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Contents

VOL. 10 • ISSUE 6

Michael Paul & Glenn Ford

MP and Ford Cattle Company

Page

88

cover photos by Stephanie Humphrey

The Redheaded Gardener

Recipes

Page 10

Page 50

Business Up Front: Napa

Grand Champion Steer

Fishing Hot Spots

Cake Decorating

Dry Creek

UF Horticulture Certificate Program

Page 15 Page 18 Page 19

Rocking Chair Chatter

Page 22

Termites and Antibiotics

Page 28

Urban Agriculture Volksgarden

Page 32 Nutrislice

Page 34 Florida Swiss Chard

Page 35 Gus Trent

Page 38 Market Watch

Page 46

What is Old is New Again

Page 56 Page 57

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Naturally Amazing

Page 84

A Closer Look

Page 85

Page 60

Plant Show 40th Anniversary

Strawberry Festival Food Drive

Grand Champion Swine

Page 61

Farm Bureau Legislative Days

Page 64

Strawberry Crest FFA Wins Display Award

Page 66

Summerfield Visit Gulf Coast

Page 70

Truck Review

Page 73

Strawberry Festival Art Show

Page 74

Page 90 Page 91

Xtreme Cuisine

Page 96

Strawberry Festival Exhibit Competition

Page 97

Pomegranates

Page 98

Plant City Garden Club

Page 100

Neighborhood Village New Location

Page 104

Neighborhood Village Youth Exhibit

Page 106

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Strawberry Festival Results

April 2014

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Publisher/Photography Karen Berry Senior Managing Editor/ Associate Publisher Sarah Holt Editor-In-Chief Al Berry Editor Pasty Berry Where does your food originate? Really, this is a serious question. Do you know where the food you just fed your family was grown/raised? It is my hope that you answer this question with a resounding YES! Unfortunately, it seems that research shows most of the general population, when posed this question, would answer no. First, lets define just exactly what is meant by “local” food. According to the Center for Public Issues Education (PIE), “When it comes to local, consumers’ definitions range from within 10 miles to within United States borders. But that doesn’t stop them from seeking locally grown produce.” While I would LOVE everyone to purchase food that is grown in Florida, and especially to take note of what is grown in our county and those surrounding us, at the very least please ensure your food is produced in this country. Who wants imported food that may or may not be the same quality as food grown right here in the good old USA? I often remind our readers to buy their food Fresh From Florida. I don’t think this message can be relayed enough. I urge you to check your labels. Keep your hard earned money right here in your town, county and state. Producing a safe, abundant food supply and the resources we use on a daily basis, those are the stories we bring to you. We hope you enjoy this issue of In The Field magazine. Until Next Month

Sarah

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The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. _ Numbers 6:25

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April 2014

Office Manager Bob Hughens Sales Manager Danny Crampton Sales Al Berry Tina Richmond Danny Crampton Melissa Nichols Creative Director/Illustrator Juan Alvarez Photography Karen Berry Al Berry Stephanie Humphrey Staff Writers Al Berry Sandy Kaster James Frankowiak Sean Green Ginny Mink Libby Hopkins Contributing Writers Woody Gore Les McDowell

ABC Pizza..................................................93 Ag Technologies.......................................31 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers............54 Alan’s Air Conditioning Service...........86 Aquarius Water Refining........................111 Arrowhead Archery................................37 Astin Strawberry Exchange.................93 Bankers South Group.............................71 Bill’s Transmissions...............................101 Bingham...................................................87 Boots and Buckles..................................57 Brandon Auto Services, Inc..................68 Brandon Regional Hospital...................95 Brewington’s Towing & Recovery........45 Broke & Poor...........................................42 Cameron Financial Service...................23 Cecil Breeding Farm..............................30 Chuck’s Tire & Automotive...................75 Country Village.......................................27 Country Village........................................36 Crescent Jewelers..................................79 Dad’s Towing............................................43

Dr. Barry Gaffney, O.D. PA...............................11 Dr. Pat Almerico.................................................13 Exo Creative....................................................107 Everglades Farm Equipment..........................112 Fancy Farms.......................................................12 Farm Bureau Insurance-Valrico....................92 Farm Bureau Insurance/Jeff Sumner............73 Farm Credit........................................................111 Felton’s.................................................................51 Fischbach Land Co.........................................108 Fla Ag in the Classroom..................................55 Florida Cattlemen’sFoundation......................42 Fla Dpt of Ag & Consumer Svcs...................59 Florida Mineral...................................................12 Florida Strawberry Growers Asso.........24-25 Florida Strawberry Festival...........................52 Forbes Road Produce........................................14 Fran Haasch.......................................................58 Fred’s Market Restaurant................................23 Gator Ford.........................................................40 Grimes Hardware Center................................78 Grove Equipment Service...............................44 Grove Equipment Service...............................99 Gulf Coast Tractor............................................48 Harold’s Feed & Pet Supply..............................3 Harvest Meat Market.......................................26 Harrell’s Nursery, Inc.......................................93 Haught Funeral Home......................................72 Helena Chemical-Tampa.................................69 Highland Corporation.....................................23 Hillsboro Bank...................................................16 Hillsborough County Cattlemens.................108 Home Protection Pest Control.......................89 Hydraulic Hose & Cylinder, Inc.......................36 Jarrett-Scott Ford..............................................2 Johnson’s Barbeque.........................................21 Jon & Rosie’s Tree Farm................................93 Keel & Curley Winery......................................63 Key Plex............................................................102 Loetscher Auto Parts.........................................79 Malissa Crawford..............................................54 Mark Smith Excavating....................................93 Mid Florida American Pitt Bull.......................68 Mosaic.................................................................55 Napa.....................................................................14 Parkesdale........................................................103 Pathway BioLogic..............................................77 Patterson Companies.......................................49 Plant City Homestyle Buffet.............................5 Plant City Tire & Auto....................................93 Platinum Bank..................................................62 QLF Nutrients Division....................................43 Railroad & Industrial Fed Credit Un............40 Savich & Lee Wholesale..........................20-21 Seafood Dive...................................................108 Seedway.............................................................45 Shrimp & Co. Express......................................13 Smolker, Bartlett, Schlosser............................45 South Fl Baptist Hospital..................................7 Southside Stores LLC............................29 & 76 Southwestern Produce......................................41 Stephanie Humphrey........................................84 Sweetlife Farms.................................................49 Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort.................17 Trinkle,Redman,Swanson,Coton,D................69 Verti-Gro, Inc....................................................68 Walden Lake Car Wash & Service..............42 Wasabi Japanese Steak House.......................9 Wells Memorial..................................................94 Willie’s.................................................................79 Windfield............................................................93 Zaxby’s..............................................................109 WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Back or Neck Pain Got You Down?

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For a referral to one of our spine surgery physicians:

(813) 443-3073

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301 N. Alexander St., Plant City

INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

■ Donald Sachs, MD Neurosurgery

April 2014

BayCareEvents.org

BC1401136_0414

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■ Philip Henkin, MD Neurosurgery

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100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

TELLING THE STORY A BUSY TIME FOR YOUR FARM BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE A BUSY TIME FOR YOUR

100 South Mulrennan Road • Valrico, FL 33594 • 813-685-9121

Dear Readers: Dear Readers: These are very busy times for Hillsborough County Farm BureauDear board members and volunteers. This edition of IN Readers: am both humbled and honored to have THEIFIELD includes articles about a few of thebeen activities elected president of YOUR Hillsborough County that have taken place, and I would like to highlight a few Farm All us owe a debtto ofhave gratitude to of them andBureau. express myofsincere appreciation to those I am both humbled and honored been who president Danny Aprile for his years of have outgoing been involved. elected president of YOUR Hillsborough County service to our organization. do my to Farm Bureau. All of us oweI apromise debt oftogratitude

I ambest particularly pleased with Aprile ongoing programs to continue the momentum hefor carried forth.offooutgoing president Danny his years cused service on our to youth. Once again, our Executive Director our organization. I promise to do my Judi As Whitson and Board Secretary Michelle Williamson a sixth generation Florida farmer, I know the best to continue the momentum he carried forth. brought thechallenges multi-faceted of all theof Xtreme Cuimany and experience opportunities us have sine program to a group of Tampa youngsters at HillsinAsthe agriculture industry and farmer, that is an industry a sixth generation Florida I know the borough River State Park. This is a multi-year partnership that is global. Our major challenge is to continue many challenges and opportunities all of and us have with the Florida Department of Agriculture Conproduce the City foodindustry our growing population must the agriculture andParks that is anRecreation industry sumertoin Services and of Tampa and have the lands devoted to farming that while is that global. Our major challenge is toincontinue continue Department engages these young people hands-on to diminish. The good thing is that the market activities and lessons on Florida fruits andmust vegto produce the that foodfocus our growing population for our products continues to expand. Ourcontinue task etables, as well as the good nutrition. have while lands devoted to farming istotodiminish. effectivelyThe meet those dual while good thing is challenges that the market

Two protecting programs that willcontinues be taking soon areconfident Ag our precious environment. I am for our products toplace expand. Our taskLiteracywe Day and Ag in the Classroom’s Ag Venture, an opare up to that task and I look forward to helping is to effectively meet those dual challenges while portunity spans several weeksthat later this month and in usprotecting allthat do our part to assure we do so. our precious environment. I am confident May. My thanks to those who have already volunteered to are up to that and I look forward to helping read towe kindergarten andtask elementary students April 29 as Let me alsoour tellpart youtoabout thethat other new officers us all do assure we do so. part of the 11th annual Ag-Literacy Day activities across elected by your board last month. They are: Florida. I encourage others to volunteer and teachers deVice President Will Treasurer Ray Wood, me also tell you aboutclasses the other officers siring Let to have readers forWomack, their are new invited to call Secretary Michelle Williamson and Member-Atelected by your board last month. They or are:to make our office, 813/685-9121, for more information Large Billfor Burnette. thanksTreasurer to each ofRay them and arrangements participating. Vice President WillMy Womack, Wood, our board for their willingness serve. Secretary Michelle Williamsontoand Member-At-

Ag-Venture, another student-oriented provides Large Bill Burnette. My thanks toactivity, each of them and 3rd graders in Hillsborough County schools with a field As I am sure all of you have come to realize our board for their willingness to serve. trip to the Florida FairWe grounds where theybusy will learn vacation timeState is over. are particularly at aboutFarm the impact ofThis agriculture on their daily lives and its Bureau. month we are completing the As I am sure all of you have come to realize overall importance now and in the future. third of our legislative tours during which we take vacation time is over. We are particularly busy at elected and appointed officials to of ourthe Farm Thisimportant month wetime areseveral completing Last month Bureau. was a very for Florida Farm agricultural businesses in this areas so they can see legislative tours Days during which at weTallatake Bureauthird and of itsour annual Legislative activity agriculture at work, some of the best management and appointed officialsMichelle to several of our hassee.elected My thanks to Will Womack, Williamson, practices thatbusinesses have been put into place and learn of agricultural in this areas so they can see Tiffany Dale, Roy Davis and Judi Whitson for joining me

in the agriculture state’s capitol wheresome we met with Senators at work, of the bestState management

FARM BUREAU

Jeff Brandes, Arthenia Joyner and Tom Lee, as well as Representatives Steve Crisafulli, Jake Rayburn, Jim Boyd, Dan Raulerson and Dana Young. Our group also had the chance to spend some time with Florida Commissioner of the challenges ourConsumer local industry partners as Agriculture and Services Adamface Putnam. This they strive to produce the high quality products was a great opportunity for us to express our gratitude our markets demand. Those tours are hard work to elected officials for their support offace ourasindustry theour challenges our local industry partners and represent many hours of support from our and to remind them of our importance to Floridians and they strive to produce the high quality products the state’s economy. We will be doing the same in May as industry colleagues. We thank them and those our markets demand. Those tours are hard work we participate in Field to the Hill in Washington, D.C. in legislators and regulators who take the time to and represent many hours of support from our meetings with our representatives in the U.S. House and learn first hand about agriculture in our area and industry colleagues. We thank them and those Senate. how and why we need their ongoing awareness, legislators and regulators who take the time to help and support. learn first hand me about agriculture our area andwe plan And that brings to an ongoing in initiative that how and why we need their ongoing awareness, to accelerate locally. That is our commitment to bring the There’s Ag-Venture, our program for bringing help and support. story ofmore. agriculture to as many people in Hillsborough the story of agriculture to children through school County as possible. Our Farm Bureau board members activities, is going on and we will again be particiThere’s more. Ag-Venture, our program for bringing and volunteers realize the need to make the information pating in Farm City Days which we school bring I menwe with young people through the programs theshare story of agriculture tothrough children through the story of agriculture to our friends living in tioned earlier with county residents of all ages. We welactivities, is going on and we will again be particicome the opportunity to speak before any groups. Tampa. pating in Farm City Days through which we bringAt the

same time,ofwe encourage interested the story agriculture to those our friends livingininhelping us with this initiative to volunteer. Anyone interested in havLastly, if you are not a member of our Farm Bureau Tampa. ing us address their ornecessary in volunteering arebeencourfamily, please join us.group It isn’t that you a aged toor call us at 813/ 685-9121. farmer rancher to join. Please visit Lastly, if you are not a member of our Farm Bureau http:// hcfarmbureau.org or callnecessary 813/685-9121 forbe a family, us. Ityou isn’t thatdon’t you Finally, Iplease wouldjoin remind again that you have to more information. farmer or rancher to join. Please visit

be a farmer or rancher to belong to Farm Bureau. In adhttp://to hcfarmbureau.org or call 813/685-9121 dition supporting our important industry andfor helping Once again, honored be your president and more information. to assure ourI am future, FarmtoBureau membership for your my verybrings best to your family. family itsyou ownand rewards. If you haven’t checked out the benefits of belonging to to Farm Bureau, please and do. The Once again, I am honored be your president modest fee associated with family membership in Farm my very best to you and your family. Bureau is a great deal. To learn more about Farm Bureau, please visit: Thank you, http://hcfarmbureau.org or call 813/685-9121 for more information.

Kenneth Kenneth Thank you,

Kenneth Parker - President Kenneth Parker - President

practices that have been put into place and learn of

Board of Directors

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Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Vice-President; Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board members: Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, of Erin Directors Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, GregBoard Lehman, Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Kenneth Parker, President; Will Womack, Vice-President;and Ray Wood, Treasure; Michelle Williamson, Secretary; Ron Wetherington, Ray Wood, Member-at-large; Bill Burnette; Board Roy Davis, David Drawdy, Jim Dyer, Jim Frankowiak, Judi members: Whitson, Executive Director Glenn Harrell, Chip Hinton, John Joyner, Greg Lehman, Erin Nesmith, Jake Raburn, Marty Tanner, James Tew, Ron Wetherington, and Ray Wood, INTIN FHE IELD MM AGAZINE 2013 WWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM W W. I N T H EIF IE MA AZINE.COM WWW. NT HELFDIELD MGAGAZINE.COM Judi Whitson, Executive Director IHE N TTHE FFIELD IELD M AGAZINE AGAZINE NOVEMBER AApril pril 2014 2014


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By Shannon P. Mitchell, The Redheaded Gardener It’s the time of year when I go plant crazy. I attend almost every plant sale in the area so that I can find those unusual plants. You know…the ones you can’t find at your everyday home improvement box stores. Those elusive new-to-market perennials, scarce native habitat plants, rare fruit trees or organically grown heirloom vegetable starts. I thrive on finding those special treats. Gardener’s eye-candy. In addition to scavenging for plants I don’t yet own, I am frantically starting seeds for spring and summer vegetables, flowers and herbs. This year my goal is to have a very robust vegetable garden around my patio. I’ll be using in ground raised beds and large pots along with tomato cage and bamboo trellising. Yes you can grow vegetables on the patio in pots if you don’t have a large yard. You’d be surprised the amount of harvest you can have in a very small space if you go a bit vertical. Veggies I’m working on growing this year include squash, zucchini, lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, beets, pepper and eggplant.

folia ‘Miller’. Other common names you may have heard are Tahiti lime, Bearss lime or limon. This is the bartender’s lime. The one you find in the grocery store produce section which is also used most in general cooking. Other choices you might like include the smaller-fruited, more acidic Key Lime tree or Citrus aurantifolia ‘Swingle’ or the Kaffer/Thai Lime or Citrus hystix whose leaves are used to flavor Thai food dishes. If you buy, look for grafted trees with straight trunks. You should plant your lime tree in full sun approximately 15 to 20 feet away from structures or other trees. Fertilize every 2-3 months the first year with a 6-6-6-2 combination or similar ratio. Water in well and every other day the first two weeks and then weekly thereafter.

I’m also adding some fruit trees to my mini (really mini) orchard collection. Along with my existing Meyer Lemon tree, I’ve added a low-chill Prunus persica ‘Florida Prince’ peach tree. Low-chill means that it requires fewer hours of chill temperatures to readily produce fruit. This variety only requires 150 hours at temperatures below or at 45° Fahrenheit to produce robust leaves, flowers and fruit in Florida.

