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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2012

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Contents

VOL. 8 • ISSUE 10

Cover Story John Stickles

Page 53 Business Up Front

Page 10 Tampa Bay’s Fishing Report

Page 14 Grub Station

Page 18 Biopesticides

Page 20 Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22 Jessica Copeland

Page 30 Tropical Storm Debby

Page 35 Healthy Dogs

Page 47 Recipes

Page 50 The Critters Have It!

Page 60 Food and Nutrition

Page 64 Protecting the Waterfront

Page 66 Burning To Help

Page 68 Ask-A-Vet

Page 84 4

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From the Editor

ITFM Staff PUBLISHER/PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Al Berry SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sarah Holt EDITOR Patsy Berry

Did you hear about the United States Department of Agriculture’s gaff over Meatless Monday? Some poor soul had the nerve to suggest that the USDA’s cafeteria participate in Meatless Monday. Yep, really. I saw the briefest of notes on this in a local paper and had to investigate it more. Here’s what I found: An internal memo at USDA suggested: “One simple way to reduce your environmental impact while dining at our cafeterias is to participate in the 'Meatless Monday' initiative http://www.meatlessmonday.com/. … How will going meatless one day of the week help the environment? The production of meat, especially beef (and dairy as well), has a large environmental impact. …. Because Meatless Monday involves only one day a week, it is a small change that could produce big results. Did you notice that our cafeterias have tasty meatless options? So you can really help yourself and the environment while having a good vegetarian meal!” Of course after the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Texas agriculture commission Todd Staples, among others, put in their two cents worth, the USDA issued the following via Twitter: “U SDA MT @usdapress: U SDA does not endorse Meatless Monday. Statement on U SDA site posted w/ o proper clearance. It has been removed / / @FarmB ureau.” What does this tell us? Would you like to be a part of an organization that will stand up for your rights as a farmer and rancher? Take action and become part of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau. It is an organization that will be sure your voice is heard. They will fight for your rights! Once again, a big Thank You to our advertisers. You allow us to continue to cover what is growing! We appreciate each and every one of you. Until Next Month,

Sarah

The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. –Numbers 6:25

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In The Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc. Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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OFFICE MANAGER Bob Hughens SALES MANAGER Danny Crampton SALES Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton José Mendoza CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mona Jackson PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey STAFF WRITERS Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankwoiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Woody Gore Les McDowell

Index of Advertisers ABC Pizza..................................................................9 Ag Technologies ........................................................5 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers .............................23 American Cancer Society.......................................85 Aquarius Water Refining.......................................25 Astin Strawberry Exchange...................................85 Bill’s Transmissions .................................................77 Bingham...................................................................78 Bloomingdale Children’s House............................34 Brandon Auto Services, Inc. ..................................16 Broke & Poor..........................................................75 Byrd & Barnhill, P.L.................................................7 C&C Services of Tampa........................................79 Cecil Breeding Farm...............................................24 CF Industries, Inc....................................................82 Chemical Containers..............................................44 Certis ........................................................................52 Choo Choo Lawn Equipment...................13 & 83 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive ...................................2 Cowboys Western World ......................................12

Index of Advertisers Crescent Jewelers................................................................69 Dad’s Towing....................................................................59 Discount Metals...............................................................15 Dr. Barry Gaffney O.D. PA.............................................61 Driscoll’s............................................................................57 Earhart’s Runway Grill ...................................................87 Farm Bureau Insurance...................................................46 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner..............................85 Farm Credit ......................................................................21 Felton’s ..............................................................................51 Fischbach Land Company..............................................63 Florida Dept. of Agriculture............................................17 Florida Strawberry Growers Assoc................................62 Fluid Measurements ........................................................43 Forbes Road Produce......................................................16 Fred’s Market ...................................................................15 Fishhawk Sporting Clays ................................................35 Fronto Recycling ...................................................48 & 49 Gator Ford........................................................................37 Gerald Keene Plumbing ..................................................71 Grove Equipment Service.....................................19 & 36 Gulf Coast Tractor...........................................................88 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply .............................................3 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................................85 Haught Funeral Home....................................................58 Helena Chemical-Tampa...................................................9 Hillsboro State Bank........................................................77 Hillsborough County Farm Bureau ......................4 & 59 Hinton Farms Produce, Inc.............................................44 Home Protection Pest Control .......................................25 I-4 Power Equipment ......................................................42 IHOP.................................................................................31 Johnson’s Barbeque..........................................................57 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm.................................................85 Key Plex ............................................................................40 Loetscher Auto Parts .......................................................34 Malissa Crawford............................................................33 Mark Smith Excavating..................................................19 Meryman Environmental, Inc........................................37 Mosaic...............................................................................39 Myers Cleaners.................................................................65 Parkesdale.........................................................................11 Pathway BioLogic............................................................70 Plant City Tire & Auto Service, Inc. ................................9 Pool Masters.....................................................................71 Product Consultants Unlimited (PCU) ..........................67 Rick’s Custom Meats ......................................................21 Ring Power Corporation ................................................29 Roadrunner Oil & Lube.................................................21 Savich & Lee Wholesale .................................................26 Seedway ............................................................................77 Shrimp & Co Express.....................................................29 South Florida Baptist Hospital .......................................56 Southside Farm & Pet Supply........................................80 Southwestern Produce.....................................................27 Stephanine Humprey.......................................................29 Stingray Chevrolet............................................................32 Super Service Tire & Auto..............................................81 Tampa Bay Times............................................................33 The Hay Depot................................................................57 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort................................16 Trinkle, Redman, Swanson, Coton, Davis & Smith .................................................................75 Walden Lake Car Wash.....................................................7 Wells Memorial................................................................21 Willie’s..................................................................................7 Woodside Dental..............................................................41 Zaxby’s..............................................................................73

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INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2012

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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

THANK YOU PLANT CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Dear Reader: I must begin this letter to you on a sad note. Former Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board Member John Stickles passed away July 26. He had served on the HCFB board from 2001 – 2007. A partner of Florida Pacific Farms and Board Member of the Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association, John had also served on the board of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association. Our most sincere condolences to his widow, Kim, daughter, Helen and siblings Robert, Donald and Susan. All of us on the board of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau are usually satisfied going along quietly as we serve the needs of our membership and community. There are exceptions, however, and this month offers me an opportunity I just can’t pass up. The Plant City Chamber of Commerce recognized us as 2012 Agri-Business of the Year and of equal importance was the selection of our board member Michelle Williamson as Agriculturist of the Year. “We are pleased to be able to recognize these outstanding individuals and businesses. Their contributions make a significant difference to the agriculture industry in Plant City and Hillsborough County,” said Debbie Simpson who chairs the Chamber’s AgriBusiness Committee. I would like to express the thanks of all of us at Farm Bureau for this honor and recognition. Michelle typifies the many volunteers who serve not only our industry, but community, too. She rarely says no to requests for volunteer assistance and does what she does on behalf of the industry and community because it’s the right thing to do.

This recognition presents an opportunity to remind you that you don’t have to be a farmer or rancher to belong to Farm Bureau. If you support: • • • • • • •

The right to freely practice your religious beliefs Our nation’s Constitution and laws Private property rights Environmental practices based on sound science A competitive free market system Freedom of opportunity Respect for fellow man

It would be worth your while or that of your neighbors and friends to consider membership in Farm Bureau. In addition to advocacy on behalf of a range of important principles, your $54 annual membership (that’s for your whole family) brings with it a host of benefits that make it pretty tough to pass up. Here in Florida we have more than 144,000 family members and we are also part of a substantial national organization. Whether local, state or national, we do have the ear of our elected leaders and those seeking office. For more information on Farm Bureau, including how to join and the benefits of membership, please visit www.hcfb.org or call 813/685-9121.

Thank you,

Danny Danny Aprile President

Board of Directors

Danny Aprile, President; Bill Burnett, Vice-President; Jemy Hinton, Treasurer; George Coleman, Secretary; Glenn Harrell, Member-at-large; Amanda Collins, Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Stefan Katzaras, Joe Keel, Greg Lehman, Kenneth Parker,Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Patrick Thomas, Michelle Williamson and Ray Wood Judi Whitson, Executive Director 8

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• Peter the Great taxed people with beards. • Gibraltar was named after a slave. • Diamonds will break if hit with a hammer. • There are more than 20,000 brands of beer. • More movies are produced in India than Hollywood. • The first credit card was issued in 1951. • The Tower of Pisa has never been straight. • Paul Revere never finished his ride. • Five billion crayons are produced every year. • The first submarine was designed in 1578. • Half of the worldʼs population has seen at lease one 007 movie. • Expresso has less caffeine than a cup of coffee. • If you give flowers on Motherʼs Day from a florists in the United States, itʼs likely that the flowers you get were grown in either California or Colombia. • The first known government sports organization in the country was the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation. • Thereʼs a national championship for pigeon breeding. • Did you know that the rooster crows at dawn? • Roosters cannot crow if they fully extend their necks. • The Underside of horseʼs hoof is called the frog.

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Business Up Front

Your Local Trusted Advisor for All Things Computer

By Jim Frankowiak

PRODUCT CONSULTANTS UNLIMITED

F

or the past 16 years Jim and Jennifer Brown, the couple behind Product Consultants Unlimited (PCU), have been providing end users, companies and associations “all things A to Z in the computer business,” said Jim. “In the industry there’s a designation called trusted advisor. That’s an apt description of the way we work with all of our clients. We strive to win their trust.” Not surprisingly, the Brown’s have customers from throughout central Florida and even as far away as Georgia. Your one stop computing source, PCU is located at 3017 James L. Redman Parkway in the retail center on the south side of Plant City. In addition to selling desktops, laptops and tablets, PCU also offers an entire range of hardware and software plus web page design and hosting, virus

removal and data recovery. Offered repairs include Macs, laptops, LCD replacement, DC jack replacement and IPad/tablet repairs. Brown also offers service contracts and a range of on site services, as well as on location assistance. “We began our business focusing on building systems and eventually morphed into computer repair,” said Brown. The ups and downs of the economy have prompted the Brown’s to continually adjust to the changing needs of the marketplace. “It isn’t uncommon for major retailers to force customers to adapt to the way they do business, while we do the opposite and continually challenge ourselves to meet the needs that arise for advances in technology. We are able to change course on a dime and we feel that is important to help meet the needs of our customers.”

Brown was born and raised in Plant City, while his wife is originally from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, relocating to Lakeland with her parents who made the move after retiring. Jim traces his roots to a long line of farmers in Plant City. His heritage also includes the Plant City Shoe Fixery, which was located at 101 South Drane Street, now called Arden Mays Boulevard in the heart of Plant City. Brown has also served stints as president of the Plant City Downtown Business and Merchants Association and Kiwanis Club of Plant City. After receiving an undergraduate degree from the University of South Florida, Brown joined Winter Haven Hospital where he served as Information Technology Manager and a Mental Health Specialist. He met Jennifer who worked in the retail industry for a friend. That romance blossomed and they married. They have three children, a 15-year-old boy and two girls, ages 4 and 9. Brown decided to open his first store in Plant City in 1996, despite admonitions not to “do such a crazy thing.” Over the years, the Brown’s have had as many as four locations, but the impact of the economy prompted them to downsize. “We have also been instrumental in training people on various aspects of technology that enabled them to compete with us,” he said. “That is part of our ongoing

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customer service commitment that may have cost us.” However, it was also part of the reason Brown has become known as “The Computer Guy” in Plant City. The Brown’s do little traditional advertising thanks to a continuing flow of referrals from satisfied customers. “We do utilize web-based marketing opportunities, but truly appreciate the many referrals we receive,” he said. In addition to individual end users, PCU has and continues to serve small compa-

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nies and associations across central Florida. And as the firm continues to reinvent itself by expanding its services to embrace emerging technologies, that referral base and flow of new customers continues to increase. If you are in the market for a “trusted advisor” to help you with your technology challenges, consider PCU. You can check them on the web at www.pcustore.com or stop in and meet Jim and Jennifer Brown. •

