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Western & Outdoor Wear, Farm, Ranch & Pet Supplies

S. Jim RedmanAugust Pkwy. (Hwy. 39 S) Plant City, FL • www.southsidewesternwear.com I T F M I T F M 2018 23014 N HE IELD

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CONTENTS

AUGUST 2018 | VOL. 13 • ISSUE 10

AGRICULTURE IN HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY

64 PAGE 12 Jake Fitzpatrick

PAGE 38 FTFFA Hall of Fame

PAGE 16 PC Chamber Awards

PAGE 42 VASP PAGE 44 Milk Vs Non-Milk

PAGE 18 Fishing Hot Spots

PAGE 46 John Dicks

PAGE 22 Rocking Chair Chatter

PAGE 48 Endangered Species

PAGE 32 Jemy Hinton PAGE35 Goumi Berry PAGE 36 Jack Payne

PAGE 56 Rainwater Harvesting

PAGE 62 Drone Czar

PAGE 63 Lunches

PAGE 66 The Field Foodies

PAGE 70 Activity

PAGE 50 VeganDelights

PAGE 71

PAGE 54 Literary Time Machine

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A Closer Look

News Briefs

Hey Readers!

Hidden somewhere in the magazine is a No Farmers, No Food logo. Hunt for the logo and once you find the hidden logo you will be eligible for a drawing to win a FREE No Farmers No Food Sticker and a FREE In The Field T-Shirt. Send us your business card or an index card with your name and telephone number, the number of the page which you found the logo and where on the page you located the logo to the address below

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InTheField® Magazine P.O. Box 5377 • Plant City, Fl. 33566-0042 *Winners will be notified by phone. You Too Can Be A Winner!

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Hillsborough County Farm Bureau 305 S. Wheeler St. Plant City, FL. Office Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Insurance Services: 813-685-5673 Member Services: 813-685-9121

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Kenneth Parker....................President

Dennis Carlton Jr................Vice President

Michelle Williamson..............Treasurer Buddy Coleman..................Secretary DIRECTORS FOR 2017 - 2018

Jake Cremer, Tiffany Dale, Carson Futch, Jim Frankowiak, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Tony Lopez, Rep. Jake Raburn, Emeritus, Sambahv, Marty Tanner, Vincent Tort, Carl Bauman, Will Womack , Melissa Grimes.

Judi Whitson, Executive Director 813-685-9121 Farm Bureau Insurance Special Agents

Valrico Office 813-685-5673

100 S. Mulrennan Rd., Valrico, FL. 33594 Tommy Hale, CLU, ChFC, CASL, CPCU Agency Mgr. Juile Carlson, John McGuire

Plant City Office 813.752.5577

305 S. Wheeler St., Plant City, FL 33563 Jeff Summer Bill Williams

Tampa Office 813.933.5440

6535 Gunn Highway, Tampa, FL.33625 Greg Harrell, Sonia Valladares

AGENCY MANAGER Tommy Hale WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


ININTTHE FFIELD HE IELDM MAGAZINE AGAZINE

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STAFF Publisher/Photography Karen Berry Senior Managing Editor/ Associate Publisher Sarah Holt Editor-In-Chief Al Berry Editor Patsy Berry

Letter from the Editor It is back to school time! Be on the lookout for children walking, biking and boarding buses. Crossing guards will frequently stop traffic, but every corner doesn’t have a guard, so be on the lookout so children arrive safe and sound. A new school year means a new beginning for many. It could mean a new teacher, a new school, new classmates, and hopefully memories that will be cherished and friends made that will last a lifetime. This August in Florida the heat isn’t just about the temperature outside. It is a big election year and the primary is August 28. Whoever you are for, no matter your political preference, do your homework, find the candidates with values you appreciate. Ensure they are an advocate for agriculture and go vote. Don’t think, “This is just the primary why should I vote?” It’s important to get the best candidates for the general election in November. You will read in this month’s magazine of the importance of agriculture and the impact it has locally. We have the freshest food source at our fingertips thanks to the hard work of our farmers and ranchers. We need to do our best to keep it that way. Until Next Month

Sarah Holt

The LORD make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you. - Numbers 6:25

Sales Melissa Nichols Chandler Workman Karen Berry Sarah Holt Creative Director/Illustrator Juan Alvarez Photography Karen Berry Staff Writers Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Breanne Williams Contributing Writers Woody Gore John Dicks

In The Field Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Hillsborough County businesses, restaurants, and many local venues. It is also distributed by U.S. mail to a target market, which includes all of the Greenbelt Property owners, members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and Strawberry Grower’s Association. Letters, comments and questions can be sent to P.O. Box 5377, Plant City, Florida 33563-0042 or you are welcome to email them to: info@inthefieldmagazine.com or call 813-759-6909 Advertisers warrant & represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. In The Field Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Berry Publications, Inc. Any use or duplication of material used in In the Field magazine is prohibited without written consent from Berry Publications, Inc.

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Published by Berry Publications, Inc.

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CANDIDATES WE HOPE YOU WILL SUPPORT HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY

- Kenneth Parker - President

Dear Readers: Last month I encouraged you to take the time to learn about the men and women who are pursuing public office at the local, county, state and federal levels. Once you have reviewed their backgrounds and positions on issues of importance, I’m hoping you will vote for them and, if possible, support their candidacies through financial assistance and/or volunteerism. Part of our mission at Hillsborough County Farm Bureau is to do just that. We foster personal meetings with candidates and through our political action committee provide financial support. Many of our directors and members assist these candidates as they seek public office financially and through volunteer help while they are on the campaign trail. Collectively we have the wherewithal to make an impact on every election. Supporting and promoting good, quality leaders who will help strengthen and grow Florida agriculture is a priority for our organization and our member families. These are the candidates that our board and PAC is supporting, and we ask that you give them your consideration and support, as well, in the upcoming primary election: • Adam Putnam for Governor • Ashley Moody for Attorney General • Denise Grimsley for Commissioner of Agriculture • State Senator Dana Young

• State Representative James “J.W.” Grant • State Representative Jackie Toledo • Sean McCoy, candidate for State House District 57 Making informed decisions about these candidates is important to you and your family, as well as our industry. If you have any questions about candidates, please do not hesitate to contact Florida Farm Bureau’s State Legislative Affairs office in Tallahassee at 850-222-2557. Your actions in support of these candidates will help the “Voice of Florida Agriculture” to be heard during this election season. If your family does not belong to Farm Bureau, please consider joining so you can help make our voice that much louder. Please remember you don’t have to be a farmer or rancher to join. For more information, visit: hcfarmbureau.org, call us at 813-685-9121. Thank you.

Kenneth Parker Kenneth Parker - President

305 SOUTH WHEELER STREET • PLANT CITY, FL 33566 • 813-685-9121 Board of Directors

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Kenneth Parker, President; Dennis Carlton, Jr. , Vice-President; Michelle WIlliamson Treasurer; Buddy Coleman, Secretary; Will Womack Member-at-large, Carl Bauman, Jake Cremer, Tiffany Dale, Carson Futch, Melissa Grimes, Jim Frankowiak, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Tony Lopez, Lawrence McClure, Jake Raburn, Member Emeritus, Sambahv, Marty Tanner, Vincent Tort Judi Whitson, Executive Director

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Jake Fitzpatrick FLORIDA FFA AREA V STATE VICE PRESIDENT By Jake Fitzpatrick My FFA career began almost reluctantly in the 6th grade. I walked into Barrington Middle School with my heart set on joining the band program, but once I participated in the elective wheel I soon learned that my lack of musical ability would put a very quick end to my dreams of becoming a band superstar. Just when all seemed lost, I found my new home in Mr. Greg Lehman’s agriculture foundations class where I soon held my first officer position as the Barrington FFA Sentinel. This gave me the opportunity to attend the State FFA Convention where I had my first experience watching the state officer team. I was immediately awe inspired by these young leaders who seemed to be so confident and full of wisdom, and I knew from that moment that I wanted to one day be like them.

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The process of becoming a Florida FFA state officer is one of the most thorough and rigorous of its kind in the nation. Initially a prospective candidate must make it through a difficult two-day interview process designed to narrow down the pool of candidates from 30+ to 14, who are then voted on in an election by delegates sent from each school during the state FFA convention. The process was extremely long winded and stress inducing, but the preparation and self-reflection necessary to advance past the interview phase has transformed me into the person I am today, and for that I owe this organization a debt of gratitude. Perhaps the greatest advice I can give to a student interested in undertaking the daunting task of running for state office is to not let the nervousness and fear act as a deterrent of action, but as a motivation for preparation. Following the announcement of the state officer team, my new teammates and I were given a week to catch up on sleep and allow the realization to sink in before meeting at the Florida FFA Association Headquarters in Gainesville for orientation and our first level of training known as “Blast Off.” This was a weeklong process geared towards getting the team acquainted with one another with lessons on self-discovery, teamwork, and the importance of diversity. We had the privilege of being instructed by our new friend and state office mentor Brittaney Hudson, former Colorado state officer and Washington Leadership Conference facilitator. Once the

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week was over, we once again parted ways to head home to rest up before our next trip. The following week the team and I reunited in Gainesville and loaded up in the team van for a seven-hour drive to Wilmington, North Carolina for our first road trip and second training known as “Checkpoint 1.” This training was entirely based upon team dynamics and workshop facilitation, a topic I found extremely intriguing, as one of the biggest duties of state officers is creating and hosting workshops for students and FFA members around the state with the hope of teaching them something about themselves or the agriculture industry. For this training we were joined by the North and South Carolina state officer teams, two groups of strangers who I now consider to be close friends. If I had to choose one aspect of state office that I enjoy the most, it would certainly be the connections you are able to create with such amazing people. The conference only lasted a week, but I am positive the friendships and connections made in Wilmington will last a lifetime. Our final experience in July was attending the inaugural State Officer Summit alongside the state officers from all 50 states (as well as Puerto Rico) in our nation’s capital. We heard from the US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, explored the idea of advocacy, and discussed important legislation that will impact the future of agriculture education with our honorable congressmen. Over the course of the week, state officers from around the country came together to complete over 200 scheduled congressional visits to advocate for the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, as well as the modernization of the National FFA Charter, both of which will be key in setting the stage for the agricultural innovation of the 21st century. It truly is an honor to be a part of such an amazing industry, and I have every intention of using this year of service as a way to give back to the organization that has gifted me with the experience of a lifetime. To all my friends, family, and fellow FFA members back home, each of you are the reason I am here today, I promise not to let you down. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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WE’VE MOVED. COME VISIT US. Our new Plant City address is:

2504 Walden Woods Dr., Ste 2 Plant City, FL 33566 (past the post office on the left)

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P: 813-754-8507 • 800-962-4999 www.siegers.com

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a12% patronage would reduce

2018 Plant City Chamber Agriculture Awards

the rate of interest to 3.96%.

Ask your Farm Credit loan officer about the details of a patronage refund and our diverse loan products.

Luncheon sponsored by:

866.245.3637 | FarmCreditCFL.com Ray was inducted into Kathleen Sr. High Hall of Fame and the Florida FFA Hall of Fame. He proudly holds the coveted Honorary State and American FFA Currently heliving operates Loans forDegrees. land, homes & country a cow/calf operation and enjoys spending time with family and friends and being involved at his church. Ray is still very involved with the FFA in Hillsborough and Polk County and throughout the state and lives his life daily holding to the truth that “God has really blessed me over the years and still continues to today!

Jake Raburn

Young Agriculturist of the Year Jake Raburn was born and raised in Plant City. After graduating from Plant City High School in 2003, he attended the University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences where he earned a degree in Agricultural Education and Communication with minors in Food & Resource Economics and Agricultural Law.

“God has really blessed me over the years and still continues to today!

Ray Clark

Supporter of Youth in Agriculture Ray Clark was born in downtown Plant City. He grew up on a farm and his family grew citrus bell pepper, strawberries and raised cattle. He was very involved in 4-H and FFA from an early age. He attended Kathleen Sr. High and went on to Polk Junior College before graduating from the University of Florida with a BS in agriculture. He earned a Masters Degree in Administration from the University of Tampa. Ray is married to Phyllis Clark and they have a daughter, Sylvia, and a son, Jeremy. Jeremy and his wife Angie have blessed Ray and Phyllis with three grandchildren, Cody, Maggie and Kaydee. All three have been or are currently involved with the FFA at Kathleen Sr. High. Cody is currently at the University of Florida, following in his granddad’s footsteps. Mr. Clark proudly served his country through the National Guard for six years in Lakeland and four years in Plant City. Ray started teaching at Plant City High in 1972, the very first year the new school opened. He had 36 wonderful years at Plant City High School.