Another new addition is a Brown Turkey Fig or Ficus carica. This is a typical dooryard fruiting tree that is better in your garden than being used commercially for harvest as the fruit is extremely perishable. I have an older fig tree which dies back each year and comes back in fully glory about this time every year. Fruit typically sets for me around July. Plant in full sun for best results and harvest fruit daily during the production period as the critters will race you to these delectable treats. You’ll be fending off the birds and raccoons for your bounty if you don’t. The fruits can be frozen, dried or made into jelly to preserve. I like it so much I’m adding the second younger tree so I can have more. More is better right?

I’ve also purchased a very young Persian Lime or Citrus lati-

As I mentioned earlier, the very air, effusing effervescent bursts

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of fragrances and gentle cool nips, and the fortuitous time change with longer daylight hours urge me into a gardening frenzy. I’ve begun trimming freeze-scarred shrubs and perennials so winter’s blight is erased and new leaves can bud out and begin forming more compact foliage and flowers. It feels harsh to have to cut them back so rigorously but I promise you, as they begin flushing back you’ll thank me later. I’ve also begun refreshing all my potted begonias and perennials with some top dressing of fresh soil and time-released fertilizer. It’s a time for new container combinations to bring color and charm to my garden, haphazard as it is. If you’ve caught the gardening fever, I urge you to start visiting some of our local plant festivals to get a jump on purchasing new varieties for your garden. Some of the larger ones I go to each year include the USF Botanical Gardens Spring Plant Festival on April 12-13 and the annual Green Thumb Festival in St. Petersburg on April 2627. Google both to find out details. Word to the wise, go early and take a portable cart with you. You’ll fill it up multiple times with several trips back to the car to offload. Did I mention you might want to drive or borrow a truck? If you’re in the mood for ideas, they abound at the Epcot Flower and Garden Festival which is happening now through the end of May in Orlando. I find lots of inspiration for garden settings and plant and flower combinations for my outdoor rooms there. It’s worth a few days enjoying their creative garden displays and the chance to talk with some experts along the way. Happy Gardening! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Since 1974 and still learning.

Thank You! As our favorite season comes to a close, we would like to take a moment to thank those who have supported our industry, this season and every season, for the last 39 years. This season has been another memorable addition to the Farm’s history.

Carl and Dee Dee Grooms 813.478.3486 | FancyFarms.com

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By Jim Frankowiak

Business Up Front MOTOR PARTS NAPA STORES: Celebrating 50 Years of Continuous Service

50 Years

Not all auto parts stores are equal, and locally owned Motor Parts exemplifies this perfectly. Motor Parts and its 59 employees are celebrating 50 years of customer-focused service to Polk, Hardee, and Highlands Counties. According to Vice President and General Manager, Kevin Stanaback, who has been part of the organization for 30 years, the difference is notable, “Motor Parts orients its business around its customers, who engage in agriculture and industry. It has been that way for 54 years.” Bill Read, founder and owner of Motor Parts, opened his very first NAPA store in Mulberry, and purchased the store four years later in 1964. In the subsequent years, Mr. Read expanded Motor Parts to include stores in Avon Park, Bartow, Lake Wales, Lake Placid, Plant City, Sebring, and Wauchula.

As further evidence of the company’s commitment to its customers is the industry certification that Motor Parts requires from its staff. “ASE Parts Certification provides an additional layer of excellence in customer service,” said Stanaback. ASE, which stands for Automotive Service Excellence, is an independent, non-profit organization founded in 1972 to improve the quality of vehicle repair and service by testing and certifying repair and service professionals. Among the more than 40 certification tests offered by ASE, is the Auto & Truck Parts program, which requires successful passage of a written examination plus on the job experience and maintenance of certification on a prescribed basis. “This commitment to ASE certification is a win for our customers, a win for our staff members and a win for our company,” noted Stanaback.

“Motor Parts does serve ‘do-it-yourself ’ customers in its retail locations, but we dedicate staff at each store to attend specifically to our local farmers, ranchers, and industrial customers in the markets we serve,” said Stanaback. He also noted that Motor Parts’ inventory reflects its commitment to businesses, highlighting that the outside sales team members survey customer needs to ensure that inventory is a match. “For example, if a customer needs a specific individual filter and hydraulic hose, we make sure that those are continually in stock. This means the customer has little to no downtime, which translates to minimal financial impact for our customers,” he said. Motor Parts’ inventory specialist is Dennis Barnhart with more than 45 years with the company. Barnhart recognizes the important role inventory has in customer satisfaction.

Vehicle owners can easily find ASE Certified Technicians knowledgeable professionals. Repair shops set themselves apart and certified professionals gain the respect and recognition they’ve worked hard to earn. “The Motor Parts’ commitment to professionalism is another way that sets us apart in the marketplace,” he said. “We have many, many long term employees at our locations. It is not unusual to find members of our team who have been with us for 20, 30 and even 45 years. Longevity, commitment, and professionalism are what customers have come to expect from Motor Parts. We’ve got something that’s hard to beat.”

NAPA, the National Automotive Parts Association, is an automotive parts and accessories retailer that was founded in the U.S. in 1925. It is a cooperative that distributes parts to both corporately and independently owned auto parts stores like those of Mr. Read, who has the largest group of NAPA stores in Florida. NAPA operates 62 distribution centers in the U.S., 6,000 stores, 14,000 affiliated NAPA AutoCare repair facilities and more than 400,000 parts in inventory every day. The company has gone beyond automobiles and supplies replacement parts and specialty parts and equipment for the markets served by Motor Parts stores here in central Florida. The cooperative also serves consumers in Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Latin America and Australia. “It’s good to know NAPA has our back every day,” said Stanaback. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Motor Parts also serves the community in other ways. Stanaback notes the importance of the community connection. “We support our communities where Motor Parts has a presence,” said Stanaback. “If there’s a Motor Parts store, you can be certain we’ve given back. Whether it’s Ducks Unlimited, FFA, scouting, youth baseball, Wounded Warriors or the Polk County Sheriff’s Office to name a few —we’ve gotten involved.” If you’re looking for parts on a one-time or continuing basis, give NAPA a call and let their ASE-certified team members take care of your needs. Avon Park 863-453-3191 Lake Wales 863-676-3471 Plant City 813-752-3193 Lake Placid 863-465-5019

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Bartow 863-533-3128 Mulberry 863-425-1116 Sebring 863-385-0104 Wauchula 863-773-4126 April 2014

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Jason

Tampa Bay Fishing Report April 2014

Mitch Paul Sudano & Keith Finn

Spring is here…so get the boat checked out, it’s time for another great summer of fishing on Tampa Bay. Through the winter fishing has been good and will continue to pick up as our water temperatures return to normal, the bait shows up on the flats and the winds begin subsiding. Remember a falling barometer usually means good fishing and be sure to check your tides, currents, winds and weather conditions. Fishing the bay for over 50 years I continually marvel at the excellent opportunities the area offers anglers. You’ll find many people fishing from the shore bridges, or piers while others might wade or fish from boats, kayaks, or canoes. You will find them just about anywhere there is accessible water. Fishing is a great pastime, not only does it give us the opportunity to catch a few fish, it also allows us to enjoy the wonders of our natural environment and marvel at the creations nature has afforded us. Fishing and catching fish is okay but sometimes just being on the water noticing the balance of nature can allow the release everyday burdens. So, when things begin building to a high level of stress. Step back, grab your fishing gear, and spend some time relaxing with nature. Greenbacks are at the Skyway, some markers and beginning to show up on the flats. Keep your eyes open as many species begin showing up in April. All the popular species like Snook, Redfish, Trout, Sheepshead, Mangrove Snapper, and Mackerel should be in full swing by this month. Snook (Season’s Open until June 1st) The ideal temperature range for snook is 70° – 82° and look for them around deep passes early then spreading out into shallower water as the day continues to warm. Live greenbacks always work, but so do artificial lures. Try a MirrOlure MirrODine, Top Dog Jr. and the 7M. Redfish (No closed season) Like snook the Redfish should become easier to catch when the temperatures reach their ideal range if 70° – 90°. They’ll cruise the outer flats on the deeper edges then travel into the mangroves as the tide gets higher. Watch for large schools of mullet as redfish are usually mixed in together. When chumming with live baits, try keeping the baits within casting distance to draw the fish to you. Remember, not 18

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too much, if you over feed them they’ll get full and stop eating. Expect some good excitement when pitching soft plastics on high in coming tides or low water potholes on the outside grass flats. Spotted Sea Trout April produces some good catches on incoming or outgoing tides, using topwater popping plugs on an early morning grass flat. Pop the lure several times, let it rest until the rings are gone and do it again. If there are Trout in the area they’ll strike. When fishing topwater lures do not set the hook until you feel the fish. Trout’s ideal temperature range is 68° – 78° and usually keeps them active. As always live shrimp are the best bait for Trout. Suspend one under Popper cork with a medium split-shot about 8” above a 2/0 circle hook then find any good grass flat and catch all the trout you want this month. Remember, shrimp, greenbacks or small pinfish under a popping cork are all-time trout favorites. Mackerel, Sharks, Cobia, Kings and Tarpon With the onset of threadfins, the mackerel, sharks, cobia, kings and tarpon begin showing up. Cobia will cruise markers, especially those holding bait schools. Mackerel will be showing up all over the Bay again, feeding on bait schools and large kings and sharks will be feeding on the mackerel. Tarpon should begin to start showing up on the beaches and Skyway. “Give Me a Call & Let’s Go Fishing” – 813-477-3814 Captain Woody Gore is the area’s top outdoor fishing guide. Guiding and fishing the Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs, Bradenton, and Sarasota areas for over fifty years, he offers world class fishing adventures and a lifetime of memories. Single or Multi-boat Group Charters are all the same. With years of organizational experience and access to the areas most experienced captains, Woody can arrange and coordinate any outing or tournament. Just tell him what you need and it’s done.

Visit his website at: WWW.CAPTAINWOODYGORE.COM send an email to wgore@ix.netcom.com

or give him a call at 813-477-3814

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Spring has Sprung

America’s First Frontier By Les McDowell Photos by Linda Constant I love this time of the year at Dry Creek. Everything is new and there’s But yesterday was different and I needed this special Spring day. the smell of orange blossoms in the air. That smell drifts through the Palmetto and Pine and drifts down the 1882 Streets of Dry Creek. Made me take another look at previous life, from the shade of the barn when I watched that new colt at play. This year the Dry Creek Television set has been busy with other productions coming in to use it. As we complete Dry Creeks first one There uneasy on four long legs new life looked me in the eye. hour episode, The Doll, other film makers are rolling their camera Brought back a old memory verse from the past and in my mind it lit. dollies down our streets. It’s exciting to see the passion of actors, “For I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do production crew and other industry folk turning the years back to you not see it?” 1882 and early Florida. Guess this ole Cowboy has grown kind of hard through out the years. But this Spring at Dry Creek will always stand out in my memories. Grown old with worry and what this life brings with fear. There must have been more than orange blossoms in the air? I must say that the first day of Spring really Sprung. Along with Dry Creek’s I do see it, from those previous words written in Red. This little life is Film and TV Production there was some reproduction going on. a gift ,when all is done and said. It turns my thinking anew. I awoke the first day of Spring to the orange blossoms in the air but Gives my soul comfort when I might get to feeling blue. something else appeared announcing the start of the new season. There standing next to one of our mares was a black colt on four Little one, I will always remember your lesson well. wobbling legs? Yes, I did end that last sentence with a question mark. On the first day of Spring each year of our bond I’ll tell. I bought a mare to be used on Dry Creek about six months earlier. But this was a complete surprise! That mare with a grass belly turned There will be shoeing and Vet bills. out to be more than from grass. Times I’ll have to stay up nights to walk you when your belly is feeling ill. The whole Dry Creek ranch changed that morning. The other horses stood back and watched that little one. They seemed to be taking in When I traded for your mom I didn’t know she’d already sowed her the wonderment of New Life. Even the ranch dogs showed a quietness oats with a beau. To pay you back I’ll help you find your Daddy, on and a respect for our new addition. I found myself sitting in the barn the Maury TV Show! writing a poem about what I was seeing. Well, it’s time to get back out on the Dry Creek Set. Time to finish up production on The Doll episode. But I find myself shaking my head with a big smile on my face as I walk past our new four legged Cast Member. Watch for him on Dry Creek. Everybody knows where Dry I’ve seen the first day of Spring for 60 times in my life. Creek is...causes it’s inside each one of us. Oh, and on the credits Seen the winters come and go, then watched as young birds took look for Springer. flight.

The Gift

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A group of rhinos is called a crash. Anteaters prefer termites to ants. About one-third of all Americans flush the toilet while they’re still sitting on it. The toothpick is the object most often choked on by Americans. A rhinoceros’ horn is made of compacted hair. A rat can last longer without water than a camel. A peanut is neither a pea nor a nut. A peanut is a member of the legume family. A mole can dig over 250 feet of tunnel in a single night. A kangaroo can’t jump unless its tail is touching the ground. Budweiser beer conditions the hair. For a minor burn use Colgate or Crest toothpaste. If you burn your tongue you should put sugar on it for relief. You can use Preparation H for puffy eyes and chigger bites. If you have heavy dandruff, just pour on vinegar. Coke Cola will remove acid buildup from your cars battery post. Bread is delivered fresh to the stores five days a week. Each day has a different color twist tie. Monday-Blue, Tuesday-Green, Thursday-Red, Friday-White, Saturday-Yellow.

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Running A few months back I wrote about my Daughter, Karen, publisher of this magazine, Sarah Holt, associate publisher and senior manager editor getting involved in cycling. Well, Sarah has really jumped in big time in running. I asked her if she ever gets tired or hurts a lot. She said, “If I hurt I run faster. It will not be any less painful, but I’ll be done quicker.”

of running in compression shorts by males found a 62% reduction in viable sperm count. I wonder if they did a study on those tight headbands runners wear? Do you suppose if runners continue to wear all this compression gear that a whole new race of people will be formed that could have only been envisioned by science fiction writers?

She has tried to get me into shape by going to the gym and riding my bike. I told her I am already on the bike getting in at least 4 miles a day three days a week. As for the gym I told her I was “on top” of that, too! I hit it first thing every morning. What I didn’t tell her I named my john in the bathroom “Jim”! Yes sir buddy, I go the Jim first thing in the morning.

For those of you who stopped running maybe it’s time to start again. Here’s a way to tell if it’s the right time start. When you step on the scale and it says, “Come back when you’re alone.” When you come to the conclusion that, if God really wanted you to touch your toes each morning, He would have put them somewhere up around the knees. You analyze your body while looking in the mirror and decide what you should develop first is your sense of humor. When your children look through your wedding album and want to know who mom’s first husband was. And finally you try to do a few pushups and discover that certain body parts refuse to leave the floor.