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12


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by Captain Woody Gore

L

ike us, comfort is paramount to all species and water temperature is a major factor because of its governing effect on bodily functions. Ever questioned why some fish congregate in a particular area one day and completely disappear the next? There could be different reasons fish relocate, but the most overlooked is probably water temperature. Whereas almost all fish are cold-blooded, weather and water temperature inevitably controls their activity, feeding patterns, and where you find them. Every species has particular temperature ranges they tolerate better than others and within that range there is a comfort zone where they’re most comfortable. Every species has a preferred temperature range and are most active within that range. When temperatures exceed or drop below that particular range, they often become non-responsive and lethargic. Learning the tolerances of those species will go a long way toward helping you choose the right location, time of day, and the right baits and lures. For example, water temperatures dropping in the low 60s puts Spotted Sea Trout in high spirits, but becomes very perplexing to Snook, Redfish, and Tarpon. On the other hand, temperature in the 80s is fine for Snook, but in the high 80s Redfish,

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Tarpon and particularly Sea Trout start getting a little uncomfortable. When water temperatures reach into the 90s, as is often the case in Tampa Bay, start looking for deeper cooler waters. How fish react to today’s temperature often depends on yesterday’s temperature and even some days before. Gradual temperature changes over several days or weeks have different effects as opposed to rapid temperature changes. Slower changes usually result in better long-term fishing, while rapid changes sometimes motivate only a strong short-term feeding rush. With clear skies and hot summer days the suns thermal energy quickly penetrates shallow water allowing dark and grassy bottoms to become warmer than the white sandy ones. The difference between dark and white bottoms may only be one or two degrees but it can make a difference when you’re looking for happy fish. Inexpensive sinking swimming pool thermometers are available for use in finding the different ranges at different levels.

shores and oyster bars on incoming tides. Live bait normally produces good catches along with cut baits. Early morning artificial lures on the grass flats and around the mangroves will offer some excellent excitement as well. Work both incoming and outgoing tides. SNOOK – STILL CLOSED… Snook fishing will continue strong this month with some larger fish still in the passes and on the beaches. Expect those near the passes to congregate near the deeper holes and back eddies. They often appear to have lockjaw but patience seems to pay off when looking for larger fish. Snook of all sizes like dead bait, especially the big ones. Simply cut the tail off a threadfin and let it lay on the bottom. Artificial lures usually produce some awesome action and once you pass the learning curve, tossing plastics to waiting snook can be loads of fun and excitement.

Spotted Sea Trout

LET’S GO FISHING! REDFISH - August should see more redfish action around the Tampa Bay area. This past month we could find lots of single and a few small schooling fish, but getting them to take live bait with any consistency was often difficult. We seemed to have better luck using cut bait on the bottom with the rod in the rod holder. We also had decent success using shrimp around mangroves and docks. The bay area notoriously produces good catches of redfish, you just need to find the ones ready to eat. Redfish will push into the Mangrove lined

SPOTTED SEA TROUT – Tampa Bay Trout have come back like gangbusters. It’s not unusual to catch a limit of nice 18 to 19 inch trout for dinner on any grass flat provided you’re on good incoming or outgoing tides. Trout fishing is always fun W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


especially when you find some larger fish willing to eat. If you’re free-lining white or shrimp and the current is moving, you might need to add # 5 split shot to keep the bait down. In water five feet or shallower try a popping cork, but again you might want to add a little weight to keep the bait down. TARPON - Tarpon fishing on the beaches has been really good but the storm and full moon pushed many off shore to spawn. Now they are heading back. The first week of July my son Capt. Mike Gore, spotted a huge school about nine miles off shore heading for St. Petersburg. MACKEREL & BLUEFISH - Tampa Bay has its share of mackerel and bluefish and fishing this month should be great. Just look for schools of threadfins, put out a chum bag and hold onto your rod and reel. The real bite is off shore. The mackerel will actually wear you out to the point of putting your rod and reel down and taking a seat. For some exciting top water action try tail hooking your bait and let it work against the current. This forces the bait to the top for some great top water strikes.

Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing 813-477-3817 Captain Woody Gore is the areas top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, and Bradenton for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done. Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM, send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give him a call at 813-477-3814.

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By Cheryl Kuck

D

espite the doubtful economic future, soaring costs of getting produce to the market place, and a rising jobless rate, folks are still giving to charity and filling restaurants. When asked to what he attributes the success of his restaurants, Copper Bell Café restaurateur Darren Denington simply said, “I keep giving to worthy causes.” By this month, in both his Brandon and Riverview locations, there will have been 18 events he has dubbed, “Cooking for a Cause.” All proceeds and gratuities benefit a charitable organization named by a host celebrity chef. Denington invites local community leaders to serve as chefs, greeters and often waiters and waitresses on the day of their fundraiser. Some of those notable chefs with notable causes have been

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Chef’ Earl Lennard, former supervisor of Hillsborough County elections, raised thousands for Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Hillsborough County School Superintendent MaryEllen Elia prepared Italian Lasagna, served with Caesar salad and garlic bread benefitting the Hillsborough Education Foundation. Former Florida State Senator Tom Lee put on a chef’s hat and cooked Fajitas for his charity, A Kid's Place. Jen Holloway, marketing director for Bright House Networks, the sponsor for this year's event, prepared her version of tortellini bruschetta for her chosen charity: HARC, which enables people with disabilities in the Tampa Bay area, to name a few of the celebrities who have cooked for a cause. In July Tammy Bracewell, executive director and CEO of the Greater Brandon Chamber of Commerce, made her third appearance as a celebrity chef. “I didn’t really cook this year but met guests, waited on AUGUST 2012

tables and cleaned them. The fun part was collecting all those tips to send kids to camp at the YMCA. I did suggest my favorite spaghetti for the menu and all kids seem to love it too. It was so much fun,” she said. “We had four trucks running catering to offices and a line for take-out as well as a full restaurant. We do a lot of delivery when the event is during regular business hours,” says Denington. However, the next event will be held in the evening with reserved seating times at 4:40, 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, August 25 with Tampa Bay Lightening Coach Guy Boucher. There will be a large buffet dinner with a roast beef carving station and a variety of other meats such as, roast chicken and pork medallions, potatoes au gratin, green beans almandine, specialty mac ‘n cheese, Caesar, strawberry salad with feta cheese, coleslaw,

rolls and dessert for $15.95 per person or $8.95 for children under 12 years of age. Posted in each restaurant, customers can watch the changing tabulations of money raised for charity. So far, that amounts to $31, 206.42 and Denington expects that number to rise by at least $4,000 come August 25.

“These cooking events benefit so many in the community and are an entertaining way to help others…a win, win for everyone. I just love doing this, it’s so worthwhile,” said Bracewell. Locations: Brandon, 401 S. Parsons Ave. Phone: (813) 681-3354 Riverview 11226 Boyette Rd. Phone: (813)671-1100

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Business Up Front

Biopesticides

flexibility exporting their crops. SoilGard has zero hours REI and PHI. MeloCon has a 4 hour REI and zero PHI.

Crop Protection for Today MeloCon® Nematode Eggs

SoilGard® Rhizoctonia

P

esticides have helped growers yield bountiful harvests for decades. Biopesticides, or pest management products based on naturally occurring materials, have also been used since they were first introduced 50 years ago. Agriculture today, however, faces many challenges — resistance to pesticides, crop export limitations, sensitive environments — that are increasingly met and solved with biopesticides. MELOCON®: NEW NEMATICIDE TO THE RESCUE With the phase out of methyl bromide and the loss of several traditional nematicides, strawberry, potato, and vegetable growers welcome viable options for nematode control. MeloCon controls sting, root-knot, burrowing nematodes and several other species. Its active ingredient is the spores of a naturally occurring fungus, Paecilomyces lilacinus, and a highly effective parasite of all stages of development of nematodes. Dr. Mike Dimock, Director of Field Development and Technical Services for Certis USA, said MeloCon is particularly effective on eggs and infectious juveniles. MeloCon has minimal impact on the environment and non-target species. “But there is nothing lightweight about MeloCon and how it effects nematodes,” Dr. Dimock says. “Once it is applied to soil, spores of the MeloCon fungus adhere to the bodies of nematodes as they move through the soil. The spores germinate, penetrate the nematode and kill it. MeloCon is brutal to nematodes and highly effective.” MeloCon can be used as a pre-plant, transplant or post-plant treatment. Formulated as a water dispersible granule, MeloCon is applied by conventional methods, including chemigation through drip or micro-sprinklers. Dr. Dimock said the product should

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then be watered in. That will help move the spores of MeloCon down to the rhizosphere of the plant’s root where the majority of the plant parasitic nematodes are found. SOILGARD®: THE FUNGICIDE THAT FIGHTS “When you apply SoilGard to your soil, you are—in effect—creating a battlefield of fungi versus fungi,” says Dr. Brett Highland of Certis USA, the manufacturer of SoilGard. Use SoilGard to battle damping off-diseases in vegetable and row crops. The active ingredient in SoilGard is Trichoderma virens, a naturally occurring soil fungus that is antagonistic to plant pathogenic fungi. “The SoilGard fungus is aggressive and in competition with fungi that cause damping-off diseases, I would want T. virens in my corner every time,” says Dr. Highland, who serves as Eastern U.S. Field Development Manager. SoilGard employs four modes of action in its fight against pathogenic fungi. 1) SoilGard produces a “gliotoxin” that kills and inhibits the growth of other fungi, Dr. Highland says. 2) SoilGard can also penetrate and consume parts of other fungi it comes into contact with. 3) Because it is so aggressive, it grows quickly and out-competes pathogenic fungi for nutrients and living space. 4) Eventually SoilGard occupies so much area around the plant’s root zone, it prevents or delays the reestablishment of the disease-causing fungi. Dr. Highland says to deploy all four modes of action, it is best to apply SoilGard to young plants or transplants.

CERTIS USA: PUTS THE “BIO” INTO PESTICIDE Certis USA is a manufacturer and distributor of the largest line of biopesticide products for specialty agricultural and horticultural markets and the home and garden market. Headquartered in Columbia, MD, Certis USA products provide valuable solutions by meeting the challenges faced by today’s growers who are seeking sustainable alternatives, resistant pest management and harvest solutions, and low pesticide residues for market flexibility and export accessibility. For more information about Certis USA or its products, visit www.CertisUSA.com.

DID YOU KNOW? According to the U.S. EPA, biopesticides may be “naturally occurring substances that control pests (biochemical pesticides), microorganisms that control pests (microbial pesticides), and pesticidal substances produced by plants containing added genetic material (plant-incorporated protectants) or PIPs.”

