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Leading the way: preparation strategies for common core Date: 14.7.2012

Elizabeth Rogovoy Montgomery County Public School, Maryland


Enduring Understanding: ď‚Ą

Instructional leaders have an important role in teaching and learning as the coach and guide through the exploration of the Common Core State Standards.

Essential Question: 1. What are the most effective ways we can integrate the Common Core Standards into our IB curriculum to support student learning? 2. What is the best way we can design curriculum to prepare our learners for their future?


WHY

What What Wh HOW


By the end of the training, the instructional leaders will understand: the importance of laying the foundation by establishing Professional Learning Communities  exploring knowing versus understanding of the standards  the power or essential elements of the standards  transferring the meaning through assessment 

Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

Knowing vs. Understa nding the Standards

Power of the Standards

Transferr ing Meaning through Teaching and Learning


"Standards define what children should know and be able to do at the end of each grade. A curriculum specifically describes what children need to learn to meet those standards.� --http://www.coreknowledge.org/ccss


Common Core  The Standards are designed to build upon the most

advanced current thinking about preparing all students for success in college and their careers.  The standards will establish what students need to learn and will dictate how the teaching and learning will look like in the classroom setting.  The standards are a clear set of shared goals and expectations for what knowledge and skills will help students be successful.  The standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. DECODE THE PUZZLE Page 6


Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

Which graphic best represents the relationship between Common Core, IB standards, and Local Requirements?

A.

B.

C.


Polleverywhere.com A. Venn Diagram 61464 B. Separate Circles 61465 C. Circle within a Circle 61466


Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

Which graphic best represents the relationship between Common Core, IB standards, and Local Requirements?

A. 61464

B. 61465

C. 61466


Common Core ď‚— The Common Core establishes a set of clear and

consistent goals for learning that will ultimately prepare students for college and the workforce.


Data Teams and Professional Learning Communities

ď‚— The learning pathways and progression of the

Common Core allow for Data Teams to come alive because of the intentional alignment of standards between grade levels. ď‚— Data Teams: collaboratively improve their instructional practices, use standards and assessments to program for students, share a common way to assess and evaluate student performance.


Professional Learning Communities  Give a structure and function for teachers to have a

conversation around teaching and learning  “Strongest way to improve students learning is to help teachers function as PLCs.” - Rick Dufour


Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

Criteria for Effective PLCs

Criteria  Shared mission, vision, and values  Collective inquiry  Collaborative teams  Action-oriented and experimental  Continuous improvement  Results-oriented

That question:  What is it we want students to learn?  How will we know if students are learning?  How will we respond when some of our students are not learning?  How will we enrich and extend learning for those students who are already proficient?


An Effective PLC Looks Like

Sounds Like

Assessed Like


Reading the Standards CCSS Reading Standard Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text. RI.6.6

Strand: Reading Standards for Literature

Grade Level

Number of the Standard in the Strand


Knowing vs. Understanding the Standards

Unwrapping the Standards

 The standards are the “what” the academic

learning outcomes that each student needs to know and be able to do in each grade and course.  The curriculum framework that IB has developed serves as both the detailed road map and the high-quality delivery system for ensuring that all students achieve the desired end.  The Unit of Study is a series of specific lessons, learning experiences, and related assessmentsbased on the designated standards, topics, and skills that will be the focus.


Knowing vs. Understanding the Standards

Envelope Progression

ď‚— Work within a group to collaborate and discuss the

progression of the standards. ď‚— Sort the standards in the envelope according to the progression that bests fits how students learn best.


Knowing vs. Understanding the Standards

 Identify the

Tips for Reading the Standards verbs: They tell you the student outcome and

clarify and highlight valid student performances in which content is used  Identify the nouns: They tell you the big ideas (conceptual understanding)  Identify the qualifiers (adjectives and adverbs): They tell you the context and degree of expectation and help to determine valid criteria and rubrics related to successful performance against the standards.  Identify and/or infer long-term transfer goals by looking closely at the highest level standards and indicators for them


Reading the Standards  RI.6.6 DETERMINE an author’s point of view or

purpose in a text and EXPLAIN how it is conveyed in the text.  RH.6.-8.8 DISTINGUISH among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.