To me running is an unnatural act, except from a dog and to the bathroom. In high school I ran track and lettered in the 440-yard dash. I tried the mile run one time. About half way through the last lap the guy in front of me, second to last was making fun of me. He said, “Hey buddy, how does it feel to be last?” I replied, “Do you really want to know?” And I dropped out of the race. It is well documented that for every mile you jog, you add one minute to your life. The way I figure it at age 84, I can spend additional five months in a nursing home at the cost of $5,000.00 a month. Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing.” I noticed a heavy-set lady jogging around Walden Lake a few months ago. She was there every evening huffing and puffing. Recently I noticed she had lost a lot of weight. In passing I said the usual “how’s it going!” She replied, “Great.” Then I asked, “Why did you start running to begin with.” She said, “ I was over 300 pounds and my thighs kept rubbing together and setting my pantyhose on fire.” There are so many runners these days that I figure it’s a good market for business. I think I will set up a stand to sell t-shirts somewhere around Walden Lake. For my first batch I will have four different shirts for men and women. On the back they will read: “Beep! Beep”, “Kiss me, I’m a Jogger”, “The thrill of Victory, The Agony of Da Feet,” and the last one, which most likely will be the big seller will read: “In Case of Emergency, Call…” Back when I ran I always had on my Jeans, or, “Dungarees” as we called them. Now days you’re not in style if you don’t have on a pair of “compression shorts” and top to match. Shell out some big bucks and get in style! After reading a report from Harvard researchers on compression shorts for men, you runners should think twice before hitting the trail in those shorts. These trained scientists came up with interesting findings in their yearlong study. One hard fact 22

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Now it’s time to take “Participant Race” intelligence quiz! FIRST QUESTION: You are a participant in a race. You overtake the second person. What position are you in now? If you answered that you are first, then you are wrong. If you overtake the second person and you take his place, you are in second place. SECOND QUESTION: If you overtake the last person, then you are…? If you answered that you are second to last, then you are…WRONG AGAIN. Tell me, sunshine, how can you overtake the last person in the race? I know all of my readers are not runners, so here’s quiz for you. No pencil or paper! You must do this quiz in your head. Take 1000 and add 40 to it. Now add another 1000. Now add 30. Add another 1000 now add 20… now add another 1,000 and add 10 more. What is the correct score? Did you say 5000? If you did you’re wrong. It is actually 4100. If you don’t believe it check it with a calculator. Try this one: Mary’s father has five daughters: Nana, Nene, Nini, Nono and ???? What is the name of the fifth daughter? Did you say “Nunu”? Of course it isn’t! Her name is MARY! Read the question again. Here is the bonus round. OK here’s a chance to redeem yourself. A mute person goes into a shop and wants to buy a toothbrush. By imitating the action of brushing his teeth he successfully expresses himself to the clerk and the purchase is done. Next a blind man comes into the shop to buy a pair of sunglasses; how does he indicate what he wants? This is easy. He opens his mouth and asks for them. In closing I have to be honest, I admire all runners. They have conditioned their mind and body that will give them a longer life and a healthy lifestyle. And remember, life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in attractive and preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways with a bottle of Chardonnay in one hand, and chocolate in other. Body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming “WOO-HOO, what a ride! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Power in the Poop: Termites and Antibiotics

By Ginny Mink

Munch, munch, crunch, crunch, wonderful musical performances when attached to your own mouth devouring something delightful. However, that same sound might become wholly unpleasant if you discovered that it was coming from deep inside your walls! If you’ve been both fortunate enough and unfortunate enough to own a wood frame home in Florida, there’s no doubt you’re familiar with the despicable creatures stuffing their faces at your expense: termites. Indeed you’ve probably also discovered that these self-same pests are extraordinarily heinous due to their super-power-esque abilities toward elimination resistance. Why is this? How is this? Well, researchers at the University of Florida obviously had the same questions because they’ve made some pretty incredible discoveries about these home-wreckers! Thanks to Tom Chouvenc and Nan-Yan Su (inventor of Sentricon), researchers at the UF/IFAS Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, we are now one step closer to discovering termite kryptonite. It’s really hard to destroy things that seem wholly invulnerable to every tactic you can muster. So we ask again, what makes them so resilient? Much to our shock, and certainly to yours as well, the answer is found in their poop. Yes, you read that correctly, termite feces has some fascinating characteristics and is therefore, notably, their secret weapon. Of course, we’ve much to explain therein but we’re better off doing so via the actual research. Chouvenc told Discovery News (www. news.discovery.com), “Killing a single termite is not a problem. Killing a whole colony is a challenge. With the Formosan subterranean termites, the nest can be spread in the ground over 150 meters (492 feet) through a complex system of tunnels. They are therefore difficult to detect, and usually people notice them in their house after extensive damage becomes visible.” This is a problem that runs deep! Perhaps an astounding bit of trivia is the fact that there are roughly 3000 species of termite, though only 80 of those species are known to destroy structures. Chouvenc and Su utilized five Formosan subterranean termite colonies for analysis purposes and then published their findings in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The UF News explains the process by stating that the team isolated, “more than 500 strains of bacteria from five termite colonies collected from outdoor sites around Broward County. About 70 percent of the bacteria were shown to be active against a range of bacteria, yeast and fungi. When they introduced a disease-causing fungus into sterile nest-like environments, they found that the fungus survived and killed the termites. When the Streptomyces bacterium was added to the nest, it protected the termites. When they tested a different bacteria strain against the fungus, it had little effect, leading them to conclude that the Streptomyces bacteria found in the nests may aid the termites by producing beneficial antimicrobial compounds, while feeding on the termite fecal nest.” 28

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Ultimately the paper declares, “Researchers have now discovered why termites have proven to be so disease resistant. Termites use their own feces as nest-building material. The fecal nest promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria, which in turn suppress pathogens — or in plainer words: termite poop works as a natural antibiotic. Besides improving termite control, the findings could help pave the way for new human antibiotics.” Apparently, the termite feces-filled nesting material promotes the growth of something called, Streptomyces, which is a beneficial bacteria that prevents infection caused by other microbes. The truth is, termites possess a biochemistry that provides an innate immunity to bacteria and pesticides. In addition, Chouvenc explains, “Termites have what is now accepted as ‘social immunity,’ as they can increase their disease resistance as a group with the help of prophylactic behaviours (such as grooming, cadaver removal and cannibalism).” The kicker is of course the added power of poop which is made up of partially digested wood and is therefore low in nitrogen which hinders the growth of additional organisms. The real question looming in the air, is termite poop a new antibiotic? They can’t be serious, right? Well, according to research going on in Brazil, there might actually be something to this super-poop. Brazilian researchers (Coutinho, Vasconcellos, Lima, Almeida-Filho, and Alves) published their own study saying, “the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. With the increase in microbial resistance to antibiotics, the use of natural products represent an interesting alternative for treatment. Many products have been evaluated not only for direct antimicrobial activity, but also as resistance modifying agents. The results obtained indicate that decoctions of N. corniger (and possibly of other termites) could be a source of natural products with antibiotic modifying activity to be used against multidrug resistant bacteria.” Yes, that really does imply that termite poop might be the next penicillin; we wonder if they’ll make it bubble-gum flavored too? But seriously, science is incredible and those who devote their time and money to research things that seem absurd, yet might one day offer us a solution to new antibiotic resistant super-bugs, are worthy of praise. We are thankful for Chouvenc and Su for their nine years of study on this topic and we hope that they will pursue the potential in the poop! If you’d like to read more specific information, here are the links utilized for this article: http://news.discovery.com/animals/insects/termites-getting-smarter-130917.htm, http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2013/09/18/3851449.htm, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2751743/, http://news.ufl.edu/2013/09/19/termite-poop/.

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Urban Agriculture is the Wave of the Future: Check out the Volksgarden® By Ginny Mink

Having toyed with the title: Crop Circles for City Folk, I decided it might be a little misleading and therefore I have had to revamp the concept. What I am endeavoring to provide you with is a synopsis of perhaps one of the coolest agricultural innovations out on the market. Certainly a good deal of us are stuck in subdivision dwellings rather than the vast acreage and country life we’d prefer to have. I know I am. That can be both a blessing and a curse. When it comes to conserving gas, it’s great, Wal-Mart and Publix are both three blocks away from my home. However, when I desire, with all my heart, to grow some of my own sustenance, particularly tomatoes, peppers, onions, herbs and the like, I find that my non-existent yard foils all those plans. This is where the Volksgarden® comes into play. Gizmag calls it a, “hi- tech hydroponics Ferris wheel,” touting the Volksgarden’s® ability to provide growing room for up to 80 plants. They suggest that it’s the perfect tool for people without garden space. In fact, they inform readers that thanks to this revolving cylinder that constantly envelops the plants in light, “Herbs, vegetables, fruits and grains can be harvested easily and continuously without the need for a degree in horticulture.” We’d say that’s a pretty serious compliment. Of course, whenever something like this hits the market it’s necessary to do your research and so we contacted the people who created the Volksgarden®. 32

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Omega Garden Int. claims to manufacture, “intelligent hydroponics for an intelligent planet.” We got a chance to accumulate some information from them via Ted Marchildon (designer of the Omega Garden and part owner of the company). He sent us pictures and links that explain the concept in great detail. This is what we gathered, “Like all units featuring Omega Garden Technology, the Volksgarden® utilizes a rotating cylinder housing the plants arranged around the light at the center. The result is highly effective use of lumens, water, and nutrients. Ultimately, you’ll have a garden that grows fast, strong, and healthy through each season of the year.” Gizmag adds, “The unit only takes up one-third of the floor space used by a conventional flat garden - and because it’s on wheels, it can be moved around easily.” It grows up to 80 plants in just 6 square feet of floor space! Omega is at the forefront of agricultural technology and that’s because it’s at the heart of our current issues. They say, “…our current unsustainable patterns of consumption and waste, and persistent hunger and inadequate nutrition in one of the richest countries in the world, are forcing us to examine some new approaches.” According to the people at Omega Garden Int., urban gardening is the epitome of new approaches. Given the crowded urban spaces, escalating land prices and improved storage capabilities it seems axiomatic that we move towards things like the Volksgarden® and other hydroponic growing concepts. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Specifically, the Volksgarden® functions this way, “All of the plants in the cylinder are within 24 inches of the light source, receiving the maximum light energy (lumens) from the lamps at all times, thus achieving maximum light possible.” Plants exposed to light 24/7 have a tendency to produce faster than those that are dealing with ordinary day and night cycles. What’s particularly interesting about this product is the fact that the plants don’t grow to their normal size and yet produce more than those that are traditionally grown. Omega Garden Int. says, “The effect on plants being constantly rotated, 360 degrees is known as orbitropism. This effect combined with gravity’s influence on plants, compresses the plant, producing more internodes, or flowering sites with shorter and stronger growth. You can get up to 3/5 times more in harvest per watt of power used!” Yet another impressive claim! WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

So, what’s the cost and what kind of electric bill will we be accumulating if we venture down the urban-gardening-via-agriculturaltechnology road? Well, certainly a set up with this kind of output/ harvest potential is not going to be cheap and the truth is, most of us probably can’t just shell out the $2595 required and then there’s the lighting: one 400, 600 or 1000 watt compact fluorescent lamp. However, we submit to you that perhaps this could be a group endeavor. Maybe the people in your subdivision, those on your block, or in your complex might be interested in producing fresh vegetables and herbs? Urbanites can unite for better nutrition and agricultural productivity. It’s certainly something to think about! You can always visit these sites to get more information just in case you’re interested: http://www.gizmag.com/volksgarden-hi-tech-hydroponics/12915/, http://omegagarden.com/index.php?content_id=1548. IINNTTHE HEFFIELD IELD M MAGAZINE AGAZINE

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Adam H. Putnam

Florida’s sunshine and temperate climate provide for more than a great vacation destination. Our unique climate allows for the vast majority of Florida’s nearly 300 agricultural products to be in peak production between the months of October and May, which just so happens to correspond with Florida’s school year. With this correlation in mind, and with the support of the Florida Legislature, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services assumed responsibility of Florida’s school nutrition program two years ago. We believe that by aligning our school menus with Florida’s harvest seasons and establishing relationships between schools and farms, we can direct more locally grown, fresh produce to Florida’s school cafeterias. While we have made great progress in directing more locally grown, fresh produce to Florida’s school cafeterias, we discovered the most difficult challenge is getting the healthy menu items the last 18 inches, the distance from the tray to the mouth. To eliminate that 18-inch gap, we turned to a tool familiar to students: social media.

lenged to try the produce item of the day. Staff or volunteers can track the points using an app on a smart phone, and the scores are streamed live on a display in the cafeteria. The realtime scores drive more and more students to put their team ahead by trying the healthy item Preliminary results show these competitions increase consumption of healthy items and significantly reduce food waste. I recently officiated one of these competitions at an elementary school in Orlando, where first-graders, boys against girls, competed to see how many students tried fresh strawberries. The girls won, but nearly everyone tried, and finished, their strawberries. I encourage you to download the Nutrislice app to learn more about what your kids are eating in school. The food and the menu are not what they used to be.

We partnered with Nutrislice to develop an app for tablets and smart phones that features detailed school breakfast and lunch menus. The Nutrislice app is more than just a digital version of the school lunch menu - it is an interactive tool that provides nutritional information, opportunities to rate menu items and even allergy alerts. We’re also using social media technology in the cafeteria to encourage students to make healthy choices. We partner with schools to host lunch-time competitions to boost consumption of healthy foods. Students are divided into teams and chal34

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a d i r o l F

Swiss Chard A Rainbow of Colors and Nutrients By Sandy Kaster, M.S. Clinical Medicines, B.S. Nutrition Science Swiss chard is a beautiful, leafy green vegetable with brightly colored stalks that can be red, yellow, orange, or white. The large, wide, deep green leaves can be flat or curly, depending on variety. Also referred to as rainbow chard because of its colorful stalks, this popular Mediterranean vegetable is also extraordinarily nutritious. Chard is a member of the chenopod family along with beets, spinach and quinoa. Like the other members in the family, chard is slightly sweet, salty, and pungent with bitter notes. Swiss chard is available throughout the year in many grocery stores, but its peak season in Florida is between November and April.

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE

Swiss chard is a nutrition superstar and stands out for its rich concentration of a wide range of vitamins and minerals. Chard is considered an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, copper, manganese, potassium, vitamin E, and iron. It is a very good source of dietary fiber, choline, vitamin B2, calcium, vitamin B6, phosphorus, and protein, and a good source of pantothenic acid, zinc, and many B vitamins. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, a one cup serving of chopped, boiled chard (175 g) contains 35 calories, 3.3 g protein, 0.14 g fat, 7.2 g carbohydrate, and 3.7 g of dietary fiber. One cup of boiled chard also provides a whopping 636% of the Daily Recommended Value (%DV) for vitamin K, 60% for vitamin A, 42% for vitamin C, 38% for magnesium, 32% for copper, 29% for manganese, 7% for potassium, and plentiful amounts of iron, fiber, B vitamins, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc!

Vitamin K: For blood and bone health A mere one cup (boiled) of this zesty vegetable provides over 600% of your daily requirement for vitamin K, an essential vitamin for bone and blood health. Vitamin K plays a major role in proper blood clotting in the body. It also helps your body transport calcium and metabolizes the mineral into your skeleton. Several research studies have found that vitamin K boosts bone mineral density and reduces fracture rates in people with osteoporosis. As a result, the Institute of Medicine increased its daily recommendation of vitamin K. Eating chard just a few times a week will help you maintain healthy levels of vitamin K and healthy bones.

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Vitamins A and C: Fight Free Radicals Fresh Florida chard is high in both vitamins A and C, providing roughly half of your entire day’s requirement in a one cup serving. These vitamins are also considered antioxidants that help prevent cell damage from free radicals in the body. Free radicals cause damage to cells and are involved in cholesterol accumulation in the arteries, which leads to atherosclerosis and heart disease. These harmful compounds also play a role in nerve and blood vessel damage in those with diabetes. In addition to their protective effects against free radical damage, vitamin A is also required for good eye function and vitamin C plays a role in strong immunity. Vitamin C is also important for healthy blood circulation and wound healing, and helps the body absorb more iron, which is also plentiful in chard.

How to Select and Store

Choose chard with leaves that are vivid green and fresh looking that are free of yellowing, browning, or wilting. The stalk should look firm and crisp, without blemishes or bruising. Chard can be stored in the refrigerator for up to five days when wrapped tightly in a plastic bag. Do not wash until immediately before use. If you have more chard than you can use right away, you can blanch the leaves and freeze for up to several months.

How to Enjoy

When ready to use, rinse chard well under running water and remove any part of the leaves that have holes or yellowing. The stems of the white variety can be eaten, but the colored stalks may be too tough. Chard is delicious boiled for several minutes, which brings out its sweeter flavor. Several other ways to enjoy this vegetable include: • Toss cooked chard with pasta, olive oil, and garlic. • Add boiled chard to omelets and frittatas • Use cooked chard as a substitute for spinach, such as in lasagna or other casseroles. • Use fresh leaves as a decorative and edible plate liner for a fruit or vegetable salad. • Boil leaves in a stew or soup. Fresh Florida chard is at its peak season and flavor this month. Try this super nutritious and delicious vegetable today.

SELECTED REFERENCES http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu http://www.whfoods.com

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A New Face in Rodeo and Riding: Gus Trent Enterprises

By Ginny Mink

Children grow up in all sorts of environments, some good, some bad. They live in all kinds of housing situations, small town communities and bustling metropolis’. More importantly though, they each have within them their own sets of hopes and dreams, goals and aspirations. Typically we see kids that grow up on the farm desiring to do something in the agricultural realm though there are a few (like the lady we met in downtown Plant City) who swear off stepping another foot on the farm so long as they live. In addition to that generalization we suspect that most children reared in the midst of city life will move in the direction of corporate America. Certainly, as mentioned previously, there are those who abandon all stereotypes and venture toward things their childhood cohorts can’t even comprehend. We spoke with just such a man. Let us introduce you to Gus Trent, a self-proclaimed cowboy and former inner-city kid! Gus spent most of his adult life in the military and is a veteran of three wars, but when he got stationed at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, he knew this was his chance to pursue his childhood dream. Gus told us, “I’m into horses, so I don’t necessarily have a background in agriculture. I have horses. I train horses, I ride horses; I do trail rides and different equine events. I moved to Florida from Pittsburg in 2010. I’d never owned a horse. I never knew anything about horses. I have always had a love and fascination for horses but I did not grow up around them. You can learn something from a horse almost every single day. I’ve been to 11 different countries and jumped out of airplanes! I never found anything that interested me like horses do. They can teach you so much about patience, I would say before I got into horses one of my weaknesses was patience. These horses have taught me to be a very patient person.” He continues, “So, when I moved down here to Florida, I started hanging around horse people and ended up getting my very first horse and immersed myself in the horse culture. Then I had to start seeking out what I wanted to do, particularly with my horses, and I started out doing cowboy mounted shooting. 38

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I learned how to ride a little bit; I learned how to shoot off of a horse and unfortunately, my first horse just really wasn’t cut out for it so I got another horse.” We’re certain he’s not complaining as this has probably assisted in the build-up of his business which includes seven horses (though he has access to more if a bigger party is interested in utilizing his expertise). Amazingly, the inner city boy jumped into cowboy life successfully. He tells us that the more mounted shooting he got to participate in, the more equine activities he sought out. He explains, “I just started wanting to do more and more! Then I started working a traveling rodeo as an arena assistant for the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo. That’s a rodeo that celebrates and honors the black cowboys and Bill Pickett was the man that invented the sport of Steer wrestling which is also known as bulldogging. I started doing about six shows a year with them and I just got deeper and deeper into horses.” According to blackhistorynow.com, “Bill Pickett was the most famous African American rodeo performer of all time, and the first black cowboy movie star. He...became a star attraction of wild west shows…the event he created remains a popular part of rodeos to this day.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Having whetted his appetite for rodeos and all things equine, even enjoying an 11 hour ride one day while in Texas, Gus chose to hold his own rodeo. He said, “Last year I had my own which featured bull riding, calf roping, barrel racing, mounted shooting, Steer wrestling. I still have a lot to learn but I ride a lot. I ride horses almost every day. I train a lot and I study a lot. I do a lot of reading and I also watch a lot of instructional videos and different things on horses and it basically has become my life.” Perhaps when agriculture gets to you, when it sinks in, you are catapulted into an overwhelming desire to invest all. That’s what happened to Gus. He told us, “I decided back in June, 2013, to open Gus Trent Enterprises. That’s when I officially went into business doing trail rides, birthday parties, speed shows and then obviously my own rodeo. People that demonstrate a real desire to learn about horses can be in our apprenticeship program. They come and learn from the ground up and it also includes some riding. This is for people ages 16 and above. It involves about three to six months.”