MELOCON AND SOILGARD: MEET THE NEEDS OF TODAY’S FARMERS Both products are ideal selections for resistance management programs. They can be used in conventional or organically grown crops. MeloCon and SoilGard are NOP approved and OMRI® Listed. Residue exempt, the products do not add to Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs), so growers have full W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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ne day last month I passed by “All A Bloom Florist” in downtown Plant City. While standing there looking I reflected back to when I was a boy and this location was a barbershop owned by Mike Sansone. Mike was an Italian immigrant that settled in Plant City just before World War I. He opened a barbershop but left to serve in the War. When he returned, Mike helped form the American Legion Post 26 in Plant City in 1919. The Post was later named Norman E. McLeod, who was Plant City’s first casualty of World War I, and with whom Mike Sansone served. During his time Mike Sansone was always working with the youth in Plant City (especially scouting) and the surrounding area. For his tireless effort for so many years the City Commission named the sports complex on north Park road in his honor. It seemed like yesterday that I would jump up in the chair at his barber shop and Mike would ask me if I was playing baseball, football or what ever sport was in season at the time. He had a couple of barbers that worked in his shop, too. Can’t remember their names, but I do remember the short, heavy set, bald-headed man was always talking about something. The barber had a man in overalls pushed back in the barber chair and started foaming his face for a shave. The man mentioned the problem he was having getting a close shave around his cheeks. “I have just the thing,” he said, as

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he turned around and picked up a small wooden ball off the shelf. “Just place this ball between your cheek and gum.” The man rolled his eyes and did as the barber said. After a couple of strokes the man under the lather said, “What if I swallow the ball?” “No problem,” he replied, “Just bring it back tomorrow like everyone else does.” Then there’s the story of the priest who went into a Washington, DC, barbershop, got his hair cut and asked how much he owed. “No charge, Father,” the barber said. “I consider it a service to the Lord.” When the barber arrived at his shop the next morning, he found a dozen small prayer booklets on the stoop along with a thank you note from the priest. A few days later a police officer came in. “How much do I owe you?” the cop asked after his haircut. “No charge, officer,” the barber answered. “I consider it a service to my community.” The next morning the barber found a dozen doughnuts on the stoop along with a thank you note from the police officer. A few days after that, a Senator walked in for a haircut. “How much do I owe you?” he asked afterward. “No charge,” the barber replied. “I consider it a service to my country.” The next morning when he arrived at the shop, the barber found a dozen Senators waiting on the stoop. Did you hear the story of a man and a little boy that entered a barbershop together? After the man received the full treatment - shave, shampoo and haircut, - he placed the boy in the chair. “I’m going to

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buy a green tie to wear at the party tonight,” he said. “I’ll be back in a few minutes.” When the boy’s haircut was completed the man still hadn’t returned. The barber said, “Looks like your daddy’s forgotten all about you.” “That wasn’t my daddy,” said the boy. “He just walked up, took me by the hand and said, “‘Come on, son, we’re gonna get a free haircut!’” Coleman Davis, owner of Badcocks in Plant City, told me about the time last year when he was returning from a furniture convention in Chicago. (This has nothing to do with a barbershop). Coleman said, “While waiting at the baggage return for my bags I checked my pockets, only to find I did not have my car keys. It was then I realized I must have left them in car. My flight arrived early and part of the luggage did not make the flight I was on. They advised me that the luggage would arrive on a later flight. Having plenty of time, I took the shuttle to the long term parking where I always parked.” He said, “Al, I checked the lot twice, and could not find my car. I immediately picked up my cell phone and called 911. When I got back to baggage return about 15 minutes later I decided to call Sue (his wife).” “This had to be the most difficult call I have ever made.” “Honey,” I said, “I left my keys in the car, and it has been stolen.” “There was a period of silence. I thought the call had been dropped. Then Sue said W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


in a very stern voice, “‘Coleman, I dropped you off at the Airport.’” “Oh yes, now I remember.” “Being somewhat embarrassed I said, ‘Well, do you mind coming over and picking me up?’ Sue replied, ‘I will as soon as I convince this policeman that I have not stolen your car!’” It has been sometime since I have had to take flight. However I spend some time on I-75 traveling to our place in Blairsville, Georgia. Recently I stopped at the rest area just over the Florida/Georgia line. Much to my surprise I found a clean cubicle and sat down. A few seconds later a voice from the next cubicle said, “Hi, how are you?” Embarrassed. I said. “I’m doing fine.” The voice said, “So what are you up to?” I said, “Just doing the same as you, sitting here!” Next he said, “Can I come over?” Annoyed, I replied, “I’m rather busy right now.” The voice next to me said, “Listen, I will have to call you back, there’s an idiot next door answering all my questions.” There are a few things I just don’t understand. How do those dead bugs get into those enclosed light fixtures? Why don’t

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you ever hear a father-in-law jokes? Why does a round pizza come in a square box? What disease did cured ham really have? Once you’re in heaven, do you get stuck wearing the clothes you were buried in forever? Why do men press harder on the TV remote control when they know the batteries are going dead? Why do people say they ’slept like a baby’ when babies wake up every two hours? If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, what is baby oil made from? Why is it that the Alphabet Song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star have the same tune? And why did you just try singing those two songs above? Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection? Why is it that no matter what color bubble bath you use the bubbles are always white? And Gail Lyons, why do banks charge a fee on ’insufficient funds’ when they know there is no money in the account? In closing, if you ever wondered how long a minute is, remember it depends on what side of the bathroom door you’re on. •

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REAP WHAT YOU SOW

Dry Creek By Les McDowell Photos courtesy of Linda Constant

Time for family and friends, listening, being compassionate toward each other and common sense. All of that is planted deep inside each of us. Just like a garden seed. With just a little his month we film a new episode of Dry Creek America’s nurturing think of the harvests our lives will generate in 2012. First Frontier. I’m really excited about this episode. It is my goal as the creator of Dry Creek to inspire the viewer and It’s called Reap What You Sow. It deals with a grandfa- uplift them. As folks watch, at times I hope they feel a tug at their ther who is raising his two young grandkids. Their mother, his heart. Laugh out loud by sitting back and seeing themselves. daughter, was the Johnny Appleseed of Gardens around Dry Maybe be inspired to pull a weed or so from their gardens. Slow Creek. down for just a time and listen to that voice inside them, that is

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Everybody loved and respected her. Her father is very bitter about losing her and every garden season struggles with her passing. In this episode his grandkids initiate a Town Garden. This garden changes lives in Dry Creek.

them.

Watch for Dry Creek’s new episode coming soon to Dry Creek on Blue Highways TV, Verizon, channel 246 Saturday nights at 7:30p.m. Eastern Time. For those of you with Brighthouse please I was inspired to write this episode of Dry Creek as I drove request BHTV. The deal has been made but they want viewer through Central Florida and saw all the fields of plants and response before they air Dry Creek. • gardens. As I wrote this episode I saw the similarities of a Check us out at drycreektv.com garden mirroring our lives. If our garden rows are straight we take pride in things. If our gardens are left with weeds growing and crooked rows our lives have clutter and chaos. Like a Everybody knows where Dry Creek is..... garden our lives need sunshine and just the right balance of cause it’s inside each and everyone of us. rain. Too much sunshine and a garden will die. Too much rain and the same will happen. Most important, we do “Reap What We Sow.” In today’s trying financial times people are getting back to growing a garden. Earth boxes on porches and decks are used due to lack of space. People are finding that getting their hands into the soil brings the good out in them. There’s something inherit with people and the soil that is good for the soul. We can learn a lot from the folks that came before us that worked their gardens. Dry Creek takes place in the 1880s. Yes things have changed. But some things will always be inside each of us, though hidden sometimes in today’s fast paced world.

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UNIQUE SITUATION, DEVOTED TEACHER

Jessica

Copeland By Ginny Mink

eaching is a hard job, and anyone who has ever been in that field can vouch for its difficulty level. However, when you’re an Ag teacher in an inner city school, teaching mostly special needs kids, one would imagine the toil goes up quite a few notches. Incredibly, Jessica Copeland, a Middleton High School Ag teacher, doesn’t see things that way at all.

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she wasn’t equipped for. So what then? She continues, “We’d just gotten a new Ag teacher that year who was very young and I could see how much she enjoyed her job and that’s kind of what helped me decide I wanted to be an Ag teacher. So then I graduated and I went through HCC for two years and I did my second two at UF. I actually went to the UF Plant City campus.”

Jessica loves her job and is passionate about her students. Her Ag experience began when she was quite young. She says, “My entire life we’ve had a variety of different animals: horses, cows, goats, chickens. I think we even had ducks for a while. Pretty much any farm animal you can imagine. So when I was really little I was feeding baby calves and already riding horses. My mom’s an animal lover so she was always bringing home abandoned cats and dogs and then we’d find them new homes. I’ve pretty much just always had a love of animals in general I guess.” No doubt this love fueled her passion for the Ag industry.

Jessica did half her internship at Riverview High School where she says, “I taught one period of TMH students, that’s trainably mentally handicap.” This was her first taste of working with special needs kids. She then finished her internship at Plant City High School while Mrs. Pierce was on maternity leave. Jessica started looking for a job at that point but admits that it was a challenge due to the fact that there weren’t many Ag teacher positions available. However, an opportunity presented itself when she got a call from the Ag Supervisor for Hillsborough County. That phone call resulted in an interview at Middleton High School.

Eventually Jessica reached sixth grade and entered middle school. That grade level includes a student’s first opportunity to choose an elective, or field of interest. Jessica says, “When I started middle school, of course I picked Ag for my elective but our teacher went on maternity leave so we didn’t have an Ag program. They put all the Ag students in other classes.” Some people would have just chosen another path but when Jessica got to high school she got right back into Ag classes. She explains, “I went to Armwood and starting from my freshman year the officers included me and got me involved in CDEs and then for the rest of my high school career I was an officer in our FFA chapter.”

Jessica elaborates, “The job was for most of the day teaching agriculture to the TMH students. It was my experience at Riverview that made me comfortable with that so then I got offered the job and my first year at Middleton two-thirds of the day I had the TMH students in Ag and then rest of the day I taught credit recovery which is kind of like IMPACT. It was my first year at Middleton, with my TMH students, that I discovered my love for the special needs kids.” A lot of teachers will claim such love, but Jessica’s sincerity is evident in her voice and the stories she shares.

At that time Jessica thought she knew what she wanted to do with her life. She says, “My junior year in high school, when I first started working, I worked at a vet’s office because I thought I wanted to be a vet and quickly discovered that I didn’t do needles very well.” Good thing she realized that issue before she started investing her college years in a field 30

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She’s in a unique position, not only is she teaching Ag in the inner city, but she’s also teaching special needs students. Joyfully she continues, “This past school year I still had most of the day with the TMH kids but then I had a couple periods with more traditional Ag students. Teaching my TMH students is probably the highlight of my day. We do so many projects that they’ve never done before. My dog comes to school with me every day and my students take care of her and we have a rabbit that they W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


take care of. They grow strawberries every year. With my TMH kids we also compete in the Ag Abilities Competition and they even get to drive the lawnmower in the competition!” No doubt her excitement and enthusiasm about this opportunity rubs off on her students, some of whom are incapable of the most basic pre-school age activities. She recalls, “Last year we had a student named Anthony who doesn’t write his name, couldn’t color in the lines, but at the end of the school year when we were learning how to drive the lawnmower, to see his face when he was driving, was enough to make every day great!” She emphasizes again, “He couldn’t write his name but that boy figured out that when the lawnmower started going towards the cones he needed to turn the wheel the other way, and in my world, that was just a huge deal!” Still excited she adds, “My students take care of the animals so after two years seeing my students clean the rabbit’s cage, feed her, water her and take care of her without anybody’s help, that’s amazing to me!” Jessica does teach some traditional Ag students and she brags on them as well. “The past two years Middleton has been kind of in a

transitional period going from a magnet Ag program to a traditional Ag program, and I would say our FFA members have been working really hard to make sure Middleton stays a quality chapter. This past school year we had our very first student compete in a national contest for the Ag science fair. We had a garden for my traditional, neighborhood, Middleton students and seeing them out in their garden being proud and taking pictures with their plants, that was something special because these kids knew nothing about agriculture when they started. This year we’re actually going to start a fish project and the kids are going to grow fish from babies to adults.” Obviously Jessica has high hopes for her students. She finishes, “My days at school are amazing because I get to help kids find something they’re good at and that they enjoy and that they can do in their future! One of the most important things that I hope students get out of their agriculture class is leadership skills that they can use regardless of what kind of career they have.” Certainly she’s got her work cut out for her, but her demeanor proves that she thinks it’s worth it! •

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hat a crazy month it has been! Since my team and I were elected at the end of June it feels like we've been going nonstop to learn how to best serve Florida FFA. State Convention itself was an amazing experience as I got to see the energy that the members of our association brought to this exciting week! Also Area 5 was well represented, bringing home multiple state speaking titles among other accomplishments! A week after State Convention we traveled to North Carolina to participate in the National Leadership Conference for State Officers. At NLCSO we worked on team building and trust as well as how to create and facilitate workshops. After NLCSO we traveled back to Gainesville for BLAST-OFF training. This training is more individual and helps us learn everything from our strengths on a team to speech delivery and even etiquette! Finally most of us were able to take a week off as the State President Clayton Willis and State Secretary Matthew Cantrell traveled to Washington DC to participate in State Presidents Conference. This conference is very important, as it is a major facet of the National Delegate Process, which is how changes are made in our organization. Tomorrow we will be leaving to spend a week in Iowa and a tour of Production Agriculture!

I know that I speak for my whole team that we are all excited to see a facet of American agriculture that is so different from what we are used to. As we move forward in the year we are so excited for what the future will bring. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to email me at david.walden@flaffa.org and help me make this year memorable for all of our members!