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He has been actively involved with the Strawberry Festival Steer Show since its beginning in 1972 and the Swine Show, since its beginning in 1982. He serves on the Florida Strawberry Festival Steer and Swine committees and also serves on the Florida State Fair Steer committee. He proudly sits on the State FFA Foundation Board and continues to be a huge promoter and supporter of the organization. He also served as a past President of the Hillsborough County Ag Teachers. He recently was Polk County Cattlemen’s Association President and has served as the Polk County Cattlemen’s State Director. Ray is currently is serving as the PCCA Vice President.

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After graduation, Jake was hired as a marketing coordinator at the Florida Department of Citrus. As a part of the marketing team at the Department of Citrus he managed web projects and assisted in industry relations. Two years later Jake had the opportunity to join his wife Melissa’s family business at Hinton Farms where he has worked for nine years and currently serves as Director of Marketing. In 2012, while serving on the Florida Farm Bureau Young Farmer & Rancher Leadership Committee, Jake decided to run for office and was elected to represent the people of Southeast Hillsborough County in the Florida House of Representatives. While serving for three terms in the Florida House, he has held several leadership positions. He served as Vice-Chairman of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Vice-Chairman of Higher Education and Workforce, Vice-Chairman of Education Appropriations, Chairman of PreK-12 Quality Education, Chairman of the Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation and Deputy Majority Whip. For his work in agricultural policy, Jake has been recognized by several agricultural organizations. He was awarded “Legislator of the Year” awards from Florida Farm Bureau, Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association, Florida Nursery Growers and Landscapers Association and the Florida Forestry Association. In 2013 he was recognized as one of the University of Florida’s “Top 20 under 30” Alumni. In 2014, he was awarded the University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences’ Outstanding Young Alumni Award. In 2015 he received the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences “Legislative Leader Award.” Jake has also been recognized as a Florida Farm Bureau “Champion for Agriculture” for the past six years. In addition to his legislative service, Jake has served on the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors, the UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Advisory Council, the University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Alumni Board, the State of Florida Higher Education Coordinating Council, the Florida High School Athletic Association Public Liaison Advisory Committee, and the Straz Center for the Performing Arts Board of Trustees. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


his greatest influences were his dad Tommy Gillman, neighbor and friend Gene Roach, and 103 year old grandfather, JL “Poppa Buddy” Gillman. These men advised and helped him as he navigated the changing agricultural industry. Lee and Dixie appreciate their families, many agricultural teachers, and “farming friends” who have encouraged and assisted them.

Jake and his Wife Melissa live on their farm in Lithia with their four children; Jackson (7), Mason (4), Clayton (4) and Leah (2). Their children are 8th generation Floridians.

Lee and Dixie Gilman

2018 Agriculturist of the Year Award Recipients

The Plant City Agriculturalist of the Year award has been presented each year since 1986 to those involved in production agriculture, have a history of industry achievement, and an exceptional record of service to the community. The 2018 winners, Lee and Dixie Gillman, meet all the requirements and have worked with dedication to each other, their family, their faith, and friends to realize success. Lee was raised in Dover and Dixie in Pinecrest. They were introduced by mutual friends in 1994 and married in 1995. Lee was already growing strawberries and other crops. He began farming for himself in 1986. He currently owns and manages 40 acres of strawberries and has a small cattle operation. Dixie began to manage the farm bookkeeping in 2004. She often works in the packing shed during berry season, does the company payroll, and especially enjoys helping with the cattle operation. They began marketing through Wish Farms about three years ago because of the company’s broad customer base, especially the local shipping markets, also, Wish features advanced product traceability and has a strong food safety program. Lee was influenced by a whole generation of farmers, but

The Gillmans knew farm values would be good for their children, but they were pleasantly surprised to see both boys pursue interests in the industry. Buddy works year-round with Lee and Dixie on the family farm, and has his own operation for growing and pickling cucumbers. Jarrett is currently pursuing an agribusiness degree at UF and is interning at Chemical Dynamics.

“The future looks especially challenging for beginning farmers who wish to own and manage their own farms. The cost (and availability) of good farmland, the escalating production costs, government regulations, foreign competition, and labor issues are very challenging. We foresee many potential farmers choosing to pursue other endeavors. On the positive side there is always a way for a hard worker to get ahead. We live in an area where fresh produce is popular and affordable. We believe the next generation will discover new ways to market and package products and that new technology will make producing and harvesting crops easier. One thing that won’t change is that every generation of farmer must realize that God is in control,” said The Gillman’s

Lee and Dixie Gillman have worked hard to become successful strawberry growers. Their success has led them to give back to the industry and community. It is with no hesitation that the Plant City Chamber of Commerce and the Farm Credit of Central Florida present them with the 2018 Agriculturalist of the Year Award.

Everglades Equipment Group 2018 Agribusiness of the Year

Everglades Equipment Group, a family-owned business founded in 1963 in Belle Glade, Florida, has grown to 14 locations covering south and central Florida. They have become one of the largest John Deere equipment dealers in the world by focusing on customer service, which includes involvement continues on pg. 26 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Lee and Dixie believe that it important to give back to the community and those who have helped them succeed. Lee is a board member of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association. They are also members of the Florida Cattleman’s Association. The Gillmans enjoy helping youth that show an interest in agriculture. Lee has helped local agricultural teachers lay plastic for school fields. Dixie has helped coach FFA forestry teams and led a 4-H group for several years. Both have been active in the FFA Alumni of Plant City High. They raise club calves for the Strawberry Festival and help 4-H members with steer projects through financial and hands-on assistance. They attend Bethany Baptist Church in Plant City.


Tampa Bay Fishing Report-September 2018 Capt. Woody Gore

Like other parts of the south Florida, Tampa Bay fishing also struggles through the summer, especially when water temperatures top out in the nineties. However one good thing is, the fish are still biting, but you never catch the numbers like in the spring and fall. If you’re a die-hard angler and able to withstand the heat, try fishing the stronger tides and currents. So far we’ve been catching a few fish by freelining greenbacks, threadfins, small pinfish, sardines, and shrimp in the deeper cooler water. But if it’s some real early morning excitement you’re after, try tossing artificial topwater’s around a broken bottom grass flat.

Snook During the summer snook are looking for comfortable water. So, as water temperatures rise later in day expect to find them in deeper passes, washes, around deep-water docks, and deep holes close to structure. Around Tampa Bay greenbacks are the bait of choice. Night snook fishing usually proves successful, mainly around docks and bridges, often resulting in a nice surprise when one of the big ones gets hungry. Redfish seem to be on a hit or miss schedule this year. We’re not seeing the larger schools moving around the bay. In talking with other folks about the scarcity of redfish we feel comfortable in contributing it to extreme fishing pressure. Hopefully, they show up this month, so start watching for schooling reds on grass flats with sandy potholes or along mangrove shorelines. The bait of choice is live or cut greenbacks, threadfin herring or pinfish. On the other hand, it’s hard for them to resist anything stinky on the bottom. So, toss out a piece of cut mullet, crab, threadfins, or ladyfish and put the rod in the rod-holder. Remember, using dead bait requires something most anglers never carry in their tackle box and that’s patience. Sea Trout action is showing up on the deepwater flats on strong tide days. They’re eating freelined shrimp, pinfish, and greenbacks. You might try fishing along deeper flats with good moving water. We’re catching the larger fish as they cruise early morning grass flats looking for an easy meal. Cobia seem to be fairly plentiful around the bay this summer. They

usually show up on the backs of large rays or manatees or just cruising open water. They are particularly attracted to structure, especially when it’s holding bait. They also tend to pop up at the most inconvenient time, so always keep a heavier rod rigged and ready.

Tarpon at the Skyway, Gandy and Howard Frankland bridges should still produce in the light lines, especially early mornings or nighttime. A few should still be spotted cruising the deep drops of any grass flat holding bait.

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Capt. Woody Gore (www.captainwoodygore.com)

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Mackerel, Bluefish, Snapper action are still strong with giant mackerel and blues chasing any shiny artificial lure or spoon and always taking live sardines or threadfin hearing. Just look for pods of threadfins, tie on your favorite lure or net some live bait, put out a chum bag and hold onto your rod and reel. Tie on some 60 lb. Seaguar fluorocarbon leader with a Daiichi #2 or #3 long shank hooks. Free line the baits in the current with a #3 split-shot weight on the leader. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


“Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing”

813-477-3814

Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the west central Florida areas for over fifty years; he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Multi-boat Group Charters With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Captain Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com or give me a call at 813-477-3814

Fresh from Florida Mineral for your Summer Livestock Needs:

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• An area of the brain known as the bilateral vomitation center notices when our stomach is upset and makes the final decision on barfing. • Squid is the number one pizza topping in Japan. • Coca Cola has never been patented because to do so the secret formula would have to be revealed. • Your typical hen lays 300 eggs per year. • World Wide Web is three syllables when spoken. Its abbreviation, “www,” is nine syllables. • Iceberg lettuce derived its name from the 1920s when it was shipped from California packed in ice. • Bobby Leach was the second person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel. He survived that fall but later died as a result of slipping on a piece of orange peel.

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Sponsored by:

HOPEWELL FUNERAL HOME • MEMORIAL GARDENS

www.HopewellFuneraI.com FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1971

For the life of me I could not come up with anything special to write about for this month, so I decided just to go back through my notes and see what I could find.

Bruce, I arrived home safely without incident, which was a real surprise as I have never driven a cab before and am not sure where I got it or what to do with in now that it’s in my garage.

The first one was an email from my friend Bruce Rodwell. He said he had a close friend before he moved from Clarks Summit, Pa. to Plant City that had a drinking problem. Bruce said he tried his best to get him to go to AA. Nothing seemed to work until one night his friend spent the evening with some friends and had a few cocktails.

Last week I pulled off I-4 at the Stingray Chevrolet exit. Seeing all the new cars reminded me of the old “fender skirts” that were a status symbol in high school. Going south on Park Road I stopped for the red light, and to my right was Jarrett-Scott Ford. That made me think of some other things we never hear about anymore. Like “curb feelers” and “steering knobs.” Any kid today will most likely have to find some adult over 55 to explain some of these terms.

He emailed Bruce that after that evening he has completely stopped drinking. The email read as follows: Dear Bruce, as you well know many of us at one time or another have had brushes with the authorities on our way home from an occasional social session. Last Friday I had one to many cocktails, and a couple of glasses of red wine at a small party on the west side of town with Mike Townsend who works in the same department with me at the metal shop.

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Knowing full well I may have been slightly over the limit, I did something I’ve never done before. I took a cab home. Sure enough, I passed a police roadblock but, since it was a cab, they waved it past.

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Remember “Continental kits?” They were rear bumper extenders and spare tire covers that were supposed to make any car as cool as a Lincoln Continental. The light changed and as I pulled away I thought about the “emergency brake.” No such thing any more, it’s a “parking brake.” What we called a foot feed is now called the accelerator. My dad always used the phrase “store-bought.” Never hear that any more, because everything is store bought these days. When dad used those WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


words it was bragging material to have a storebought dress or a store-bought bag of candy from McCrory’s Five and Dime in Plant City, managed by Otis Andrews. We have a couch now. What ever happened to the davenport? Now we’re going to a “luncheon.” When I was coming up we were going to lunch. Let’s close with a lesson from a great old girl. The 92-year old, petite, well-poised and proud lady, who was fully dressed each morning by eight o’clock, with her fashionably combed hair and makeup perfectly applied, even through she was legally blind, moved to a nursing home. Her husband of 70 years recently passed away, making the move necessary. After many hours of patiently waiting in the lobby of the nursing home, she smiled sweetly when told her room was ready. As she maneuvered her walker to the elevator, the nurse provided a visual description of her tiny room, including the eyelet sheets that had been hung over her window. “I love it,” she stated with the enthusiasm of an eight-year-old having just been presented with a new puppy. “Mrs. Jones, you haven’t seen the room…just wait.” “That doesn’t have anything to do with it.” She replied. “Happiness is something you decide on head of time. Whether I like my room or not doesn’t depend on how the furniture is arranged, it’s how I arrange my mind. I already decided to love it. It’s a decision I make every morning when I wake up. I have a choice; I can spend the day in bed recounting the difficulty I have with the parts of my body that no longer work, or get out of bed and be thankful for the ones that do. Each day is a gift, and as long as my eyes open I’ll focus on the new day and all the happy memories I’ve stored away just for this time in my life. You see, old age is like a bank account…you withdraw from what you’ve put in. So, my advice to you would be to deposit a lot of happiness in the bank account of memories.” As they entered her room she said to the nurse, “Thank you for your part in filling my memory bank. I am still depositing.” I hope you will remember these five simple rules to be happy: 1-Free your heart from hatred. 2-Free your mind from worries. 3-Live a simple life. 4- Give more. 5- Expect less. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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PARTS & EQUIPMENT IN STOCK AT KENNCO YEAR ROUND!!!! You know what works... and we’ve listened to you.