Specifically he named: Bob Shivers of Plant City, Lu Vason, President and Founder of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo from Denver, Colorado and Sedgwick Haynes, General Manager, of the Bill Picket Invitational Rodeo from Hempstead, Texas. He concludes by expressing his deep love of Florida and Plant City in particular. For more information visit:

www.gustrenthorsebackriding.com You can email Gus at: exodus1906@aol.com or you can call him on his cell: (412)

592-6916. Happy riding!

Gus attributes all his blessings and successes to his faith in God and is particularly appreciative of his parents, claiming his father always told him, “Nothing worthwhile in life comes easy.” He had special thanks for several gentleman that have been supportive in all his endeavors in the horse lover arena.

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Market Watch:

The Urban Canning Company By Libby Hopkins

Illene Sofranko is the owner of The Urban Canning Company, LLC. She learned how to can from her great uncle. She started canning to keep her family’s canning traditions alive and share her creative recipes with her customers.

I have a guilty pleasure I have to admit to…I love Mason Jars. I know it sounds crazy but I do. My Italian great-grandmother used to grow vegetables in the back yard of our family home in Pennsylvania and she would can them in Mason Jars and put them on shelves in the cellar for winter. I’ve always associated Mason Jars with this childhood memory because those jars were made with love and filled with delicious food. Mason Jars are what attracted me to The Urban Canning Company, LLC at a recent trip to The Hyde Park Village Fresh Market in Tampa. Illene Sofranko is the owner of the canning business and her family canned everything. Sofranko didn’t have an Italian great-grandmother like me but she did have a great uncle who grew up in West Virginia and his family survived off the food they canned. “My family tree dates back a long, long way here in America,” Sofranko said. “Most of my family grew up in West Virginia and a lot of them were farmers or coal miners who did not have very much.” Her great uncle and his siblings grew up tending their farm and canning at the end of every summer so they would have food through the winter. “The first thing that sparked my interest in canning was listening to my great uncle tell stories about how he and my other great aunts and uncles grew up,” Sofranko said. “He said the only things they would buy from the grocery store were salt, flour and sugar. He said that they were so poor, that his mother would use the large burlap bags that the salt, flour and sugar came in to make clothing for all the children.” Her family may have not had a lot but they were very resourceful. In the family home’s cellar, they had giant pots of sauerkraut fermenting with large stones or bricks pushing the cabbage down into the pot. “They kept pigs and would slaughter and can the meat,” Sofranko said. “The stories just went on and on and I couldn’t imagine, having grown up in St. Petersburg, what it must have been like to be completely self sustainable like they were.” Her uncle still cans at the end of every summer, not because he has to, but because it’s what he knows and loves to do. Canning is on the rise again. Many people, some with their own gardens, have developed a growing interest for having more control over 46

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their food source. Those without gardens find access to fresh, local produce from farmer’s markets as well as expanded produce options in grocery stores. “I just decided one day I wanted to keep the tradition alive and I wanted to learn how to can my own food,” Sofranko said. “My uncle didn’t hesitate to say yes when I asked him if he would teach me.” The first recipe he taught his niece was his 14-Day Sweet Pickles. “They are famous in my family and they are probably the most difficult thing I ever canned,” Sofranko said. He also taught his niece the basics of canning like sanitizing jars, rim wiping and hot water bath/pressure canning. “I guess it’s just in my family but, my first batch of 14-Day Sweet Pickles were pretty darn good,” Sofranko said. “From that day on I just never stopped canning.” Sofranko got her start in the farmer’s market circuit at the St. Petersburg Indie Market, but she didn’t sell her canned goods. She actually was a vintage dealer at the market, but one day curiosity got the best of her and she took some of her strawberry jam to the market to see if it would sell. “I sold out,” Sofranko said. “So each market I would bring a little more.” Bringing her jam to the market was the best decision she ever made because in February of this year, she turned her canning hobby into a full-time job. “It’s a way for me to share with people something that I love and it also gives me artistic freedom to come up with recipes with interesting flavor combinations that you cannot find at your local grocery store,” Sofranko said. Being a vendor at the market is very important to Sofranko because she believes in keeping things local and supporting local. “Being a part of my city, county and state economy is very important to me,” Sofranko said. “I am a member of an organization called Keep St. Petersburg Local and our whole mission is to educate, collaborate and bring awareness to our community on how to be a self-sustaining city.” If you would like to learn more about The Urban Canning Company, LLC, you can visit their Facebook page at www.facebook. com/TheUrbanCanningCompany. The Hyde Park Fresh Market is located at Hyde Park Village, 742 South Village Circle in Tampa. The market is open the first Sunday of the month from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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What is Old is New Again By Libby Hopkins

Were you ever faced with the task of cleaning out your attic and wonder what you were going to do with that hatbox full of grandma’s old buttons? Did you ever stop yourself from throwing something away because you thought to yourself, “I can use this for something someday.” If so, you aren’t the only one. Susan Hall makes a living out of creating beautiful jewelry from things she just couldn’t throw away. “I grew up in a crafty family,” Hall said. “My mom owned a ceramics shop, so I grew up making stuff, jewelry was just my medium.” She started off making what she called “traditional jewelry” which was made from beads and wire. She would make jewelry and sell it at her mom’s booth at the flea market in Tampa. Hall’s inspiration for jewelry making changed once she read an article in a magazine about a woman who paid off all her credit cards, then cut the cards into pieces and made a necklace out of them. “I thought that was a neat idea, so when I would get those fake plastic credit card offers in the mail, I would cut them up and make earrings out of them,” Hall said. Soon, all of her friends and family where giving her their fake plastic credit cards they would get in the mail and she would make them into earring for them. “It kind of snowballed from there and about three years ago, I completely re-branded my business and changed the name,” Hall said. Re-Usin’ by Susan was born. “My business is 100 percent upcycled materials,” Hall said. Upcycling is extremely popular nowadays and it is the conversion of discarded products or waste items that are made into something new. In Hall’s case, these items are made into jewelry. The goal of upcycling is to prevent the waste of potentially useful materials by making good use of existing ones. According to the website, EcoCloud (www.sustainableesv.org) “Americans throw away 26 million pounds of shoes, textiles, and apparel every year, according to the EPA, and this figure is predicted to increase by 40 percent in the next six years. The EPA also states that in 2011, Americans tossed 1.8 million tons of small appliances, plus 3.4 million tons of consumer electronics.” Upcycling has become popular and trendy thanks to websites like Etsy (www.etsy.com). The website gives crafty people like Hall a place to sell their handmade, upcylced items. EcoCloud also states that, “Etsy upcycled products increased from 7,900 in 2010 to almost 30,000 in 2011 and then to over 260,000 in 2013.” On a more personal level, upcycling serves as a way to engage in community and family activities because most upcycled items are fun to make and end up being a conversation piece. Upcycling also saves money. That’s the main reason Hall started

making upcycled jewelry and moved away from making traditional pieces. “The economy has a big impact on upcycling being so popular now,” Hall said. “People are pinching pennies whenever the can.” Kids are some of Hall’s best customers. They love her jewelry and her creativity. “They are already programmed to think about the environment, recycling and saving the planet,” Hall said. “It touches a good nerve with some people because I can make something out of nothing.” Hall makes jewelry and other items out of soda can tabs, wine corks, guitar picks, keys, you name it, Hall can make jewelry out of it. “I have been making jewelry for over 20 years,” Hall said. “I am always on the lookout for new ideas and inspirations.” Keeping things local is another reason why Hall got into jewelry making. She believes in keeping the local economy thriving. She has been a part of the Ybor City Saturday Market for 12 years. “We are very much a big extended family and we all take care of each other,” Hall said. “We may not be the biggest businesses or have the best advertising, but we are the best because we are local.” If you would like to learn more about the different materials Hall uses to make her jewelry or if you would like to purchase some of her pieces, you can visit her website at www.reusinbysusan.weebly.com or you can visit her booth at the Ybor City Saturday Market. The market is located at 1901 N 19th St. in Ybor City. The market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Susan Hall is the owner of Re-Usin’ By Susan. She makes jewelry from upcycled materials such as soda can tabs, wine corks, duct tape, guitar picks and anything else she can find.

Re- Usin’ by Susan

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RecipeS

Submitted by Department of A Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Chef Justin Timineri

Blueberry Biscuit Cookies DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine biscuit mix, blueber-

INGREDIENTS 2 cups biscuit mix 1 cup blueberries 1 cup pecans, chopped 2 tablespoons low-fat milk 1/2 cup honey, divided

ries, pecans and milk. Mix well and add enough of the honey to make the mixture stiff like cookie dough. Place dough by tablespoonful onto a greased baking

3. sheet about 2 inches apart. Bake until edges begin to brown, about 15 minutes.

Remove from oven and drizzle remaining honey on

4. each cookie. Bake an additional 5 minutes and serve immediately.

DIRECTIONS

Blueberry Barbecue Sauce Ingredients

2 teaspoons vegetable oil 1/4 cup onion, minced 1 tablespoon fresh jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced 1/4 cup ketchup 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar 3 tablespoons light

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1. Heat oil in a non-reactive saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and jalapeño, stirring until wilted, about 3 minutes.

brown sugar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce 2 cups fresh blueberries kosher salt to taste freshly ground pepper to taste

2. Add the ketchup, vinegar, sugar,

mustard and Tabasco and bring to a simmer. Add the blueberries and simmer over low heat, stirring until thickened, about 10 minutes.

3. Purée the sauce in a blender or food processor until smooth. Pass through a strainer and season with salt and pepper. Serve at room temperature. WWW. WWW.IIN NTTHE HEF FIELD IELDM MAGAZINE.COM AGAZINE.COM


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Print Ag Tag ad In the Field Mag Kids Calf.pdf

1

3/28/14

4:30 PM

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Mosaic proudly welcomes the CF Industries phosphate team. We are celebrating a partnership that will strengthen Florida phosphate operations and help the world grow the food it needs. As we combine our expertise, deep experience and facilities, we can learn from each other to enhance operations, while growing careers for a combined workforce of nearly 4,000. Mosaic is committed to supporting the local communities where our employees live and work. Here’s to growing a bright future together. We help the world grow the food it needs.

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The 2014 Florida Strawberry Festival Grand Champion steer was raised and exhibited by Clay Joyner. Clay is no stranger to the show ring as he has spent many years showing heifers in the beef breed show circuit. Clay is a sophomore at Strawberry Crest High School where he is active in FFA and the current chapter President. He has been involved in raising beef cattle and market hogs since he was 8 years old. This was his second year raising a Festival market steer.

a feed plan that worked properly to grow the steer and provide adequate gain and muscle. This is usually the hardest part of raising a steer, finishing them out properly. He raised the steer at his house and had his hands on him daily. The Maine-Angus crossed steer weighed in at 1210. He was first selected the winner of middle weight division and went back in to compete against the light weight champion and heavy weight champion before being selected as the winner.

For those involved in raising market animals, achieving the title of Grand Champion is usually their greatest accomplishment. For Clay and his parents Wesley and Jennifer it is no different. Clay has had amazing accomplishments, such as being on a state winning Parliamentary Procedure team in middle school, but the hard work and dedication it takes to raise a Grand Champion steer will most likely always be at the top of his list. Jennifer said in the days following the Festival that it still seemed like a dream, a dream come true. Clay spent countless hours grooming and working with his steer he bought from MP and Ford Cattle Company (Michael Paul). He developed

Clay will be investing the money he received in the sale of his steer towards in his college education. Clay was overwhelmed and grateful to Grimes Produce-Charlie Grimes for supporting his future education by purchasing his steer. Clay is grateful for the support of his family and knows it would have not been possible without the help of his father Wesley, Granddaddy (Richard Joyner), Michael Paul and Scott Maxwell. He thanks them all for their help through the entire project. Clay will forever cherish the die cut strawberry Grand Champion sign, the memories and the experience of a lifetime.

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Joanne Lima, Tampa – Professional (pillow cake shown in display)

Kelly Everhart, Seffner – Beginner. By Cheryl Kuck

Tea tray from Cake Décor Department Head Summers kitchen showing her expertise.

An outstanding visual display highlight of the Neighborhood Village is protectively enclosed within Plexiglas panels to reveal visually delectable prize-winning examples of cake decorating skills created by beginning, intermediate and professional cake artists. While all the cakes on display may look mouth-watering, you would probably not enjoy biting into a mouthful of Styrofoam or frosting infused with lots of salt in order to make it last.Although these cakes are not edible, they are made by people who actually make the edible versions. Fake cakes are solely meant to display decorating skills. That means the talented cake decorator is also talented in arts and crafts. It is a real challenge to decorate something that is not made of its normal ingredients cleverly enough that anyone viewing it will believe it is the real thing. Of the three village cake decorating grand champions, Delina Blair in the Intermediate division, Kelly Everhart for the Beginner division, and Professional winner Joanne Lima, two of them chiseled and spackled their way to effectively fooling the viewing eye. Showing photos to discerning folks in the arts, not one person who looked at the Everhart entry thought it to be other than a photograph of real pancakes with syrup dripping over the top! Tania Summers, an outstanding professional cake and cookie artist who owns her own company (that actually makes the real thing) is the village cake decorating chairwoman. Working alongside her cochair husband Lloyd Summers, the couple design and recreate the cake décor showcase each year. “I received cookie decorating tips by taking a class given by a local store promoting cake and cooking decorating products,” says Summers. “It was such fun. Soon I started decorating cookies for friends and then graduated to decorating cakes. Before I knew it, I was in business. I would encourage anyone who likes to bake to learn decorating and enter competitions like the Strawberry Festival. The competition provides an opportunity to challenge yourself. This department and judges give each entrant a critique that will help improve their skill level.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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Fresh From Florida: Nurturing Success. Growing the Future.

B&W Quality Growers Richard and Steven Burgoon Fresh From Florida Members since 2001. “For five generations and over 140 years our family has specialized in growing premium quality fresh and flavorful watercress and baby leaf specialties.” “We are proud members of Fresh From Florida and salute their ongoing efforts to help Florida’s farmers bring fresh and healthy foods to the Americas and beyond.”