David Walden

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– Area 5 State Vice President

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Tropical Storm Debby Non-Profits Eligible For Low-Interest Loans

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he U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has added Hillsborough County as a primary county to the disaster declaration for Tropical Storm Debby. This means that eligible homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes, and non-profit organizations in Hillsborough County that were affected by Tropical Storm Debby are now eligible to apply for physical and economic injury disaster loans from the SBA’s disaster assistance program. Previously, only businesses and non-profits were eligible to apply for SBA economic injury disaster loans. Disaster loans up to $200,000 now are available to homeowners to repair or replace disaster-damaged or destroyed real estate. Homeowners and renters are eligible up to $40,000 to repair or replace disaster-damaged or destroyed personal property. Businesses and private non-profit organizations of any size may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace disaster-damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets. The SBA may increase a loan up to 20 percent of the total amount of disaster damage to real estate and/or leasehold improvements, as verified by SBA, to make improvements that lessen the risk of property damage by future disasters of the same kind. For small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private non-profit organizations of all sizes, the SBA offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster. Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance is available regardless of whether the business suffered any physical property damage. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Interest rates are as low as 1.938 percent for homeowners and renters, 3 percent for non-profit organizations and 4 percent for businesses with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition. To be considered for all forms of disaster assistance, residents should first register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) by calling 800-621-FEMA (3362), (TTY) 800-462-7585 for the deaf and hardof-hearing. The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is Sept 4, 2012. The deadline to return economic injury applications is April 3, 2013. After registering with FEMA, residents can access an SBA Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/ and apply. Disaster survivors do not have to wait on insurance to be settled before applying to SBA. Questions about the electronic loan application, details on the locations of local Disaster Recovery Centers, and information about the loan application process also is available by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an e-mail to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individual homeowners suffering home damages also can seek assistance from Hillsborough County's Homeowner Rehabilitation Program by calling 813-612-5397.

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By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicine, B.S. Nutrition Science

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he most popular fruit in America, bananas, are grown year-round in Florida. Few plants thrive in the heat of an August day in Florida, but bananas grow well in tropical and subtropical weather throughout different parts of the state. The banana plant is in the same family as the lily and orchid and can grow 10-25 feet tall. The fruit is grouped in clusters or “hands” of 10-20 bananas. Although grocery stores most commonly carry the “yellow Cavendish” variety, there are many more varieties grown in Florida including Apple Banana, Hua Moa, Lady’s Finger, and Dwarf Cavendish. Sweet and creamy, bananas are brimming with vitamins, minerals, nutrients, and antioxidants. They are also very portable fruits since they come in their own peels, which keep the inner fruit clean and dry. Florida bananas make a quick, nutritious snack wherever you go!

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE Although bananas are creamy, they are virtually fat-free. They are also low in sodium and rich in potassium. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one medium banana (118 g) contains 105 calories, 1.3 g of protein, 0.4 g of fat, 27 g of carbohydrate, and 3.1 g of fiber. It provides 22% of the Daily Reference Intake for vitamin B6, 17% for vitamin C, 16% for manganese, 12% for dietary fiber, and 12% for potassium. They also contain notable amounts of calcium, copper, iodine, iron, phosphorous, zinc and vitamin A.

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PROMOTE DIGESTIVE HEALTH Eating bananas and other foods high in fiber can help decrease the risk of coronary heart disease and help prevent atherosclerosis. Bananas contain both insoluble fiber that adds bulk and speed up transit time through the digestive tract, as well as soluble fiber that lowers cholesterol levels. Bananas are also famous for their stomach-soothing effects. They act as a natural antacid and protect the stomach lining from ulcers and acid damage. Bananas contain substances that encourage the stomach lining to produce a thicker mucus barrier that protects it from stomach acids. Additionally, bananas are extremely easy to digest. They are part of the BRAT (Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, Toast) diet used during illnesses that require easily digestible foods. This fruit can help ease both constipation and diarrhea, normalizing the GI tract. Other nutrients in bananas can help promote nutrient absorption from other foods.

ENJOY BETTER VISION

Bananas are famous for their high potassium content, about 467 mg in a single banana! High potassium coupled with the 38

low sodium content of bananas (1mg/ banana) is beneficial for maintaining normal blood pressure and optimal heart function. Several research studies have established the beneficial effects of potassium foods in effectively lowering blood pressure. Additionally, people who ate foods high in fiber and magnesium, as well as foods high in potassium, had a lower risk of stroke. The potassium in bananas can also enhance bone health. Some studies suggest that potassium can counteract some of the effects of high sodium diets and slow the rate of calcium loss from bone.

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With very high levels of vitamin A and C, bananas join the ranks of carrots as an eye

promoting food. High fruit intake appears to be related to a lower risk of age-related macular degeneration. Data from a large study of over 100,000 men and women indicated that eating three or more servings of fruit per day lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) by 36 percent, compared with people who ate less than 1.5 servings of fruit per day. ARMD is the primary cause of vision loss in older adults. Researchers concluded that the vitamins and carotenoids in fruit, such as bananas, were responsible for the protective effect on the development of ARMD. Vitamin C also supports the body’s immune system in its ability to fight infections and viruses, and may possibly shorten the duration and intensity of a cold. Additionally, this vitamin is involved in keeping capillaries, gums, and skin healthy and supple.

HOW

TO SELECT AND STORE Bananas are harvested by the bunch when they are still green but plump. Unripe bananas can be stored in a cool, shady place. Ripening can be expedited by placing bananas in a closed paper bag, where the ethylene gas can stimulate ripening. As bananas ripen, more of their starches are converted to sugars, and they become sweeter. If you’re going to use bananas right away for eating out-of-hand, choose fully ripe, yellow fruit. Overly ripe, speckled bananas are great for banana bread and muffins because they are very sweet and soft and can be easily mashed. Ripe bananas can be stored at room temperature for several days. While ripe bananas can be refrigerated, their peels turn from a pretty yellow to black. Ripe bananas can also be dried or frozen for later use. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


HOW

TO ENJOY Bananas are delicious eaten straight out-of-hand. They also can be sliced and used in fruit salads or frozen whole for a creamy popsicle-like treat. Other ways to enjoy them include: • Combine with milk and frozen yogurt in the blender for a banana milkshake • Mash or slice with peanut butter for a PB and banana sandwich • Dice bananas and add to oatmeal or cereal • Slice lengthwise and fill with ice cream for a banana split • Use mashed ripe bananas for bread, cookies, and muffins to replace part of the oil • Slice banana thickly, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar and put under the broiler until top is browned • Cut banana in half lengthwise, brush lightly with butter, and grill • Puree with strawberries and other fruit for a smoothie or as a fruit sauce for ice cream or yogurt • Sautee with butter and brown sugar for an almost instant dessert With so many ways to enjoy this delicious fruit, eat more fresh Florida bananas today! These locally grown treats are sweet and creamy and are easy to take with you anywhere you go. Selected References: http:/ / www.whfoods.com http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu/

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State Convention by Rebecca Knowles

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welve members from the Lennard FFA Chapter attended the 84th Annual Florida State FFA Convention, held the last week of

June in Orlando. The State Champion Vegetable Judging team, consisting of Kyle Bowman, Rey Penaloza, Roger Smith and Amber Wiggins, was recognized on stage. Randall Casey represented the third place State Citrus Judging team during the awards presentation. Madison Brown also received an award for her third place State OH Demo, in the Artistic Arrangement category. Rebecca Knowles and Tiffany Conard participated in two leadership workshops presented by Jason Troendle of Minnesota, National FFA Secretary, and the University of Florida’s Collegiate FFA. Kyle Bowman (Turfgrass Management), Randall Casey (Diversified

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Horticulture) and Rey Penaloza (Specialty Animal

Practicing in Plant City for Over 20 Years

Production) were announced as State Proficiency

Dr. Pat Almerico, DDS

Winners for their outstanding Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs. Senior FFA

813.752.5554 704 N. Alexander St., Plant City, FL

members Kyle Bowman, Madison Brown, Randall Casey, Rey Penaloza and Josh Stanaland received the State FFA Degree which is the highest honor bestowed upon any member of the Florida FFA Association. Lennard FFA members Kyle Bowman, Madison Brown, Randall Casey, Casey Fitz, Rey

Cleaning, Exam and Xray $ New Patients Only. Must present coupon

129

Penaloza and Josh Stanaland served on Courtesy

WOODSIDE DENTAL

Corps which assisted convention staff backstage.

Coupon Expires 9/15/12

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Farm Bureau Helps UF/IFAS Get Closer To Fundraising Goal For

New Learning Center

By Robert H. Wells

T

he University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation received a $50,000 donation from the Florida Farm Bureau to help rebuild a learning center destroyed by fire in July 2011. The school, part of UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, is now halfway to the fundraising goal of $1.5 million for rebuilding the center, located on Lake Mize in the Austin Cary Forest northeast of Gainesville. “We are proud to be a major contributor to the rebuilding of the Austin Cary learning center,” said John Hoblick, Florida Farm Bureau president. “Education is one facet of what Farm Bureau is all about, and this center will offer a quality learning environment as well as a place for university and community functions.” Jack Payne, UF’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, said “Florida Farm Bureau has always been a stalwart supporter of IFAS, and this is great example of achieving shared goals through our long-standing partnership.” The school’s director, Tim White, called the donation a reflection of the partnership between Florida Farm Bureau and IFAS. “And we hope that they will use the new building often for their events,” White said. Officials said the fundraising goal may be met by year's end, and they’d like to break ground on a new learning center by March 2013. The rebuilt facility will give forestry faculty and students, as well as the public, a venue for enjoying and learning about the forest while attending meetings, classes or special events. In May, Plum Creek Foundation gave $75,000 toward rebuilding the center. Other sources of funding have included companies and private donors. Administrators have set a target of drawing 25,000 visitors each year to the center once it’s complete, including UF students, faculty, professionals, K-12 students, municipal and county government officials and the public. •

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A Closer Look

Looking for us?

By Sean Green

The Lone Star Tick

M

y Fiancé, April, and I go hiking every weekend and have rarely come home with more than an occasional mosquito bite and sometimes pleasantly sore feet. This past month however, on more than one occasion, when we removed our hiking boots, we found we had picked up some unwelcome guests. Ticks are fairly common in Florida, though I can honestly say they have never been a consistent aspect of our hiking trips and certainly not in the quantities we have experienced recently. On one trip we counted more than 15 before we were sure we found them all. The ticks we found are known as the Lone Star Tick, and have unique qualities that warrant a closer look. The Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) is not so large that it is named after Texas, nor is it a species strictly associated with The Lone Star State, in fact, this tick is one of the most abundant in the United States ranging from Texas to Iowa in the Midwest and east to the coast and as far north as Maine. The common name Lone Star comes from the females distinguishing white dot resembling a lone star. Ticks are related to spiders and mites. The Lone Star Tick belongs to the family Ixodidae that characterizes hard bodied ticks. Ticks have four stages of development, (egg, larval, nymph and adult) and need a blood meal to complete each stage. Although the ticks will typically take a blood meal from a different host type at each stage, I’m not so sure they would refuse a blood meal from any host that happened by if variety is scarce. We commonly associate ticks with Lyme disease. Interestingly, this association is not as accurate for the Lone Star Tick. According to research cited in Medical and Veterinary Entomology (Mar, 2005) the saliva in the Lone Star Tick inactivates the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, and thus, is an extremely unlikely vector. This does not mean however, that this tick is not dangerous, it absolutely can be dangerous and for some, the results may seem to be a fate worse than death itself. The Lone Star Tick has a reputation of creating an allergy to meat and has recently resurfaced in the media described as a “weapon in the war on meat”. Though the implication of leveraging an insect for any political agenda is an entertaining one, this insect’s behavior has not likely changed recently and it’s not likely that its reputation W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

of turning meat eating mammals into vegetarians would have gone un-noticed for long. According to a manuscript published by the National Institute of Health, researchers suggest that the bite of The Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) is the cause of a delayed allergic reaction to red meat that could include severe anaphylaxis. Researchers claim that the bite of the Lone Star Tick sets off the production of an antibody that binds to certain sugars, alpha-gal (galactose-alpha1,3-galactose). These alpha-gal sugars are said to be found in all non-primate mammals (Pigs, Deer, Cow, Cats, Dogs etc.). Apparently, the only mammals that lack the enzyme that leads to the production of the alpha-gal string of sugars are humans, old world monkeys and great apes. When this alpha-gal antibody is present in the body, and meat is eaten, the meat triggers the release of histamine causing hives and anaphylaxis. There are reports of a growing number of cases in which humans are affected by this tick but researchers admit they do not know the mechanics of this reaction to offer more than a subjective conclusion. Dr Thomas PlattsMills and his colleague Dr Scott Commins, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, published their research in 2009 claiming that patients that have alpha-gal sugars have had at least one tick bite, however, a University of Virginia resource page for mammalian meat allergies states that it is not believed this allergy can be shared by donating blood. It would be interesting to learn how this tick would affect old world monkeys such as baboons that are known to have a taste for meat that sometimes includes young mammals. The published research indicates that this tick will create a potentially deadly allergic reaction to the consumption of meat, but there are no published reports of how this tick affects meat eating primates that presumably would gather more ticks than a weekend hiker. Continued research on this insect will be interesting. If presumptions are correct, this will be one of our most fascinating insects and perhaps provide insight in the mechanics of biologic adaptation and natural selection. If we can understand how microorganisms can cause a complete change in an organisms natural feeding pattern, imagine the potential for pest control. •