Kennco’s new line of Strawberry Equipment is compatible with your current equipment and proven to form rounded beds on 48” row centers, lay tight plastic and drip, resulting in the

best berries.

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Plant City strawberries are the best in the world. 24

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Call for details!

KENNCO MANUFACTURING, INC. P.O. Box 1158 | Ruskin, FL 33575 | 800-645-2591 | Fax 813-645-7801 Sales@KenncoMfg.com | www.KenncoMfg.com

Hear about specials and deliveries in your area. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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continues from pg. 17 At Durant High School, Thomas currently coaches Citrus, Creed, Nursery & Landscape and the Ornamental Horticulture Demonstration contest. He has had 19 state winners in O H Demonstration contest, one in Creed, three in Nursery and Landscape and finally won Citrus in 2016 after 19 years. Successes with these events is what keeps the excitement and passion in his heart for his students to achieve.

Bob Wells

Everglades Equipment group in each dealership’s local community. The Plant City community is very important to Everglades and they enjoy giving back to an area that gives so much to its residents. They are proud to support the local high schools and their FFA chapters, along with the Hillsborough County Fair, and any other charitable organization where they can provide equipment or support. The Everglades Plant City team maintains great relationships with their customers and the 2018 Agribusiness of the Year award would not be possible without two key players, Gary Noel and Bob Wells. Gary has been with Everglades since 2011 and was the Site Manager of the Palmetto location for six years prior to becoming the Site Manager at the Plant City location, where he provides strong leadership at the dealership. Bob has been working in the Plant City area since 1997, where he started his career as the Service Manager under different management, moved to Store Manager of then Southern Equipment in 1999, and finally in 2008 Bob felt he could make a better impact on the agricultural community as a Salesman for Everglades Equipment Group. Bob has maintained a strong commitment to the local farmers and agricultural businesses; he is a huge asset to Everglades and the Plant City Community. They are very grateful to accept the 2018 Agribusiness of the Year Award and are proud to be apart of the Plant City Community.

Thomas Sturgis

Agriculture Educator of the Year Thomas Sturgis grew up in Frostproof and was active in the Frostproof FFA chapter holding many officer positions. As an FFA member he showed heifers, steers and citrus and participated on many competing teams. He knew by the ninth grade that he wanted to be an agriculture teacher because of his teacher and mentor - Mr. Jimmy Smith. Thomas graduated high school in 1986 and attended the University of Florida.

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Thomas took a job at Van Buren Junior High (near Busch Gardens) and taught Agriculture there for four years. Finally, in 1996 there were three agriculture openings at a new high school, Durant. He quickly interviewed and was offered the job by their principal, Mr. Ron Frost. There he began his career and currently plans on finishing it in another 10 years, when his son Jackson graduates from high school.

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Thomas has also coached several state winning Proficiency Awards in everything from Sheep Production to Horse Production and just this past June had a student win the Nursery & Landscape Proficiency Award who will be competing at FFA National Convention in October. He will also accompany his state winning Nursery & Landscape team to National Convention and has already began practicing with them in preparation for the national contest. Thomas also serves on several committees. He has been on the State Fair Swine Committee since 1995, and served as Superintendent 1999-2000; he is a member of the Strawberry Festival Swine Committee; has been the Chairman of the Festival Rabbit and Poultry Committee since 2004; and he’s also a member of the Hillsborough County Fair Swine Committee. Last year, Thomas was asked to be a member of the Suncoast Credit Union Advisory Committee. Thomas is a member of the Plant City Church of God and currently resides with his family, wife – Racquel, daughter – Brenna and son Jackson). He relocated his father (Daniel) a few years ago from Frostproof to Plant City and he lives in an Assisted Living Facility near Thomas’ home.

Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce 106 North Evers Street, Plant City, FL 33563 813.754.3707 | 813.754.3707 Info@plantcity.org WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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CLASS AMBASSADOR, TIRELESS ADVOCATE, TENACIOUS JEMY HINTON: WORLD DEFENDER AND TRUE FRIEND TO ALL INVOLVED IN AGRICULTURE By Jim Frankowiak The headline pretty much says it all about Jemy Hinton in the words of Florida Strawberry Grower Association Executive Director Kenneth Parker. Jemy has retired from her position as a member of the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMP) Program. She and her team members have been under contract to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) Office of Ag Water Policy that oversees statewide Water Quality and Water Quantity BMPs. Jemy has been a member of that team since 2006. A group of Jemy’s colleagues, clients and acquaintances – all friends since that’s just the way she treats everyone and they treat Jemy– gathered for a “Girls (and Guys) Night Out” to say thanks and wish her well with future endeavors. The gathering was organized by Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Executive Director Judi Whitson and the FSGA’s Tiffany Dale, who were admonished by Jemy not to call the get-together a “retirement party.” Though ending her relationship with UF/IFAS, she is not retiring and has a number of volunteer efforts that will keep her busy, and would welcome another job “maybe” since she is now a “free agent.”

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Born in Lakeland, Jemy was the youngest of three West girls and grew up in the midst of goats, chickens rabbits and horses. “We lived near Florida Southern College and had a few farm animals at home with other animals, including horses, located at our place near Kathleen,” she said. Jemy enrolled at the University of Florida with plans of becoming a veterinarian, but that changed after meeting a Gator football player

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from Pensacola, Charles F. Hinton III, known by most as “Chip.” “We got married and had the first of our three children while we were in college,” said Jemy. “Chip continued to play football and after having our first child, I went to work at UF and pursued my AA degree.” Jemy went on to receive her Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Sciences and worked toward a Master of Environmental Education. When the Hinton family moved to Hillsborough County in 1972, Jemy took a job at the UF/IFAS Strawberry Lab in Dover as its first biologist. She later co-owned and operated a product plant nursery. After a period in North Carolina where Chip pursued a doctorate, the family again returned to Hillsborough County and Jemy joined Hillsborough County Extension as a Home Environmental Specialist, helping farmers and homeowners resolve common problems. After nine years in that position, Jemy became a 4-H Extension agent for the next four years. “During my years with Extension, it became clear to me that there was a need for a link between farmers and the various regulatory agencies,” she said. The process of working with regulatory agencies is often “complicated, difficult and even frustrating,” Jemy noted. “Plus, there’s a good deal at stake, even the future of the farmer’s operation.” When an opportunity arose for her to join the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) as an Environmental Specialist and Agricultural Liaison with the new formed Ecosystem Management Program, it was “an opportunity to serve as that link,” assisting farmers with questions and concerns they had about regulations and procedures. The opportunity in 2006 for Jemy to enhance her service to farmers led her to the BMP statewide team. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Jemy has used her knowledge of agriculture to encourage reason in the regulatory community and diminish “urban bias” that produced unanticipated impacts on agriculture through environmental regulations. Those skills and Jemy’s interrelationships have drawn a great deal of praise. “Jemy is a world class ambassador, tireless advocate, tenacious defender and most importantly a true friend to all of us involved in agriculture,” said Parker. “To my knowledge, she has never met a stranger and has absolutely no fear in using her vast network of acquaintances to solve issues for the industry that she has devoted her life’s work to. Jemy has certainly been a friend that we all owe a great debt of gratitude to for using her influence to make our corner of the world a better place.”

ery aspect of ag and with most famers in Hillsborough County, as well as across the state. Jemy was on the development team that created Ag-Venture 25-years ago,” noted Whitson in reference to the “hands-on” learning experience designed to teach 3rd grade students in Hillsborough County about the importance of agriculture and to help them develop an understanding of and appreciation for where their food comes from and the impact of agriculture on their daily lives. “Jemy has been a true friend to me, Farm Bureau and the industry.” Thank you Jemy, and the very best to you and Chip!

Carl Grooms of Fancy Farms, who attended Jemy’s “Night Out” with his wife Dee Dee, praised her “vast knowledge of everything on earth and a whole lot about agriculture. Jemy is a well-respected lady in agriculture, and she has been helpful to me and my operation,” he said. “Chip is a fine gentleman who has been a big help to the strawberry industry in the Plant City area during his tenure with the Florida Strawberry Growers Association.” The FSGA’s Marketing Director Sue Harrell hopes Jemy “will work as hard at relaxing just as she has at work during her long career that has been marked by her passion for Florida agriculture. I am proud to call her my friend and plan to reach out to her for help with FSGA projects. We will miss her sweet smile.” “Wow, what can’t you say about Jemy,” said Hillsborough County Farm Bureau’s Whitson. “She has been involved in ev-

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Florida

Goumi Berry By Sandy Sun, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science

Berry season is in full swing right now during the summer months of Florida! In addition to the popular blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries grown in Florida, goumi berries are equally delicious and nutritious, and very easy to grow. Goumi berries are delicious eaten out-of-hand when fully ripe, with both sweet and acidic notes. Before ripening, the fruit is somewhat astringent but can be made into jams, jellies, or pies. They can also be pickled. The goumi tree is extremely hardy and tolerant to frost, hot weather, drought, and salt air. Each berry is about one centimeter wide, bright red, and shaped like a grape. Peak season is during the summer months.

Nutritional Profile The goumi berry is reported to be very high in vitamins A, C, and E. These same vitamins also act as antioxidants in the body, protecting cells from oxidative stress. This berry is said to have the highest lycopene content of any food, including tomatoes! Lycopene is an antioxidant and carotenoid which may offer protection from heart disease, sun damage, cancer, and macular degeneration. It’s role in different disease states is still being studied. Some sources report that goumi berries may also cure cough and lower cholesterol.

Vitamin C Goumi berries are very rich in vitamin C, which has many important functions in the body. It plays a vital role in forming collagen, skin, blood vessels and muscles. Additionally, it helps heal wounds and keeps bones and teeth healthy. The National Institutes of Health recommends regularly consuming foods high in vitamin C content, since it is a water-soluble vitamin that is not stored in the body. You can meet your entire daily needs for vitamin C in just a couple of berries!

known antioxidants, both of which are abundant in goumi berries. Additionally, these fruit contain compounds called anthocyanins, which also have antioxidant properties. Anthocyanins may help lower the risk of heart disease, enhance memory function, protect developing fetal brain tissue, and have anti-inflammatory effects.

Potassium: For blood pressure control

Goumi berries and other berries are high in potassium, a mineral that promotes healthy heart functioning and protects against high blood pressure. Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance, aids in muscle contraction, and helps transmit nerve impulses. This mineral is also critical in maintaining cell membranes, and balances with other minerals in the blood to regulate heartbeat and blood pressure.

How to select and store Choose ripe berries that have deep red-colored skin. They should have a slight give when squeezed. Consume them as soon as possible or refrigerate for up to three days.

How to enjoy Ripe goumi berries are delicious eaten out-of-hand or squeezed into juice. They can also be stewed, or made into juice, puree, or fruit sorbet. The puree can be used as a delicious topping for cake, waffles, oatmeal, or yogurt. Goumi berries can also be tossed into any fruit or vegetable salad. Additionally, these berries may also be made into syrup, jelly, jam, and other preserves. Enjoy this beautiful, nutritious fruit during Florida’s peak season today. Eat it out of hand or combine with other fruits for a healthy treat.

Antioxidant Properties

Selected References

Goumi berries are full of health-promoting antioxidants, powerful compounds that help fight free-radical damage. Free radicals damage healthy cells, which leads to problems such as inflammation and heart disease. Vitamins C and A are well-

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GROWING LEADERS

By Jack Payne

I’ve said it time and time again – of the 300 crops we grow in Florida, perhaps the most important is leaders.

Mary Hartney and former member of the Florida House of Representatives Baxter Troutman are also alumni.

That’s why the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences invests so much in leadership training. Sometimes we sow seeds that need time before they’re ready for harvest. But in the case of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau board member Will Womack, the bloom seemed almost instantaneous.

Hannah was supposed to be in Europe during the FNGLA’s June convention. And she was. But because of Will’s gratitude for Hannah’s service, and her dedication to her crop of leaders, they agreed to delay his swearing in until she could complete a 20-hour transoceanic journey to be there.

