy Farms in the Springhead area of Plant City in eastern Hillsborough County, won out. Married to Dee Dee 40 years, Grooms has been involved in farming as long as he can remember. Carl and Dee Dee share ownership of Fancy Farms equally. “I grew up in the Cork area and was involved early on helping my father, CT. Grooms, with his vegetable and berry operation,” said Grooms.  “I’m actually the third generation of our family to farm here.  My grandfather began vegetable farming in the early 1900s and we’ve been at it ever since,” he said. Now it’s Grooms and his wife and their son Dustin, who rejoined the family operation in 2007 after an eight year stint in the Army. Dustin, who is the fourth generation of Grooms involved in farming locally, is married to Alison and they have a daughter, Skyler. The Grooms also have a daughter, Kristi who is 54

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married to John Shaw. She is Vice President of Client Services with In Place Marketing in Tampa. Grooms began his own operation with 15-acres in 1974 and through hard work and perseverance his farm has grown to 235-acres located in the Springhead area along the Hillsborough – Polk line. Much of that land was part of a development deal that Grooms was within days of signing, but did not as the economy turned south. “The terms of that proposal were very attractive, but had it gone through I had other acreage lined up that would enable me to continue farming,” he said.  “Now that Dustin is involved, I see no end to the Grooms family and berry farming here. I’m 64, but in good health and thoroughly enjoy what I do. I have no set timetable for retirement and plan to continue farming, well until Dee Dee makes me.” Carl is quick to tell you that farming is “in no way a 9 to 5 job. While I typically grow a single crop of berries, I am always thinking about our operation and doing whatever it takes to maintain and improve what we have.  Some of my fellow farmers are able to take a few months off WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


after harvest, but I just can’t do that.” Berry farming, like any agricultural endeavor, has its risks, “but those of us who get into and stay in agriculture just take that risk as part of the business we’re in. We accept that as part of the way of life we have chosen. I would say the same thing about government regulation. Some of it does not make sense, but we have to abide by those rules and regulations. Honestly, nobody in this business is going to do anything to harm his operation or the land he works for his livelihood. So many of those regulations are not necessary, but they are all part of this business we are in.” There are some things that really bother Grooms, but they may be changing for the better. “Some of the major food chains have come out publicly about their support for buying and offering for sale only goods made and grown in America,” he said. “Wal-Mart was one of those, but you know Sam Walton began his business with that as one of his basics, but that changed as others became involved. Now, however they say they are recommitting to buying only American. We’ll see. I hope they will live up to what they have said and that other major food retailers will follow suit. That will be beneficial to those WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

of us who grow strawberries and other produce.” There’s also the threat of imports, particularly berries grown in Mexico.  “I strongly believe our berries are more flavorful and better quality than those grown in Mexico,” said Grooms.  The new Farm Bill is another item on Carl’s list. “People need to know that strawberry farmers do not benefit at all from the Farm Bill. Growing strawberries is the free enterprise system at work with no government support.  We do it because this is what we do.” Labor is another significant emerging challenge facing growers like Grooms, but he has taken steps to address that challenge.  “There’s nothing more frustrating than not being able to pick fruit that’s ready for market, but that happened to us last season and as a consequence I became involved in the H-2-A Program, fully complying with all government regulations.  I now have 175 men from Honduras working at Fancy Farms and it’s great. These men are appreciative, hard workers and they have quickly learned the skills they need to plant, maintain and pick our crops,” said Grooms. “There is no substitute for workers who enjoy what they are doing. We are confident that we will be able to pick all of our berries this season and I appreciate Continued on pg. 56 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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that feeling of comfort I have and the commitment those men have made to themselves and to Fancy Farms.” On the lighter side, Grooms is probably most well-known for his fluffy white beard. “That all started as a joke years ago,” he said. “I told everyone that once I paid off all of my bills I would shave off my beard. It was shaved off just one time and that was by my wife on our 25th wedding anniversary.  We took a trip and renewed our marriage vows and she shaved off my beard. When we came back, no one recognized me and thought Dee Dee was seeing someone else. That was 15 years ago and I have no plans to shave it off any time soon.” Giving back to the community has always been part of Grooms way of life.  Whether it is his support of Springhead Baptist Church or the industry he loves, Grooms always steps up. He is one of five founders of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, an organization he helped found in 1978 to help the industry grow and prosper through a variety of initiatives from research activities at the University of Florida to governmental outreach at all levels, the association is focused on serving the industry and paving it way into the future. “I am proud of that and only wish that every strawberry grower was a member. There’s really no good reason for them not to belong.” Within the last few years, Grooms and Fancy Farms have set aside several acres of strawberries for a day long u-pick event to benefit 4-H in Hillsborough County. The proceeds from that event help support 4-H activities and the agriculturists of tomorrow. 56

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Over the years Grooms has dabbled in extracurricular activities, but really has no single hobby or activity that he focuses on. “My wife and I did some antiquing and I have fished,” he said. He does, however, have one item with an interesting past and that’s his 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Super Sport. “I’ve owned that vehicle all but two years and now have it customized to my specifications from engine and transmission to its exterior finish and I do enjoy taking it to local car shows.” Turns out that of the three owners of that Chevelle other than Grooms, one was a young man who at the time he owned the car was dating the future Mrs. Grooms and she didn’t even know Carl at the time. “I guess you would say that’s one of those what goes around, comes around deals,” said Grooms.      “When you get right down to it, all of us in agriculture are like mothers totally responsible for whatever seed or plant we put into the ground. If someone is not ready to accept that responsibility and fulfill it from day one until harvest, they should not get involved. I work hard to do my best, to be fair and to treat others the way I want to be treated. I am proud of my game and the 40 years I have into it. My son Dustin has come to realize that and is a true farmer at heart.’” One final point from Carl Grooms and probably the most important, “behind every good farmer is a very good wife that tolerates him.  I am thankful for Dee Dee and all that she has done and continues to do for me and for our family.”  Thank you Carl and congratulations from IN THE FIELD Magazine as its very first Hillsborough CountyAgriculturist of the Year. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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2013 JUSTIN GILL MEMORIAL BEEF BREED SHOW Showmanship Winners: Junior Division – Kaylee Stallard Intermediate Division – Anna Conrad Senior Division – Kacee Lewis Steer Winners: Grand Champion – Nathan Claunch Reserve Grand Champion – Morgan Lee

Hillsborough County Fair Hay Bale Decorating Contes 2nd - 4-H From the Ground Up

Commercial Heifer Winners: Grand Champion – Anna Conrad Reserve Grand Champion –Wyatt Hinton All Other Breed Heifer Winners: Grand Champion – Madi Conrad Reserve Grand Champion – Anna Conrad Herdsmen Winners: Junior Division – Raelyn Hudson Intermediate Division – Nicholas Bogdan Senior Division – Katherine Stafford Scholarship Recipients: Hillsborough County Cattlewomen’s College Scholarship – Jessica Andrlik Cattlewomen’s Kelly Nobles Memorial High School Scholarship – Haley Zvirblis

3rd - Turkey Creek 4-H (“Hey Jack”)

“Big-Gift” Winner: Sophie Aten Sponsors: Anthony & Debbie Gill / Lonesome G Ranch Hillsborough County Cattlemen Hillsborough County Cattlewomen Florida Mineral & Salt Lacy Brown Specialties Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply Southside Farm Supply Mr. Gary Shepherd / Midway Welding Linda’s Stitchery 60