®

MAGAZINE

Find us in your neighborhood... The Hay Depot 1001 S. Alexander St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.478.1654

Rick’s Meats 10252 S.R. 39 South Lithia, FL Phone: 813.737.6776

Johnson’s BBQ 1407 MLK Blvd. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.759.0009

Cowboys Western World 120 S.R. 60 E. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.650.3888

The Catering Company 115. E. Reynolds St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.707.1447

Sisters & Company 104 E. Reynolds St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.754.0990

Crescent Jewelers 1514 S. Alexander St. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.752.2413

Southside Farm & Pet Supply 3014 Jim Redman Pkwy. Plant City, FL Phone: 813.752.2379 Note: This is just a sample of our distribution points. We’ll list different locations each month.

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In comparison, a minimally processed diet containing real whole foods, that are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and amino acids that any living creature needs in order to remain strong, healthy and resilient to disease. Just as we would not expect to maintain optimal health on a long-term daily diet of junk food, nor can our pets. A grain-free diet is similar to what a dog would eat if they were in the wild. In the wild your dog’s diet would consist of primarily meat based proteins, and the occasional fruit or vegetable. Grain was consumed very little. Grain has in fact been found to cause or irritate some pets’ allergies. Grain is also very hard to digest especially in aged pets. Some of the benefits of feeding grain free (not limited to): Shiny coat, decreased allergies, healthy skin, and increased appetite in picky eaters, increased energy, and ease in passing of stools, reduced stools and decrease in weight for obese dogs.

“Grain-free is better in my opinion because it is feeding your dog more of an ancestral diet,” Fadal said.

Healthy Dogs By Libby Hopkins

Y

our dog is your friend, your partner, your defender. You are its life, love, and leader. Your dog will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of its heart. You owe it to your dog to be worthy of such devotion. So why not feed it a healthy diet? In today’s society, we are not the only ones who aren’t eating healthy, so are our pets. So what is considered a healthy diet for a dog? Nowadays, more and more pet owners are moving toward a natural diet or a grain-free diet. So what’s the difference and how are they better than what you would buy at the grocery story? Jenn Fadal, pet wellness expert and owner of Wag Pet Boutique in Tampa, has been answering pet owner’s questions about what to feed their pets for the last seven years. Wag is a holistic pet market and they focus on all natural food and supplements for dogs and cats. Fedal also has a website, www.jennfadal.com, where she offers advice on an array of topics from pet health to pet safety. She will tell you there is a big difference between natural food and the food we buy at the grocery store. “Natural dog food is not going to have un-natural preservatives,” Fadal said. “The makers of natural dog food will use Vitamin E or mixed vitamins that preserve the food.” There also won’t be added sugar or salt. If there is, it may only be a little. She says the ingredients are better and they are going to have a lot of meat for protein instead of corn or gluten. Highly processed foods, which are produced under extreme heat and pressure, as well as diets that contain artificial chemical preservatives and hard-to-digest by-products, can gradually deplete an animal’s immune system over time and actually make your dog more susceptible to long term health problems. Chemical preservatives in particular, such as Ethoxyquin, BHA, and BHT, have been directly linked to an increased incidence of cancer in pets. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Amy Howland is the Co-Director/Co-Founder of Dogma Pet Rescue in Tampa. She is also a foster mom to an Italian Greyhound named, Iggy Pop. He came to Dogma after his owner surrender him and he was in a deplorable condition. He was very thin and his teeth were rotting out. He also had a cancerous lump at the base of his tail which resulted in his tail being amputated this past November. Howland contacted Fadal to see about changing Iggy Pop’s diet. Iggy Pop was put on a limited ingredient diet which improved his health. “I noticed right away improvements in his coat and his skin looked great,” Howland said, “He was much more vibrant and he had more energy.” How do you decided which diet options are right for your dog? Consult your veterinarian for specific diet recommendations or ingredient and nutrient content that is best-suited for your dog’s age and health. There is no “best dog food” and it comes down to making a match between the individual characteristics of your dog, your lifestyle and your budget. At the end of the day, your dog is the best judge of what they like. For more information about Dogma Pet Rescue, you can visit them on the web at www.DogmaRescue.org. Wag Pet Boutique is located at 304 E. Davis Blvd. in Tampa, Fl. You can also visit Wag on the web www.wagoftampa.com or call 813-258-9181. Pictured above: “Iggy Pop came to Dogma Pet Rescue in Tampa after his owner surrender him. He was in a deplorable condition. He was very thin and his teeth were rotting out. He also had a cancerous lump at the base of his tail which resulted in his tail being amputated this past November. His foster mom, Amy Howland, contacted Jenn Fadal, pet wellness expert and owner of Wag Pet Boutique in Tampa, Fl. to see about changing his diet to improve his health.”

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RECIPES Recipes Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agricluture

Tropical Trifle INGREDIENTS CUSTARD 3 cups skim or evaporated milk 2 teaspoons orange zest, grated 5 eggs (2 yolks and 3 whole eggs) 1 cup sugar 1/4 cup cornstarch

Florida Cream Cheese Spread With Sun-dried Tomatoes and Greek Olives INGREDIENTS 12 medium sun-dried tomatoes (not packed in oil) 1 8-ounce package cream cheese,

SYRUP 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup sugar 2 teaspoons orange zest, grated 2 tablespoons orange-flavored liqueur or cream sherry LAYERING 2 cups angel, yellow or pound cake cubes 1 cup orange sections 1 cup mango, chopped, cubes 1 cup papaya, chopped, cubes 1 cup banana, sliced 1 cup whipped cream or reduced-fat whipped topping

room temperature

PREPARATION

2 tablespoons sour cream 1/2 cup black olives (preferably Kalamata) chopped and pitted 1/4 cup red onion, chopped

PREPARATION Place sun-dried tomatoes in small bowl. Pour enough boiling water over tomatoes to cover. Let tomatoes stand until soft, about 10 minutes. Drain. Pat tomatoes dry and chop finely. Mix cream cheese and sour cream in medium bowl until smooth. Mix in olives, onion and sun-dried tomatoes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour before serving.) 50

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Pour milk into a heavy saucepan and add orange zest. While milk is heating combine sugar and cornstarch then add egg yolks and whole eggs; stir until mixture is combined thoroughly. When milk begins to boil add egg mixture and whip. Cook over low heat until custard mixture comes to a boil. Pour immediately into shallow container and cover with plastic wrap directly on custard mixture to prevent forming a skin. Refrigerate. While custard is cooling prepare a syrup with water, sugar and orange zest. Cook for 5 minutes. Cool and add liquor or sherry. In a small trifle bowl or any glass bowl begin layering ingredients. Brush bread cubes with syrup mixture, then add fruit and custard. For best results refrigerate overnight. Top with whipped topping and serve.

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Robert Oakley smokes ribs and chickens fresh everyday!

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Quiet Sincerity A Tribute to

John Stickles

By Ginny Mink

J

ohn Stickles grew up in San Diego County in Southern California. His father and grandfather grew cabbage, tomatoes and strawberries. He was raised on the agricultural land that they farmed and worked. By the mid90s John became quite aware of the fact that his agricultural endeavors, growing raspberries at the time, were not being supported by the county, rather a shift towards development had occurred. He believed that the agricultural prospects there were rapidly declining given the increases in the cost of water and land. In 1997, John was made aware of an opportunity in Dover with Florida Pacific Farms. He made a couple of trips to check things out. At that time he was not only offered a position but ownership as well. Thusly he discussed things with his family, his wife, Kim and his daughter, Helen, and they agreed to make the move from California to Dover. John felt that Florida Pacific was a good fit and it gave him an opportunity at a solid future. In fact, he called it an “enjoyable and rewarding experience.” John believed that people like to live where plants grow and he saw Florida as an exceptional example therein. He recognized Florida’s ability to produce a number of crops and was quite focused on best management practices to ensure high yield, resource preservation and cost control. He was a business man, a farmer and an environmentalist all wrapped into a human being that was widely respected and will be terribly missed. John touched the lives of many people and as a tribute to him several of his friends and acquaintances shared their thoughts on his character and personage. Their emotions and sentiment will be conveyed here: Ted Campbell, Executive Director of the Florida Strawberry Grower’s Association, says,

“The persona of John Stickles could light up a room, and the only thing that exceeded his charisma was his passion for constant improvement. That passion drove John to be an obsessive innovator with other growers eagerly following his leadership to improved methodologies. He was gracious in sharing his depth of knowledge, and his quality orientation always spurred our industry to excel. John’s contributions to Florida Farm Bureau, Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association, Florida Strawberry Grower’s Association and other such organizations allowed him to help agriculture in so many ways that reach far beyond the farm’s boundaries.” W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Judi Whitson, Executive Director of the Florida Farm Bureau, added, “John served on the Hillsborough County Farm

Bureau Board from 2001-2007. During that time he served on several in house committees. He also served on the FFB State Vegetable Advisory Committee from 2003-2005 and again in 2010. John was usually very quiet during board meetings but when he spoke it was always important and everyone listened. I used to think he was like EF Hutton commercials, when John spoke, everyone listened. I don’t have any funny antidotes or stories, but I had all the respect in the world for John. He was very respected in the industry and in our board room. He will be very missed.” Alvin Futch recalled, “I leased my property to Glenn Williamson in 1996 to grow strawberries. He told me he had some friends that were in California. John Stickles showed up from California and it wasn’t long before I’d rather John come around than Glenn. John was a real gentleman, and I guess one of the best people in business I ever knew in the field of agriculture. He was honest and fair in the game of life. It wasn’t sixteen years later and he was running the whole show for Florida Pacific, as well as a lot of other things. He was the kind of man that you could ask a question and you certainly did not get the run around. He was very honest and direct.” Dennis Carlton reiterates Judi Whitson’s sentiment. He says,

“I served on the board with him at the Farm Bureau. The thing about John was that he didn’t say a whole bunch, he

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was a quiet man, but when he spoke it was meaningful and important!” Michelle Williamson, who also served on the board with John, sniffles and replies, “He was a really, really good friend to a

lot of people and he was a good advocate for Florida agriculture. He’s going to be missed a lot.” Elaine Harris at Driscoll’s, shared a seemingly unanimous sentiment about John, “He’ll be deeply missed. He was a wonder-

ful person. He was very innovative and forward thinking and a major contributor to Hillsborough County agriculture, the strawberry industry in particular.” John was a gifted man, well respected, honest and sincere and those who knew him held him with high regard. While most people are aware of his agriculture involvement, he was also a Porsche lover. John Reker, Secretary and Membership Chair of the Porsche 356 Florida Owners Group, shared, “John just

became active in the last year. He had a very special car, a Speedster, which is a very popular model today, a 1955 Speedster that he restored. We were happy to have him bring it to the events. I know he got an award last fall. He always seemed upbeat and a little laidback but was very personable. He will be missed.” In closing, Lisa Lochridge, Director of Public Affairs for the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association shared, “John’s pass-

ing is an immense loss for his family, friends and Florida

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agriculture. There are so many things to remember him for: his easy smile, his openness, and his thoughtful leadership in the specialty crop industry. John was extremely knowledgeable but at the same time unassuming. He and Kim have been such a great team through the years. Our thoughts and prayers are with her, their daughter, Helen, and the rest of the family.”