For more information on member benefits visit FreshFromFlorida.com or call (850) 617-7399. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

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UF-PLANT CITY INTRODUCES NEW HORTICULTURE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM First Course Offered Is Environmental Plant Identification and Use By Jim Frankowiak

The University of Florida (UF) has developed a new Horticulture certification program that can be totally completed online. Certificate students can earn additional credits towards the certificate by attending weekly labs at the Plant City campus. The certificate program is designed to meet the needs of students seeking career advancement without completing a four-year degree, and is a response to industry needs and horticulture interests across Florida. “This new certificate program is being offered for statewide delivery and its goal is to provide students a background in sustainable ornamental horticulture practices used in the greenhouse, nursery and/or landscape industries,” said Dr. Sydney Park Brown, who will conduct the weekly lab sessions at the Plant City campus teaching garden. It is part of the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC). “The overall emphasis of the new certificate program is on conservation of resources through proper plant management, and offers an alternative to individuals who want career advancement but do not need a Bachelor of Science degree.” Environmental Plant Identification & Use (ORH 3513C) begins May 13. Students have the option of earning 1 credit in the lecture section or 3 credits by taking the online lecture section and enrolling in the on-site lab section offered Tuesday evenings at 5:30 pm. The lab will explore plant identification, growth characteristics, culture and use of landscape and greenhouse plants. Materials include trees, shrubs, vines groundcovers, grasses and floriculture crops – most of which are growing in the on-campus’ 1.8 Teaching Garden. The lectures, which students may access on line as their schedules permit, will be given by a team of UF professors based around the state. Classes begin May 13 and the semester concludes August 8. 60

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“Our on campus teaching garden will give course students the opportunity for hands-on experience with the majority of the materials studied,” said Park Brown. “By semester’s end, students should be able to: • Identify approximately 100 temperate and tropical landscape plants using multi-sensory and recall approaches • Explain plant characteristics used in their identification • Propose plants for landscape settings based on climatic conditions, cultural requirements and other features • Incorporate Florida native plants into landscape settings • Identify current and potential pest plants “Students completing the 15-credit certificate program will have acquired the ability to identify the impacts of light, temperature, humidity and the growing environment on plants and sustainable management practices in the greenhouse and/or landscape,” said Park Brown. “They will also be able to identify ways to reduce inputs such as water, fertilizer, chemicals and others, while maintaining high quality ornamentals in the greenhouse or landscape,” she added. Park Brown noted ornamental horticulture is a rapidly growing segment of Florida’s agricultural industry with a strong demand for those with knowledge of landscape plants. “Enrollment in courses will be on a first come, first served basis,” said Park Brown. “Horticulture courses are offered to those pursuing the certificate, a degree, or to anyone interested just for their own personal knowledge.” For more information contact Sydney Park Brown, 813-757-2286 spbrown@ufl.edu or Erin Nessmith enessmith@ufl.edu, 813/7572280. Added course and program information is also available online at: http//gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pcc. UF-Plant City is located at 1200 North Park Road, Plant City, FL 33563. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Items Collected at Florida Strawberry Festival Presented to Food Bank The Florida Strawberry Festival, in partnership with Publix Super Market, presented a donation to the United Food Bank of Plant City yesterday that included items collected at the 2014 festival. Over 5,000 pounds of non-perishables and Pepsi brand can products were donated to the food bank by Florida Strawberry Festival President Jim Jeffries and Publix Super Market Media and Community Relations Manager Brian West. “Our festival celebrates agriculture, the industry that feeds our people,” said Jeffries. “So it’s important to us that we do our part in making sure the families in our community are fed.” Three days of the festival featured drives to collect non-perishable food items and Pepsi brand can products. On the Publix Super Market Day on the Midway, festival patrons were invited to bring any Publix brand non-perishable item to the festival to receive $4 off the fun pack ride coupon book. Pepsi Family Day, held both Sundays of the festival, allowed patrons to receive $5 off the midway wristband in exchange for a Pepsi brand can product. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

In addition to these food items, six steers and five pigs were donated to the food bank from buyers at the festival’s CF Industries Youth Steer Sale and Youth Swine Sale. The United Food Bank of Plant City is a partner of the United Way and helped feed nearly 23,000 people in Eastern Hillsborough County last year, said Director Christine Miller. “We are proud to partner with such an outstanding organization in our community,” said Jeffries. “We hope to work with them for many years to come.” About the Florida Strawberry Festival The Florida Strawberry Festival is an 11-day community event celebrating the strawberry harvest of Eastern Hillsborough County. Each year, over 500,000 visitors enjoy the Festival’s headline entertainment, youth livestock shows, exhibits of commerce and, of course, its world-famous strawberry shortcake. The 2015 Florida Strawberry Festival will be held Feb. 26 through March 8 in Plant City. For more information, visit www.flstrawberryfestival.com, Facebook and Twitter (#berryfest2015). INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Trust. Compounded Daily.

THINK

BIG GROW LOCAL PLANT CITY

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813-659-1234

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HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY SCORES SUCCESSES AT FARM BUREAU LEGISLATIVE DAYS By Jim Frankowiak

One of the most important Farm Bureau activities that takes place every year is the annual Farm Bureau Legislative Days at Tallahassee. This year was no exception. In fact it was termed a “huge success” by Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Executive Director Judi Whitson. The Hillsborough County Farm Bureau contingent included Board President Kenneth Parker, Vice President Will Womack, Secretary Michelle Williamson and Board Member Roy Davis. Young Farmer and Rancher Chair Tiffany Dale also represented the county with Whitson. During this annual event, Florida Farm Bureau members from across the state travel to the state capitol to meet with elected officials to support legislative priorities and to thank their representatives for recognizing the importance of agriculture in Florida. Part of the annual Farm Bureau program is the 64

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“Taste of Florida” reception for officials during which attendees enjoy state grown fruits and vegetables. Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Adam Putnam was the guest of honor. “Our meetings this year involved State Senators Jeff Brandes, Arthenia Joyner and Tom Lee,” said Whitson. “On the House side, we met with Representatives Jake Raburn, Dan Raulerson and Dana Young.” Raburn is director emeritus of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau. “This year we also had the opportunity to meet with Commissioner Putnam, as well as a House Chamber meeting with Representatives Raburn, Steve Crisafulli and Jim Boyd.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Florida Farm Bureau hopes to build on the successes of the 2013 Legislative Session to further protect and strengthen the state’s family farms by lowering production costs, reducing tax burdens, protecting Greenbelt property tax classifications and expanding educational and training opportunities. Farm Bureau’s top legislative priority this year is a bill that will expand the sales tax exemption on power farm equipment to include replacement and repair parts in addition to transportation and storage equipment such as trailers and grain bins. This legislation also protects farmers who store water on their land by preventing the agricultural assessment from being removed. Another legislative priority is adding agricultural industry certifications to the CAPE funding list, providing additional opportunities for students looking for a career in agriculture. Rep. Raburn is the House sponsor of this legislative measure. For additional information on the progress of Florida Farm Bureau legislative priorities, visit: www.floridafarmbureau.org.

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Savannah Vida, and Levi Mayo show off the blue Ribbon Strawberry Crest H.S. FFA students won for their educational display depicting the 2014 Strawberry Festival theme, “Florida’s Best Family Recipe.”

Strawberry Crest High School Wins FFA Strawberry Festival Educational Display Award By Cheryl Kuck

Last year was the first time Strawberry Crest FFA students entered the competition for the educational display best depicting the Strawberry Festival theme. They didn’t win in 2013 but that only made them more determined to try again and this year they came out on top garnering the blue ribbon and $1,000 in prize money for their FFA chapter. This year the festival theme, “Florida’s Best Family Recipe” inspired them to create an old country store setting for strawberry plants, fresh fruit and vegetables. The FFA students put in the flooring and then called on their families to donate genuine antiques such as an ice box from the late 1800s, an old hand water pump, a meat grinder, as well as various tools, furnishings and farm equipment. Some of the highlights included rows of gorgeous fruits and vegetables the students had canned themselves and honey that came from the hives of a former FFA chapter member. 66

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A touch of whimsy was added by large framed examples of ‘best recipes’. There was a recipe for one strawberry queen whose ingredients consisted of 20 nervous girls and items such as, “makeup, high heels and a crown.” There were recipes for ‘best’ in beans, bees and honey, livestock and mid-way fun. Cheering crowds were included in the directions for ‘Best Family Grand Parade’, while ingredients for ‘Best Family Entertainment” added 10 days of ‘awesome entertainment’ mixed with ‘25 eager FFA students’ ushering daily and red hat ladies for extra spice. “Each year area schools with an FFA program are given an opportunity to design and build an entire booth for competition. Our four judges were focused in the most outstanding example of this year’s festival theme, how best their display told the story, how many of the chapter’s kids participated and the level of difficulty in execution,” said Pam Walden supervisor of agribusiness and natural resources education and JROTC for the HillsWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Strawberry Crest High School FFA Wins Strawberry Festival Educational Display Award. From the left, Savannah Vida FFA treasurer, Pam Walden supervisor of agribusiness and natural resources education and JROTC for the Hillsborough County school system, Levi Mayo and Susan Mayo, Strawberry Crest Agriculture teacher and Department Head, Career & Technical Education.

borough County school system. She is in charge of all 45 county Ag programs, which include the Florida Strawberry Festival, Florida State Fair and the Hillsborough County Fair. “The students loved working on this and everyone got into the spirit of the theme. They even created a memory book with pictures of all the kids working on the display. Most of them were also involved with animal husbandry competitions, as well as, other home skills such as canning, baking, quilting, and volunteering as festival workers. They should be very proud of their accomplishments and contribution.” “This program helps with the development of life skills, as well as, careers in agriscience. Because of agriculture and FFA, visionary new leaders are being nurtured who will be important in the future of Florida and the nation,” says Susan Mayo, Ag teacher and Strawberry Crest department head, career and technical education. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Savannah Vida, and Levi Mayo the fruits and vegetables The Strawberry Crest FFA student members canned for their festival display.

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SUMMERFIELD 4TH GRADERS VISIT GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER Learn About Florida Fruits and Vegetables and More By Jim Frankowiak For the third consecutive year, fourth graders from Summerfield Elementary in Riverview spent a half-day at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC) at Balm in southern Hillsborough County to learn about some of the many different aspects of Florida agriculture that take place there. The more than 120 Summerfield students were given the opportunity to tour the GCREC, its greenhouses and fields. Their visit concluded with the chance to experience eight different “stations” for added information on the science of agriculture. “Our main goal in undertaking this trip is to expose students to science in a real-world setting,” said Mary Garner, a 4th Grade Science Teacher at Summerfield Elementary. “Students love science, but need to know it is relevant to their everyday lives and a trip such as this helps to achieve that. We also want to show they there are a variety of science careers close to home to choose from. “Students get excited on this trip. Maybe this interest in science is even more important than the content they learn,” said Garner. “Many students said this was the best field trip ever!” The GCREC is located on a 475-acre tract and houses more than a dozen Institute of Food and Agricultural scientists and researchers who work in a variety of disciplines along with a supporting staff of nearly 100 individuals. Their mission is to develop science-based information and technology that will help the Florida agriculture industry compete in the global marketplace. The center staff also works diligently on ways to help maintain and enhance the quality and sustainability of natural resources and to overcome the challenges growers continue to face from pests and diseases that attack their crops, as well as problems such as freezes and droughts. Teaching, research and extension functions are critical to the overall work of the GCREC and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Program areas include genetics, plant breeding and variety develop-

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ment and evaluation; integrated biological, chemical and cultural pest management in entomology, plant pathology and weed science; soil and water science, plant nutrition and natural resource management; production, cultural practices and physiology of vegetables, small fruits, landscape and ornamental plants; and graduate student education and undergraduate degrees. The Summerfield students visited some of the center’s greenhouses where various types of plants, fruits and vegetables are grown before planting in the fields, another stop on the tour where they saw how many of the greenhouse items had matured once planted. They also viewed a farm tractor “up close and personal” and learned how this equipment and other items were critical to all aspects of farming. The Center’s diagnostic lab was an added tour stop where students were shown the different ways staff members help growers determine what pests or weeds were hampering growth of their plants. “We receive samples of problem plants from growers and our staff members help to identify the problem and offer potential solutions,” noted Cooley. The final tour stop was the Center’s auditorium and eight stations where the students engaged in horticulture, plant pathology and entomology experiments. Other stations included exposure to scientific words, a barn owl video that detailed how owls eat their prey and then regurgitate pellets of fur and bones, the creation of dry ice bubbles and their scientific use and a hands-on plant pathology experience with strawberry plants and fruit. Composting and the proper use of waste was another station and that stop included a coloring book with a lesson in how to start a home compost pile. The fourth graders also had the chance to view white flies in a microscope and to learn what entomologists do to control this pest in the field. They also had the opportunity to cut a clipping from a lantana plant to plant at home and to view a variety of amaryllis plants and their many different colors. For more information about the GCREC and its varied mission, visit: gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu or call 813/634-000.

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Truck Review The Power you want. The fuel economy you need.

You know your business and what it takes to grow its bottom line, like choosing the right trucks with the power you want and the fuel efficiency you need. The Ford Super Duty® offers a standard 6.2L V8 with best-in-class gas horsepower and torque. And for applications calling for the unique severe-duty strength and dependability of a diesel, the next generation of the Power Stroke® Turbo Diesel V8 for 2015 delivers higher performance ratings than ever.

Toughness. The DNA of the Ford Super Duty®

Built Ford Tough® is the DNA engineered into every component that goes into a Ford truck. For the Super Duty® Pickup, it runs through the steel foundation of the proven, durable frame designed to easily handle the everyday rigors of heavy hauling and towing. It’s evident also in the available Ford-built 6.7L Power Stroke® Turbo Diesel V8 that endured more abuse during its long, torturous testing than you could ever subject it to. And there’s the 6-speed Ford TorqShift® automatic transmission engineered for high-torque performance and dependability. If you demand a truck that’ll get the job done today and be there for you over the long haul, look no further than the Ford Super Duty.

This crew member wears many hard hats.

The Ford Super Duty® handles every task you ask of it every workday – and does it all with the dependability you expect. You can say it’s one member of the crew that can wear a lot of different hard hats. The Super Duty performs the tough work of hauling and towing with the smart technology of AdvanceTrac® with RSC® and trailer sway control. And at the purely mechanical end, there’s the available classexclusive tailgate step that shows how Ford designers literally thought outside the box to make your job as easy as possible.

Super Duty® works hard. You work smart.

Ford Super Duty® is engineered to work hard, but that doesn’t mean you have to. The available driver-configurable LCD productivity screen, for example, puts you in touch with fuel economy data, towing and off-road information, plus much more. Also optional are Ford SYNC® plus SYNC® with MyFord Touch® that help keep you connected with life on the road in ways that are both enjoyable and productive.

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2014 Strawberry Festival EHAG Fine Show takes up residence in former Neighborhood Village location By Cheryl Kuck The Strawberry Festival Fine Art Show, hosted by the East Hillsborough Art Guild (EHAG) was established in 1992. The guild is a non-profit organization of artists, art lovers and patrons of all ages whose volunteers host the annual Strawberry Festival Fine Arts Show. This year has brought some remarkable changes to the Festival grounds, including tearing down the guild’s long-time location in the old stone building facing Lemon St. to accommodate a growing mid-way and transferring the fine arts competition to the Milton E. Hull Building. In order to accomplish that the Neighborhood Village needed to relocate, so a building was erected for them next to the main business offices. Sounds a little like a chess game doesn’t it? In 2013 it became obvious that major expansions were in order due to the ever-increasing crowds and so construction was begun and changes enacted. The changes seem to have been a good thing for all concerned since the festival upped its attendance rate by 5,000, enlarging the 2014 visitor numbers to 531,659. The happiest recipients of relocation are the art guild members. It is obvious the Festival fine art show and competition has found its perfect space. The change has created the atmosphere of an upscale gallery instead of a cramped mishmash of student art, sculptures, and large works of art with not enough space to be properly viewed. No one is more pleased than show chairwoman Debra Bryant who stated, “This is the perfect showcase. Since we are now more centrally located, people will be better able to find us and take time to enjoy the beauty created by Florida artists. There are 10 Adult Divisions and four Youth Divisions, yielding more than $3,800 in prize awards. Made popular in 2013, 14 organizations and local businesses sponsor individual Business Leader’s Art Awards.

Debra Bryant, chairwoman of the 2014 East Hillsborough Art Guild (EHAG) Strawberry Festival Fine Arts Show with show judge Jerry Crawford as he makes his selection of first place professional graphics; a mixed colored pencil medium painting created by Lakeland artist Joyce Bugaiski, a Native-American whose tribal name is ‘Spirit Wind’. Two expert judges, with differing backgrounds, complimented one another’s primary sphere of knowledge, resulting in outstanding selections. John Hardin, Hillsborough Community College humanities professor brought his educational expertise training others eyes and hands to create, coupled with his understanding of all mediums and techniques. Jerry Crawford is a retired owner of several fine art galleries in Texas. He says he brings business acumen; a knowledge of what makes good art and what makes the public want to buy it. “I feel like I have good feel for color, depth in art and recognition of quality and genuine inspiration that makes people want those feelings the color and inspiration will bring to their homes and offices.” This year, ‘Best in Show’ went to Lois Staller for her delicate watercolor landscape and the award for best Strawberry Theme depiction went to amateur oil painter Petera Semple for the second year in a row. First place awards in the professional artist category went to Colleen Justin for oil painting, Libit Jones for acrylics, Karen Stechschulte won watercolor, graphics/mixed media went to a mixed colored pencil medium painting created by Lakeland artist Joyce Bugaiski, a Native-American whose tribal name is ‘Spirit Wind’.

Sculpture entries in the new festival art gallery located in the old Armory or Milton E. Hull Building, which formerly housed the Neighborhood Village. The miniature sculpture, “Canoe Trapper”, shown in foreground, by Andreas Spikowski received the first place award in that category. 74

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First place awards in the adult amateur category went to; Betty Sumner for oils, Susan Greer- acrylics, Diane Smeed-watercolor and Donald Korte for graphics/mixed media. The top adult miniature painting award went to longtime Florida Miniature Society artist Angela Santos and Andreas Spikowski received the first place award in adult sculpture for his highly detailed “Canoe Trapper.” WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


First place wards in the youth categories of drawing and painting; Rachael Carter for artists in the 15 to 17-year age group, Anna Dixon, for the 12 to 13-year age group, Jessica Alepin for ages 9 to 11, and Nathan Gail for ages 6 to 8 years-old. The art guild encourages professional artists, amateur artists and students to work along with member mentors, at every skill level, participate in the many cultural community activities and simply let creative ideas flow and grow through group and individual artistic endeavors. If you’ve never painted before, enjoy the discovery of learning new things and making new friends…it’s relaxing and fun! For further information, contact EHAG through their P.O. Box 3055 Plant City, Fl. 33564-3055 or through their Website: www.ehagfinearts.com or go to ‘EHAG Fine-arts’ on Facebook.