Knowing vs. Understanding the Standards

Revisit Envelope Progression

ď‚— With this new knowledge revisit the standards in

the envelope according to the progression that bests fits how students learn best. ď‚— Paying close attention to the nouns, verbs, and qualifiers.


Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

Knowing vs. Understandin g the Standards

ď‚— What are the most beneficial

reasons for establishing a Professional Learning Community for this type of learning experience?


Power of the Standards

Power of the Standards

To unwrap the standards means to identify the teachable concepts that students need to know and the skills they need to be able to do in the wording of the standard. To do this underline the important nouns and noun phrases, and circle or capitalize the verbs. Even though the initial task of “unwrapping” is to separate concepts from skills, the two remain interrelated.  RI.6.6 DETERMINE an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and EXPLAIN how it is conveyed in the text.  RH.6.-8.8 DISTINGUISH among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.


Transferring Meaning Determine the “big ideas� or conceptual understandings. What do you want the students to understand 10 years from now? 2. Knowing vs. Understanding: What would proficiency look like for this standard? 3. Instructional Strategies: What instructional strategies would be most effective to get students to this standard? 4. Assess: Determine exactly what it is you want to find out, what it is you want the assessment to do, and why you are assessing this standard? (Progression) 1.


Transferring Meaning through Teaching and Learning

Transferring Meaning


Reflect on your organizer‌ Can you answer‌. What is it we want students to learn? How will we know if students are learning? How will we respond when some of our students are not learning? How will we enrich and extend learning for those students who are already proficient?

Laying the Foundation Establishin g PLCs

Knowing vs. Understandi ng the Standards

Power of the Standards

Transferring Meaning through Teaching and Learning


Laying the Foundation Establishing PLCs

ď‚— What are the most beneficial Knowing vs. Understandin g the Standards

Power of the Standards

Transferring Meaning through Teaching and Learning

reasons for establishing a Professional Learning Community for this type of learning experience?


What is the difference between collaboration through a PLC and group work?


How does this photo show the difference between collaboration through a PLC and group work?


Contact Information elizabeth_m_rogovoy@mcpsmd.org


Common Core State Standard

4.

Assess Determine exactly what it is you want to find out, what it is you want the assessment to do, and why you are assessing this standard (going back to the progression)

2. Knowing vs. Understanding Discuss with group and jot down what proficiency would look like for this standard. What would enriched and extended learning look like for this standard?

3. “How” Instructional Strategies What instructional strategies would be most effective to get students to this standard?

1. Determine the “big ideas” or “conceptual understandings” These ideas convey to students the benefit or value of learning the standard. They represent what educators want students to remember long after instruction ends. This helps to determine the clarity or meaning of the standard.


Progression of Skills and the Common Core English Language Arts: Reading Literature-Craft and Structure  

Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

  

Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

 

Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

  

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.


Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

  

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

 

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

  

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.


 

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

  

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.  

Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).


Progression of Skills and the Common Core English Language Arts: Reading Literature-Craft and Structure Kindergarten 

First Grade

RL.K.5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

RL.K.6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

RL.1.4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

RL.1.5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

RL.1.6. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

Second Grade 

Third Grade

RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

RL.2.4. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

RL.2.5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

RL.2.6. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

RL.3.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

RL.3.5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

RL.3.6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

Fourth Grade 

RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

RL.4.5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

RL.5.5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

RL.5.6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

RL.6.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RL.6.5. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

RL.6.6. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

Fifth Grade

Sixth Grade


Seventh Grade 

RL.7.5. Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

RL.7.6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

Eighth Grade 

Ninth Grade And Tenth Grade

RL.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

RL.8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

RL.8.5. Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.