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1st - Simmons Career Center Environmental science technology students protect our natural resources. HCC’s environmental science technology program prepares students for jobs with local organizations such as the Southwest Florida Water Management District and Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission. Through cutting-edge training and hands-on field work, students transfer new skills into careers in natural resource management. With small class sizes, affordable tuition and guaranteed transferability to state universities, it’s easy to see why more than 46,000 students each year choose HCC.

hccfl.edu/registernow HCC is an equal access/equal opportunity educational institution. In-the-Field_7.25x3.14_12-6-13_EVS.indd 1

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Creating a Sustainable Buzz in the Community

FARM TO TABLE The farm to table movement is on the rise. More and more people are becoming concerned about where their food is coming from and how it’s produced. Restaurants are also joining this movement by incorporating fresh produce and meats into the dishes they serve in their establishments. The Sustany Foundation in Tampa has been helping the farm to table movement grow over the last six years. The Sustany Foundation was founded in 2007. Their mission is to improve the Tampa Bay area’s quality of life currently and in the future by promoting a society of sustainability on the local level. They encourage environmental and social responsibility but supporting individuals and organizations committed to stewardship and sustainability. They serve as an intermediary between those who wish to contribute their time and assets to protecting and enhancing our quality of life as well as those who have effective plans and programs in development that will complement or advance their mission. David Reed is the president of the foundation and he is proud of what the foundation has accomplished in the short time they have been in existence. “What we are trying to do is focus on our quality of life in area, which is terrific, and manage it to where we can have growth, prosperity, and jobs, but not sacrifice that quality of life,” Reed said.

that want to better their community by using green practices. One of the programs that goes hand in hand with the Sustainable Buzz event is the foundation’s Green Business Designation Program. This program promotes sustainability in the City of Tampa by partnering with local businesses to identify and acknowledge its best green practices and measures. The Straz Center is one the certified green businesses that is recongnized by the foundation for incorporating green practices. The Sustany Foundation hopes to reach more people in the Tampa Bay area by hosting different events like the Sustainable Buzz. They hope to make the community more aware of their sustainable efforts. “We are trying to raise awareness and get people to start thinking about sustainability and understand who we are and what we are trying to do,” Reed said. “We also hope that with events like this, we can have volunteers and donors come together to make Tampa a greater place to live.” If you would like to learn more about The Sustany Foundation and the different programs they offer, you can visit them on the web at www.sustany.org or call 813-507-111.

One of the ways the foundation is raising awareness about what it does is by hosting their yearly Sustainable Buzz event. This year’s event took place on Nov. 7 and it was held at The Straz Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Tampa along the Tampa Riverwalk. This year’s theme was “Farm to Table” which celebrated the most direct journey food could take to our tables, from a farmer’s hand to ours. “We hold this event annually and we try to drive awareness for our organization and to showcase our vendors who truly represent this year’s theme as they are not only local, wonderful examples of farm to table, but they also incorporate these practices into their operations,” Reed said. The event featured over 20 restaurants along with local brewers and farms that supplied the guest with a variety of food and drink samples the entire night. Marissa Hill of The Florida Aquarium was at this year’s event and it was her first time ever attending any event hosted by the foundation. “The idea of sustainability is something that is very much a part of our mission, so to be able to see it this close in the community is kind of beautiful,” Hill said. “The energy here is great and the fact that there are so many sources of sustainability right here in our own backyard is wonderful.” Mary Ellen Gottlieb was also a first-time attendee and she was happy to see so many like-minded people gathered together to work towards making Tampa Bay a better place to live. “I would like to see more major corporations like Aramark incorporate local food in their food production,” Gottlieb said. She was also very impressed with one of the event’s vendors, Dave Smiles, or “Farmer Dave” of Uriah’s Urban Vertical Farms in Tampa. “I had the opportunity to meet Farmer Dave and some of the other members of the Sustany Foundation at a conference and it was great to meet so many people who believe in the same thing that I do,” Gottlieb said. Smiles’ business installs vertical grow systems in local restaurants so they will have fresh herbs and vegetables on hand. In addition to the Sustainable Buzz event, the foundation offers various programs and grant opportunities for people and businesses 64

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The “Fresh From Florida” brand is a symbol of quality and the logo is recognized around the globe. Behind the logo is our dedicated team of marketing professionals with a proven track record of increasing sales of Florida agricultural products. Direct benefits* of membership in the program include: • Use of the widely recognized “Fresh From Florida” logo on products, packaging, advertising and promotional materials • Point of purchase materials to display with Florida grown products • Choice of customized FFF business signage 2x3 metal farm gate sign, 3x6 vinyl weatherproof banner or 2x6 vinyl weatherproof banner • Participation in the logo incentive program • Company listing and website link on the “Fresh From Florida” website • Subscription to the “Fresh From Florida” magazine and e-newsletter *Benefits of the program are subject to change.

Join Today! Visit FreshFromFlorida.com or call us at (850) 617-7399. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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CALS Alumni and Friends Seeks Nominees for Award of Distinction, Horizon Award

The University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Alumni and Friends organization is seeking nominations for its Award of Distinction and Horizon Award. “These awards provide an opportunity for us to recognize CALS alumni and friends who have made a true commitment to service,” said Valerie Dailey, CALS Alumni and Friends President. The Award of Distinction is presented to UF/IFAS CALS alumni or friends in recognition of their outstanding contributions to UF, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, CALS and the agricultural, natural resource, life science and related industries and professions. The 2013 recipients were Andy Andreasen, BSA ’74, MAG ‘82, of Marianna, FL, and Arlen N. Jumper, BSA ’53, MAG ’58, of Homosassa, FL. The Horizon Award recognizes a graduate of the last decade for the same contributions and his or her potential as a leader in the agricultural, natural resource, life science and related industries and professions. The 2013 recipients were Kelly Padgett Mosley, BSA ‘04, of Green Cove Springs, FL, and Crystal Kelts Snodgrass, BSA ’03, MS ‘05, of Wimauma, FL. Selection for both awards is based on service to industry and profession, service to UF, IFAS and CALS, community service, and professional recognitions, honors and memberships. “As a CALS alumnus, volunteering is a way to give back to the program that helped me get to where I am today,” said Dailey. “I am excited to have this opportunity to recognize CALS alumni for their service.” Nomination information and a list of previous recipients are available online at http://www.cals.ufl.edu/alumni-friends/ awards.php. Individuals may request a copy of the nomination form by calling (352) 392-1963. Completed nominations must be received no later than Tuesday, Jan. 21. CALS Alumni and Friends is dedicated to building a network to enhance awareness and promote the quality programs of UF IFAS through fraternity among graduates, former students and friends. For more information, visit www.cals.ufl.edu or call (352) 392-1963

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One-Handed Hunter:

John Stewart

By Ginny Mink

People with disabilities are at some pretty serious disadvantages. Yeah, they get the best parking spaces and have extra accommodations provided, they even get to skip you in line at Disney World. Now, before you start thinking that this is an insensitive article, let us explain. While it might appear to those with all appendages and average to above average intelligences that having a disability would be a major hindrance and set back, the truth is, there are amputees out there doing things many of us would never dream of. Let us introduce you to John Stewart. John was in a tragic car accident in 2000. He was just nineteen years old. The accident caused him to endure third degree burns over 50 percent of his body and it necessitated the amputation of his left arm below the elbow along with half of his pinky on his right hand. The burns destroyed his ears and much of his face. While plastic surgery has achieved the recreation of a nose and lips, his scars are still very prominent. He gets many a stare, though over the years he’s become a little more accustomed to them and a lot less sensitive. People might wonder how they’d survive with just one hand. Indeed, if you’ve ever had an arm in a sling you’re amazed at an amputee’s ability to button and zip his/her pants, tie shoes, or cut fingernails. Well, John goes a step further in that he is a one-handed hunter. Thanks to the assistance of his prosthetic he can shoot ‘em up with the best of them, or at least he likes to think so. We sat down and had a chat with him about his last hunting experience in which he brought home a particularly large hog. However, we had some other questions for him, too. We asked him about the challenges he faces. He said, “The hardest thing since my accident has been adjusting to the new me. That was the hardest because I just kind of woke up and I had a totally new identity and new challenges. I overcame pretty much everything other than becoming gainfully employed. Everything takes two trips, where a two handed person would take four bottles (or ever how much they can carry) I have to go back. I carry as much as I can in one hand but then it always takes twice as many trips because I only have the one hand. I don’t really think about it anymore it’s been so long, I don’t really get frustrated, I just deal with it.” He laughs a lot and has an amazing sense of humor and uncompromised honesty. He shared, “I could hunt before and I still have my right hand so I just throw the rifle or shotgun over the fake arm as a rest for it and then I aim and shoot. I went to the gun range 70