Winning oil painting, “Berries and Sweet Onion” by Petera Semple

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Original oil painting Debra Bryant, a well-known professional artist, who is also a multiple best of show festival fine art winner. This still-life was created solely for the EHAG public raffle benefitting the guild’s scholarship fund. Debra no longer enters the competition while she has undertaken the duties of Strawberry Festival Fine Art Show chairwoman.

Winning painting, “Glade Creek”, a watercolor, by Lois Staller

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Give-A-Way

Get Chamilia tote bag with $99 purchase. April 15th thru May 13th

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2014

Results

CF Industries Swine Show Held in the Patterson Companies Livestock Arena Grand Champion: Cole Hanson Reserve Grand Champion: Zachary Bozeman Class 1: 1st Place: Rylee Vanstronder 2nd Place: Ali Baker 3rd Place: Jenna Baker 4th Place: Olivia Whitman 5th Place: Kathryn Taglarine 6th Place: Cade Shissler 7th Place: Reghan Telfer 8th Place: Landon Lofley Class 2: 1st Place: Colton Stubbs 2nd Place: Jacquelyn Ryan 3rd Place: Erica Hartman 4th Place: Bernard Bentz 5th Place: Jake Fitzpatrick 6th Place: Alejandro Davila 7th Place: Nicole Patten 8th Place: Marybeth Stewart Class 3: 1st Place: Colten Drawdy 2nd Place: Matthew Diem 3rd Place: Erin Lytle 4th Place: Jaycob Baker 5th Place: Jace Stines 6th Place: Chase English 7th Place: Destinee Miller 8th Place: Meghan White Class 4: 1st Place: Jenna Keely 2nd Place: Sophie Aten 3rd Place: Anthony Nadal 4th Place: Savannah Kummelman 5th Place: Tori Griffith 6th Place: Tiffany Wilson 7th Place: Nathan Hood 8th Place: Drexyl Brewer Class 5: 1st Place: Haley Zvirblis 2nd Place: Destiny Cox 3rd Place: Gracie Lee 4th Place: Austin Holcomb 5th Place: Tyler Wright 6th Place: Tanner Jurnigan 7th Place: Michael Nading 8th Place: Selena Berrios 9th Place: Kyle McConnell 80

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The Richard Kahelin all breeds champion award Brandon Carey

Class 6: 1st Place: Cailey Lord 2nd Place: Brett Love 3rd Place: Alexa Diaz 4th Place: Abigayle Almon 5th Place: Kenley Connell 6th Place: Chloe Tew 7th Place: Justin McQuaig 8th Place: Kenneth Hattaway Class 7: 1st Place: Cole Hanson 2nd Place: Zachary Bozeman 3rd Place: Benjamin Gude 4th Place: Zoe Odom 5th Place: Taylor Brown 6th Place: Chelsea Woodard 7th Place: Jacob Gainer 8th Place: Morgan Sodders 9th Place: Lacey Hicks 10th Place: Reagan Messick Class 8: 1st Place: Corbett Wyatt 2nd Place: Samuel Shiver 3rd Place: Corbett Wyatt 4th Place: Marissa Zolna 5th Place: Kasey Kleinatland 6th Place: Madilyn Stone 7th Place: Kagen Alred 8th Place: Jeremiah Ford 9th Place: Joseph Ford Class 9: 1st Place: Justin Cain 2nd Place: Tanner Ashley 3rd Place: Carlos Curnow II 4th Place: Emma Futch 5th Place: Meagan Petitt 6th Place: Emma Futch 7th Place: Colton Miller 8th Place: Tyler Salvato SWINE SHOWMANSHIP Senior Division 1st Place: Rachel Carter 2nd Place: Colton Stubbs 3rd Place: Michael Nading Intermediate Division: 1st Place: Tanner Ashley 2nd Place: Reagan Messick 3rd Place: Carlos Curnow II

April 2014

Junior Division: 1st Place: Emma Futch 2nd Place: Austin Holcomb 3rd Place: Marissa Zolna Poultry and Rabbit Shows Grand Champion Poultry: Hannah Spivey Reserve Grand Champion Poultry: Thomas Stephenson Best Opposite Sex Exhibition: Tyler Jurgens Best Opposite Sex Production: Ashlyn Ledbetter Grand Champion Rabbit: Triston Wager Reserve Grand Champion Rabbit: Parker Websster Best Opposite Sex Exhibition: Benjamin Harris Best Opposite Sex Production: Triston Wager Dairy Show: Sponsored by Grove Equipment Held in the Patterson Companies Livestock Arena Ayrshire Junior Champion: Zoe Wallace Ayrshire Reserve Junionr Champion: Aaron Bingham Brown Swiss Junior Champion: Blane Rogers Brown Swiss Reserve Junior Champion: Aaron Bingham Guernsey Junior Champion: Siera Linton Guernsey Reserve Junior Champion: Emily Linton Holstein Junior Champion: Zoe Wallace Holstein Reserve Junior Champion: Brooke Freeman Jersey Junior Champion: Ty Hamilton Jersey Reserve Junior Champion: Cierra Ellis Ayrshire Senior Champion: Brooke Freeman Ayrshire Reserve Senior Champion: Siera Linton Brown Swiss Senior Champion: Emily Linton Brown Swiss Reserve Senior Champion: Emily Linton Guernsey Senior Champion: Nicholas Hammer Guernsey Reserve Senior Champion: Siera Linton Holstein Senior Champion: Brandon Carey WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Florida Strawberry Festival’s Champion Swine

Cole Hanson, Turkey Creek Middle FFA GRAND SWINE

Holstein Reserve Senior Champion: Emma Bradley Jersey Senior Champion: Austin Holcomb Jersey Reserve Senior Champion: Gracie Lee Ayrshire Grand Champion: Brooke Freeman Ayrshire Reserve Grand Champion: Zoe Wallaace Brown Swiss Grand Champion: Blane Rogers Brown Swiss Reserve Grand Champion: Aaron Bingham Guernsey Grand Champion: Nicholas Hammer Guernsey Reserve Grand Champion: Siera Linton Holstein Grand Champion: Brandon Carey Holstein Reserve Grand Champion: Emma Bradley Jersey Grand Champion: Austin Holcomb Jersey Reserve Grand Champion: Gracie Lee Richard Kahelin All-Breeds Champion Award: Brandon Carey’s Holstein Premier Exhibitor Award: Siera Linton Junior All-Breeds Bred-By Exhibitor Award: Siera Linton Junior Herdsman: Austin John Senior Herdsman: Hannah Madagan Charlie Hunter Memorial Sportsmanship Award: Ty Hamilton Showmanship PeeWee Division: Garrett Linton Novice Division: Danielle Brown Junior Division: Nicholas Hammer Intermediate Division: Siera Linton Senior Division: Brandon Carey Adult Division Joanna Rogers Premier Showmanship Award: Brooke Freeman

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Zachary Bozeman, Turkey Creek Middle RESERVE GRAND SWINE

Costume Contest Funniest: Anthony Bouchard, “Eat Mor Chikin” Prettiest: Kyleigh Glenn, “Cinderella and the Stage Coach” Most Original: Hunter Boyd, “Moooosical Chairs” Most Colorful: Aiden Heidt, “Uncle Sam and Betsy Ross” Overall Winner: Adam Cole, “Ace Ventura and His Gator in the Swamp”

Black Face Ram Grand Champion: Samuel Sands Reserve Grand Champion: Christian Pelfrey

Sheep Show Held in the Patterson Companies Livestock Arena

Speckled Face Ewe Grand Champion: David Squituri Reserve Grand Champion: Sarahann Sweeney Speckled Face Ram Grand Champion: Charlie Davis

White Face Ewe Grand Champion: Abby Davis Reserve Grand Champion: Aubrey Davis White Face Ram Grand Champion: Aubrey Davis Reserve Grand Champion: Darby Hasting

Showmanship Junior Division 1st Place: Ava Hasting 2nd Place: Emiliy Linton 3rd Place: Isabelle Murphy

Rare Breed Ewe Grand Champion: Brenna Sturgis Reserve Grand Champion: Kelly Cribbs

Intermediate Division 1st Place: Abby Davis 2nd Place: Cole Hanson 3rd Place: Sarahann Sweeney

Rare Breed Ram Grand Champion: Avery Surrency Reserve Grand Champion: Emily Linton

Senior Division 1st Place: Cassidy Hasting 2nd Place: Samuel Sands 3rd Place: Darby Hasting

Overall Grand Champion Aubrey Davis with her White Face Ram

Long-legged Division 1st Place: Samuel Sands 2nd Place TIE: MaCayla Phillips and Cheyenne Sommer

Costume Contest Funniest: Xavier Heath, “Perfect Redneck Couple” Most Original: Alaina Carter, “Pocahontas and her ‘berry’ best buffalo” Most Elegant: Haven Futch, “Serving Sheepcake” Most Creative: Nicole Rice, “American Barn Show” Most Colorful: Emily Linton, “Princess and the Sheep” Best Overall: David Squitieri, “Mad Hatter and the White Rabbit”

Black Face Ewe Grand Champion: Morgan Sistrunk Reserve Grand Champion: Christian Pelfrey

Continued on the next page

Jumping Contest Short-legged Division 1st Place TIE: Jennifer Wayman and Kelly Cribb 3rd Place TIE: Tyson Matthews, Kristen Felbert and Lindsay Short

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Overall Grand Champion: Clay Joyner

CF Industries Steer Show Held in the Patterson Companies Livestock Arena

2nd Place: Meredith Del Castillo 3rd Place: Miranda Lane 4th Place: Tyler Jensen 5th Place: Caleb Gude 6th Place: Joshua Lewis 7th Place: Cassidy Dossin 8th Place: Emily Benoit Class 4 1st Place: Gregory Berrios 2nd Place: Lindsey Killebrew 3rd Place: Jonathan Rowell 4th Place: Trey Fletcher 5th Place: Cassidy Hastings 6th Place: Levi Mayo 7th Place: Kacee Lewis 8th Place: Dalton Dry

2nd Place: T.J. Hutchinson 3rd Place: Morgan Lee 4th Place: Jace Hardee 5th Place: Kayla Mosley 6th Place: Lexie Jett 7th Place: Hunter Hampton 8th Place: Luke Coggins 9th Place: Macy Gay

Class 1 1st Place: Jacob Thornton 2nd Place: Lindsey English 3rd Place: Taylor Kelly 4th Place: Alyssa Shepherd 5th Place: Lane Harrell 6th Place: Rachelle Sapp 7th Place: Landon Messick

Class 5 1st Place: Anna Conrad 2nd Place: Gianna Ciotoli 3rd Place: Mariah Edwards 4th Place: Linda Sanchez 5th Place: Breanna Tarlton 6th Place: Dalton McHenry 7th Place: Cole Ebdrup 8th Place: Nicholas Andrlik

Class 9 1st Place: Nathan Claunch 2nd Place: Ethan Vaughan 3rd Place: Jacob Burnette 4th Place: Andrew Gmytruk 5th Place: Megan Todd 6th Place: Alexus Williams 7th Place: Alexander Fernandez 8th Place: Zachary Zolna

Class 2 1st Place: Justin Stallard 2nd Place: Allison Lane 3rd Place: Darby Hastings 4th Place: Heather Ross 5th Place: Gresham Stephens 6th Place: Morgan Higgins 7th Place: Tyler Glenn 8th Place: Kailee Triner

Class 6 1st Place: Shannon Gill 2nd Place: Aly Joyner 3rd Place: Morgan Gaudens 4th Place: Keylee Christie 5th Place: Jarrett Gillman 6th Place: Kyle Maidens 7th Place: Haley Riley 8th Place: Shelby Keely

Class 3 1st Place: Mylie Feaster

Class 7 1st Place: Clay Joyner

Class 10 1st Place: Margaret Holt 2nd Place: Kaleb Tew 3rd Place: McKenzie Wheeler 4th Place: Brooke Freeman 5th Place: Ethan Ohnstad 6th Place: Madison Greany 7th Place: Traile Robbins 8th Place: Hanna Simmons

Overall Grand Champion: Clay Joyner Overall Reserve Grand Champion: Shannon Gill Lightweight Division Grand Champion: Justin Stallard Reserve Grand Champion: Mylie Feaster Middleweight Division Grand Champion: Clay Joyner Reserve Grand Champion: Shannon Gill Heavyweight Division Grand Champion: Nathan Claunch Reserve Grand Champion: Margaret Holt

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Class 8 1st Place: Katie Johnson 2nd Place: Autumn Tarlton 3rd Place: Zachary Campbell 4th Place: Katherine Stafford 5th Place: Mary Colding 6th Place: Jacob Coggins 7th Place: Morgan Stanfiel

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Grand Champion: Taylor Harrell, Monstera Deliciosa

Beef Breed Show Sponsored by The Hay Exchange Held in the Patterson Companies Livestock Arena Bred and Owned Heifer Grand Champion: Dusty Locke Reserve Grand Champion: Shalee Conrad Bred and Owned Bull Grand Champion: Justin Barthle Reserve Grand Champion: Kendall Locke Angus Heifer Grand Champion: Allyson Polston Reserve Grand Champion: Kaleb Williams Angus Bull Grand Champion: Kendall Locke Reserve Grand Champion: Taeler Dupre Brangus Heifer Grand Champion: Allyson Polston Reserve Grand Champion: Kaleb Williams Brangus Bull Grand Champion: Casey Harper Reserve Grand Champion: Justin Barthle Other Breeds Heifer Grand Champion: Madi Conrad Reserve Grand Champion: Bailey Buchanon Other Breeds Bull Grand Champion: Jessee Bibby Reserve Grand Champion: Dalton Dry Simmental Heifer Grand Champion: Anna Conrad Reserve Grand Champion: Eddie Maute WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

Simmental Bull Grand Champion: Hannah Cline Commercial Heifer Grand Champion: Meagan Meredith Reserve Grand Champion: Shalee Conrad

Champion Woody Ornamental Chloe Wineinger Champion Foliage Plant Morgan Gaudens

Commercial Heifer with Brahman Influence Grand Champion: Mary Davis Reserve Grand Champion: Baleigh Williams

Champion Hanging Planter Adam Koenig

All Breeds Heifer Grand Champion: Anna Conrad Reserve Grand Champion: Allyson Polston

Champion Liners Chase Guynn

All Breeds Bull Grand Champion: Casey Harper Reserve Grand Champion: Jesse Bibby Showmanship Junior Division 1st Place: Layton Pharis 2nd Place: Shalee Conrad 3rd Place: Sophie Aten

Champion Miscellaneous Plants Stephanie Boehmler

Champion Plant Size No. 1 Jennessy Trushel Champion Plant Size No. 3 Hannah Jones Champion Plant Size No. 7 Rylee Moorman Awards of Distinction: Kendall Gaudens Carver Wineinger Joy Bordner

Intermediate Division 1st Place: Chloe Tew 2nd Place: Madi Conrad 3rd Place: Katie Harwell

2014

Senior Division 1st Place: Anna Conrad 2nd Place: Jacob Burnette 3rd Place: Meagan Meredith Youth Plant Show Sponsored by Gulf Coast Turf and Tractor Grand Champion: Taylor Harrell, Monstera Deliciosa Reserve Grand Champion: Kendall Gaudens, Mammy Crotons

Results

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Naturally Amazing Activities

By Sean Green

Home Grown Easter Eggs 1 2 3

Plants have been used for more than just food for longer than history has been able to record it. It has not been that long that we have had Easter egg dye kits to use to decorate Easter eggs. Plants could dye not only clothing for early civilization, but also things like Easter eggs, and the best part is it can be done with stuff you can find

around the house or in the yard. Anything that has color in it can be used for a dye and I encourage you to experiment. There are some suggestions listed below, but you should definitely not limit your dyes to the list.

Dye Material: (anything with color gathered) Flowers Grass Onions Beets Berries

Weeds Roots Cabbage Spinach Carrots

• Let the eggs sit out to reach room temperature (so they don’t break when you boil)

Materials:

Scissors Small Rubber Bands Old Stockings

Patterns:

(anything with a cool pattern gathered the day you do your eggs)

Leaves Parsley Weeds

Directions:

Rosemary Fern

• Place your Dye Material, 3 tablespoons of salt, and water in a small pot to cover the eggs. • Wet the egg (so your Pattern material sticks to it) • Place the Pattern material on the wet egg • Wrap the stocking around the egg tightly to hold the pattern against the egg • Wrap a rubber band around the stocking (like a hair tie) to keep it tight. • Place the eggs in the pot and hard boil the eggs on low heat. Once boiled, cool the eggs with running water. Remove the stocking and pattern material to see the pattern. The same thing can be done with the coloring kit if you want the nature patterns but not the earth colors for dye.