RL.8.6. Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Eleventh Grade And Twelfth Grade

RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).


Leading the Way…Preparation Strategies for Common Core Training Plan Audience: IB Conference, Mexico Date: July 14, 2012

Time: 75 minutes Author: Montgomery County Public Schools, Division of Accelerated and Enriched Instruction (Elizabeth Rogovoy)

Purpose: How do instructional leaders (i.e. district and governing boards) develop system-wide strategies and processes to prepare schools and teachers for educational mandates such as the Common Core State Standards (CCSS?) This session will present one school district’s method for building collaborative learning communities to explore the commonalities between current standards and the Common Core which also highlight the importance of conceptual understanding, articulation, on-going support and professional development. Participants will also be provided with an action planning template for future strategic planning.

Enduring Understanding: Instructional leaders have an essential role in teaching and learning as the coach and guide through the exploration of the Common Core State Standards. Essential Question: 1. What are the most effective ways we can integrate the Common Core Standards into our IB curriculum to support student learning? 2. What is the best way we can design curriculum to prepare our learners for their future? Desired Outcomes: By the end of the training, the instructional leaders will understand the importance of:  laying the foundation by establishing Professional Learning Communities  exploring the difference between knowing versus understanding of the standards  identifying the essential elements of the standards  transferring the meaning through assessment Additional Supplies/Trainer Resources:  www.todaysmeeting.com  www.polleverywhere.com  http://www.tc2.ca/wp/


Agenda: 1. Welcome, Background Information, Purpose 2. WHY: Common Core Standards, often misunderstood 3. 4. 5. 6.

What…The Common Core How…Criteria for Effective PLC and Data Teams: Give ownership to the people doing the work Unwrapping the Standards: Knowing vs. Understanding Power of the Standards

7. Why…Transferring Meaning 8. Summarizer

Time 5’

Format Share

Content Welcome, Background Information and Purpose Say the following: The overall goal of the training is for instructional leaders to understand the importance of preparing for the Common Core with your IB Programmes and to share some ideas on how to do so that are working well for one district.

8’

Discuss

The goal of today’s training is to understand the importance of developing system-wide strategies and processes to prepare schools and teachers for educational mandates such as the Common Core State Standards. WHY: Common Core Standards, often misunderstood Read the findings on the slide. (Myths and Facts from the Common Core) Briefly elaborate on each point. Then, explain to participants that one point is false. There are two criteria for identifying the false point:  The finding does not advance the argument supported by the other findings  The finding is inconsistent with the other findings Give participants time to collaborate with a neighbor and identify the false point. Tell them that they will have to justify their answer. After 2 minutes facilitate the sharing out of the “false” answer with justification.

Resources


Time

Format

Content The goal is get participants “engaged” in thinking about the Common Core and considering what it true about the Common Core. Create the Purpose: Setting out the problem…How are we going to get there?

5’

Think Pair Share

What…The Common Core Present slide four and say the following: What model best represents the relationship between Common Core Standards, IB Standards, and Local Requirements? Give time to participants to think, pair with a partner and then share their votes. This could be done with activotes or polleverywhere.com

12’

Discuss

The criterion for making a reasoned judgment is “best” to answer the question. The key is to determine what is meant by “best” and justify the response. Don’t spend too much time getting into people’s different points of view at this time. Acknowledge that there are different points of few and listen to a few justifications. At the end of the training we will come back to the question and spend more time on it. How…Criteria for Effective PLC and Data Teams: Give ownership to the people doing the work The Common Core establishes a set of clear and consistent goals for learning that will ultimately prepare students for college and the workforce. Complete with specific learning pathways, the CCSS make the Data Teams process come alive because of the intentional alignment of standards between grade levels. Data Teams see great gains in student learning because teachers are given structure and time to collaboratively improve their instructional practice, which includes the use of standards and assessment in the classroom. Teachers on a Data Team share a common focus/standard, a common measurement tool (formative assessments) and common way to evaluate student performance. Therefore, teams use data-driven process and walk away at the end of a 60 minute meeting with a plan to accelerate student learning by providing targeted, researchedbased, explicit instructional interventions. Just as data teams are a vehicle for professional conversations, Professional Learning Communities are also a means for teacher to have conversations around instruction and student learning. Dufour and Eaker have asserted that