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prior to hunting. It’s a lot of fun! I was scared the first time that I went and shot with a higher caliber pistol because normally you would kind of put your other hand for extra support. I was worried about how the kickback was gonna be, but it was easy. I shot a 357, no problem, with just one hand! I’m great with a handgun and a shotgun but a rifle not as much. That’s because of my vision, a direct result of the accident. Close range I’m lethal (he chuckles) but my vision further off and my depth perception is messed up, so that makes it hard.” Eager to discuss his prize hunting adventure he continued, “The great thing about hunting is getting out in the wilderness, getting out in nature, and then having the chance to take an animal, and get to eat him. It’s really great to get out, away from the city, away from everything and go hunt an animal and not just shoot him and kill him, but shoot him and bring him home and eat him and share with your friends, too! The first time I went after my accident I just went squirrel hunting and I shot a batch of them. I don’t enjoy eating squirrel but I still do because ‘if you shoot it, you eat it’ as per Big Dog (Dad). Just like I shot a dove in our backyard when I was a kid and Big Dog (I shot it with my BB gun) saw me through the kitchen window and he made me cook it up and eat it. It wasn’t good! I didn’t shoot anymore dove’s. I’ve just hunted Florida: green swamp (that’s the main one), Croom, other places I can’t say and Cedar Key. My favorite gun to shoot is my 12 gauge shotgun, that was always my favorite. I love a shotgun.” Finally we arrive at the whopper of a tale. He recalled every detail, “We went to Cedar Key; that’s North Florida. The pig came out from a patch of bushes in front of me. I had a 30/30 lever action rifle that my friend loaned to me so that I could go hunting because all I had was my shotgun and it wasn’t allowed at that particular place. You had to use a rifle or a handgun, but no shotguns. The pig was like 30 or 35 yards, he walked out from a patch of bushes. I took like a kneel kind of, took my aim on him, and PI-YOW, shot him! Right above the shoulder too and I expected to see him drop, but he didn’t. He turned and looked at me, he grunted and then he started charging right at me! So then I fumbled, I was scared I wasn’t going to be able to reload in time so I hugged a pine tree. He blows right by me, I’ve reloaded the gun, I swing around the tree and then I pop him one more time and then he dropped to the ground, a 180 pound boar! Oh, it was a huge adrenaline rush. I mean I wasn’t even sure if he was going to WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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mow me down, but he didn’t, he ran right by like I made myself part of the tree, he dropped and his leg was just kicking, and it was over. We hooked him up to a four wheeler, hoisted him up, took him in. He was good, he fed us almost all year, not every day, but we had pig for almost a year. I gave a bunch away! I took two pigs on the trip but my trophy was the 180 pound boar. I have his tusks mounted on my wall. Their tusks go all the way up into their mouth, but I would put it at 3, or 2 ½ inch, cutters. Three inch tusks? That will tear you up! What’s mounted on my wall is probably 5 inches long but that goes way up into his mouth, you don’t get to see that. That would be outrageous!“ He laughs at the image. Because we can, we asked him about his agricultural background. He said, “I worked on a couple different farms, orange groves as well as strawberry fields. I drove tractors, backhoes, I did irrigation on strawberry fields and in orange groves. I wasn’t in FFA, I was in FHA with all the girls (he chuckles), it worked out good (he chuckles again). I worked directly with the farmer, I’d be the guy who’d be punching the cards and giving them extra flats. I drove the load of strawberries in before, without losing any, that was a big responsibility. I started working on the farm in 1995 and I got paid five dollars an hour which was really good at that time because the other job that I had paid $4.25 so that was a $.75 raise to start working at the farm and I loved it. I thought I was getting rich making five dollars an hour, back then I did! I had to get up in the middle of the night when it was a freeze and go ride the fields make sure the rain birds weren’t freezing up. So you get wet and cold in the middle of the night. It was a lot of fun, I miss that. I’m not supposed to be in the sun now and with my arm situation I can’t operate heavy machinery anymore.” John closed with some words of encouragement, “There’s people that have it way worse off than me. I always think about that one girl I met on a trip to Michigan. She had lost both her arms and both her legs, the only thing she could use was her mouth and I saw her struggle, it was really rough. It made me feel like ‘man, you’re all right!’ I’m thankful for every extra day that I get to spend on earth. Be willing to try new things even if it seems you can’t, give it a try because I can still play video games, maybe not as good as a two hander, but I can still play pretty good with just the one hand! Just like I can hunt and I can fish.” The list of what he can do goes on and on, I would know, he’s my brother! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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FREE Thanksgiving Dinners Served to 550 in Dover

By Cheryl Kuck

One of the things we, as Americans, can be thankful for is that in this, in the country where the first Thanksgiving was celebrated, we remember the importance of sharing with one another. No other country’s citizenry pulls together to help each other in times of crisis as steadfastly as we do. No where was the message of Thanksgiving more profound than on Saturday, November 23, at the IGA store parking lot on Dr Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. in Dover, where volunteers from Eastern Hillsborough communities served 550 needy and homeless people free Thanksgiving dinners through the coordination of Buddy Bass and his not-for-profit mission Manna On Wheels. Some of the support groups helping make this event so successful included 27 Streetlinks Appraisal Company employees who helped serve, as did members of various Rotary Clubs and Lithia Pinecrest Ace Hardware who supplied all the fuel for cooking. Volunteers from six area churches, Bell Shoals Baptist of Brandon, Fishhawk Fellowship, Countryside Baptist-Dover, located in Plant City, Knight’s Baptist, First United Methodist and Church on the Rock, helped with the set up and take down of the big tents and chairs, served food, drinks and were part of the ongoing clean-up crew. Throughout the afternoon, pastors gave individual counseling. Pastor Tomas Pizana of Bell Shoals Baptist Church also gave a sermon in Spanish and Countryside Baptist Church Pastor Doug Carter gave a sermon in English. Pastor Julio Santana of First United Methodist Church, Christ’s Community Café and Bread of Life Mission gave booklets containing the message of Psalm 91, describing what life is like when there is a personal relationship with God. Wearing his “Walk with Jesus” cap and a welcoming smile, chief cook and coordinator Buddy Bass warmly greeted every one as though they were eating a meal in his own home. An owner of an Allstate insurance business for 36 years, Bass decided to sell his company in 2006 and follow what he terms, “The Lord’s direction to feed the homeless and needy. With my wife Jane’s support we felt we would not be fulfilled until we did what the Lord wanted,” he said. For the past seven years, Bass and his Manna on Wheels ministry has been successfully distributing over 130,000 pounds of cooked food to various charity and church events in eastern Hillsborough County on a monthly budget consisting of food donations and a budget of only $1200 a month. “It’s a good day when we can feed so many people and have 16 families and individuals come to the Lord,” said Bass. 74