Womack will tell you that before he entered the UF/IFAS Wedgworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources he was a hole digger, and he came out of it on a path to become president of the nation’s largest state nursery and landscape association. Much as I like to believe that Wedgworth director Hannah Carter sculpts masterpieces of leaders from her students, Womack was no lump of clay when he started the program six years ago.

Emboldened and inspired by his Wedgworth experience when he graduated, Womack accepted when the FNGLA Nomination Committee approached him to be the secretary/ treasurer nominee. His ascension to that state office put him in the rotation to become president this past June.

The atmosphere Hannah creates in the two-year Wedgworth program develops those kinds of bonds among classmates. She has a now well-honed ability to see leadership potential in ag up-and-comers and to turn their potential into achievement. Hannah’s contributions to fostering the state’s agricultural leaders are so numerous that she is the only person in the history of FNGLA who has never worked for the association yet been recognized as an honorary staff member.

Nor is Womack a fluke. Carter has trained five of the last eight presidents of the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association.

If you want to identify the future leaders of the agricultural communities in Hillsborough and Polk counties are, look for locals on the roster of names on the Wedgworth Leadership Institute website.

Will says he simply wouldn’t be president without having gone through Wedgworth.

Carter has already identified them, sometimes, as in Womack’s case, even before they identified themselves as leaders.

It did three things for him. It equipped him with tools to sharpen his skills in communications, problem-solving, and decision-making. It gave him the confidence to handle the responsibilities of leadership. And it plugged him into a network of alumni -- a who’s who in Florida production agriculture.

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For example, John Bertram of Lykes Brothers and Sambhav of Driscoll’s graduated from the program just last month (July). Hillsborough County Farm Bureau board member Tony Lopez, Florida Fertilizer and Agrichemical Association President

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Jack Payne is the University of Florida’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources and leader of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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TROPICAL AQUACULTURE LAB DIRECTOR INDUCTED INTO FLORIDA TROPICAL FISH FARMS ASSOCIATION HALL FO FAME By Jim Frankowiak

Craig Watson, director of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/ IFAS) Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory (TAL) at Ruskin, has been inducted into the Florida Tropical Fish Farms Association’s (FTFFA) Hall of Fame. Watson is the 39th inductee into the FTFFA Hall of Fame. The FTFFA is a trade association of professional ornamental tropical fish and aquatic plant breeders. Its mission is to represent its members in governmental matters, provide a cooperative for purchasing necessary materials to produce member products and support research and development for the production of ornamental species. The association was formed in 1964 and its members represent more than 120 farms in Florida, raising a wide variety of fish, aquatic plants and assorted invertebrates. The association is governed by a 15-member board of directors.

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Watson traces his career to the age of 7 when he got his first aquarium. “My brother and I would spend hours watching the fish, but I had no idea then it would be the beginning of a career,” he

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said. While a high school student in Miami, Watson worked an after school job at a local fish farm. He paid for his undergraduate degree in biology from Florida State University (FSU) working at a tropical fish store in Tallahassee, managed the Florida Fish Co-op’s shipping department wholesaling tropical fish throughout North America for a year after graduating, then became a Peace Corps volunteer for three years at a marine hatchery in Tunisia, Africa. After returning to the U.S., Watson enrolled in the aquaculture program at Auburn University, receiving his Master’s of Aquaculture degree. He joined UF/IFAS as a multi-county aquaculture Extension agent in 1988, eventually expanding his area to include the entire state, interacting with members of the industry through on-site visits, communications outreach and a range of other services. As the UF/IFAS aquaculture programs grew in the late 1980s and beyond, the opportunity rose to create a research and Extension facility in the WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Tampa Bay region, the heart of the industry. With the help of partnerships with Hillsborough County, the FTFFA and USDA Wildlife Services, the TAL was established in 1966, as part of the UF/IFAS Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (now the School of Forest Resources and Conservation). Watson was named director, a position he continues to hold. “We (UF/IFAS) really built that facility from the ground up. And now TAL is an integral part of the aquaculture industry in the southeast United States and beyond,” Watson said. “From our onsite veterinarian and disease diagnostic lab, to research on nuisance invasive species, to innovations in captive breeding for species like the blue tang, TAL is at the forefront of research and agriculture in the region.” TAL now consists of a 6.5-acre fish farm with 48-ponds, five greenhouses and lab space for UF researchers. Partly through Watson’s efforts, Hillsborough Community College (HCC) has instituted an Aquaculture Associate’s degree program in which he serves as a key advisor. HCC and UF have partnered in the construction of a greenhouse where HCC students have added practical proficiency and hands-on experiences. At the FTFFA Hall of Fame induction ceremony, Watson was recognized for spending “over 30 years in service to U.S. aquaculture’s development and success. Craig’s work ethic and integrity are inspirational. Craig has an effervescent, positive attitude, great vision, and a team-oriented, and holistic approach to challenges and opportunity. He is selfless and continually motivated to do all he can, above-and-beyond if necessary, to promote and support farmers.” “While I have been fortunate to receive other honors, this is the biggest of my life,” said Watson. “This job has been a total pleasure from the very beginning. The people who’ve received this honor over the years are my heroes,” he said. “For FTFFA to recognize me and put me in that group of amazing people in their industry is very special.” Watson’s volunteer service includes a director position with the Florida Aquaculture Association, the National Aquaculture Association and the Florida Aquarium. Other committee activities include the USDA Southern Regional Aquaculture Center’s Technical Advisory Committee, Florida Farm Bureau’s Aquaculture Advisory Committee and Associate Editor for the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society. Watson has been married for four years to his wife Pattie, and he has two children: Adam, 22; and Erin, 24. His interests and hobbies include fishing, hunting and boat building. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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AIR FORCE VETERAN PURSUES AG CAREER VIA VASP By Jim Frankowiak

Ian Gaines is the latest participant in the Veteran Agriculture Selection Program (VASP), seeking “to bring purpose and meaning to my life.” A U.S. Air Force veteran, Gaines was born in Minot, North Dakota, grew up in Atlanta and moved to New York City before beginning his military career as an Air Force reservist. VASP is a paid internship supported by the University of Florida (UF) that provides hands-on learning and training experiences for veterans so they can transition into a rewarding career in agriculture. During the program, Gaines will be introduced to various modern crop production practices, while enrolled in a UF Certificate Program and explore career opportunities within the Florida agriculture industry. The first nine months of his internship, Gaines will spend four to six weeks on rotation with staff and faculty at the UF Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC) to assist with activities related to basic plant production and industry challenges. He will also meet with a VASP mentoring committee to seek guidance and provide feedback. After completion of the initial nine-months of the program, Gaines will transition to a three-month paid internship with a local farm or agribusiness to use his skills and experience and potentially decide upon a permanent position with the Florida agribusiness community. Though raised “in the city” Gaines and his brothers and sisters “gained an appreciation for the history and an understanding of agriculture and its importance from our grandparents who had been sharecroppers in southern Georgia,” said Gaines. His grandfather, Jack Jenkins, was from Madison, Georgia, while his late grandmother, Sarah, was born and raised in Americus, Georgia. Agriculture had them follow crops as far north as Connecticut each year.

“While we did grow up in Atlanta, we had a backyard garden of fruits and vegetables which helped to feed our family,” said Gaines.

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After high school, Gaines decided to join the Air Force Reserves. His enlistment took place just a week before “9/11” with his reserve unit mobilized immediately after that event. “My father urged that I learn a trade so I pursued

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the opportunity to become an aircraft mechanic,” he said. Gaines specialized in the hydraulic systems associated with the huge C-5 transport aircraft and spent eight of his 12 years in the Air Force intermittently overseas. He rose to the rank of E-6 and was also a flying crew chief. While serving in the Air Force, Gaines earned an associate’s degree in Aviation Technology from the Community College of the Air Force, an undergraduate degree in philosophy from American Military University and a Master’s Degree in Leadership and Management from Embry Riddle University. In 2014 Gaines decided not to re-enlist in the Air Force. Following his separation he worked for the U.S. Postal Service and at Busch Gardens and Universal Studios, applying his hydraulic systems knowledge to the maintenance and repair of rides at the theme parks. He and his daughter Mya, 12, are Westchase residents and she is enrolled at St. Peter Claver Elementary School in Tampa. “While those positions were fine, I sought greater purpose and meaning for my life,” said Gaines. “My time and travels in the Air Force showed me how we impacted the lives and cultures of people throughout the world. I want to do more to influence others not just through the maintenance and repair of theme park rides,” he said. Gaines became aware of VASP through a visit to the Hillsborough County Veterans Affairs office in Tampa and was put into contact with Simon Bollin, Hillsborough County’s Agribusiness Development Manager, who has been closely associated with the program since its inception. Though new to VASP, Gaines has already been exposed to the growing role of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in agriculture and enthusiastically sees a possible link to his skills and drones and how their use benefits precision agriculture. Thank you for your service Ian, and best of luck as you pursue your next career step in agriculture. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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MILK V. NON-MILK OPTIONS – The Importance of the Facts By Jim Frankowiak

You have undoubtedly noticed the expansion of what used to be the dairy products section at your local supermarket. What was once devoted solely to products from cows is now home to those same products and a lot more. Coupled with those new varieties of beverages is some heavy marketing that’s done more to confuse shoppers interested in buying what’s right for their family than anything else. That bevy of products and related confusion made it attractive to the Plant City Noon Rotary Club to accept a suggestion from one of its members for a presentation at its late July meeting by two speakers able to clarify exactly what’s going on at supermarkets and the milk versus non-milk option. Those speakers were Dale McClellan and his daughterin-law Andrea McClellan. He is owner of M&B Products and M&B Dairy, while she is the general manager of the plant where water, dairy drinks, fruit juices and American yogurt are processed and packaged. M&B supplies many of the beverages consumed at schools and institutions throughout Florida and southeastern U.S. A lifelong dairyman, McClellan’s M&B Dairy is home to some 700 cows in Lecanto. In anticipation of the Rotary Club meeting and presentation, Andrea visited her local Publix supermarket and purchased half-gallon containers of four milk products and three aptly named “nut juices.” The milk products included whole milk, 1 % milk, organic milk and lactosefree milk, while Silk Soy, Silk Almond and Elmhurst Almonds were the other items studied

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The initial element in her study was pricing with half gallon and per serving costs as follows: Whole Milk - $2.65/.33; 1 % Milk - $2.65/33; 1% Lactose Free Milk - $4.49/.56; 2% Organic Milk - $4.49/. 56; Silk Soy $3.28/.41; Silk Almond - $3.28/.41 and Elmhurst Al-

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monds - $1.00 per serving and it is only available in quarts at $3.99 each. “Whole and 1% milk are the most affordable options,” said Andrea. “The savings on real traditional milk is much better if purchased in galls, but half-gallons were chosen since the other products in the comparison aren’t available in gallons.” Visually, there’s a difference in the appearance of nonmilk products when placed alongside servings of milk. That’s a personal thing, so that judgment has to be made by individuals. That’s also true with regard to taste. “Even when you compare the taste of real mil that’s organic versus traditional locally produced and packaged milk, people mention they notice a flavor difference,” she said. “It’s not because it’s organic, it’s because it’s pasteurized differently in order to have a longer shelf life in a UHT container. It is heated to 285° instead of 175° or 180° like traditionally packaged milk.” Lactose-free milk has certain enzymes added during processing that pre-digest lactose. Another point of information from Dale and Andrea had to do with labeling. Plant codes on the carton of any of these products other than “12” mean it came from out of state. “And you have to think about the fuel and emissions associated with transporting products,” said Andrea. She noted some of those non-milk products came from farms and/or plants as far away as Colorado, California and Canada. The next part of Andrea’s study focused on ingredients and labeling. The four milk products contained cow’s milk, Vitamin A, Palmitate and Vitamin D3, in that order which means the number one and most substantial ingredient is cow’s milk, and the other are required additives. A review of the non-milk products in the comparison study all show a “deceptive (and if it were dairy, illegal) use of a non-existent word such as soymilk or WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


almond milk then followed by filtered water, as the initial and therefore greatest ingredient. Silk Soy’s ingredients included filtered water, soy beans, cane sugar and 2 % or less of vitamin and mineral blend (Tricalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D2, Riboflavin (B2), Vitamin B12, Sea Salt, and Natural Flavor Gellan Gum. Silk Almond’s ingredients included filtered water, almonds, cane sugar, 2 % or less of vitamin and mineral blend (Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin E Acetate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D2), Sea Salt, Natural Flavor, Sunflower Lecithin, Locust Bean Gum, Gellan Gum and Ascorbic Acid (To protect freshness -- In other words, as a preservative.). The Elmhurst Almond beverage contained filtered water and almonds. “These non-milk beverages have been fortified to try to match milk’s nutritional profile,” said Andrea. That’s particularly challenging since milk is the most naturally wholesome, nutritious drink that’s available. It also offers the best pure and simple nutrient value. Milk contributes more calcium, Vitamin D and potassium than any other food, she noted. Health experts note that those three nutrients are considered lacking in American diets. Overall “Milk provides a package of nine essential nutrients, including calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, riboflavin and niacin as niacin equivalents that are not easily replaced with other foods,” said Andrea. The message from Dale and Andrea about milk versus non-milk products show milk from cows is natural, affordable, nutritious and offers the best shelf life after being opened that any non-milk products. While no one can argue the importance of marketing a product or service, in this particular instance the marketing of non-milk products has done more to confuse consumers interested in buying what’s best for their families. The McClellan’s encouraged Rotarians and others to read and compare the ingredients listed on the labels of the products being considered. They also suggested visiting: FloridaMilk.com for more information. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Al Berry - A Friend Remembered