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John was 57 when he passed away, July 26, 2012. He is survived by his wife, Kim and daughter, Helen. Those wishing to make memorial contributions “In Memory of John Stickles” can contact the FFVA Specialty Crop Foundation, P.O. Box 948153, Maitland, FL 32794.

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Driscoll’s Team Honors Memory of

John Stickles John has been a true leader in his business and in our industry, providing tremendous mentorship to the Florida Pacific Farms and Driscoll’s team members. His forward-thinking in production systems as well as farm business management and eagerness to trial and research new ways has been ground-breaking. The learning’s from this will be a key part of future berry production in Florida. John will be sorely missed by us all and we will always honor his memory.

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g KYLE ROBERT AMMERMAN, age 25, Plant City Died on Saturday, July 28, 2012. He was born December, 1986 in Tampa, and the son of Nicholas Ammerman and Margaret Parris. Surviving are fiancee' Mandy Owens, daughter, Haylie Lynn Ammerman, brother, Trenton Ammerman, paternal grandparents, Donald and Carol Ammerman, and maternal grandparent, Martha Parrish. BRUCE CRUMPTON, 82, of Plant City died July 28, 2012. He was born August 11, 1929, to the late Wesley and Mildred Dolloff Crumpton. He was preceded in death his first wife, Clara H. Crumpton, and brother Roland Crumpton. He is survived by his beloved wife of 21 years, Ann Palmer Crumpton, daughter, Nancy Sue (Bill) Gerhard, step children Rick, Gary, Arthur, and John Green, Debra Rivett, grandchildren William and Alison, 4 step grandchildren, Kade, Kenzie, Sidney and Andrew.

DONNA JEAN SPROUSE, age 64, of Plant City, died August 2, 2012, at her home. She was born December 7, 1947 in Tampa the daughter of the late Ollie Pick and the Late Mary Russell Pick. Donna Jean was the wife of Jack Sprouse. Survivors are, Jack Ray Sprouse, son, Olyne Perez and Jacklyne Carter-four grandchildren and 3 great grand children. 58

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RICKY ERWIN BRADFORD, 50 of Plant City passed away August 1, 2012 at the Sun City Center Hospice. He was born February 3, 1962. Ricky was the son of the late Robert Bradford and Dolly Griffin. Surviving are brother, Michael Griffin, and sister, Donna Anders.

ELOUISE WILLIAMSON, 85, of the Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park, and Dover, Florida died July 29, 2012. She was born January 26, 1927, and the last of four daughters and three sons of WIll and Deb Fletcher. Elouise Williamson as preceded in death by her husband of 52 years, R.J. Williamson of Dover, Florida. Survivors include two sons, Francis Williamson, George Williamson, 6 grandchildren,and 4 great grandchildren.

BERTHA K. GASCHLER, age 74, of Plant City died July 30, 2012. She was born August 28, 1937. Bertha was the daughter of the late Andrew Haili and the late Elizabeth Kinolau Haili. She was the wife of the late William Gaschler. Survivors include three sons, Andrew Joseph, Robert Allen and David Wayne Gaschler, daughters, Debra Ann Thompson and Marlene Leiani Shover, 10 grandchildren, 6 great grandchildren. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


For Sale Regions Bank 4892 Sun City Center Blvd. Sun City Center, Fl 33573

CF Industries P O Drawer L, Plant City, Fl 33564

2003 White Astro Chevy Van/Cargo

Driscoll 12880 E US Highway 92 Dover, FL 33527

A/C, Automatic, AM/FM Radio. $3,200 Please call Karen 813-759-6909.

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By Ginny Mink

4H

is an organization with a vast history. Yet, individual 4H clubs seem to come and go. Rarely does one find a club with as rich a storyline as that backing the Kids & Kritters 4H Club. Sally Alford Manning is at its helm and she’s got quite a unique story as well. She says, “I grew up just east of Tampa on a couple of acres. My father purchased horses for my brother, sister and I and later added a few dairy calves from a family friend. In the mid-1960s he bought 10 acres on McIntosh Road with the intention of building a home and moving the family there. Sadly, things did not turn out the way he’d hoped. She continues, “The family enjoyed working together on weekends clearing and fencing the land. Unfortunately, just before construction on the house was due to begin, my father suddenly passed away, which put an end to the dream.” For some people, such a great tragedy would push them away from things associated with the loss. Sally, however, forged onward and in the midst of that determination she found some wonderful supporters. She explains, “The family that my father bought calves from introduced me to their neighbor, Phyllis White, when I was 13 years old. Phyllis knew I enjoyed riding and asked if I was interested in riding her Half Arabian. Of course, like any young girl, I jumped at the chance. Later, Phyllis arranged for me to begin taking riding lessons and showing in local, as well as Arabian, horse shows. As my friendship with Phyllis grew, she became a mentor

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and was like a second mother to me.” People come into our lives for a variety of reasons, but it is apparent that part of Phyllis’ role in Sally’s life was to inspire and encourage her. Phyllis was a dog trainer and owned her own boarding kennel in Valrico. She helped found the Purebred Dog Tent at the State Fair when it moved to its current location in the 1970s. Shortly thereafter she started the Hillsborough County 4H Dog Project and then she created the 4H and Youth Dog Shows at the Florida State Fair. At that time there weren’t any dog based 4H clubs. However, as time passed and other 4H dog clubs appeared, they added the name, Kids & Kritters. While all this was going on, Sally says, “The Saddlebred trainer I took lessons from, Peggy Lair, offered me a job at what was then, Brandon Stables. For several years during high school I worked for an Arabian trainer, Buck Grass. While in college, I decided to marry another horse trainer and together we opened our own training stable specializing in training Arabians and their amateur owners and junior exhibitors. I ended up training horses for more than 30 years.” She adds, “Since Phyllis and I remained friends, when my children grew old enough, she started teaching them to train dogs and secured show dogs for each of them. Of course, that led to me becoming a 4H parent and eventually a 4H leader. We also started a 4H horse club at our training barn. My three children showed

both horses and dogs simultaneously for many years in both 4H and breed shows.” As time continued to speed through, as it often does, Phyllis got Sally involved with the Florida State Fair Dog Show Committee; it was the mid-1990s then. Sally says she’s still a member today!

Once again, loss struck. Sally says, “When Phyllis’ health began to fail, my children were already involved in the 4H Dog Project and by then, being trained by Bruce Hutcheson. By the time Phyllis lost her battle with cancer, I wanted to make sure the programs she created continued. So, following the death of my first husband, I retired from training horses and I continued on with the 4H Dog Project. Even after my youngest daughter aged out of 4H, I remained. I recruited fellow 4H dog parent, Mary Rothering, to help lead the Kids & Kritters 4H Club.” Mary had her hands full and eventually retired from W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


community service. I know animals have enriched my life.” Anyone seeking to enrich the lives of their own children via the Kids & Kritters 4H Club should check out the contact information provided below!

Kids & Kritters, at which point Sally, with Bruce’s assistance, took over the leadership of the club.

The Kids & Kritters 4H Dog Club will resume classes on Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 6:15 at Mary Help of Christians Center. For more information contact Sally Alford Manning at: horsepny@tampabay.rr.com

She says, “The heart of the Kids & Kritters Club is the 4H members and parents. As the instructors and leaders, we are only the support system that assists the children in achieving their goals. For the last few years we have had a group of children who come to dog training classes almost every Tuesday evening between September and the end of April. Their dedication has paid off with wins in the show ring in Showmanship, Obedience, Agility and Rally. Behind every successful child there is a supportive parent.” Supportive friends are always helpful too, as Sally knows quite well. Animals are important to her and thusly she summed it up by saying, “One can never underestimate the power and influence of animals in a child’s life. Early on, through interacting with and owning animals, a child can learn compassion and responsibility. In my own life, animals have shaped my career choices and determined where I devoted my years of

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AVAILABLE HORSES WELCOME!

5 ACRES POLO CLUB LANE LITHIA

8 ACRES GUN DOG WAY LITHIA

A great country homesite or ranchette, close to shopping but still secluded! $140,000

Large vacant lot with 8 acres waiting for your perfect country home! $116,000

12 ACRES TRAPNELL ROAD PLANT CITY

37 ACRES LANIER ROAD PLANT CITY

Great vacant parcel for home site or farm. Already platted into four parcels. $190,000!

Gorgeous Oak Hammocks and pasture land for grazing. Bank Owned $359,900 FARM LEASES AVAILABLE

Lithia 50 acres with two 10" wells, drip only

Wimauma 78 acres with 10" and 8" wells, drip only 49 ACRES THOMPSON ROAD LITHIA

Wimauma 260 Acres with drip

Gorgeous property with scattered oak hammocks. Over 2,300 feet of road frontage. $795,000

Reed Fischbach, Broker Fischbach Land Company

813.546.1000 P.O. Box 2677 • Brandon, FL 33509 Note: While every attempt is made to provide as accurate information on the property offering as possible, FISCHBACH LAND COMPANY, LLC does not guarantee the accuracy thereof. Buyer shall rely entirely on their own information and inspection of property and records.

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Through an experiential learning process, adult program participants learn how to make food choices which can improve the nutritional quality of the meals they serve their families. They increase their ability to select and buy food that meets the nutritional needs of their family. They gain new skills in food production, preparation, storage, safety and sanitation, and they learn to better manage their food budgets and related resources for governmental assistance agencies and organizations.

Donna Lopez

Food and Nutrition Educational Program Works EACH $1 INVESTED, SAVES UP TO $10 IN HEALTH CARE COSTS AND MORE

By Jim Frankowiak

I

t’s no secret that obesity, poor nutrition and limited physical activity are major health concerns and challenges in America. And, they have disproportionate impact on minority and low income populations. The United States Department of Agriculture and its National Institute of Food and Agriculture recognized in this in the late 1960s and introduced the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in 1969. Since its introduction, EFNEP has improved the diets and foodrelated behaviors of program participants from across the country. Every year, more than 500,000 new participants enroll in the program. In 2010, EFNEP reached 137,814 adults and 463,530 youth directly and nearly 400,000 family members indirectly. The program operates in all 50 states, American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

They also learn about related topics such as physical activity and health. Information is provided in a series of lessons over several months by paraprofessionals, perhaps better described as peer educators, and volunteers, very often members of the community from which participants originate. The lessons are not lectures, but hands-on, learn-by-doing approaches that allow participants to gain the skills needed to make positive behavior changes. “There is also the aspect of increased self-worth that program participants derive,” said Hunter, “which comes from their recognition that they have learned something of significant value to offer their families and society.” Specific lessons that are part of adult EFNEP sessions have been determined according to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines and Choose MyPlate. There are 20 lessons in the Eat Right for Life series. Each takes about 60-minutes and some lessons can be in a single session. The lessons cover such topics as MyPlate in which the participant becomes able to name the five sections of the Plate and describe food variety, moderation, choosing amounts of foods from the food groups based on proportions. Another session discusses the health benefits of physical activity and fosters understanding of the difference between sedentary activities and moderate to intense levels of physical activity, as well as identifying barriers to such activity and creation of a physical activity plan. There are also lessons in reading labels for better nutrition, meal planning for good nutrition and saving money, the benefits of eating breakfast and smart snacking, food safety, plus several that provide information for pregnant moms and parents with infants and young children.