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HERITAGE HARVEST CELEBRRATION SHOWCASES CULTURE, AGRICULTURE AND GIVING BACK Coincides with National Farm City Week By Jim Frankowiak Downtown Tampa workers had a special noon hour opportunity to make lunch meaningful last month as the Heritage Harvest celebrated culture and farming while helping the needy at Joe Chillura Courthouse Square. The many cultural dimensions of the area were recognized through live music and performances as well as a number of exhibits – all designed to create awareness. Agriculture was front and center with representation from Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, Hillsborough County Extension and chef-prepared dishes using locally produced or harvested ingredients. Though admission to Heritage Harvest was free, attendees were encouraged to kick-off the holiday season by donating non-perishable food items that will benefit residents across the county served by Metropolitan Ministries. No cost chef-prepared dishes were made available through the participation of Thai Gourmet, Sassy Cucina, G& F Farms, Bavaro’s and M & B Products Inc. Farm Bureau brought its special whipped cream topped pumpkin pie desserts and a good deal of information about agriculture in Hillsborough County.

• Strawberries - $388 million • Vegetables - $150 million • Ornamental Plants - $139 million • Aquaculture - $23 million • Beef Cattle - $18.9 million Farm owners and urban residents maintain vital, longstanding relationships that make possible our abundant food supply. Farm Bureau leaders throughout the state and nation take an active role in organizing and participating in events such as Heritage Harvest to mark this annual occasion. Last year, Farm Bureau volunteers across Florida held more than 45 events that included meals, farm tours, school demonstrations and interactive exhibits. Each of these activities was designed to remind attendees that a complex network of production, distribution and quality control stands behind our abundance of high quality food. Farmers, shippers, retailers, processors and other citizens share the responsibility for bringing the Thanksgiving menu – and the rest of the food we eat all year long – to the family table.

Heritage Harvest also coincided with national Farm City Week, an annual pre-Thanksgiving Day awareness campaign designed to remind Americans that farmers are responsible for making the holiday feast possible. Here in Hillsborough County, agriculture accounts for more than $800 million in sales and has an even deeper impact in support of related businesses like banking, real estate, transportation, packaging, equipment, industry suppliers and more, according to Hillsborough County Extension and Economic Development Department.

“There is no other place in the world where families can enjoy the variety and quality of food available to them here in our country,” noted Hillsborough County Farm Bureau President Kenneth Parker. “All of this is available at the lowest prices, too. Unfortunately, these facts are too often overlooked and frequently ignored. This is important information everyone must recognize as our global population continues to grow and makes even greater demands on those who produce the world’s food supplies,” Parker added.

The top five agricultural commodities in Hillsborough County in terms of annual sales, according to statistics compiled in 2011, include:

“For agriculture to continue to supply families around the world, it is important for all to recognize and understand the challenges the industry faces,” he concluded.

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First Flat

Harvested the morning of October 17, 2013

From Left to right: Raul Montez (Irrigation Tech), Ricky Miller (Spray Tech), Lupe Fernandez (Harvest Manager), Dudley Calfee (General Manager), Butch Vance (Production Manager)

We help hardworking farmers nourish our growing world.

That’s our promise. As the world’s population increases, the demand for affordable food increases with it. The Mosaic Company helps the world grow the food it needs by providing farmers with essential crop nutrients. Today, more than half the phosphate fertilizer used by U.S. farmers is produced right here in Florida. Mosaic’s more than 3,000 Florida employees are honored to help farmers put food on the table for millions of families – including yours. Join in Mosaic’s promise at www.mosaicco.com/promise.

Tom Pospichal, Manager Mosaic Agricultural Operations, Florida

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Kenneth Parker AND HIS PLANS FOR HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FARM BUREAU

By Jim Frankowiak

Agriculture is in Kenneth Parker’s blood. The recently elected president of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau is a sixth generation Floridian, raising cattle and hay, as well as serving as a crop advisor for Chemical Dynamics. Growing up in the Welcome area near Pinecrest, Parker has always been involved in agriculture and outdoor activities. “I grew up raising and showing beef cattle at the Strawberry Festival and the Florida State Fair,” he said. “I was always involved in FFA. We hunted squirrel and dove and fished every chance we had. Those were the good days.” Parker got his degree from Florida Southern College, majoring in business and citrus. “After college I started working in the agrichemical business. I joined the Carson family’s Chemical Dynamics and loved it from the start,” said Parker. “I’ve got the best job in Hillsborough County. I spend most days in the fields of the eastern part of the county meeting with growers who are my friends. I consult with them to test their soil and plants so that we can provide the proper analysis and rate of fertilizer to maximize marketable yields of strawberries and other crops.”  Married to his high school sweetheart, former Dee Newsome, the Parker’s have two children, Jerrod who was just married, and Calli Jo. Jerrod earned a degree in English literature from Florida Southern College and is currently teaching English at Plant City High School. Jerrod’s wife, Summer Norris Parker, earned an Education degree from the University of South Florida and is teaching at Tomlin Middle School. Calli Jo is in her final semester at the University of Florida, majoring in agriculture education and communications. Parker and his father-in-law Joe Newsome grew citrus until diseases made it difficult to succeed. They switched to hay and continue to raise hay today. One of his passions is a cattle operation. Parker and his life-long friends, Scott and Hank Varnum, run the South Prong Ranch near the Welcome community in the South Prong Basin of the Alafia River. “South Prong Ranch is a commercial cow/calf operation that uses Brangus and Beefmaster crossbred cows that are bred to Brangus and Charolais bulls. It’s definitely something I enjoy when I’m not on the job. I also really enjoy the hay operation. These things are relaxing to me to be able to work the land like my family has done for many years,” said Parker. As president of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau, Parker and his executive committee recently met to formulate a plan of action for the coming year. “It is our hope to build on the efforts of past leadership with a special emphasis on membership development,” he said. “Many people have the mistaken idea that you must be either a farmer or rancher to belong to Farm Bureau. That is simply not the