I never knew anyone who didn’t like Al Berry. That’s just the kind of guy that Al was. To meet him, was to love him. He was charming to both friends and strangers. People simply loved to chat with Al and be entertained by his seemingly endless supply of stories and anecdotes. Regular readers of this magazine might already know that Al recently passed away. Even those who personally never knew him, already miss him. Al’s magazine column was by far each month’s most popular piece that devoted followers loved to devour. Loyal fans loved reading his monthly musings of wit and wisdom in his beloved, Rocking Chair Chatter. Al, though, was very much, much more than just the prolific, witty writer. To say that Al was an integral part of the magazine would frankly be an injustice to his involvement. He was, after all, the father of the Publisher, Karen, and mentor to Sarah, the Senior Managing Editor / Associate Publisher. Lest we not think that Al Berry was slacking off in his early 80’s, I should point out, too, that he was also busy at the magazine with his responsibilities for sales and photography. He’s greatly missed by everyone at the magazine; and of course by his family, his many friends, and frankly, by any and everyone whom he ever met. That’s why I said at the beginning, “I never knew anyone who didn’t like Al Berry.” Al had a quick wit; he was a wonderful storyteller, and a masterful promoter of ideas and events for which he had a passion to share. Most people remember Al with his great radio voice and persona. He spent more than 40 years in radio broadcasting, starting when he was still in college.

Along with his good friend, and business partner, Ercelle Smith, Al became a part owner of WPLA, the radio station once located in Plant City. Together they created and hosted for years their signature talk show, This and That, which was listened to by everyone in town, or so it seemed to me as a young boy growing up and mesmerized by the power of the spoken word. Al was a master at choosing just the right words to use whether it was broadcast through the airwaves or published in print. He was a very gifted writer and knew that using the right words would weave a story into one that people longed to listen to and readers would relish. Many people, myself included, were blessed with having Al Berry, not only as a friend, but also as somewhat of a “coach” on whom we could count on. When I was Mayor and gave many speeches, Al was often present. He always listened intently and politely applauded, but I found him focused more on how I gave the presentation than he was on the subject matter itself. Al never found fault with the opinions that I shared, nor the decisions that I made. That was true even when it was on matters that we might otherwise disagree. Instead, Al cared enough to focus on the nuances of my delivery. He would constantly remind me to smile more often and to laugh at my own jokes. Like so many others within his circle of influence, Al wanted me to do well and succeed in my endeavors. We’d all do better in life with someone like Al, coaching and cheering us on. Thanks, Al Berry, for so many years of selfless service to our community and for the influence, encouragement and words of wisdom that you shared with us and cared about doing so. You’re missed already and will continue to be so.

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John Dicks is both a Lawyer and Businessman, including an interest in farming. He and his family have owned a blueberry farm and have agricultural lands which they lease for cattle operations, as John says, “to someone who knows and handles cattle much better than I do!” John is both a Gator, having received his undergraduate degree from the University of Florida, and a Seminole, with his law degree from Florida State University. He and his wife, Sharon, live in Plant City, where he served nine years as City Commissioner, including three terms as Mayor.

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E n d a n g e r e d S p e c i es PAGE

Dire Situation: Short-Leaved Rosemary By: Ginny Mink

With all the focus on essential oils, the following plant got our attention. We are not saying that it is connected to the much beloved essential oil that bears a part of its name. We are only stating that the short-leaved rosemary (Conradina brevifolia) caught our eye as it is on the endangered list for native Florida plants.

the C. brevifolia and the C. canescens are indeed the same plant. However, the writer at the Hawthorn Hill site states, “I have almost never found a short-leaved rosemary with a lower lip as richly lavender as that almost always found in its close relatives…I have grown both species for years and they are distinct.”³

Fish and Wildlife Services says it is a shrubby mint of which only five are found in the scrub of central Florida. Two counties call this petite flower home, Highlands and Polk. And, it can only be found on 30 sites which is why it is in desperate danger of extinction. There are some similarities between the short-leaved rosemary and the C. canescens found in Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida panhandle. As well as the C. glabra (another endangered species) located in the Apalachicola bluffs. But, it has more flowers and shorter leaves which helps differentiate it from these two.¹

Additionally, that writer adds that the short-leaved rosemary grows in a more sprawling way than wild rosemary which makes it less attractive. Flowers might be produced as late as early winter though they are most proliferate in the spring. Late fall rains are the determining factor behind the lengthened blooming season.³

The flowers of this endangered native plant are typically white with a lower lip that is speckled purple. They cannot handle shade or having their soil disturbed. This makes them particularly susceptible to harm when people begin to develop the areas they call home. The white sands of pine-oak scrub seem to be their preferred place of habitation.²

The Fish and Wildlife Services’ site reveals that they are uncertain as to the process of reproduction in the short-leaved rosemary. But, because it is dependent upon fire-necessary scrub habitats, they believe that it will either sprout after a good fire, or will “recruit from seed that is stored in the sand.” However, there is some research that suggests it doesn’t do well when defoliated, clipped, or burned. This leads them to believe that “sprouting and other forms of asexual reproduction are unlikely.” Of course, that means it is even more challenging to encourage continual growth and protect this species. ¹

Hawthorn Hill Wildflowers brings up an important issue. There are some taxonomists who have decided that

The numbers revealed by Nature Serve illuminate just how dire the situation is for this endemic Florida

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species. Apparently, 10 of the 30 occurrences are all housed within a five square mile space. And, most of the populations that have been observed and recorded have less than 25 plants within them. To make that all the more dire, 25 of the 30 sites are potentially going to be developed and the habitat converted.²

In fact, the Fish and Wildlife Services specifically recommends, “In order to effectively conserve C. brevifolia… management of protected lands must restore and maintain scrub communities…If adequate fire management programs are developed for protected lands, C. brevifolia is likely to persist in the wild.”¹

Additionally, that same site reveals that in the shortterm they expect a 10-50% decline in the population. But, the long-term looks more like 30-50%! The destruction and conversion of the short-leaved rosemary’s habitat has been consistently going on since 1980. And, it achieved a threatened or endangered status as long ago as 1991.²

There is the potential for these plants to be introduced into suitable, yet currently unoccupied, habitats. The research provided did not, however, suggest that this was something scientists and conservationists had already attempted to do. So, what is our job? Like we say in almost every one of these articles, we are put here by God to be good stewards of His land. Thusly, our job is to protect plants and animals that are in danger of extinction. Contact your local Ag extension office and see what they know about how you can help ensure the short-leaved rosemary remains.

To give more insult to injury, the Fish and Wildlife Service states that, “Overall, scrub habitat has declined in total area from an estimated 32,000 ha prior to human settlement to about 11,000 ha.” By 1981 roughly 74% of the scrub habitat in Highlands County was lost. Certainly that loss is much greater at this point. Sadder still, is the fact that, “Upon completion of land acquisition efforts, C. brevifolia will probably only be protected at five of the 30 scrub sites where it is currently found.”¹ Periodic and high intensity fires are absolutely necessary for the protection and preservation of this plant. These fires are only required every 15 to 20 years, but the suppression of the fires has contributed to the loss of these cute plants that can grow up to three feet tall.

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Resources: ¹https://www.fws.gov/verobeach/MSRPPDFs/ShortLeaved. PDF ²http://explorer.natureserve.org/servlet/NatureServe?searchN ame=Conradina+brevifolia ³http://hawthornhillwildflowers.blogspot.com/2009/10/shortleaved-rosemary-conradina.html Photo Credits (note these images are of common rosemary): Sara Stasi. Rosemary (2008). Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/4uboCo) Kristopher_Fitters Hamilton. Wild Rosemary (2007). Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/CPYBP) Cynthia Cheney. Rosemary in bloom (2011). Flickr (https://flic. kr/p/9sGjPa).


Vegan Delights

By Libby Hopkins

“The Farmacy differentiates itself from other plant based concepts in that we specialize in classic back-yard comfort fare” There is one simple rule to follow when you’re trying to eat healthy and that is if it came from a plant, eat it. If it was made in a plant, don’t. Charles Rumph and his best friend, Timothy Fedorko would agree with this theory. They are the owners of The Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery in Tampa and they believe in eating clean and healthy. “I came from a sales background,” Rumph said. “Tim was a chef for a couple of different concepts, most notably P.F. Changs. Tim and I became interested in veganism around the same time, albeit for different reasons. Ultimately, we both felt strongly that veganism was a wholly positive movement and worth pursuing personally and professionally.” Not long after, Rumph quit his job in sales and joined Fedorko in Tampa to try their luck in the restaurant business. “That luck was not so good the first time around, and we lost everything without our concept ever seeing the light of day,” Rumph said. “Strangely, that twist of bad luck may have set us up for the bigger win, as our next concept would be The Farmacy,” which they are very proud of and for good reason.

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The Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery is a quick service restaurant offering a well rounded, 100 percent plant-based menu. Patrons may choose from a wide

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variety of made to order acai bowls, smoothies and wraps. Baked daily are a rotating assortment of both clean and more delectable baked goods. Available hot or for re-heat are several comfort favorites ranging from Shepard’s pie to mac and cashew cheese, as well as staple soups. Through creative culinary approaches, their chefs have found a way to create familiar and contemporary dishes that are both delicious and completely free of meat or dairy. Gluten free options are available as well. “The Farmacy differentiates itself from other plant based concepts in that we specialize in classic back-yard comfort fare,” Rumph said. “Burgers and Philly cheesesteaks, donuts and other familiar items that make the whole notion of eating vegan less scary for newcomers and nostalgic for more established vegans. Our customers have responded with rave reviews and appreciation.” Their food seems to have largely done what they intended, and their customers have thanked them for giving them what they craved or never thought would be possible. For those of you who are wondering what the difference is between vegetarian and vegan, a vegan removes all animal products from their diet, including dairy. Those who are following a vegan lifestyle generally do not wear leather and avoid products made from animals WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


such as wool, silk and down. Vegans’ tremendous humanity for animals is steadfast, prime conviction in their lives. Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish or poultry, but might eat eggs, or dairy products such as cheese, yogurt or milk. There are many health benefits to eating a vegan diet as well. Vegan diets can reduced the risk of hypertension, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, bronchial asthma, and Parkinson’s disease. It also helps in improving bone health, cardiovascular health, reducing obesity and has anti-aging properties. It also helps in maintaining lower levels of homocysteine and keeps the body revitalized. “We envision The Farmacy being one of the first mass market vegan restaurants,” Rumph said. “The kind of company that grows in such a way

that no matter what major city you are in, you’ll be able to get a satisfying, plant-based meal.” Rumph and Fedorko are both strong supporters of keeping things local and sourcing local food to use as the ingredients in their vegan delights offered at The Farmacy. “Local business is very important to us, particularly given Tampa’s tourism being largely seasonal,” Rumph said. “Our produce is almost all from suppliers within the state. We use a small outfit out of Miami for coconuts. Albert’s organics, who is our primary producer supplier, operates farms throughout Florida. The Sourdough from our beloved California Cuban sandwich comes from a most wonderful bakery just down the road at Gulf Coast Bakery.”