813-767-4703 301 South Collins Street, Suite 101, Plant City, Florida 33563

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A Closer Look

By Sean Green

Aphidiid Wasps (Aphidius)

Photo by Lyle Buss, University of Florida

Springtime debuts the greatest drama one could attend. For many, the show is just outside the door. What joy! To have a collection of plants, herbs, vegetables, and spices that attract a variety of insects. My collection is somewhat a science experiment and excludes the use of any chemical control methods, barring undisclosed GM sources of plants or seeds. For the past few years, one of the most persistent pests have been the small but devastating oleander aphid (Aphis nerii). Once it arrives, a host of other insects follow, including a small braconid wasp that is the hero of this story. Wasps in the genus Aphidius comprise several species of native parasitic wasps that are known to parasitize a large variety of aphids. A closer look at these tiny wasps will illustrate why they are a popular addition to greenhouse operations and a welcome guest in outdoor gardens. Aphidiid wasps are native parasitic wasps that only attack aphids. Commonly used in greenhouses and outdoor crops, these wasps are known for their ability to locate aphids even when aphid populations are low. The surprising part of this bit is that the success in finding the aphids appears to be a collaborative effort between the plant and the wasp. Researchers at the University of California Davis conducted a study that concluded certain volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) are produced in some plants and activated by a surface wound to the plant, such as aphid infestation. One of the characteristics of VOC’s as a compound is its low boiling point, resulting in quick vaporization and the mass release of molecules that serve as a long range means of communication between the plant and the insect, directing the aphids natural enemy (Aphidiid wasps ) to its rescue. It’s not just the plant that benefits from this call to arms; the wasp arrives to find a crowd of potential hosts for her eggs and is furthermore treated to a buffet of honeydew produced by her soon to be victims. The real drama begins to unfold as more insects join the mix. Aphids are usually found at the tips of the plant where the stalk is tender, they are herded there like cows by the ants that farm them for their honeydew. The ants also offer protection to the aphids by attacking natural enemies and in some cases, actually build protective shelters for the aphids. The Aphidiid wasps react to the presence of ants as if they know that the ants are not only protecting their honWWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

eydew source, but the aphids that produce it and will back off from parasitizing the aphids when they see an ant. The aphids likewise recognize their wasp enemy and in a panic, release their own alarm pheromone which results in a “follow the leader” plunge to the ground in an attempt to escape the wasp. Those that do not escape are doomed to become the nursery for a wasps egg. The Aphidiid wasp punctures the aphid with her ovipositor to lay a single egg inside. The grub hatches from the egg within two days and begins feeding on the aphid from the inside, killing the aphid within a week. As the grub matures, the aphid’s body mummifies, turns dark, and swells with the growth of the wasp. A week later, the developed wasp chews an exit hole in the top of the aphids corpse to emerge as an adult. In addition to the mortality rate caused by direct parasitism, reproduction of the parasitized aphids stops completely within five days of attack. Adults will generally live for two weeks to reproduce, but can lay up to 300 eggs in that time period to produce an exponential reduction in the aphid population. Although under ideal conditions, Aphidiid wasps can offer an effective solution for aphid control, the natural order of the world around us does not guarantee prolonged success for any species. For the Aphidiid wasps to remain effective, temperatures must remain close to 60°F just for mobility and at least 65°F for ideal reproductive rates. Aphids have a greater range, they can tolerate temperatures as low as 40°F before reproductive rates are affected. Aphidiid wasps are opportunistic feeders, they will not stick around to protect your crops or plant all the time, once the aphid population diminishes, the Aphidiid wasps will have no food source and look elsewhere to find one, thus beginning a new cycle of rising aphid population, plants sounding the alarm, and wasps racing to the rescue. It’s these fantastic characteristics of nature and the great outdoors that keeps me excited about agriculture and entomology. Wether you tend towards creationism or evolution to explain such characteristics, one thing is clear, the drama of nature is indeed the greatest show on earth. INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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Michael Paul

PRESERVING THE PLANT CITY LIFESTYLE By Jim Frankowiak

Michael Paul is a lucky man. He’s been able to combine his love for cattle with a teaching position at Plant City High School and a good deal more. A native of Plant City or “Plant City-ian” as he says, Paul is the son of Steve and Kathy Paul. He has two sisters: Mary and Rachel. Paul was introduced to cattle at an early age. “I was 6 or 7 and raised bottle calves purchased from my Uncle Joe Walden’s dairy,” said Paul. “That enabled me to start my herd and developed a love I have for cattle and the land.” Growing up, Paul was active in FFA, showing steers and playing baseball and basketball. He is a 1994 graduate of Plant City High School. Paul continued his education attending Florida Southern College in Lakeland where he majored in citrus business. After receiving his undergraduate degree, Paul became a sales representative for Gro Mor Fertilizer. It was at that time that he received a phone call from Ray Clark, a longtime agriculture instructor at Plant City High School. Clark, who is now retired, was on a recruiting mission. “Mr. Clark called and told me he was looking for an Ag teacher and wanted to know if I was interested,” said Paul, who studied under Clark while at Plant City High School. “It seemed like a good thing for me to consider. I did, applied for the position and was hired. “I had a good rapport with the teachers at the school and the position would enable me to blend and perpetuate my love 88 INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE April 2014

for cattle while teaching others about this way of life which I fully enjoy,” said Paul, who has been teaching agriculture at Plant City High School for 12 years. “I teach animal science and agri-technology. This is farm animal production and it includes things such as anatomy, physiology and animal husbandry.” For the previous six years, Paul also served as coach of the girl’s flag football team at the high school. “Since the opening of Strawberry Crest High School many of our farm kids now enroll in that school, making Plant City High School the high school for city kids, many from the Walden Lake community,” noted Paul. “A lot of our students, both male and female, are not able to raise cattle at their homes and we can accommodate their interest in raising and showing cattle with heifers we have on campus.” The teaching position at Plant City High School also provided the opportunity for Paul to meet his wife Lauren, an English teacher at the school and alumna of the University of South Florida. The Paul’s have a daughter, 20-month-old Mackenzie, and “she’s already an outdoor girl who loves to be outside.” Since both Paul and wife Lauren are faculty members at Plant City High School, they are involved in many student activities that form much of their life away from the classroom. “We are also active in Bethany Baptist Church and our friends there plus time with family.” The Paul’s live in the Cork area on land adjacent to his grandparents. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


In 2003 Paul and his grandfather Glenn Ford began MP and Ford Cattle Company, a club calf operation located on land next to both families. “This has been a great thing for me for several reasons,” said Paul. “It has allowed me to continue my hobby, but more importantly it has given me the opportunity to spend time with my grandfather. We have become close friends and I see him every day.” There’s an added benefit to MP and Ford Cattle Co. “We raise show calves that we sell to young people active in FFA and 4-H in this area. They work with and show these calves at the annual Florida Strawberry Festival and Hillsborough County Fair,” said Paul. Paul, his grandfather and several of their friends breed club calves through artificial insemination. “We cross Maine Anjou with heifers and have been pleased with the results.” Five out of the last seven years, MP and Ford Cattle Co. steers have taken Grand Champion honors at the Florida Strawberry Festival. Clay Joyner took those honors earlier this year. “We have also done well at other prospect shows and that includes the Hillsborough County Fair where our steers took both Grand and Reserve Champion titles this year.” Paul and his grandfather sell an average of 15 of their club calves every year. The price for each is limited by Florida Strawberry Festival officials at no more than $1,000 per calf. “I am hoping my daughter Mackenzie takes after her dad and becomes involved with cattle. That would be terrific,” said Paul. As to the future, more of the same would be just fine for Paul. “I consider myself very fortunate to have been able to blend my love for cattle with my job and to have all of it take place in my hometown. Many memorable things have taken place for me at Plant City High School. I met my wife there and have been able to nurture my love for cattle and share that with many of my students.” Watch from more from MP and Ford Cattle Co. steers and don’t forget the name Mackenzie Paul, there’s a good chance she will become a formidable competitor at a future Strawberry Festival.

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YOUTH ORNAMENTAL PLANT SHOW AND SALE CELEBRATES 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Recognizing the Growers of Tomorrow By Jim Frankowiak

The recent Florida Strawberry Festival marked the 40th anniversary of the Youth Ornamental Plant Show and Sale. Held in conjunction with the Festival the show and sale encourages the production of high quality ornamental plant material and rewards young growers for their efforts. The event is co-sponsored by the Tampa Bay Chapter of the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association, the Florida Strawberry Festival and the Hillsborough County Cooperative Extension Service. “Any FFA or 4-H Club member attending a Hillsborough County School or enrolled in a Hillsborough County 4-H Club is eligible to participate,” said Extension Agent Shawn Steed. “Participation is a great way for these young men and women to be introduced to the industry. It’s also a chance for them to interact and network with those already established in the profession.” Environmental Horticulture is one of the largest segments of Hillsborough County agriculture and it ranks fourth in annual sales by nurseries in Florida. Annual sales for the ornamental plant production industry in 2012 exceeded $137 million. Hillsborough County has almost 400 wholesale and retail nurseries licensed by the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. “Ornamental plant producers farm over 3,600-acres in the county,” noted Steed. The landscape and retail sectors in the county represented an additional $500 million in sales in 2011. “Those are substantial figures and help make a case for doing whatever we can to assure the industry will continue into the future and this annual activity certainly fosters that effort,” said Steed. In addition, the Youth Plant Show and Sale is an opportunity to introduce Florida Friendly Landscaping Principles to youth in Hillsborough County and the general public. The exhibits represent the student’s project for the year. Record keeping requirements, growing experience and classroom instruction serve to expose students to the production segment of the industry and to experience the pleasure of learning by doing. The silent and live auction occur simultaneously. This year’s show and sale attracted nearly 200 entries, called projects, and they garnered a range of awards from blue ribbons for winning exhibits, $20 Awards of Distinction, section champions at $25 each and reserve ($35) and grand championship ($75). In addition to cash prizes, top honors included a rosette, while the top two 90

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awards also included a plaque.

2014 winners were:

Grand Champion Taylor Harrell of the Antioch Critters 4-H Reserve Champion Kendall Gaudens, Tomlin FFA Champion Woody Ornamentals Chloe Wineinger, Antioch Critters 4-H Champion Foliage Plants Morgan Gaudens, Strawberry Crest FFA Champion Hanging Planters Adam Koenig with Lennard FFA Champion Miscellaneous Stephanie Boehmler of Brandon FFA Champion Size #1 Jennessy Trushel, Turkey Creek FFA Champion Size #3 Hannah Jones, Above and Beyond 4-H Champion Size #7 Rylee Moorman, Tomlin FFA Champion Liners Chase Guynn of Lennard FFA Awards of Distinction Winners: Kendall Gaudens, Tomlin FFA; Carver Wineinger, Antioch Critters 4-H and Joy Bordner, Lennard FFA “I would like to extend my special thanks to our master of ceremonies Friedel Scholl, FNGLA Tampa Chapter President; Auctioneer Don Kirkland with Higgenbotham Auctioneers, our judges from Kempton, Hardeman & Associates; Committee Chair Greg Shiver and Roger Newton,” said Steed. “We also owe our gratitude to all of our buyers with special thanks to Consolidated Land Care & Pest Control, Gerard Davis of Davis Farms, Tommy Hale with Farm Bureau Insurance and Sunshine State Federal Credit Union.” Steed also expressed gratitude to Records Book Contest Sponsors: Camarra’s Landscape Nursery, Suncoast Plant Nursery, J-SLAC Nursery, Windfield Solutions, Inc., Jemy Hinton, Tampa Bay Landscaping and Touch of Health and Healing, as well as Parking Lot Sponsors: Harrell’s Nursery, Inc., J & R Nursery, Epps Nursery and Central Maintenance and Welding. Since the inception of the Show and Sale, more than 3,000 students have participated with more than 7,000 projects entered and sales of approximately $800,000. “Two years ago we introduced a measurement dimension to this overall program that plots 16 individual skills from public speaking and decision-making to trimming plants correctly and the safe application of pesticides,” noted Steed. “There has been significant progress in each of these measured skills which is an important benefit in that these youngsters are truly learning by doing,” said Steed. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Florida Strawberry Festival’s Grand Champion Swine

By Melissa Nichols

Cole Hanson exhibited the 2014 Grand Champion swine

at the Florida Strawberry Festival. Although Cole has won many Grand and Reserve Champion and even won Supreme Champion with Sheep in 2012 and 2013 at the Florida Strawberry Festival, this honor of Grand Champion Pig took five years. Cole waited five years for his name to finally be drawn for him to be able to raise and exhibit a pig at the Florida Strawberry Festival. He said this year if he didn’t finally get drawn he was going to stop trying, as every year he would get his hopes up and not get drawn. After waiting all that time, he put all his effort into raising his pig. He, in fact, took no chances and bought two in case something happened to one of them. The Grand Champion Pig’s name was “Mercedes” the backup pig was named “Benz”. Cole really enjoyed the whole experience of raising the market animals, from washing them, to cleaning their pen, walking them for exercise and making sure their feed was rationed properly. He quickly realized that pigs are a lot of work and different from sheep, but very much worth the effort. Cole is also a student at Turkey Creek Middle School, where he is a chapter officer and participates in many CDE’s (Career Development Events). Mercedes started out weighing around 60 lbs. and weighed in to the festival at 276. Cole was called back for showmanship with Mercedes which made this experience even more exciting.

Cole is grateful to share the champion drive moments with class winner Jenna Rae Keely and Reserve Champion Zack Bozeman, both his friends.

Cole has taken what he has learned from the experience and shared it with his peers in an effort to enrich them with his lessons. Mercedes and Benz both came from Alan Newsome. Mr. Newsome was a great help to Cole throughout the project, always answering questions and giving him advice. This was really a family effort, his mom Julie Hastings, step dad Shane and his Ag teachers Allison Sparkman and Buddy Coleman were very helpful and dedicated to seeing Cole succeed in this project. Cole is grateful to share the champion drive moments with class winner Jenna Rae Keely and Reserve Champion Zack Bozeman, both his friends. Cole would like to thank everyone who helped him with this project it was a great year for him and an experience he will never forget!

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GET R.E.A.L. CAMPERS EXPERIENCE AND ENJOY XTREME CUISINE

Learning About Cooking with Florida Fruits and Vegetables By Jim Frankowiak Since 2007, teachers, nutrition education professionals, 4H club leaders and other education coordinators have taught “Xtreme Cuisine Cooking School” concepts to older elementary and middle school students in Florida. Through this program, students learn to make their own healthy snacks using “Fresh from Florida” fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and other nourishing recipe ingredients. Here in Hillsborough County the Xtreme Cuisine program has been fostered by a partnership involving volunteer instructors from Hillsborough County Farm Bureau teaching Tampa youngsters who are camping out at Hillsborough River State Park through the City of Tampa Parks and Recreation Department’s Get REAL (RecreationEnvironmental-Adventures-in-Learning) Spring Break Camping Program. “Our group this year included young people from Tampa ages 9 through 12 and two Junior Camp Leaders,” said Deborah Giep, a City of Tampa Parks and Recreation Department Team Supervisor. “The vast majority of campers in the class participated in Xtreme Cuisine previously and enjoyed the new dishes they created this year. As a matter of fact, three of the campers had never tasted blackberries before this session.” The Xtreme Cuisine menu this year included fresh berry yogurt parfaits and tasty wraps, with both the parfait and wraps made with Florida berries and vegetables, created by each of the youngsters participating in the program. “In addition to preparing nutritious and tasty treats, we help students learn how Florida fruit and vegetables used in these recipes help prevent heart diseases and other obesity-related illnesses,” said Michelle Williamson, a member of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Board of Directors who is part of a strawberry growing family business and the lead Xtreme Cuisine instructor. In addition, students learn the dangers caused by excessive amounts of salt, sugar and fats in their diet, and how fiber could eliminate their desire for high-calorie, low-nutrition snack foods. 96

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“We close each session by telling students how many calories are needed for their age and gender, the vitamin and mineral content of many Florida fruit and vegetables, and how to read a food nutrition label,” said Williamson. “We also tell them the sugar and salt content of many popular snacks along with the calories of each.” Participating students receive recipe and nutritional brochures for their use after the Xtreme Cuisine class and for sharing with their families. “The realization of increasing obesity among children prompted our Women’s Leadership Committee to partner with Florida Farm Bureau Federation, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the City of Tampa Parks and Rec Department to offer Xtreme Cuisine Cooking Schools during the year,” noted Williamson. “What’s really neat and appealing about this program is that students not only learn about good nutrition, but learn how to prepare snacks that are good for them. It was especially gratifying to see youngsters who had been in Xtreme Cuisine classes previously anxious to participate again to learn about new treats they could make for themselves.” Since the Xtreme Cuisine program began in 2007, Williamson and other members of the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau have led numerous classes. The goal of each class is to give students some options to put healthy snack into their daily eating habits. “Our hope is that by showing these youngsters that just by making a few small changes they can make a real difference in their future health,” said Williamson. “The added bonus is using Fresh from Florida produce to make these delicious and nutritious snacks. Based on the reaction of this most recent class, we know this program is working.” Sessions similar to the one held here in Hillsborough County take place across Florida, and it is estimated that nearly 20,000 Florida youngsters have participated in Xtreme Cuisine Cooking School since 2007.