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case. While our focus is agriculture and those involved in the industry, we serve the entire population. I am sure you have seen the slogan, ‘No Farmers, No Food’, and that’s the truth. Families in this country are so fortunate to have an abundance of high quality food items to select from at costs that can’t be matched anywhere else. That plus the fact that the demands on agriculture are global present some very substantive challenges for our industry. “Meeting those challenges is a multi-faceted task beyond just doing the best we possibly can in the field,” he said. “We need the support and understanding of all of our stakeholders from those who purchase the products we produce to lawmakers and regulators whose actions have a significant impact our industry. That will help maintain and sustain our industry so we can continue to meet the demands of the marketplace. Additionally, agriculture has a substantial impact on the local, national and global economies. The sale of agricultural commodities here in Hillsborough County exceeded $832 million in 2011. In Florida, agriculture ranks second behind tourism. That makes us an important economic factor, too. Consequently, it is important that we have the ongoing support of our membership in all that we do.” Parker also noted that membership in Farm Bureau is a family engagement. “We have more than 147,000 family members statewide and a host of benefits for all that include low rates and substantial discounts on loans, personal, life and car insurance, merchandise, travel and other services,” noted Parker. “Our members here in the county are also invited to enjoy a steak dinner at our annual meeting each year and that, too, is included in Farm Bureau membership. I am confident that the phrase, ‘No Farmers - no Food’, will never become reality. However, I hope all of our members will become involved in our activities and those of you who do not currently belong to Farm Bureau will reconsider and join us as we look to the future and the continued ability to feed the world’s hungry. “My family is what I love most about my life, I take pride in being a good father and spending time with my wife and children,” said Parker. “I have been blessed. I also recognize the responsibility that I have been given in my new role with Farm Bureau. I am confident we can succeed. Please join as we move forward. And, if you are not a Farm Bureau member, please give that your consideration.  We would appreciate having your family join ours.” For more information about joining Farm Bureau and the benefits associated with membership, visit: http://hcfarmbureau.org or call 813/659-9121. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Your Personal Water Number, “Motivator” Julia Palaschak Water use Program Coordinator, Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County Greetings y’all! In our last conservation conversation, I asked you to look at your water bill and find your personal water number1. Did you share the math with your household? What motivates people to practice water conservation? It’s probably pretty much the same for any change we accept into our lives: health, wealth, family, community, legacy. “Running out of water” sorta sounds like a science fiction story. That’s understandable. The US possesses an amazing wealth of natural resources. Florida has a wide diversity of water resources with 54,836 miles of rivers and streams, 49,128 miles of canals and ditches, over 1.8 million acres of lakes (7,800 freshwater lakes), reservoirs, ponds, more than 1,000 springs, and over 11 million acres of wetlands.2 Still, water shortages and drought have changed and challenged America many times over. The way I see it, the organisms furthest from the spigot experience change first. In that scenario, urban dwellers may be the last to run out, lucky us. Should we care about changes furthest from the spigot? It is a choice to conserve. There are laws regarding water use, but still there is choice to follow or not. The states of Georgia, Florida, and Alabama have been engaged in a 20-year interstate conflict over water allocation in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river system. In October 2013, Governor Rick Scott and Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia, claiming Atlanta is using up water that should be flowing to Florida.3 The lawsuit comes after the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a fishery disaster declaration on August 12, 2013 over decreased oyster production in Apalachicola Bay. 4 Simply put: diminished water flows affect the health of Apalachicola Bay, which diminishes the wealth of fishermen and the lifestyle of the families in Florida’s coastal communities, changing and challenging a bountiful legacy. So, what’s your personal water number? Can you find some motivation to use less? I hope you’ll join our next conservation conversation! 1.

A personal water number is my way of talking about how much water each person uses on an average day at their home. Using the information provided on your water bill, divide your total gallons used by the days in the month, then by the number of people in your home. Share it with everyone in your household!

2.

http://extadmin.ifas.ufl.edu/images/lrp.pdf http://fcir.org/2013/10/02/ florida-georgia-lawsuit-water/`http://www.newsherald.com/news/government/feds-declare-disaster-for-oyster-fishery-1.185935

3 steps to lower your personal water number: 1) a functional rain shutoff device 2) verify your assigned watering days; set your system accordingly 3) apply only ¾” each time you water Schedule a free “in-yard” consultation: 813-744-5519 x54142; palaschakj@hillsboroughcounty.org

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A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Two Spotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae)

Spider mites are one of the world’s most economically significant pests. The Chelicerata are arthropods that include horseshoe crabs, scorpions, spiders, mites and ticks. Although chelicerata originated as marine animals, they have evolved to become the second largest group of terrestrial animals and maintain the primitive root of the arthropod phylum. Within this large group is the order Acari defining mites and ticks, and include the family Tetranychidae describing spider mites specifically. There are an estimated 1200 species comprising the Tetranychidae family, all of which are notorious pests of ornamentals, vegetables and greenhouse crops. A closer look will reveal why these pests are so difficult to control. Acari, as a group of animals, represent a potential threat to human health. Ticks are vectors of Lyme disease and various forms of haemorrhagic fever such as Ebola virus, Yellow Fever, West Nile, and Dengue fever. Mites in this group contribute to asthma, and dermatitis, moreover, spider mites in particular, are a major agricultural pest that is one of the most difficult to control. Unfortunately, these tiny arthropods are difficult to study and are poorly understood, consequently, there are limited effective pest management options for the agricultural community. The consequences associated with the use of broad spectrum insecticides are becoming more relevant and include the reduction of beneficial insects which only complicates the threat. The two spotted, or red spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) have a seemingly boundless range of host plants and a puzzling reputation of pesticide resistance. To understand pest adaptation, scientists aspired to gain a greater understanding of Tetranychus urticae and the characteristics that make this species resistant to pesticides. In 2011, researchers led by the University of Western Ontario (UWO) in Canada, completely sequenced and annotated the genome for Tetranychus urticae cultivating a greater understanding this species and a framework from which to consider other pests. One of the most profound characteristics of the spider mite genome is its ability to maintain homeostasis (stability of internal systems). Compared with other insects, the Tetranychus urticae genome has unique changes in the internal hormonal environment that may have contributed to evolutionary advantages such as silk production. The silk webbing that characterizes spider mites provides the colony a micro-habitat that provides shelter from predators and chemical agents (such as insecticides). Within the silk shelter, the colony is insulated from temperature and humidity changes and 84

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pheromone communication is more effective. It is not just the silk fortress that makes Tetranychus urticae so successful, the rest of its evolutionary strategy is an inside job that makes our human attempts of conquest fail the more we try. Tetranychus urticae is known to feed on more than 1,100 plant species spanning more than 140 various plant families. This is not a trivial matter. Most other insects can claim a handful of host plants at best. Researchers found adaptations in the gene sequence that include signatures of both polyphagy (eating many plants) and detoxification (associated with toxic plant compounds). The interaction between the host plant and the spider mite demonstrates how this species, and possibly others respond to changes in the host environment. Tetranychus urticae is known for its ability to develop rapid resistance to pesticides. Among arthropods it is unmatched in its pesticide resistance. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the ability to transfer genes between organisms by means other than traditional reproduction, for example, by feeding on different hosts, or being exposed to a variety of toxins. Through HGT, Tetranychus urticae can acquire new gene families to quickly become resistant to pesticides in much the same way bacteria becomes resistant to antibiotics. Tetranychus urticae belongs to the most diverse groups of mites, sharing the genetic variation, and evolutionary innovation of over 40,000 described species and a genetic history that began at least 410 million years ago. Biological pest control involves the use of natural predators, parasites, and pathogens, all of which naturally evolve with their host or prey. Several species of insects including predatory midges, Ladybugs, Ghost Ants, and other mite species prey specifically on spider mites and can be an effective and sustainable control strategy; unlike chemical solutions, biological pest control is effective on the eggs and every stage of the mites development. Most biologic solutions have specific seasonal, temperature and humidity requirements for effective use and can be ordered for commercial use. Without a doubt, the Tetranychus urticae genome will provide a new lens from which we view the most challenging pests. Tetranychus urticae is like the lab rat of the insect world that scientist hope will provide insight into the evolutionary biology of a variety of significant pests. Our new understanding of insect evolution and interaction may inspire healthier, more sustainable alternatives to toxic pest control, or at the very least establish the certainty that more is definitely not better. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Naturally Amazing Activities

By Sean Green

Recycled Wreath

Each year, most families drag out the holiday decorations only to find there are many things to get rid of before the decorating begins. Scraps of last year’s festivities, wrapping paper that has become too wrinkled to use, bows that no longer have a sticky back, and even uneaten candy canes. Rather than just toss these items, why not use them to create this year’s decorations. This month we fea-

ture a simple wreath that the whole family can join in creating. It’s likely that everything you need for this project is already laying around the house somewhere. For an exciting twist on the materials, gather some items from nature such as pinecones, and pine needles, with the right natural materials the wreath may smell pretty good when you’re finished.