If you would like to learn more about The Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery, you can visit their website at www.farmacyvegankitchen.com or call 786-681-1644. The Farmacy Vegan Kitchen and Bakery is located at

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s e p i c e R

Courtesy of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Chef Justin Timineri

Florida Citrus Tea

Florida Mango Upside Down Cupcake q Ingredients q

2 cups Florida mango, diced small ½ cup light brown sugar 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup whipped cream (store bought or homemade) Fresh mint, for garnish (optional) 1 cake mix (store bought or homemade)

INGREDIENTS 1 cup Florida orange juice 1 Florida orange, cut into rounds 1 Florida grapefruit, cut into rounds (optional) 1 lime, cut into rounds 1 gallon sweet tea, home made or store bought

DIRECTIONS Combine all of the ingredients and store in the refrigerator. Serve over ice.

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 375 degrees if using the homemade recipe (if using store bought, follow package instructions). Prepare cupcake batter using box mix or homemade recipe provided. Once the batter is prepared, place cupcake liners in the cupcake pan and set aside. In a small sauce pan over low heat combine the brown sugar, butter, vanilla and mix until smooth. Add the diced mangos and stir to combine. Remove from heat and

allow to cool for 5-10 minutes. Once cool, add a tablespoon of mango mixture to each cupcake liner. Using an ice cream scoop, evenly divide the batter into the liners (about 2/3 full) do not overfill. Bake for about 16-18 minutes (if using the scratch made recipe) or until a toothpick comes out clean when inserted. Set aside to cool completely. Top with whipped cream and mint sprig, if desired.

Homemade Cupcake Batter q Ingredients q

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1 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour 1 cup Florida cane sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 2 large eggs ½ cup milk 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon salt

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DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place the cupcake liners in the cupcake pan and set aside. To prepare the batter sift all the dry ingredients in a medium-size bowl. Mix in the softened butter until it looks crumbly (the butter does not have to be fully incorporated). In a separate bowl, whisk the wet ingredients together and add this mixture to the dry ingredients, stirring to combine. Using an ice cream scoop, evenly divide the batter into the liners (about 2/3 full) do not overfill. Bake for about 16-18 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean when inserted. Cool completely before frosting. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Part 47 By Ginny Mink

Ornamental Gardening in Florida When last we ventured on our literary time machine we were focusing on exotic conifers. We move now on to exotic shrubs. We love the ability to look back in time and revisit the advice from Mr. Charles Torrey Simpson as he penned it in his 1926 book. Antique books hold a special place in our heart and time travel is always exciting and educational. The first exotic shrub that stands out in Mr. Simpson’s writings is the Ardisia crenulata. He writes it, “…is a fine shrub, probably from India, with thick, lance-ovate, wavy, margined leaves. It has drooping panicles of small sweet flowers followed by beautiful, coral red berries which last a long time. It is somewhat tender and does better in partial shade. There is a white fruited form. A. polycephala, a handsome shrub of stronger growth than crenulata the young leaves being wine colored and the fruit shining black.”¹ Initially we envisioned something similar to the holly tree, mostly due to the red berries. Of course, further research revealed that according to IFAS, it is now called the A. crenata, or Coral Ardisia, and is often referred to as the Christmas berry. So, we weren’t too far off in our initial visualization. Though Mr. Simpson wasn’t certain of its origin, IFAS states that its native range includes northern India and areas of Japan. One piece of interest is, “Ardisia escaped cultivation in 1982, spreading into wooded areas.” It’s possible then that this is a runaway shrub (or invasive species) and it is established in many areas of north and central Florida.² Mr. Simpson moves on to discuss the Aucuba japonica variegata. He explains, “This beautiful shrub has repeatedly and completely failed for me but I should think it might be grown in half shaded situations up the state.”¹ When reading his words here one can almost feel the disappointment in his tone. Which of course makes us wonder what’s so beautiful about this particular shrub since he was willing to try multiple times to get it to grow?

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A visit to Dave’s Garden gave us a little insight. Apparently, this is also known as the Gold Dust Plant or the Japanese Laurel. Though there are a number of pictures on this site, we don’t see Mr. Simpson’s excitement. The leaves are kind of spiky and speckled. It, too, has red berries. The most interesting part of this particular plant is that it blooms with a tiny purple flower. We happen to like purple so that’s a win for it. But, we did discover that it grows best in zones 6-10 and since Florida is zones 8a-11a, it’s easy to see why his attempts were futile.³ While that was a disappointment for us as well, imagine our thrill when we discovered another plant with purple flowers, the azalea, on his list. He writes, “By one of the tricks of the systematists this well known and loved genus has been placed in Rhododendron. A. indica with its varieties which is extensively cultivated in greenhouses in the north does very

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well in the northern part of our state. The plants should be grown in partial shade and if the soil is not rich leaf mold and peat mixed in will be found beneficial…none of them do well in the more tropical part of Florida.”¹ We never really considered our area northern Florida, but we are certain that azaleas do well here. Unfortunately, we have also discovered that they do not do well in the unshaded swampy area in which we live. But, this makes us wonder if some leaf mold and peat mix would have been useful for sustaining these gorgeous shrubs. Of course, that requires us to understand what leaf mold is. For help with that concept we visited Fine Gardening’s website. In an article entitled, “Making Leaf Mold,” by Lee Reich, the concept became clear. Leaf mold is apparently nothing more than composted leaves. Reich writes, “Although not particularly rich in nutrients itself, when incorporated into the soil, this organic amendment physically alters the soil so that it becomes spongier, holding both moisture and air – a heavenly environment to plant roots.”⁴ Reich also suggests that when it is used on the surface it helps the soil keep an even temperature, allows water to penetrate more readily, and slows the evaporation process. We know lots of people use compost to grow healthier gardens, but we would have never thought to call that leaf mold. It sounds more like a disease you don’t want your plants to get. Yet, now that we know what it is we are not at all surprised by Mr. Simpson’s recommendation. So, if you are planning on planting some azaleas, or perhaps some Coral Ardisia, don’t forget the leaf mold. Just don’t waste your time on the Gold Dust Plant. Until next time, happy gardening! Resources: ¹ Simpson, Charles T. (1926). Ornamental Gardening in Florida. Published by the Author; Little River, FL. Printed by J.J. Little and Ives Company, New York. (p. 165-166). ²Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants. UF/IFAS. Coral ardisia. https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/ardisia-crenata/ ³Dave’s Garden. (2005). Gold Dust Plant, Variegated Japanese Aucuba, Japanese Laurel ‘Variegata’ (Aucuba japonica). https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/93691/ ⁴Reich, L. (2017). Making Leaf Mold. Fine Gardening. https:// www.finegardening.com/article/making-leaf-mold Photo Credits: Bernard Spragg. NZ.(2008). Aucuba Japonica. Flickr (https:// flic.kr/p/dhJ7T6) Slgckgc. (2009). Azalea Close-up. Flickr (https://flic.kr/ p/6rwSAR) T-mizo. (2011). Coral Bush (Matsudo, Chiba, Japan). Flickr (https://flic.kr/p/b34eC2) WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Rainwater Harvesting – Now’s a Good Time!

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Lynn Barber, Florida-Friendly Landscaping Agent, UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County

Did you know that we offer triple workshops (rainwater harvesting, composting and microirrigation) nearly every month of the year at our office in Seffner? These educational programs are free to attend, one time only, as a Hillsborough County resident. If you have not attended, think about this: after the rainwater harvesting workshop, you will receive one free rain barrel that staff and Master Gardeners have drilled and spigoted. After composting, you receive a free compost bin, kitchen compost bucket and compost thermometer. After microirrigation, you receive a free microirrigation kit, hose nozzle and rain gauge. But, let’s focus on harvesting rainwater.

Attendees will learn how to make their own rain barrels, how to set up their barrel at home, the ideal locations with or without gutters and how to create a stable platform/base for their rain barrel. Attendees will also receive information on why an overflow is important and how to create one, how to connect multiple rain barrels and the maintenance needed.

At the rainwater harvesting workshop, you will learn that a rain barrel is any device that is used to collect rainwater mainly for landscape irrigation. The benefits of capturing rainwater include reductions in potable water use for a landscape, erosion and stormwater runoff. We will explain the reasons why these reductions are important to the environment and each of us along with how to make these reductions happen.

If you have not attended a rainwater harvesting workshop with us in the past, you may want to consider registering for one now. If you are at our office for one workshop, you may want to attend all three as they are on the same Saturday, back-to-back. Pre-registration is required. Check out our website which contains the calendar of events at: http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/hillsborough/ upcoming-events/.

Did you know that one inch of rain on a 1,000 square foot roof will yield 623 gallons of water? Yes, that’s hard to believe…until you get your rain barrel home, place it appropriately and the rain falls! With an average annual rainfall of approximately 50 inches, each household can save more than 31,000 gallons a year with sufficient storage capacity.

For horticultural assistance, contact the UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County,

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Instructions are provided about painting rain barrels, safety considerations and use of products to kill mosquito larvae. Harvested rainwater can be used on ornamental plants but not edibles and this will also be fully explained during the workshop.

813-744-5519, or visit at 5339 County Road 579, Seffner, FL 33584. We hope to see you at our upcoming workshops on September 8, October 6 and/or November 3, 2018. Remember to reduce, reuse, recycle and repeat. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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COOKING SCHOOL IN SESSION By Jim Frankowiak

It might be summer vacation time, but classes have been in session during this month and last for Xtreme Cuisine Cooking School in Hillsborough County. Organized initially in 2007, these sessions are designed to introduce teens and pre-teens to the world of cooking and good nutrition.

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Through this program, participating students learn to make their own healthy snacks using “Fresh from Florida” fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and other nourishing recipe ingredients.

nutritious and tasty treats. They also learned how Florida fruit and vegetables used in these recipes provide vitamins and minerals that can help prevent heart disease and other obesity-related illnesses. In addition, they were also taught the dangers caused by excessive amounts of salt, sugar and fats in their diet, and how fiber could eliminate their desire for high-calorie, low-nutrition snack foods. Students were also taught how many calories are needed for their age and gender, the vitamin and mineral content of many Florida fruits and vegetables, and how to read a food nutrition label.

The four recent sessions held in Hillsborough County were organized and supported by Hillsborough County Farm Bureau and conducted by volunteers, among them Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Executive Director Judi Whitson, Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board Member Michelle Williamson, Farm Credit’s Gayle Yanes and Dr. Brooke Hansen, a sustainability focused anthropologist in the Patel College of Global Sustainability at the University of South Florida. Tiffany Dale with the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, Sonia Tighe, Executive Director of the Florida Specialty Crop Foundation, and Lisa Strange, an Environmental Specialist with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), also assisted with the program.

One important segment of the class had to do with the consumption of sugar and how excessive amounts contribute to obesity and tooth decay. That segment also included the many different names for sugar on food labels, among them: sucrose, fructose, corn syrup, corn sweetener, dextrose, glucose, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, honey, molasses and syrup.

Xtreme Cuisine Cooking School students learned to prepare whole-wheat pizzas, fruit parfaits and other

With the increased number of children becoming obese, Hillsborough County Farm Bureau’s Women’s

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Alternatives to soda were also discussed, prepared and sampled since soda has no nutrients and contains substantial amounts of sugar.

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Leadership Committee has partnered with Florida Farm Bureau and FDACS to conduct Xtreme Cuisine Cooking School sessions throughout the county. “The goal of these classes is to give kids some options to put some healthy snacks into their daily eating habits,” said Williamson. “Our hope is that by showing the kids that just by making a few small changes they can make a real different in their future health.”

At the conclusion of each session, students were provided with recipe and nutritional brochures, enabling them to create “Xtreme Cuisine” snacks at home.

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Whitson noted “that the lessons we share with students participating in our Xtreme Cuisine classes are very important and in keeping with our mission to function as the voice of agriculture in Hillsborough County,”


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UF “Drone Czar” Offers Guidance for Aspiring Ag UAV Pilots By Jim Frankowiak

His business card says “UAS/Drone Program Coordinator,” but it probably should read, “Drone Czar.” That’s really what John Rouse is for the University of Florida (UF) within its Environmental Health and Safety Department. Rouse recently led a drone orientation workshop at the UF Gulf Coast Research and Education Center at Balm which included “Using Drones for Crop and Field Monitoring” and getting started the right way for those at UF and agricultural producers who are considering their own unmanned aircraft systems, also known commonly as drones. Drones have been used commercially since the 1980s and agriculture has become a promising growth area for drone use. That’s because the world’s population is expected to reach nine billion by mid- century, placing heavy production needs on agriculture, as well as enhancements to productivity and sustainability. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones are part of the solution. Some of the ways drones can assist farmers is through aerial soil and field analysis, planting, crop spraying, crop monitoring, irrigation and health assessments. However, potential users must take the proper first steps. That includes familiarization with the rules, regulations and procedures that must be followed. Rouse is particularly wellequipped to provide guidance in these areas as his career has included several decades in law enforcement with the Gainesville Police Department and a number of years as a helicopter pilot flying emergency medical service (EMS) or Air Ambulance missions in the north Florida area before joining the UF staff. He was named to his current assignment coordinating the UF Office of Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program across Florida on January 1 of this year.