EFNEP is designed to assist limited-resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes to change behaviors necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of total family diet and nutritional well-being. The program brings together federal, state and local resources focusing on low-income families with young children. Here in Hillsborough County, EFNEP is under the aegis of Extension. Jacqueline Hunter coordinates the program, a role she has held for 32 years. In the adult EFNEP program, she is assisted by paraprofessionals Mary Owens, Pamela Bradford and Mae Allen. EFNEP Program Assistant Owens is retiring in November after 25 years of service. Paraprofessionals usually live in the communities where they work and are involved in program recruitment. They recruit families and receive referrals from current and former participants, community organizations and agencies. 64

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Chola Little

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Shannon Williams

“I feel better since participating in the classes led by EFNEP Program Assistant Mae Allen at our church in Tampa,” said Chola Little. “My eating habits and the way I prepare food have all changed. You know our bodies are the Lord’s temple and we have to watch what and how much we take in,” she said. “She has raised my consciousness and she also encourages us to follow the lessons she has taught us.” The sessions that Little attends attract groups from 25 to 40 and often are part of regional gatherings devoted to health and wellness and often include children. The EFNEP program outreach also includes residents at Alpha House of Tampa, which offers homeless pregnant women and mothers with young children safe housing and the tools they need to become self-sufficient and effective, responsible parents. “There are very valuable and popular lessons for our residents,” said Donna Lopez, an Alpha House staff member. “The classes are educational and fun and not just limited to lectures. Our mothers enjoy cooking and shopping with EFNEP Program Assistant Pam Bradford. They see the value in what they learn for themselves and their children by eating what’s right and in the right quantities.” Alpha House sessions are held several times a year. Shannon Williams, an 18-year cancer survivor, is “very thankful” for the classes he took with Mary Owens. “I learned that half of what I had been eating was really killing me. I learned how to read labels and get on the right type of diet, plus exercise. Changes in my diet have enabled me to get off one of my cholesterol medications and the regular exercising I do is a big reliever and controller of stress,” he said. “I just wish more people would take advantage of this program. It is truly a blessing.” “We are delighted with the results our program has achieved,” said Hunter. “We conduct pre and post program phone surveys with all of our adult programs and we consistently show improvements in all program areas on completion. That’s a clear indication EFNEP is working here in Hillsborough County.” For more EFNEP information, including how to participate, contact Extension – 813/744-5519, Extension 54121 or Ext. 54124. You may also email Hunter at JDH7611@ufl.edu. The website is Hillsboroughcounty.org, under “residence” on the site, click on “educational classes.”

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household trash. If there is no buffer zone, Florida-Friendly low-maintenance plantings will assist in filtering out fertilizer and pesticides that runoff. The addition of shoreline vegetation reduces erosion and attracts wildlife. If you live on the waterfront without a riparian zone containing plants, you have a shoreline structure that helps minimize erosion: a seawall, rip rap or gabions. Seawalls are walls that face the sea where they shoreline is steeply sloped and exposed to high wind and waves. Seawalls can cause erosion on adjoining properties. Rip rap is loose, large stones, and gabions are rectangular metal baskets filled with rocks. Consideration should be given to including native vegetation in and along these structures.

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hether you live on the water or not, your property is directly connected to a water body near your home. The reason is that rain and/or over-watering leave your property as runoff. This runoff, en route to a water body, picks up fertilizers, pesticides, grass clippings, gasoline, oil and other pollutants from impervious surfaces. Impervious surfaces do not allow water to percolate through the soil. Examples of pervious surfaces include mulched landscape beds, pavers, turfgrass where runoff (water) is filtered. How we maintain and design our landscapes impacts our watershed. Watersheds are land masses where water beneath it or drains from it goes to the same area. For us, that is Tampa Bay. Each watershed is connected to other watersheds and the underground aquifer, which supplies most of our drinking water, making it our opportunity to protect the waterfront. If you live on the waterfront and have a riparian zone containing plants, the land along the edge of the water, you probably know about the 10-foot-wide maintenance-free zone (buffer), which protects the wetland. Maintenance-free means no fertilizer, pesticide or mowing is to be performed within 10 feet. If turfgrass is near the waterfront, it should be mowed with the grass clippings going toward the landscape, not toward the water. Pet waste should be picked up and disposed of with your W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Many of us live near stormwater ponds and canals, which are man-made water bodies that prevent flooding, manage stormwater and improve water quality. These ponds and canals are connected to our waterways, so what enters them can also enter our natural water system. They are a great habitat for plants and wildlife. By including a variety of flood-tolerant plants, contaminants can be reduced, diverse habitats can be created and additional wildlife will be attracted. All of us impact the quality (and quantity) of our water sources. By practicing the maintenance options above, each of us can enjoy our rivers, streams, lakes, freshwater springs and the second longest coastline in the United States. Be sure to contact your local city or county offices or departments related to land development, building and planning before making any changes related to protecting the waterfront. If you live in a deed restricted community, check with your landscape or architectural control committee as required before making landscape changes.

The information contained in this article was adapted from the Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Handbook 2009, which is available for free at our office. For assistance with horticultural questions, call: 813-744-5519 Extension 4, or visit us at the Hillsborough County Extension Service, 5339 County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. More gardening information is available at: http:/ / hillsborough.extension.ufl.edu and http:/ / edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Remember to reuse, reduce and recycle. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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By Ginny Mink

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o matter how knowledgeable one might be in any given field, additional training and education is always the key to success. Thankfully, even in the agriculture industry there are organizations designed to offer farmers, or ranchers, training and assistance. According to Brandee Williams, a range land management specialist, “The Florida Grazing Land Coalition (FGLC) is a producer led organization that does a lot of training, education and outreach and it’s all based around topics that typical ranchers, or producers, deal with on a regular basis, like invasive weeds, feral hogs, prescribed burning and rotational grazing management.” While Brandee is employed by the National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), her position has her partnered with the FGLC. This is definitely her passion. She says, “I knew from an early age, like seven or eight, that I wanted to save the planet,” she chuckles. “I thought about environmental engineering but I wasn’t smart enough for that,” another laugh. “When I was in high school, I went to a ranch and wildlife academy, it was a week long youth camp. The people running it were from the NRCS. After that week long camp I decided that was really what I wanted to do. I enjoyed being outside and I didn’t really want to have a desk.” Brandee went to Texas Tech University and got a degree in environmental conservation. Upon graduation she was offered a

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job in Oklahoma working for the NRCS. She spent three and half years there before transferring to Florida. She’s been in her current position for the last five years. She says, “I cover 15-17 counties, my area’s pretty big for the stuff I do. Basically my job is just to write grazing plans for cattle so I work with some of the bigger ranches and things. We’re just here basically to help make ranchers lives a little easier.”

So, how do they achieve that, one might wonder? Brandee gives an example, “About three or four years ago we brought in Fred Provenza for a three day workshop and he taught us how to think in terms of animal behavior and training animals to do things they wouldn’t normally do. Animals think in terms of buffet when you send them out in the pasture and they eat their favorites and go down the line. Fred Provenza taught us how to shift that thinking of an animal into eating everything. He’s a big proponent of just training animals to eat what they don’t want to eat.”

While that might sound a lot like the cow whisperer mumbo jumbo, apparently it works because Brandee continues, “Out of that three day workshop, our current Chair, Buzz Eaves, did his own study. He began treating thistles with molasses. He would just go into a pasture and spray a little molasses on them and he trained his cows to eat thistles and then eventually the cows, no matter what age they were, would eat the thistles without molasses on them. So, he doesn’t struggle with thistle anymore in his pastures.” Perhaps this is something other ranchers will be interested in attempting. In addition to getting cattle to utilize all the greens in the fields, Brandee has another initiative she supports. She says, “In Oklahoma we had what we called prescribed burn associations. When I very first got here I wanted to get one started here in Florida. It’s a group of landowners from a particular area, say a county, and they get together to help each other out with the burning. They take the group, one has a tractor, one has a spray tank, one has three or four field hands, and they pool their time and effort, and resources and they take a lottery to burn each other’s land each year. Florida’s lucky because it has more burn days. They can help different agencies, like NRCS, we’re not allowed to burn but we can write a prescribed burn plan. The forest services can do burning but they already have their own land that they have to take care of. If the ranchers have their own coalition they can do their own burning and they don’t have to wait for a state or federal agency. We had a full W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


conference is that 50 percent of the speakers are landowners or producers, it’s not all academia. That’s kind of what makes this conference unique because its successes and failures are from the landowners’ perspective.” Given the nine year break between opportunities, this might very well be something to attend!

day workshop in March on different aspects of burning and we brought in John Weir. He is a research associate out of Oklahoma State University and he is kind of recognized as the guy who starts burn associations. He gets everyone excited. Hopefully we’ll have a burn association started, I’m hoping, in the next year.” If you’re a rancher maybe you’ll consider looking into starting a burn association in your area. No doubt Brandee will eagerly assist you in the endeavor.

If you’d like to find out more about what the FGLC does, there’s a wealth of information at: http:/ / www.ces.fau.edu/ fglc/ or if you’re interested in learning more about the GLCI, check out their website: http:/ / www.glci.org. You can find out conference information there as well. •

Putting animal behavior and prescribed burn training aside, Brandee continues, “The biggest thing we’re doing, the huge ta-da moment, is having a national conference with our parent association, the Grazing Land Conservation Initiative (GLCI), and it’s in Orlando, December 9-12. We’re having some pretty big people there who are going to be speakers: Fred Provenza, Don Ball, Garry Lacefield, Kit Pharo and Temple Grandin. The conference is only every three years and it rotates among three different sections. There’s the West and Central and then there’s the East. So the East only gets it every nine years. The best thing about this

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Though it seems like just yesterday since the days of Roger Stewart, it has been 12 years since Dr. Rick Garrity became the second administrator in EPC’s history. As he was the head of the Southwest District of FDEP for the 15 years prior to his current responsibility, it was natural to ask what he saw as the differences between the two similar missions.

DR. RICK GARRITY AND THE HCEPC

Dr. Garrity

Rick has a history of consensus building. Most feel this is his strongest suit. It certainly is something he enjoys. While he was the Director of the FDEP’s Southwest District, he directed Ecosystem Management. He fostered the concept of Team Permitting and supported the Hillsborough River Greenways Task Force, where landowners and regulators attempted to develop an ecosystem-wide approach toward sustainable agriculture.

By Chip Hinton

Dr.

Rick Garrity is a friend of mine. That’s right, the Director of the Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission, the administrator for the organization that has historically been a thorn in the side of county agriculture, is a friend. It is a friendship that has grown out of mutual trust, respect, and his willingness to listen to opinions contrary to his existing mindset. Rick seems comfortable in what has been a historical lightning rod of a position, and has been successful in defusing most of the political firestorms that have erupted during his tenure. Moreover, he truly likes his job. “What I like most about my job is that every day is different. I interact with multiple divisions, advisory committees, with neighboring counties, the Tampa Bay Estuary program for water quality, and private citizens asking for help.”

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The major difference is associated with the scope of operation. When Dr. Garrity was responsible for the 12 county Southwest District, he responded to state direction. As the EPC director, Rick still must oversee programs that are consistent with the state directives, but his immediate chain of command is the Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission board. While the membership of that board is the Board of County Commissioners, their role is different.

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I asked him what was most important to him as it related to Hillsborough agriculture. “One of my primary values is environmental stewardship. It involves respecting farmers for keeping the land green while recognizing they must maintain a viable business to keep that land green. Farming is an outstanding opportunity to work toward protecting natural resources through sustainable agriculture.” That recognition of agriculture as a resource in itself is pivotal in improving the relationship between agriculture and EPC. The balance between protection of the environment and streamlining the process of regulation is the key to the survival of both. Reducing the cost of regulations, making farming more sustainable on the profit side, enhances the potential for keeping farmers on the land, and the land green.

As Dr. Garrity sees it, there are two basic ways to accomplish this objective. From the organization side, EPC employs the Sterling Management Model. This model emphasizes efficiency by examining the core functions of the organization and determining what is essential, what is less important and what the agency can do to improve performance. The timing for this change couldn’t have been better. With the current economic crisis, EPC has faced some major challenges in their mandates relative to permitting, compliance, enforcement and monitoring. EPC has suffered through a 30 percent shrink in a budget that has reduced staff from a 173 to its current 128 people. The second way for EPC to make its regulations less burdensome relates to the rules themselves. For example, the wetlands rule was rewritten in 2008. The emphasis was to streamline the permitting process, removing some of the involvement with multiple agencies, while insuring the protection of wetlands and managing storm water. As the wetland rule relates to agricultural land use, the rewritten rule allows an exemption for wetlands less than a quarter of an acre (one half acre in some cases), allows the Water Management District to determine the needs or justification criteria and works within the District’s AGSWIM program for determinations and delineations. This is very much in the spirit of the recent state legislation which attempted to reduce duplication in local regulations. However, Dr. Garrity made it clear that the current process to revise the EPC’s rules wasn’t precipitated by the state legislation. He noted that while some of the changes were aimed at being compliant with state law, most were simply streamlining or eliminating archaic rules. Is the relationship better today between Hillsborough County agriculture and the EPC? Decidedly so. Could it improve? Most definitely! How? The best way for regulators to write rules that accomplish the stated intent with minimal impact on agriculture is to have a staff sprinkled with agricultural majors.