Materials: Old Bows Scraps of Ribbon Double sided tape Disposable Picnic Plate Bowl (used as cutting guide)

Directions: • Carefully cut a circle out of the disposable picnic plate using a bowl as a guide. • Cover the underside of the disposable picnic plate with double sided tape. • Fasten recycled materials to the disposable picnic plate to create a wreath (be creative here). Old Bows Scraps of Ribbon Scraps of Colored Rope Small boxes (thumb size) wrapped in scrap wrapping paper Last year’s uneaten candy canes Pine Cones Pine Needles • Fasten ribbon through top of the wreath to hang it. • Curl the ends of the ribbon if desired. We would love to see pictures of your wreath and the little artists that created it. You can post pictures of your wreath with comments on our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/InTheFieldMagazine.

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MOSAIC ACQUISITION OF CF INDUSTRIES PHOSPHATE OPERTIONS:

Local Community Support to Continue By Jim Frankowiak

Late this past October there was a major news announcement involving the two of the three remaining companies in the phosphate industry in Florida, The Mosaic Company and CF Industries. Mosaic announced the signing of a definitive agreement to acquire the phosphate business of CF Industries, making Mosaic the sole phosphate company in Central Florida. Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan continues to mine and manufacture in Northern Florida. The transaction, which is subject to regulatory review by the U.S. Justice Department, involves CF Industries’ mine near Bowling Green in Hardee County, a manufacturing plant in Plant City and a terminal and warehouse at the Port of Tampa. No job losses are anticipated and the sale has been termed a “win-win” for both companies. Mosaic currently has more than 2,000 Florida employees, while CF Industries employs approximately 700. Mosaic operations include three fertilizer plants – Riverview in Tampa, Bartow in Bartow and New Wales in Mulberry -- along with four phosphate rock mines – Hookers Prairie in Polk County, South Fort Meade in Polk and Hardee counties, Four Corners in Hillsborough, Polk, Hardee and Manatee counties and Wingate in Manatee County. “Uniting CF Industries’ phosphate operations with Mosaic’s creates an ideal combination that provides the opportunity for enhanced operating efficiencies and sustainability efforts, lower production costs 88

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and reduced capital investment – creating value for our shareholders, customers and employees,” said Mosaic President and Chief Executive Officer James T. Prokopanko. It is anticipated that the transaction will be finalized by mid-2014. For CF Industries the sale of its phosphate operations will enable the company to focus on its nitrogen fertilizer business, while Mosaic is anticipated to save approximately $500 million by using an oreprocessing or beneficiation facility at CF Industries’ Bowling Green operation. The company had reportedly planned to spend $1 billion on a processing facility at Ona. The company has also said it will save an additional $1.1 billion by canceling plans to build its own ammonia plant in Louisiana. Both companies are publicly held and shareholders for each are expected to benefit, as well. While announcement of the agreement was widely covered by central Florida media, there are questions regarding the impact the anticipated transaction will have upon the communities where each company has a presence. CF Industries and Mosaic both provide substantial and wide-ranging support to those communities. Financial support alone far exceeded $10 million in fiscal 2013. The Mosaic Company and the The Mosaic Company Foundation donated more than $10.6 million to organizations serving Hillsborough, Polk, Manatee, Hardee, DeSoto, Sarasota and Charlotte counties. In addition to financial support, which included donaWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


tions from both companies to the same community organizations, CF Industries’ and Mosaic employees also provided countless hours of volunteer support and personal contributions. CF Industries has a long tradition of supporting United Way and a large variety of community organizations in the region. CF Industries’ corporate and individual employee United Way contributions totaled more than $326,000 for the most recent campaign. Corporate focus areas for Mosaic investments include food, water, local communities, disaster relief and in-kind donations. In 2012, Mosaic and The Mosaic Company foundation helped Feeding America Tampa Bay provide approximately 1.7 million meals to 600 organizations in 10 counties. To date in 2012, Mosaic and the Foundation have invested more than $525,000 in local hunger relief efforts and food banks to help feed the one in six Floridians who struggle with hunger every day. Mosaic is committed to protecting critical water resources through habitat conservation, watershed restoration and nutrient stewardship. As part of this commitment, The Mosaic Company Foundation supported Florida’s Conservation Foundation of the Gulf Coast (CFGC) with a $3.2 million lead grant for the Robinson Preserve expansion capital campaign. CFBC kicked off the first phase by buying a 150-acre parcel of coastal land adjacent to Robinson Preserve and placing a perpetual conservation easement on it. They then conveyed the land to Manatee County to manage as part of the WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

award-winning Preserve. Both companies are keenly aware of the impact their support has on the communities where they operate and this recognition will be an important consideration as the acquisition proceeds. “We embrace a high level of engagement in the communities where we live and work and that will continue with the CF integration,” said Martha Monfried, vice president, public affairs – phosphates for Mosaic Company. In Florida, United Way is an important community partner. Each fall, teams of employee volunteers organize a series of events that focus employees, attention on their communities through fundraisers, agency tours and volunteer projects. In 2012, 75 percent of eligible Florida employees made a pledge to United Way, with an average pledge of $459 per employee. Mosaic matches all employee gifts dollar for dollar. “We are going to maintain ‘business as usual’ until the Department of Justice review has concluded,” said Richard Ghent, director of community affairs phosphate operations for CF Industries. “I understand that people are concerned, but I would ask that they remember that both CF and Mosaic have excellent histories of community support and employee involvement. We need a bit of time to plan, discuss and get used to working together, but I have confidence that this will be a very successful transition,” he concluded. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Mon. - Sat.: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

813-752-2379

3014 S. Jim Redman Pkwy. (Hwy. 39 S) Plant City, FL • www.southsidestores.com

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TAMPA ADOPTS STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MANAGING ITS URBAN FOREST A “Model” for the Southeast By Jim Frankowiak

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Tampa has become only the second city in the United States with a comprehensive plan for the management of its urban forest. Seattle is the other city that has taken this significant step to sustain this vital resource. Passed by a unanimous vote of Tampa City Council in November, the Urban Forest Management Plan was a five-year collaborative effort supported by Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Tampa City Council that involved all city departments, the University of Florida, the University of South Florida, Hillsborough County Extension, business and professional organizations, neighborhood associations and citizens. The city’s urban forest consists of the remnants of native forest found within public and private property and planted trees, palms and shrubs also found on all public and private property. The forest plays a significant role in maintaining the health and vitality of urban life. Among the benefits provided to neighborhoods and residents are the reduction of energy consumption, removal of pollutants from the air and water, reduction in stormwater flows, increased valuation of private property, increased worker productivity, reduction in stress and violent crime, as well as providing recreational opportunities and aesthetic diversity. The City of Tampa 2011 Urban Forest Analysis, which involved many of the same individuals and organizations that participated in the creation of the Urban Forest Management Plant, offers insight into some of the economic benefits of the urban forest. “Pollution removal by trees and shrubs was 1,163 tons/year and valued at $9.9 million/year. Pollutants include carbon monoxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter less than 10 microns. Values estimated include health effects and externality costs associated with pollutants,” the analysis reported. The analysis also detailed carbon storage, which “was estimated at 619,000 tons and valued at $44.1 million. Includes the amount of carbon bound up in the above-ground and below-ground parts of woody vegetation.” The annual removal of carbon dioxide from the air by vegetation, known as Carbon sequestration rate “was 52,600 tons/year and valued at $3.7 million/year.” Additional benefits WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