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“We are responsible for the safety of the people on the ground, the people flying drones over UF properties, as well as third parties at all UF locations in Florida,” he said. People here include UF faculty, staff, students and visitors. “We (UF Environmental Health and Safety) do some missions for university departments without aircraft or pilots, but we are responsible for compliance with regulations and the gathering

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of flight statistics. In essence, we are a resource for educators and researchers.” Drones come under the jurisdiction of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which has a series of rules related to the flying of drones with the national airspace. “These include registering your drone, flying it below 400 feet, keeping your drone within your line of sight and recognize and do not compromise FAA Airspace Restrictions,” he said. “Additionally, don’t fly near other aircraft, especially near airports, over groups of people or in manner that violates privacy.” The FAA considers drone operators to be pilots and expects them to act accordingly. Anyone who is compensated either directly or indirectly while flying a drone will do so under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule, Part 107. “That requires a Remote Pilot Certification from the FAA, a weight limit of 55 pounds on the drone, flying only during daylight, along with the stipulations mentioned earlier,” he said. The FAA defines the time 30 minutes before sunrise and 30-minutes after sunset as daylight. “It is important to note that while waivers to regulations are possible, it typically takes anywhere from 60 to 90 days to receive one so advance planning is important,” said Rouse. The Remote Pilot Certificate, which is required for drone operators receiving compensation, requires passing a computerized test that involves interpreting and understanding weather charts, air space maps and other issues related to the industry,” said Rouse. “The drone industry today is similar to where personal computers were in the 1980s,” said Rouse. “And advances are being made daily.” He also noted that that the FAA has been challenged with regard to applicable advances in technology that is changing daily and applying timely rules and regulations, however, he does envision advances as time passes. For more information about initial steps with drones and the FAA, visit: https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Packing Lunches for Picky Eaters By Alison Grooms, MPH, CPH, CHES® Nutrition & Health Agent with UF/IFAS Extension Hillsborough County

Childhood and adolescence are crucial times in a person’s life when a nutritious diet is of the utmost importance. During this time, kids are growing and need energy, as well as vitamins and minerals, to develop into healthy adults. But it’s hard to ensure kids are consuming a healthful, balanced diet, when many of them haven’t developed a palette that prefer fruits and vegetables over pizza and chips. Getting kids to eat their veggies is a lifelong battle that many generations of parents have faced throughout time. What’s even more difficult is sending them off to school with a lunch full of nutritious foods that they’ll actually want to eat – and not stop at the school snack bar or throw in the trash. Now that school is back in session, try these tips below to incorporate healthy lunchtime meals your kids will enjoy.

Make it Balanced

Create a balanced lunch by incorporating foods from all of the food groups. A sandwich is an old favorite for kids’ lunches that could incorporate four out of the five food groups if made with meat, veggies, and cheese. A turkey sandwich on whole grain bread with lettuce, tomato, and low-fat Swiss cheese is a great choice for lunch. Add a serving of fruit – like some fresh strawberries – and you’ve got a completely balanced meal.

Get Creative

If you have a picky eater that just won’t eat the veggies or fruit, try sneaking them in as desserts. A fruit and yogurt parfait with some nuts sprinkled in can look (and taste) like a dessert. You can also try getting creative with fruits by cutting them into shapes, like using a cookie cutter to cut shapes into watermelons. For the youngsters, try finding foods from movies they like to watch, or books they like to read, or create your own and call them by a different name. Use a miniature scoop to scoop out melon balls and pair them with blueberries and grapes and call them “memory orbs” from the Disney movie Inside Out, or use the old “ants on a log” recipe using peanut butter spread across celery sticks with raisins lined on top and tell your kids its Ant Man and his army of ants. You could also use a spinach wrap and roll up meat, cheese, and lettuce and call it The Incredible Hulk’s power transformer wrap. The

Switch it Up

While sandwiches prove to be good choices for lunch, sometimes having the same old PB & J everyday can become boring, and then a once loved favorite turns into a snubbed push away. To avoid having your kids get burned out on eating the same lunch, mix it up and add some variety. You can try changing out the meats in their sandwiches – switch the turkey for ham or tuna fish – or instead of using whole grain bread try using a wrap, or just the meat alone, to roll up some veggies and cheese in. Also, remember that nuts and beans are good sources of protein as well, so for kids who don’t eat meat, try using different types and flavors of nut butters. Almond butter is a healthy alternative to peanut butter and also comes in different flavors that taste great on bread, whole grain crackers, and sliced vegetables. Let kids make their own trail mix to take to lunch and include healthy nuts like almonds, seeds, and dried fruits. Hummus is also another great item to include for lunch and comes in a variety of flavors from garlic and herb to brownie batter! Having dips like hummus, salsa, or yogurt are also smart tips to get your kids to use veggies and fruits to pair with. Another alternative is to make your child a smoothie full of nutritious foods like bananas, strawberries, spinach, almond milk, and honey, and top it with some granola. You can freeze the smoothie overnight and pack it in their lunch the next morning. By the time lunch comes around, the smoothie should be thawed and ready to eat, and may even taste like a dessert! If your child’s school is lucky enough to offer a microwave to heat up packed lunches then you’ve hit the jackpot! Offering last night’s leftovers as lunch for the next day is a simple and easy solution to packing something you’re sure they’ll eat – assuming dinner was also a healthy meal that they enjoyed. Incorporating these tips with a little creativity and a lot of love, is a sure way to keep your kids’ bellies and hearts full this school year! INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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more interesting you can make it, the better luck you will have of your kids wanting to eat it.


AGRICULTURE IN HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY By Jim Frankowiak

You’ve probably seen posters and bumper stickers with the phrase, “No Farmers, No Food.” While you can’t argue with that, it’s only part of the story of agriculture, though a very important part as we all partake of our meals every day. Agriculture is the cultivation of animals, plants, fungi and other life forms for food, fiber, biofuel, medicinal and other products used to sustain and enhance human life. Here in the Sunshine State, agriculture, natural resources and related industries are an economic “powerhouse,” according to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS). Florida Ag provides more than 2 million jobs, over $106 billion indirect output or revenues, $132 billion in value added contributions and accounting for 14.7 percent of total economic activity in the state. This is according to the latest available statistics. As of 2016, the U.S. Department of Agriculture ranks Florida number one in the production of oranges, grapefruit, sugar and cane seed and watermelon. Our state is second-ranked for bell peppers, cucumbers, strawberries and tomatoes, coming in third for cantaloupes. Florida is ranked fourth in the U.S. for production of cabbage, peanuts and squash, while we come in fifth for honey, snap beans and sweet corn, as well as eighth nationally for the production of blueberries. In terms of cash receipts, Florida is number one nationally for miscellaneous crops, second for oranges, number three for sugarcane for sugar and seed, fourth for cattle and calves, fifth for dairy products-milk, sixth for strawberries, seventh for tomatoes, eighth for all other animals and products, ninth for bell peppers and tenth for broilers (chickens raised for meat production).

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Three years ago Hillsborough County’s Economic Develop-

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ment Department commissioned a study of the Economic Contributions of Agribusiness and Food Industries in the county. The study was led by Alan W. Hodges, Ph.D., Extension scientist, and Thomas J. Stevens, Ph.D., research associate, both with UF/IFAS, Food and Resource Economics Department, Gainesville. The study findings reflect the significance of agriculture in Hillsborough County. There is a long heritage of agriculture and related industries locally dating back to the 1800s. The county has experienced recent rapid population growth and development, with population reaching 1.23 million, representing a 2.5 fold increase since 1970. The study reported “the economy of Hillsborough County is closely tied to the national and global economies through its transportation infrastructure and trade, tourism and finance sectors.” The county is noted for production of fruits and berries, nursery and greenhouse products, vegetables and ornamental fish. It’s no surprise that the county ranked first in the state for strawberry production. As of the study date, approximately 215,000 acres of county lands was engaged in farming. The total economic contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Food (ANRF) industries were evaluated using the IMPLAN regional economic impact modeling software and associated data, which allows estimation of the indirect and induced multiplier effects of economic activity. Total employment contributions were estimated at 168,654 fulltime and part-time jobs, representing 20.7 percent of the county workforce. The total output or revenue contributions were estimated at $22.46 billion and value added contributions were estimated at $11.28 billion, representing 16.0 percent of Hillsborough County’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Labor income contributions (employee wages, salaries, benefits and proprietor income) were $7.11 billion and contributions to local, state and federal taxes on production and imports were $1.05 billion. The ANRF industries were classified into seven groups: Agricultural Inputs and Services; Crop, Livestock, Forestry and Fisheries Production; Food and Kindred Products Manufacturing, Forest Products Manufacturing; Food and Kindred Products Distribution; Mining; Nature based Recreation. Among these industries, Food and Kindred Products Distribution was the largest, representing over half of total economic contributions. Food and Kindred Products Manufacturing and Agricultural Inputs and Serves were the second and third largest groups, respectively, in terms of output and GDP contributions. Crop, Livestock, Forestry and Fisheries production, generally recognized as production agriculture, contributed 17,525 jobs, $1.01 billion in output and $665 million in GDP. Excluding the Food and Kindred Product Distribution industry group and certain food manufacturing sectors that do not have a strong linkage to commodity production in the county; total economic contributions were 49,976 jobs, $7.91 billion in in industry output, $3.43 billion in GDP and $199 million in business taxes. The study also noted between 2001 and 2013, employment contributions by ARNF industries peaked in 2006-2007, then declined during the global recession due to reduced domestic and international exports and recovered strongly in 2012 and 2013. While production agriculture itself no longer constitutes a large share of the county’s economy, it still serves as the basis for a much larger industry for food products and related services through the food manufacturing and distribution

(Insert Study Table ES1. Summary of total economic contributions of agriculture, natural resources and food industries in Hillsborough County.) The following preliminary figures for commodities, annual sales and acreage last year were compiled by Hillsborough County.

Commodity

Aquaculture Beef Cattle/Pasture Bees/Honey Production Blueberries Citrus Dairy Forestry Goats/Sheep Hay Ornamental Plants Peaches Sod Strawberries Vegetables Miscellaneous Total

Annual Sales Acreage $19,627,039 $13,828,250 $225,090 $13,390,000 $6,289,810 $2,393,160 $1,600,000 $143,630 $2,366,496 $125,000,000 $3,037,500 $6,700,000 $477,687,669 $150,250,000 $42,630,000 $865,168,644

733 76,859 62 1,030 5,585 200 117,560 593 5,479 2,796 450 1,579 11,367 12,020 3,045 239,358

So while we can all agree on the importance of farmers as we enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner plus snacks every day, the overall impact of agriculture and related industries on the economy of Hillsborough County continues to be of major significance and cannot be overlooked.

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sectors.


Within seconds of walking into Anthony’s a sense of classic American familiarity puts you at ease. In a world of increasing faux hipster décor, seeing The Godfather, Marilyn Monroe and The Rat Pack covering the walls, coupled with Michael Jackson and Billy Joel playing in the background, was refreshing. At 6 p.m. on Wednesday many tables were full, but there was no wait for a table. If you’re visiting for happy hour food and drinks, be sure to sit at the bar, which serves sangrias, wines, and a handful of local beers. The server seemed surprised it was our first visit, which is understandable given the various national newspaper write ups and culinary accolades on display. We took his recommendations on pizza and had no regrets. There are about a dozen pizzas on the menu, but Anthony’s conveniently allows you to split your pie into two options at no additional charge. The next visit will call for a more adventurous option of of roasted cauliflower pizza.

Eggplant Marino (Appetizer, small $7)

The thinly sliced eggplant is served with a mountain of zesty tomato sauce and romano cheese. Do not make the mistake of brushing off the basil leaves as mere decoration; you may have ordered it for the eggplant, but the tomato sauce and basil are what make the dish. Eat it the right way: stack a cut of eggplant and basil on the flatbread and add sprinkles of pepper flakes. Do yourself a favor and try to save some sauce for your pizza crust.