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Florida Strawberry Festival FFA Exhibit Competition Each year, eight FFA chapters from the local area design and construct a booth that is agriculturally educational and related to the Festival’s current theme. The theme for the 2014 Festival was “Florida’s Best Family Recipe!” “We are an agriculturally based event,” said General Manager Paul Davis. “It’s important to us to educate our patrons about the agriculture industry in Florida, and we love having our FFA members help with that effort.” 1. Strawberry Crest 2. Tomlin Middle School 3. Plant City High School 4. Turkey Creek Middle School Awards of Distinction: Brandon FFA, Durant FFA, East Bay FFA and Marshall FFA WWW. WWW.IIN NTTHE HEFFIELD IELDM MAGAZINE.COM AGAZINE.COM

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PROGRESS OF FLORIDA POMEGRANATES DISCUSSED AT GROWER’S MEETING Specialty Block Grant Helping By Jim Frankowiak

The future viability of the Florida pomegranate has been given a big boost with new research underway as the result of a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Specialty Crop Block Grant that will bring more conclusive information as the study is completed in two years. The scope of that research, formation of a pomegranate growers’ cooperative and other topics of importance were all discussed at the Florida Pomegranate Association’s Grower’s Meeting held last month at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC) at Wimauma. The research is being led by the Florida Specialty Crop Foundation and it includes blackberries as well as pomegranates. The grant of approximately $183,000 is being administered by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) with the work being done under the auspices of the GCREC. “This research project is a great example of multiple collaborators working together toward a common goal,” said the foundation’s executive director Sonia Tighe. “It is a very broad project in that it will not only look at breeding the varieties of pomegranates and blackberries that could succeed in Florida, but it will also examine the disease pressures that are hampering the growth of the industry. And, it is going to focus on insects, as well as looking at an economic model in terms of profitability scenarios and also do some consumer tasting panels so that we know how to better meet consumer demand. So it is a multi-faceted project.” The natural and economic threats to Florida’s commodities give high importance to the viability of alternative crops. Tighe noted the development of viable alternative crops is very important to Florida’s agricultural industry “in terms of bringing some balance to the risks growers face when they have crops such as citrus.” That balance is more important than ever now that citrus greening has had a devastating effect on overall Florida production and many individual producers have already switched crops or are currently exploring that option. Attendees had the opportunity to hear from the GCREC faculty that will conduct the research and their planned studies. They included Dr. Zhanao Deng, who will be involved in breeding; agricultural economist Dr. Zhengfei Guan; Dr. Hugh Smith, an entomologist and plant pathologist Dr. Gary Vallad. 98

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The researchers stressed the importance of grower engagement and participation in all studies and each in attendance was given a survey to help begin the varied research initiatives. Research updates will be provided via website postings and continued engagement with growers. Anyone with pomegranate trees is encouraged to complete a survey. Survey forms may be secured by emailing: flpomegranate@ gmail.com. Horticultural Scientist Dr. Jeffrey Williamson shared the findings of his work into the use of the plant growth regulator hydrogen cyanamide with blueberries and potential possibilities for its use with pomegranates. His presentation included both advantages and disadvantages and the need for added study to properly ascertain suitability. He stressed the regulator is a restricted use pesticide not yet labeled for use with pomegranates, but has been beneficial with crops grown in India and California. “We need controlled experiments in Florida to determine the effectiveness of hydrogen cyanamide and other compounds which may promote uniform bloom and vegetative growth,” he said. Dr. John VanSickle of the University of Florida Food and Resource Economics Department introduced the critical steps required in the potential development of a Florida pomegranate grower’s cooperative. A cooperative is a business owned and controlled by the people who use its services. They finance and operate the business or service for their mutual benefit. By working together, they can reach an objective that would be unattainable were they to act alone. “The industry here in Florida faces an uncertain future without development of markets for their products,” said VanSickle. “It will be a few years before a critical volume of pomegranates will be produced that will make a processing option viable. Growers have the time to develop a cooperative in the right way. I believe there are opportunities for Florida pomegranate growers, but they cannot expect their marketing opportunities to develop independently of their efforts,” he said. Additional information about the Florida Pomegranate Association, including its Annual Meeting and Conference, which is slated for October 10, 2014 at the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred, is available by emailing: flpomegranate@gmail.com or by calling 863/604-3778. You may also visit: www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/ extension/pomegranates/ WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


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Plant City

Club

By Cheryl Kuck

Horticulture Competition blossoms in new location

Plant City Garden Club Strawberry Festival Horticulture Show Coordinator Jan Griffin shown here with her first place dish garden award.

From the left, Horticulture Show Coordinator Jan Griffin with her entry and first place dish garden award and Garden Club volunteers Mrs. Lee Wright and Cindy Cord.

This year the Plant City Garden Club moved Horticulture Competition from its previous home in the Roy & Helen Parke building to a central location in the newly erected Neighborhood Village building. Strawberry Festival Horticulture Coordinator Jan Griffin and her garden club volunteers voiced concerns about the protection of plants in the center of the vast high traffic area that houses a huge variety of home-created arts and crafts, although they believe that over-all the public liked being able to walk all around the exhibit and view the plants from different angles. This year, there were 167 entrants with 84 in the junior division. Small starter plants are supplied free-of-charge to schools as a project under the guidance of the garden club and educator Lisa Firm before the Festival so students can learn how to take care of their plants for approximately six weeks in preparation for the horticulture exhibit and competition. In the junior division Jaylynn Silvia-Perez won best in show and Riley Buttorff won ‘best’ in the intermediate division.

liad and cactus. Jan Griffin won for the top dish garden while Liz Miller had the most outstanding orchid and Margaret Menefee received the award in the succulent category. This show had nine judges working in panels of three for each age group. The over-all consensus was that there were so many truly beautiful plants that it took a long time to make their decisions. “The Plant City Garden Club has been established for 63 years and has been a part of the Festival for over 40 years. We want to continue to thrive and teach a new generation of gardeners through our school teaching and annual scholarship we offer to a Plant City area senior majoring in environment, conservation, agriculture and other related fields. “We will continue to be passionate about growing a better future for our community and our state,” says Griffin. * Plant City Garden Club, a member of the National Garden Club and Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, holds monthly meetings at the Plant City Photo Archives & History Center, 106 S. Evers St. For further information go to their Web site: www.plantcitygardenclub.org.

Adult gardeners; Dwain Miller, best in show, Mary Collins received a ‘best’ in the hanging plant category, Mark Headly won ‘best’ awards in three categories, African Violet, brome100

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Mark Headley receives Best African Violet award with genus Saintpaulia plus top bromeliad and cactus award

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Best in show – hanging; Tradescantia Sillamontana cultivated by Mary Collins

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The Neighborhood Village

- a new home for home skills By Cheryl Kuck

There is a lot of work to be done in order to transform a building resembling an airplane hangar of monolithic proportions into an inviting atmosphere for 531,659 visitors. First, Betty Lucas, Neighborhood Village Overall Chairwoman for 23 years, holds an incessant number of meetings with all her support staff, department and co-department heads, to plan for opening day.

chair, Lloyd Summers cake decorating co-chair, Judy Hasch quilting chair, Margaret Beach quilting co-chair, and Ginger Vincent Coordinator of Village Events, as well as the youth competition which is under the direction of Judi Whitson Hillsborough County Farm Bureau executive director.

There is a talented and vigilant support team who work closely with Lucas helping her keep things running smoothly before and during the 11-day Festival, as well as helping reorganize and begin the annual planning and improvement process in preparation for the following year.

Marsha Passmore is the Chairwoman of Village Department Knitting, Crocheting and Tatting. There are mountains of fabrics and materials to sort through with each item marked and ready for judging. When judging is completed, additional volunteers help Passmore and White display everything submitted that is in the desired condition, both winners and non-winners, then match the appropriate ribbons with the item and submission ticket.

Members of the support team include Doris Smith, coordinator of department chairs and volunteers, Linda Walden, coordinator of judges and judging, and Jackie Waters, the record keeping chair.

Grand Champion ribbons were awarded to; Diane Bartek, Valrico, for Crochet, Pamela Wagner, Plant City, Tatting and Nancy Laniewski of St. Petersburg for knitting.

Another vital member of team Lucas is Ginger Vincent who is in her seventh year as Coordinator of Village Events. Her job is to oversee all the endless details required for building maintenance and village supplies, including ribbons, furnishings and other necessities for judging and display are ordered and ready for placement. “I do everything needed to make the 12,000 foot village building and experience memorable for the visitors and workers.”

The village department for quilting is another beehive of activity. Quilting judges are experts in all areas of quilting. Festival judges come from throughout the state of Florida. They receive and separate each submission for its judging category; embroidery, themed, pieced work and appliqué. They also make suggestions on the back of each individual submission card to use as a reference that may be helpful to improve the quilters skills for greater competition results in the future.

There are eleven departments in the village, each has a Chairperson and a Co-chairperson. They are Norma Riley needlepoint, needlework and plastic canvas chair, Helen Keen needlepoint, needlework and plastic canvas co-chair, Joan Reed home décor chair, Tammy Arnold décor co-chair, Betty Roney wearing apparel and accessories chair, Gerri Brownlee co-chair wearing apparel and accessories, Cindy Bently-Roberts photo scrapbooking chair, Brenda Lipham photo scrapbooking co-chair, Betty Olson food preservation chair, Janice Kimbro food preservation co-chair, Malissa Crawford toys, dolls and porcelain dolls chair, Rhonda Glisson toys and dolls co-chair, Marsha Passmore knitting, crocheting and tatting chair, Dodie White co-chair knitting, crocheting and tatting co-chair, Barbara McCall baking chair, Patti Brosky baking co-chair, Nina Megginson jewelry chair, Gladi King jewelry co-chair, Tania Summers cake decorating 104

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Festival quilt competition is open to those 18-years and up. “It takes three weeks of 8 - 15 hour days to construct a bed-size quilt. Values of approximately $500 to $1,200 are placed on the materials used for just one large quilt. Quilts are family keepsakes that are passed down from generation to generation and should be properly cared for,” says Quilting Chairwoman Judy Hasch. Due to the potential increase in value through the years, Hasch also advises quilters; to record their provenance (how it was made-materials, etc., for whom, how long it took to complete), any awards the quilt received through competition, and date the work, as well as have it appraised for insurance purposes, remembering to save all WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


receipts. The Quilting Grand Champions; Embroidery quilt created by Millie Chemiel of Tampa, theme quilt by Gina Lucas of Lakeland. A pieced quilt and an appliqué quilt, both by Cindy Bailey of Valrico, received Grand Champion Awards. Wearing Apparel and Accessories Grand Champions are; Norma Pasetti of Tampa, who received two awards in this category, and Christine Srock of Pinellas Park. Home Décor Chairwoman Joan Reed with her daughter Co-Chair Tammy Arnold help organize their large display area which also hold displays of other department entries complimentary to home décor. Home Décor involves a variety categories; for table top display, linens, wall hangings, outdoor decorations and accessories such as woven baskets and rugs. The Grand Champions are; Joy DiMarko of Tampa, who created a floral design wall hanging and also a first place unique 3-D art piece with nine hat designs. Mary Mahoney, Tampa, received her award for a curved table runner, Jerri Heer, Tampa, constructed a stone and Amethyst tree, and Jill Withrow of Wesley Chapel made a patriotic themed toaster cover. The following are displayed in the area of Home Décor but are individual departments: Toys and Dolls Department winner Janis Edwards of Sun City Center received the Grand Champion Award for her hand-created rainbow-colored floppy-eared dog . The Needlepoint, Needlework and Plastic Canvas Department Grand Champion Award recipients are; Verna McKilvin of Plant City who received a Grand Champion Award for her framed needlepoint tiger, Barbara Wolfe, Plant City, who created a country cottage, and Valerie Lamela, Seffner, who made a dragon. WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM

The Jewelry Department awarded artisan Jerri Heer a coveted GC purple ribbon for her intricately constructed necklace. Since no home would be compete without showing off photographic memories, the Photo Scrapbooking Department gave Grand Champion ribbons to Sarah Walker of Riverview and Arilla Zell, Seffner. Looking like a character out of the television series “Little House on the Prairie,” Betty Denton, known as the ‘Lady caner’ demonstrated heritage chair caning and seat weaving in the village, much to the delight of Festival visitors who asked lots of questions and were interested in this craft that is rapidly approaching the status of a lost art. Miss Betty, as she is called, started caning in 1992 and started her own business in 2002. “I love helping preserve our heritage. Caning fits with the way I was brought up believing, ‘idle hands are the devils work.’” The Neighborhood Village hosted a free raffle for each of two items; a computerized Brother sewing machine offered by Inspire! Quilting and Sewing of Plant City and a full set of cookware sponsored by Kitchen Craft. Festival patrons were able to enter both drawings throughout all 11 days of the annual event. The last day of the festival Ann Longley, a visitor from Massachusetts, became the lucky winner whose prize package is valued at approximately $4,000. Another out-of- state visitor, Jim Farris, won an 8-piece cookware set donated by longtime village demonstrating sponsor Kitchen Craft. Strawberry Festival President Jim Jeffries picked the winning raffle ticket for the cookware valued at over $1,000. “We may be a little tired now,” says Lucas. “However, our support team and department chairs are immediately going into meetings to see how we can make 2015 and even better experience for attendees and competition entrants.” INTHEFIELD MAGAZINE

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The Neighborhood Village

Youth

Competitors Prove Home Arts Alive and Treasured By Cheryl Kuck

*Two Grand Champions; Jordyn Lanier for a mossy fairy house and Tobias Beatty for Western Lego models in shadow box

* Jewelry - Noelle Cox

* Baby blanket – Roxanna Storms

Grand champions Neighborhood Youth List: Kaci Anderson, Child Development Kaci Anderson, Whole Wheat Bread Tobais Beatty, Lego Model Moriah Beaty, Stamp Collection Austin Black, Knitted Scarf Noelle Cox, Necklace and Bracelet Katie Cox, Banana Supreme Cake Cade Denhoff, Peanut Butter Fudge Cade Denhoff, Barbeque Sauce Gracie Garner, Pillow Case Dress Tucker Dock Garner, Jalapeno Cornbread Anna Gibbs, Citizenship Phillip Gibbs, Strawberry Cake *Jordyn Lanier, Fairy House Gracie Lee, Grape Jelly Morgan Maxey, Orange Pound Cake Landon Richards, Pine Restoration *Roxanna Storms, Baby Blanket Gideon Storms, T-Rex Hope Storter, Wall Hangings Hope Sorter, Hawaiian Bread Taryn Storter, Apple Jelly Aaron Thompson, Cookie Bar *Isaiah Wallace, Painted Guitar Turkey Creek, Community Service 106

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April 2014

Roxanna Storms with her entry, peanut Roxanna and Elijah Storms fill butter brittle, and her brother Elijah out Youth entry forms Storms brought his chocolate pretzel bark

The Neighborhood Village Youth Craft and Baking Competition, under the leadership of Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Director Judi Whitson, is working to reignite the enthusiasm of our youth through hands-on participation in endeavors that will have a positive influence in their lives. “We want to get back to the percentages of youth involvement we had five years ago. Kids need to know where their food comes from. Frankly, everything else seems to be going down the tubes but Florida agriculture has maintained annual revenues of over $7,000,000,000,” says Whitson. A firm believer in education, Whitson leads by example, teaching and mentoring youth who enter village, 4-H and Future Farmers of America Strawberry Festival competitions, as well as, holding the annual Youth Bake Sale where all baked goods are sold after judging. Proceeds go toward offsetting costs and any profit is donated to the Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Youth Scholarship Fund.

* Painted Guitar – Isaiah Wallace WWW.INTHEFIELDMAGAZINE.COM


Making a special appearance at the village on March first, teen fashion designer Julia Chew brought her designs fresh from the runway and Christian Fashion week, for a special show before her artful creations hit the red carpet during Gainesville Fashion Week. Considered a rising star in the fashion world at only nineteen-years-ofage, Chew fondly remembers Whitson’s encouragement and brought back a display of the many Neighborhood Village youth competition ribbons she won over the years. “Now I want to give back to the community by operating my own fashion house here in Tampa, and hiring other creative young people.”

Xaolin 2014 Strawberry fest show! – Teen designer Julia Chew allows children visiting the Neighborhood Village to pose with models wearing her designs

Family is very important to the homeschooled Christian girl who was born in Nanning, China. Her maternal and paternal grandmothers taught her to sew and gave her a good sewing machine. That began her designing and sewing garments for school and village competitions. Her father took her camping and provided the inspiration from nature and the natural elements she uses in the exquisite clothes she is known for creating today. Her mother is also involved helping promote and manage her Xiaolin brand fashion business. Young children visiting the village and were fascinated with the Xiaolin fashion show. “I just loved it that they were so excited to see the clothes and enjoyed posing with the models. Maybe one day they will find the Strawberry Festival a venue for their talents. I remember how rewarding it was to win a prize. It was a really good experience and helps give you confidence,” she said.

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Village Youth Division food judges love their job! From the left; Judi Bassett, Mitchell Baer, Rose Peacock, Judi Whitson, Michael Peacock Glenda Raulerson and Doris Baer.

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In The Field magazine Hillsborough edition  

Agriculture magazine covering Hillsborough County in Florida