detailed in the analysis included oxygen production, building energy savings, avoided cost of stormwater management with the overall annual value “of the benefits approximating $29 million.” The initial step in the development of the plan was the organization of the Mayor’s Steering committee on Urban Forest Sustainability, which then created a vision statement and series of six goals. From that work, the City developed six principles used to guide the development of the plan and test each of its components for consistency with the original vision statement and goals. Those principles were reviewed and approved by the Steering Committee. The plan’s vision statement: “Maintain and expand Tampa’s urban forest in recognition of the many benefits it provides, including: enhancing quality of life for present and future citizens, attaining numerous economic and ecological benefits nature provides, and seizing opportunities to better understand our natural environment through scientific research and public education.” The full plan was then developed using a series of management criteria and performance indicators to measure urban forest management success. This involved city representatives working with the project team from the University of Florida and University of South Florida to outline a plan framework that would meet the unique biological physical and social characteristics of Tampa. Team members included Project Lead Extension Forester Robert J. Northrop; Tampa’s Natural Resources Coordinator Kathy Beck; Rob Irving, urban forestry coordinator for the City of Tampa, Dr. Shawn M. Landry of the University of South Florida and Dr. Michael G. Andreu, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The plan identified a series of quantifiable steps that guide activities and resources to accomplish predetermined outcomes, the time frame for implementation and the responsible agency or partnerships. Clear lines of responsibility and measurable objectives tied to reasonable timelines allow the city to measure success and identify programmatic areas in need for further attention. The plan itself is seen as a long-term process, a living and adaptable Continued on pg 98 IINNTTHE HEFFIELD IELD M MAGAZINE AGAZINE

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A TASTE OF AGRICULTURE

Country Dinner Live Auction & Barn Dance 6th Annual Country Dinner

Saturday, January 18, 2014 Social Hour 6:00 p.m. Dinner & Live Auction at 6:30 p.m. all proceeds benefit the

Polk County Youth Fair

Join us for an evening of good food & great fun!

Ticket Prices: Early bird $25 Adult • At door $50 Adult • $10 Student/Children under 18 Meal provided by: Polk County Cattlemen & Polk County Cattlewomen

2200 Ewell Road, Lakeland, FL Main Sponsors: Mosaic Higgenbotham Auctioneers Int’l Work Comp Partners To purchase tickets please contact:

Janice Jackson

Corporate Sponsors: Bartow Ford Buckhead Beef Centerstate Bank Clear Springs Cremation Services Evolve Jarrett Gordon Ford Kelley Buick Superior Coatings

jejack@UFL.EDU | PCYF.net | 863-519-1046

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Switch fungicide - the standard for Botrytis control Switch® fungicide combines two highly effective active ingredients that offer outstanding control of Botrytis, powdery mildew and anthracnose in strawberry production. To learn how Switch fungicide can help your crop, contact your local Syngenta retailer.

© 2013 Syngenta. Important: Always read and follow label instructions. Some crop protection products may not be registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Please check with your local extension service to ensure registration status. Switch®, the Alliance Frame, the Purpose Icon and the Syngenta logo are trademarks of a Syngenta Group Company. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Continued from pg 95

TAMPA ADOPTS STRATEGIC PLAN FOR MANAGING ITS URBAN FOREST plan of action and not a static product. Specific criteria and performance indicators for sustainable urban forest management provide a framework for defining substantial urban forest management and assessing progress toward this goal. The criteria and performance indicators have been organized into four major topic areas: Vegetation Resource; Community Framework; Institutional Framework and Resource Management. These criteria and indicators are tied to a five-year cycle of urban forest assessment. These criteria and performance indicators allow the City of Tampa the assessment capability to use an adaptive management approach to urban forestry, and to promote flexible decision-making. Careful monitoring of the indicators will help the administration adjust policies or operations as part of an iterative learning process leading to more effective decisions and enhanced benefits, while reducing tensions among stakeholders.

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“All of us involved in this multi-year process are pleased with the outcome and unanimous acceptance of the plan by Tampa City Council,” said Project Leader Northrop. “This is an excellent start and a credit to the full team. We would welcome the opportunity to apply this framework for the creation of plans in other cities or areas of the southeastern U.S.” For further information on the City of Tampa Urban Forest Management Plant, visit: http://www.tampagov.net/dept_planning/programs_and_services/natural_resources_section.as

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STUDY SHOWS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE

FOR MANAGING TOMATO BACTERIAL DISEASES By Jim Frankowiak An extensive, multi-year study involving surveys from three areas in Florida and multiple field trials questions the value of copper for managing bacterial diseases of tomato. The comprehensive study was led by Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Plant Pathologist Dr. Gary Vallad and focused on bacterial leaf spot (BLS) control caused by Xanthomanas perforans. The study also included a survey in 2011-12 of bacterial leaf spot causing strains from tomato transplant facilities and field production areas in north, central and southwest Florida. Laboratory tests demonstrated that only one out of the 176 bacterial strains collected throughout the state were sensitive to copper, while the rest were resistant. These results were similar to a prior survey of tomato production fields in Florida and South Georgia in 2006-07 that found all 377 collected strains were resistant to copper. “The findings from our survey, along with the previous survey, clearly show that copper resistance in Florida tomato production fields is the norm, not the exception,” said Vallad. In addition, Dr. Vallad’s survey found an alarming increase in the frequency of strains resistant to streptomycin, especially in tomato transplant facilities where streptomycin is labeled for use. Of the strains collected, 86 percent from transplant facilities were found to be resistant to streptomycin compared to only 14 percent from field production. Regardless, the current frequency of streptomycin resistance is far higher that the 4 percent level found in the prior 2006-07 survey. However, resistance 100

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to Kasumin 21, which contains the antibiotic kasugamycin, was not observed at the recommended usage rate. The subsequent tomato field trials conducted at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center “were designed to address the efficacy of several bactericides alone or as part of a copper or non-copper based program,” said Vallad. “Additionally, we wanted our trials to address different rotation programs and their ability to effectively manage BLS and pathogen resistance to the various bactericides, which included two antibiotics. By increasing the number of effective products in a treatment rotation program, we should improve control and reduce the likelihood of the pathogen developing resistance.” In addition to copper-mancozeb, the bactericide program options included Actigard, Firewall, Kasumin, Quintec, Regalia and Actinovate. Firewall and Kasumin are antibiotic-based products containing streptomycin and kasugamycin, respectively. While Vallad and his team acknowledge that some of the options in the field trials are not currently permitted for commercial application, their success either alone or in combination with other bactericides would provide the basis for seeking regulatory approval for commercial use, which in the cases of Quintec and Kasumin is already underway. “We found that in some cases, it may be appropriate to limit the use of certain antibiotics to transplant production,” said Vallad. The field trials at GCREC were conducted during the fall of 2012 and the spring and fall of 2013, “giving us trials in both the rainy and dryer growing WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


seasons, which we felt was important and beneficial.” In addition, trials performed in 2013 used several strains collected from the state survey to initiate disease. Funding for the study and administrative support came from the Florida Department of Consumer and Agricultural Services and Florida Specialty Crop Foundation. In addition to Vallad, team personnel included Dr. Jeff Jones, Sujan Timilsina, Scott Hughes, Mike Sweat, Clint Dyer, Jose Moreno, Jeb Cofer, Billy Triner, Payton Barbon, Rebecca Willis, Heather Adkison, Samantha Newman and Julie Siebert. The results of the field trials are especially noteworthy as the efficacy of the “go to” standard program of copper sulfate mixed with mancozeb was minimal to non-existent,” said Vallad. “In fact, when the copper-mancozeb standard was combined with other non-copper bactericides it reduced the efficacy of those products for managing BLS. The addition of copper-mancozeb actually had a negative impact on yields in some cases. These findings have us seriously questioning the economic return of that standard program so much so that I would welcome the opportunity to work with individual WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

growers on their own test plots and encourage growers to contact me in that regard.” Vallad did indicate that there may be post harvest benefits attributable to copper-mancozeb but did not have data to support that consideration. He noted that Firewall, Quintec and Actigard were more effective than the copper sulfate-mancozeb standard at reducing bacterial spot on fruit with Actigard, the most consistent product among all utilized in the field trials. “However, changes in the pathogen population remain a major challenge for managing BLS,” he said and “developing effective programs for BLS that also limit the development of resistance to bactericides and are economically feasible is just another challenge.” In addition to assessing control of bacterial diseases on tomato, the field trials also reported marketable yields, the costs associated with each type of program and the overall return on investment. For access to additional information on the study, visit: http://flagexpo. ifas.ufl.edu/. Growers interested in developing their own tests plots for trials of copper-mancozeb options may reach Dr. Vallad via email: GVallad@UFL.edu or by calling his office: 813-633-4121.