Philly Cheesesteak Pizza (Entree, 12” $17)

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Any specialty pizza that includes cheese as part of the speciality, like cheesesteak, there is the risk your standard pizza cheese is being glamorized. Fear not. This is not a cheese and steak pizza; this is a cheesesteak pizza, and it’s delicious. If the excessive amounts of mozzarella cheese smothering tender and juicy top round steak doesn’t prove it, then the carmelized onion will.

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Paulie’s Pie Pizza (Entree, 12” $19)

If you choose your pizza for the meat, then order the Paulie’s pie. The meatballs and sausage are generous and complemented with ricotta cheese and a choice of hot or sweet peppers. The peppers are neatly laid out one per slice, so if you opt for hot and can’t handle the heat, just peel it off. This pie is an Anthony’s favorite, and for good reason.

Oven Roasted Chicken Sandwich (Entree $9.70)

The coal-fired cooking is not limited to pizza. Although the size of the sandwich will make you think you just ate a whole pie -- it’s proportioned for sharing. It’s served on focaccia flatbread, so the massive size is mostly meat. Stacked with the marinated chicken breast are roasted red peppers, mozzarella cheese, and arugula. If you’re a sauce person, then order a side of marinara.

Mini Cannoli (4) (Dessert $6) Cannolis: a treat that always delights. Upon first glance this treat was almost too beautiful to eat, but eat we did. They are as crunchy on the outside as they are dreamy and creamy on the inside. The sweet cinnamon flavor complements the lines of chocolate syrup along with the slices of fresh strawberries. The bitesize rolls make it the ideal dessert to share. Open: Lunch and dinner Price: $$ (moderate) Noise Level: Moderate, allows for easy conversation Happy Hour: $4 small meatballs, $5 chicken wings, $6 personal traditional pizza, $2 off beer, $3 off wine (available at the bar only) Pet Friendly: Yes, on the patio Reservations: No WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Political advertisement paid for and approved by Matt Caldwell, Republican, for Commissioner of Agriculture INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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A Closer LookAmazing Activities Naturally

by Sean Green | Photos by April Green

Hidden Jewelry Safe Long ago, anything of value that needed to be saved, such as money, jewelry, or important documents, was hidden somewhere in the house, or buried somewhere on the property. A common “safe� was a picture frame safe. Though often used for thin treasures such as cash or documents, the right size frame can be used for jewelry. This month we will walk you through creating a simple jewelry box that is disguised as a painting and actually saves room and help to declutter the home.

Materials: Stretched Canvas Picture Peg Board Pegs Wood Screws Wood Glue Wall Anchors (drywall, concrete, wood) Drywall Screws

The Frame: Measure the inside area of the picture frame Create a rectangular frame to fit the INSIDE area of the picture frame Cut pegboard to fit the inner frame Glue and screw the pegboard to the inner frame (allow to dry 24 hrs) *predrill holes for screws Sand the frame and pegboard together for a snug fit within the picture frame. Drill out and set wall anchors Secure the inside frame to the wall with screws Cut pegs to size slightly shorter than the depth of your inside frame (this is what you hang the jewelry on.) Arrange the pegs to your liking, hang jewelry. Press the picture over the inside frame to hide the jewelry behind a decorative painting (nobody will know)

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This project can become as intricate as desired and can include carved framework, stained or painted wood, hinged or Soak Leatheretc. Mold Leather slide openings,

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Trim Leather

Glue Felt WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


A Closer Look

by Sean Green | Photos by April Green

Book Scorpion (Pseudoscorpionida)

Imagine dusting off an old book and opening it only to find dozens of scorpions within. It’s conceivable that Aristotle, one of History’s Greatest thinkers, may have experienced this or something similar hundreds of years ago while thumbing through scrolls. Considering Aristotle’s characteristic curiosity about the world around him it’s no surprise that rather than smash the tiny insect, he took a closer look and was the first to describe what is now commonly called the book scorpion. These arachnids are nothing new, in fact, their natural history dates back to the Devonian period some 380 million years ago. They have not changed significantly in their natural history, so if you should find one, realize you are looking back in time at an insect that you would have seen millions of years ago had you been around to do so. You have to have a good eye to spot them because they are rarely larger than 3 mm. This month we’re going to take a closer look at pseudoscorpions, very tiny arachnids that are easy to miss but hard to forget. Because pseudoscorpions are so small they don’t get a lot of attention in the world of biology. There are over 3000 known species and more are being discovered worldwide every year. Despite having no wings, these tiny insects are the Master of International travel and have come to inhabit literally every habitat on the planet. Their success in dispersion is mainly attributed to their habit of hitching a ride on other insects or animals in a process biologist call phoresy. These tiny predators provide a valuable service in return for hitching a ride. Some species are phagophilous, meaning they feed on mites and other organisms found in the nests and guano of other animals such as birds or bees. Other species are synanthropic, found in houses, books, furniture, aging wood, and chicken coops. The main diet for the pseudoscorpions are soft body invertebrates such as booklice, springtails, thrips, beetle and moth larvae and even other predators such as the varroa mite that threatens our honey bee population. Pseudoscorpions don’t have a tail with a stinger like a true scorpion but resemble true scorpions in every other way. They do have venom glands, but rather than have them in a tail like structure, the pseudoscorpions inject venom through their claw-like pedipalps, which are also used to grasp their prey. Once captured and subdued with venom, the pseudo-

This time of year, when it is warm and wet, is a great time to look for pseudoscorpions. There are abundant populations of insect larvae that come with the warm weather. The rainfall produces mold and mildew under rocks and in crevices such as aging wood, tree bark, which attract small detrivores of which the pseudoscorpion can feed on. The photographs of this species were taken along the boardwalk of Eureka Springs, a local park in Hillsborough County. Look for them in the crevices of the boardwalk in the shaded areas that are slightly damp, this is where you will also find small flies, larvae, and other food sources for the pseudoscorpion. These insects are completely harmless, they are not easy to pick up without injuring them, but if you can gather a few, they would make a great pet for a young student that is interested in observing insects. Finding food will be a challenge and I would suggest finding a small rotting chunk of termite infested wood as a start. If nothing else, put the insect in a jar and take a closer look before releasing it back into the wild.

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scorpion slurps the insides out of their victim, much in the same manner a spider “drinks” it’s food. Pseudoscorpions are designed to prey on small soft body invertebrates and are consequently too small and weak to be any danger to human beings or any other vertebrate; they simply cannot penetrate thick skin to be a danger. Most species have two or four eyes at the front side of the carapace however some have no eyes at all and are completely blind. The pseudoscorpion’s chelicerae (mouth) is shaped like pinchers, complete with teeth similar to what you would see on a crab or crawfish claw but also have an end segment that produces silk during it’s pupation stages. For such a tiny insect, they are long lived with an average span of several years. Their life begins when a protonymph hatching from the brood sac and remain free living for the first year. The protonymph will spin a silken igloo shaped chamber when it is ready to molt and develop into a deutonymph, the second stage of its journey to adulthood. It emerges again for a period of up to a year before molting into a tritonymph it’s final pre-adult stage. The full-on adult emerges never to molt again but remains alive for another year or two continuing to spin silk igloos in which they lay their eggs and overwinter.


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Air One Solutions LLC. SOLUTIONS FROM A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW

John S Rouse Owner

john@aironesolutions.com www.aironesolutions.com

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NEWS BRIEFS Compiled by Jim Frankowiak

UF LAUNCHES NEW, SINGLE SOURCE WEBSITE FOR DISASTER PREP & RECOVERY Floridians have a new, single source website for disaster preparation and recovery thanks to the University of Florida (UF). The site – http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu –includes an updated UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension Disaster Handbook; Tip sheets for preparing your home, farm, boat and more; How-to videos and infographics; the latest blog posts by UF/IFAS faculty on disaster preparation and a director of UF/IFAS Extension county offices.

USDA’s NRCS OFFERS ONLINE SERVICE CAPABILITY Clients of the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) have a new online portal for conducting business with the agency. The Conservation Client Gateway is a secure online portable for requesting technical assistance, applying for financial assistance, executing applications and contracts and tracking payments. For access and more information, visit: https://www.nrcs. usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/cgate.

WHIP SIGN-UP OPEN; CONTINUES THROUGH NOVEMBER 16 Agricultural producers affected by hurricanes and wildfires in 2017 may apply for assistance to help recover and rebuild their farming operations under the 2017 Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program (2017 WHIP). The deadline for signing up is November 16. Added information is available at the U.S. Department of Agriculture service center in Plant City or by visiting: www.farmers. gov/recover/whip.

EWP HELPS FLORIDA LANDOWNERS AFTER STORMS The USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) is reminding Florida landowners that if their area suffers damage from a natural disaster, the Emergency Watershed Protection Program (EWP) can help relieve imminent hazards to life and property caused by floods, fires, windstorms and hurricanes. For information, visit: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov.

SBA ECONOMIC INJURY DISASTER LOANS AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA

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The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has announced

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the availability of Economic Injury Disaster Loans to small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and private non-profit organizations in Florida as a result of Hurricane Irma. Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website: disasterloan/sba/ gov. Information and application forms may also be obtained by call the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 or by emailing disastercutomerservice@sba.gov. Completed applications must be submitted to the SBA no later than March 4, 2019.

USDA SEEKS COMMENTS ON e-CONNECTIVITY PILOT PROGRAM The USDA is seeking comments on the implementation of the e-Connectivity Pilot Program designed to bring broadband to unserved rural areas of the country that is both “reliable and affordable.” Targeted rural areas for the pilot program have a population of 20,000 or less. Comments may be submitted via www.regulations.gov (search regulations and federal action box, select “Rural Utilities Service” from the drop-down menu, then click “submit.”) Comments may also be submitted by mail to Michele Brooks, Rural Development Innovation Center, Regulations Team Lead, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Stop 1522, Room 1562, Washington, DC 20250. Refer to Docket No. RUS-18-TELECOM-0004. The deadline for submissions is September 18, 2018.

USDA OFFERING EMERGENCY SUPPORT TO PRODUCERS IMPACTED BY HURRICANE IRMA Hillsborough County agricultural producers who suffered losses and damage due to Hurricane Irma may be eligible for USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) emergency loans. Producers have until March 4, 2019 to apply for emergency loans to help cover part of their actual losses. Other FSA programs that can provide assistance, but do not require a disaster declaration include: Operating and Farm Ownership Loans; the Emergency Conservation Program; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; Livestock Indemnity Program; Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program and the Tree Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA service center for information on eligibility requirements and application procedures. Added information is also available at: https:// www.farmers.gov. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Pruning Trees Reduces Storm Damage By Robert Northrop, Extension Forester Photos Courtesy of the University of Florida

The Tampa Bay area is well known for it’s strong storms during the long summer months. These storms produce heavy rains and strong winds that can spell trouble for open grown trees in parks, roadsides and around homes. A survey conducted by Hillsborough County Extension documented that area homeowners perceive a high risk from trees during strong storms. Yet, few property owners recognize that trees can be managed to significantly reduce risk. Research at the University of Florida has shown that thinning and reduction pruning improve a tree’s ability to withstand strong winds. Experiments were conducted on live oak trees using sustained wind speeds up to 120 m.p.h. These experiments demonstrated that removal of 33% of a tree’s foliage, through structural or thinning pruning, significantly reduced the likelihood of tree failure by hurricane force wind. Thinning pruning removes small branches (1-3" diameter) from the middle and outside portion of main branches, not from the interior. It allows more air to pass through the canopy and receive less damage in storms. The effects of thinning are short lived because the tree quickly grows back to fill the canopy with new foliage. A more economical and efficient practice is structural pruning. Structural pruning for mature trees reduces the length and weight of overextended limbs. This form of pruning retains small-diameter interior branches for health and vigor (fig 1). When improperly performed, pruning can harm a tree’s health, stability, and appearance. Professional pruning that follows industry standards can prevent damage to property and injury to people.

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People need trees. Managed properly trees are long-lived; provide numerous benefits including cleaner air and water, beauty and shade. They should to be managed professionally by ISA Certified Arborists. Don’t trust your safety to someone untrained and inexperienced in tree management. ‘Chuck With a Truck’ who knocks on your door wanting to trim you trees is not an inexpensive alternative to a professional arborist, but an invitation to a serious problem.

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In The Field Classifieds ANIMALS & NEEDS

Info@inthefieldmagazine.com

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TRADE • BUY • SELL? Since 2004 In The Field has been Hillsborough and Polk Countys #1 Agriculture Magazine. Call Us at 813-759-6909 to place your Ad Today!

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In The Field magazine  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida.

In The Field magazine  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida.

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