Maybe it’s time to discuss how to take that next step … •

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Local Food Company Gives Back To “Olive” of Our Troops

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ore than 50 thousand olive snack packs were shipped to U.S. military troops overseas by Plant City based Mario Camacho Foods. Olive of our troops, a Mario Camacho Foods campaign done in partnership with Operation Gratitude, has helped supply more than 600 thousand care packages to soldiers around the world. "A generous, giving spirit is part of Mario Camacho Foods’ way to positively impact communities. From the farm to table, we grow, nurture, process and deliver good food that is good for you. We want to show appreciation for those who serve our country by providing them with high-quality, healthy food they love,” said Director of Marketing, Annie Owens. The Olive of Our Troops campaign is close to the hearts of Mario Camacho Foods’ employees. Captain Stephen Pineda, future son-in-law of Mario Camacho Foods’ employee, Earla Turcich has served two tours of duty, one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. “Many generations of my family have served our country in various branches of the military. We know firsthand the sacri-

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fices that are made by the men and women who serve in our military as well as their families while they are deployed. Mario Camacho Foods is very excited to support both our troops and their families through our Olive of Our Troops campaign,” said Turcich. Although growing olives in Spain has been done by the Camacho Family for more than four generations, they have expanded into other products. Because of their product and packing innovation, environmental sustainability, social responsibility and making continuous improvements to provide the absolute highest quality in products and service, Mario Camacho Foods’ offers so much more than olives. Their product line now include peppers, capers, onions, cooking oils, cherries, jams and preserves, bacon bits and herbal medicinal teas. Brands sold by Mario Camacho Foods include Mario, Fragata, La Veija Fabrica and Susaron. For the latest recipes and coupons, consumer can follow Mario Camacho Foods on Facebook, Twitter and their website, w w w. m a r i o c a m a c h o f o o d s . c o m Food lovers can find the Mario brand at local retailers near you!

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Naturally Amazing Activities

Solar Cooker

Step 1 Cut a hole in the Large Box Lid to the same size as the inner box.

By Sean Green Its hurricane season again, and with it may come days in which our modern conveniences fail us. So what can we do if we find the energy resources we put so much faith in have suddenly failed? One option is to rely on energy resources that are more reliable, such as solar energy. In the early 18th century, Horace de Saussure, a European naturalist, constructed what he called a Hot Box to determine how effectively glass heat traps could collect solar energy. With his Hot Box, Saussure confirmed that our atmosphere allows solar energy to pass through it to hit the earth, the earth absorbs the energy, and releases heat. Lower elevations contain more carbon dioxide and water vapors that act like a blanket to trap solar heat. Higher altitudes are not as thick with this solar blanket and heat escapes more readily, making the air temperature considerably cooler than lower elevations. This month, we will construct a simple solar oven based on the scientific principles of Saussure’s Hot Box. Solar ovens use glass or clear plastic to duplicate the conditions found in nature that trap solar energy. This is why your car gets hot very quickly when left in the sun. Your car can easily reach deadly temperatures of over 100° Fahrenheit in the summer time. Some solar ovens can reach up to 400°, but most range between 200° F to 350° F. Because Florida is closer to the equator than any other state in the continental U.S., we can cook with solar energy year round.

Materials Needed: • Small box (big enough to hold the food) • Large box with Lid (big enough for small box and 2 inches all the way around) • Aluminum foil • Clear plastic wrap (oven cooking bags sustain high heat better) • Insulation (Feathers, Rice Hulls, Wool, Straw, Newspaper • Pocket knife or box cutter • Black Spray Paint (Food Safe & Heat Resistant) • Drinking straws 76

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Step 2 Glue aluminum foil to the inside of both boxes and the inside of the lid

Step 3 Glue the unopened oven bag in place over the cutout on the inside of the lid making sure the bag opening is also glued shut.

Step 4 Line the bottom and sides of the small box with black construction paper (over the foil) and glue it to the inside of the larger box so it lines up with the opening of the large box lid.

Step 5 Fill the space between the large and small box with insulation and seal any remaining holes.

Step 6 Place the food you want to cook in the small black box, close the lid and angle the cooker to face the sun using the reflector to direct sunlight through the opening. We encourage Hillsborough County residence to participate in the classes and seminars on solar cooking that are offered at the University of Florida, Hillsborough County Extension office in Seffner. Not only will you learn about a variety of different styles of solar cookers, but you will get to share recipes with others that are discovering the economic and environmental benefits of solar cooking. More information is available at http://hillsboroughnutrition.ifas.ufl.edu/#Solar. W W W. I N T H E F I E L D M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Ask-A-Vet

Dr. Christy Layton, DVM

have deadly heartworm disease before you ever realize that the product is not what you thought it was. Then, it is too late.

Q:

My vet says I should buy my dog’s medication through him and not from an online pharmacy. Does he just want my money or is there a real reason to buy it from a vet?

A:

That is a very good question, and one that we are asked all the time. There is a very valid reason for your vet to say that. The veterinary community is very concerned about the quality of products sold through online pharmacies. There have recently been a number of medications that were purchased through online pharmacies and were found to not have the correct active ingredients in them. When the serial numbers were run by the company on the label, it was determined that these products were in fact not made by the company at all, rather they were black market products. This may be less of an issue with flea preventions as you can see the fleas if the product is not working. But, with a heartworm medication or other medication that works “inside your pet,” this is much more difficult. If your pet’s heartworm prevention that you purchased online fails to work, your dog could

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All of the major pharmaceutical manufacturers of heartworm products have a guarantee on their product but only if purchased from a veterinarian. They will pay for everything that your dog needs for heartworm treatment (which can cost $300-$900) and many will give you a year’s supply of prevention free as well. The pharmaceutical companies do not extend this guarantee to anyone purchasing from an online pharmacy since they do not sell to them directly. So you can see how the potential of saving a few dollars may have large consequences in the future. The online pharmacies get their products from one of three places: 1) unethical veterinarians selling excess amounts of product illegally to make fast cash, 2) Overseas product (These products do not carry the US-FDA approval and may come from countries that have fewer pharmaceutical regulations. They may have also been in a cargo ship in very high temperatures making the ingredients inactive by the time you receive it.), 3) Black market suppliers that could be putting none of the active ingredient in the product or even worse, something that could harm your pet while making the packaging look identical to the real thing. Most people think that buying online is always cheaper, but often this is not the case. Many of the products are cheaper or the same price from your veterinarian as they are online. Also, many of the pharmaceutical companies offer discounts to veterinarians to aid in selling their products such as “Buy 6 Get 2 Free” or “$10 off the purchase of 6

Tablets.” These discounts are not available with an online/big chain store purchase since the companies do not sell to those pharmacies. Another reason we recommend purchasing from your veterinarian is the same reason we recommend buying local “Fresh From Florida Products” in the agriculture world. Your veterinarian is a local business just like all the farmers and small retailers in your area. Your veterinarian has spent their entire life devoted to educating themselves about caring for your pet’s health and well-being. Your veterinarian is the best person capable of deciding what medications and doses your pet needs. They are the one to educate you about using your pet’s medications effectively and safely. Your veterinarian is the only one that can provide you a guarantee on the products you purchase. Support your local veterinarian and in turn, they will support you with their knowledge, caring and quality of medicine that you and your pets deserve. Your human-pet bond is only improved by a good relationship with your local veterinarian. •

What’s Your Question? Please feel free to email any of your questions to askavet@inthefieldmagazine.com and your question may be answered in next month’s issue.

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AUTOMOTIVE 1997 FORD F-250 4X2 Lariat Super Cab. This is a very low mileage (83,000) original one owner (non smoker) vehicle that has been professionally maintained and garage kept since new! Call 813-650-3173 $6,500 2003 WHITE ASTRO CHEVY VAN/CARGO A/C, Automatic, AM/FM Radio. $3,200 Please call Karen 813-759-6909.

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTOR 1980 Massey Ferguson 230. 34pto hp, power steering. $4,500 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 14’ Shop built, heavy duty trailer, 2 axel with ramps. $750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 FORD NAA TRACTOR Good condition, gas engine. $1,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 3PT LIFT 3 row hole punch. Very good condition. $500.00 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON 255 Grove Tractor with 6’ mower $7,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722. KUBOTA L275 With shuttle shift. Ready to work! $3,500. Call 813-759-8722 MASSEY FERGUSON GC2300 4 X 4 hydro stat transmission, 2702 hrs. $4,750 Call Alvie 813-759-8722 1984 MASSEY FERGUSON 240 tractor, 42 pto hp, 2wd, works great! $5,950. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 JOHN DEERE 6420 Cab with a/c, 4x4 3345 hrs. 9 pto hp. $37,500. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 KUBOTA L340 32 hp, 4x4, shuttle shift. 1783 hrs. Call Alvie 813-759-8722 USED EQUIPMENT Mowers, disk, box blades & disk plows. Call Alvie TODAY! 813-759-8722

DECKING BRDS. & TILL SIDING Call Ted 813-752-3378

FOR SALE

DOUBLE INSULATED THERMO PANE Starting at $55. Call Ted 813-752-3378 WINDOW SCREENS We make window screens of all sizes available in different frame colors. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TILL 4 X 8 SHEET B-grade $17.95. Call Ted 813-752-3378 86

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

TRAILER FOR SALE 44x12 single wide trailer in Winters Mobile Home Park. Zephyrhills 5k or best offer. Call (813)967-4515

info@inthefieldmagazine.com LAWN EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES RUBBER MULCH All colors, buy 10 bags, get 1 FREE! $8.99 a bag. Call Ted 813-752-3378 TSG50 WOODS 3pt. stump grinder. Clearance Sale! $3,381. Call Alvie 813-759-8722

REAL ESTATE BEAUTIFUL PLANT CITY 1 ACRE LOT With well. Private one street subdivision frontage 290 x 145 depth. 4521 Highland Creek Drive. $45,900. Call Today! 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – 45 ACRES VACANT LAND (Pasco County) 45 acres are comprised of gently rolling hills with big trees & solid ground. A great setting for residential development. To the east of the property is a 60 acre parcel (Lake Gilbert) that adds significant aesthetic value to the 45 acres. Zoning: AR (Agricultural-Rural) Call Heidi Cecil for more information 863-899-9620 2.66 ACRE NURSERY FOR SALE OR LEASE N. Lakeland with 1,000 sq ft frame house, 2 sheds, irrigation throughout. Call Bruce 863-698-0019 A SLICE OF HEAVEN 2.03 acres lot on Hare Mtn. Estates in Franklin NC. Breath-taking views. Purchased 10/08 for $73,400. Yours today for $32,900 GREAT INVESTMENT! Call 813-655-6769 FOR SALE – WHAT WAS 900K, REDUCED TO 375K? 20 ACRES LAKELAND AGRICULTURE RELATED, INCOME PRODUCING 1600 ft of I-4 frontage. Call us now to see how much you're losing by not owning this property! Estate Brokers USA at 813-986-9141 FOR SALE The Cat is out of the bag. Check this out- 2005 4/2 2300 sq ft residence income producing farm owner finance- non qualifying- zero interest. Antioch Call now, it might still be available. Estate Brokers USA at 813-986-9141

JOBS CONTRIBUTING WRITER Write about events in your community. Immediate openings in Hillsborough and Polk Counties. Paid per article. Responsibilities include covering community events and taking pictures. Email your resume to sarah@inthefieldmagazine.com INDEPENDENT ACCOUNT MANAGER In The Field Magazine is looking for independent account managers to join our team! Please contact Danny@inthefieldmagazazine.com or call 813-759-6909.

ALL A BLOOM FLORIST Mylar Balloons for all occasions!!! $4.95 each. 116 N. Collins - Downtown Plant City. www.allabloomtampa.com

AUGUST 2012

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