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HILLSBOROUGH SOIL and WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT 2013 LAND JUDGING CONTEST The Soil and Water Conservation District in Hillsborough County and U.S. Department of Agriculture - Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) sponsored an annual Land Judging Contest at Alderman’s Ford Park in Lithia on November 6, 2013. This competition is for middle and high school 4-H and FFA students. The students judge, as individuals and as a team, the physical properties of the soil, identify improved land management practices for various types of farming, and judge the limitations of the soil for home sites. Winning teams from local contests are eligible to compete at the State Contest, and the state winners compete at the National Contest. Soil is a basic natural resource used by humans to meet one or more of their needs. It provides raw materials, stores water and nutrients, and

supports growing plants that produce food and fiber. It also provides space for cities, highways, recreation, and wildlife. Nothing surrounds us more in our daily lives. But, like so many things important to life, soil goes unnoticed until we learn to appreciate it. The co-coordinator for the Land Judging Contest is Pam Walden, Supervisor of Agriculture & JROTC with Hillsborough County Schools. The 2013 soil judging site was located at Charanji Duggal’s field in Lithia. Juan Vega and Chuck Bailey of USDA-NRCS and Mr. Duggal were instrumental in preparing the site for the contest. Douglas Holmberg prepared and delivered a tasty barbecue lunch. Mr. Holmberg has faithfully prepared food for the Land Judging Contest for 22 years.

1st Place Winner – Randall Middle School 106

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The following Hillsborough County public schools participated: Randall Middle School (1st Place), Martinez Middle School (2nd place), Turkey Creek Middle School (3rd Place), Newsome High School (1st Place), Plant City High School (2nd Place), and Armwood High School (3rd Place).

Juan Vega, Soil Scientist for USDA-NRCS, giving an over-view to the students as Charanji Duggal looks on

1st Place Winner – Newsome High School WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Cla s s ifie d s

Te l: 8 13 .7 5 9 .6 9 0 9

ANIMALS & NEEDS

MASSEY FERGUSON 210 2wd., diesel tractor. $3,750 Call Alvie. 813-759-8722

CECIL BREEDING FARM Full service thoroughbred farm from foaling to the track. Broodmare care. Investment opportunities. 863-899-9620

REAL ES TATE LAND WANTED 10 to 100 acres, no improvements, Hillsborough, Polk or East Pasco. Call Lee 813-986-9141

F OR S ALE

ANIMAL CONTROL Complete Nuisance/Destructive Wildlife Removal & Management! Wild hogs, coyotes, raccoons, opossum, armadillo, squirrels, bobcats, etc. (licensed & insured professional Services) 863-287-2311 ANIMAL & BIRDCAGES Equipment serving the fur bearing animal & exotic bird industry! Cages built to order. Wire by roll or foot. (813) 752-2230. Call Don Ammerman. www.ammermans.com Swaps July 14, 2013 and December 1, 2013 CHICKEN MANURE FOR SALE Dry and available immediately! Call Tim Ford or Danny Thibodeau 863-439-3232

B UILDING S UP P LIES WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 T1-11 4 X 8 SHEET 5/ 8-INCH THICK B-grade $22.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378

KITCHEN CABINETS & VANITIES Get quality all wood cabinets for less than the BIG BOX STORES! Call Today! Ask for Blake. 813-752-3378 DOORS AND WINDOWS SPECIAL ORDER No upcharge. House & mobile home. Many standard sizes in stock. Call 813-752-3378 Ask for Blake

J OB S CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com

INDEPENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In The Field Magazine is looking for an independent account managers to Join our team! Please contact Danny @inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909

LAW N EQUIP MENT/ S UP P LIES

NEW DOORS CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! $75 to $295. Call Ted today 813-752-3378 MOBILE HOME TUBS Metal brand new in box 54” Mobile Home Tubs. Call Ted 813-752-3378 $155.00

BRAND NEW HUSTLER RAPTOR Zero Turn Mower. 52" cut, 23 hp. Kawasaki engine, 3 year warranty. $2,999 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378

FARM EQUIP MENT 2012 MASSEY FERGUSON 2615-4L 4X4, shuttle shift, loader with skid, steer bucket. 94.5 hours, warranty. $22,900 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

info @inthe fie ld m a g a z ine .c o m

WANTED TO BUY Problem real estate mortgages. Will consider any situation, defaults, delinquencies. Hillsborough, Pasco and Polk County. CASH OUT! Call H. Lee 813-986-9141 FOR SALE 2.66 acres, Pless Road, Paved Road by owner. 65K, 10% down, owner financing. 813-986-9141 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 JANE BAER REALTY Looking for that mountain getaway home? We have what you are looking for. Check out our website at www.janebaerrealty.com or call us toll free 800-820-7829. We are located in Blairsville GA, North Georgia Mountains!

S ERVICES CALLER ON HOLD A low cost service that enables you to communicate important information about your business to customers while they are on hold. No monthly payments or annual payments. Call today and ask for Al 813-763-2220

MIS C. PRIVATE INVESTOR Will consider any situation 813-986-9141

MAHINDRA 8560 40 actual hrs., 2wd, diesel, 83hp, shuttle shift, warranty. $22,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

P RODUCE

MASSEY HARRIS FERGUSON NO. 16 PACER With belly mower $1950 Call Alvie 813-759-8722

FRESH PRODUCE Forbes Road Produce. Open everyday from 7:30am - 8pm. Forbes Rd. & I-4 @ exit 17. Come out and see us!

BAD BOY CZT50 Zero turn 26hp Kawasaki. 138 hrs., Warranty. $4,995 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

M erry Chri stma s

KUBOTA B6100E Tractor with 48" woods belly mower. $1,750. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 110

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ZAXBY’S.

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INDESCRIBABLY GOOD.

At Zaxby’s we are known for our delicious Chicken Fingerz , Wings, Zalads and Sandwiches. Visit zaxbys.com for a full menu, and come taste the difference for yourself. ™

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Each restaurant independently owned and operated. © 2013 Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. “Zaxby’s,” “Chicken Fingerz” and “Zalads” are trademarks of Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Take 10% off

$50 off-

Select toys, clothing, and merchandise

offer ends 12/25/13

Any merchandise Purchase over $300 not valid on equipment

Since 1963 we have supplied the best equipment on earth to the best customers. With this year’s holidays being so special we wanted to invite you to come to our stores and see some of the great gift ideas we have for him her or the little ones. Bring in this coupon for special savings. Merry Christmas from the Everglades Family. Plant City, Palmetto, New Port Richey, Leesburg, Belle Glade, Loxahatchee, Fort Myers, Fort Pierce, Okeechobee, Immokalee, Largo, Opening 2014 Naples

www.EvergladesFarmEquipment.com 112

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In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in the state of Florida

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