Resources


Time

Format

Content the strongest way to improve students learning is to help teachers function as PLCs. Have participants carousel: effective PLCs characteristics: Looks Like Sounds Like

Assessed Like

An effective PLCs according to these authors would have:      

Shared mission, vision, and values Collective inquiry Collaborative teams Action-oriented and experimental Continuous improvement Results-oriented

Ask Participants: How many people are using PLCs already? How is it working? Both the Data Team and the PLC are driven by the same student centered questions: 1. What is it we want students to learn? 2. How will we know if students are learning? 3. How will we respond when some of our students are not learning? 4. How will we enrich and extend learning for those students who are already proficient? (Navigating Assessment and Collaboration with the Common Core State Standards, Laura Besser)

12’

Unwrapping the Standards: Knowing vs. Understanding Because standards, assessment, curriculum, and instruction must work together, it is important to address all four topics in relation to the Common Core State Standards. The standards are the “what” the academic leaning outcomes that each student needs to know and be able to do in each grade and course. The curriculum framework that IB has developed serves as both the detailed road map and the high-quality delivery system for ensuring that all students achieve the desired end. The Unit of Study is a series of specific lessons, learning experiences, and related assessments-based on the designated standards, topics, and skills that

Resources


Time

Format

Content will be the focus. Participants will work in groups to complete a standard sort to determine the progression of the standard. Ask participants to explain to each other how they determined the progression.  

5’

What was the conversation like? Why is it beneficial to establish a PLC for this type of learning experience?

Power of the Standards It is important for teachers to see the progression of the standard and have hands-on experience rather than simple reading the charts. Thinking about the flow sets the importance within the PLCs to begin the conversation about what this would look like as an instructional strategy. To unwrap the standards means to identify the teachable concepts that students need to know and the skills they need to be able to do in the wording of the standard. To do this underline the important nouns and noun phrases, and circle or capitalize the verbs. Even though the initial task of “unwrapping” is to separate concepts from skills, the two remain interrelated. RI.6.6 DETERMINE an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and EXPLAIN how it is conveyed in the text. RH.6.-8.8 DISTINGUISH among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

20’

Why…Transferring Meaning Have participants work through a standard by completing the graphic organizer 1. Determine the “big ideas” or “conceptual understandings” These ideas convey to students the benefit or value of learning the standard. They represent what educators want students to remember long after instruction ends. This helps to determine the clarity or meaning of the standard. 2. Knowing vs. Understanding Discuss with group and jot down what proficiency would look like for this standard. What would enriched and extended learning look like for this standard?

Resources


Time

Format

Content 3. Assess: Performance for Understanding Determine exactly what it is you want to find out, what it is you want the assessment to do, and why you are assessing this standard (going back to the progression) 4. “How” Instructional Strategies What instructional strategies would be most effective to get students to this standard?

Ask participants to reflect back on the student-centered PLC questions: Can they answer the following for the chart that was just created:    

5’

5’

What is it we want students to learn? How will we know if students are learning? How will we respond when some of our students are not learning? How will we enrich and extend learning for those students who are already proficient?

Ask participants to explain:  

What was the conversation like? Why is it beneficial to establish a PLC for this type of learning experience?

Summarizer: What is the difference between collaboration through a PLC and group work? Give participants time to share out. Now show the photo: Ask participants how if they know where this photo is taken? How this photo shows the difference between collaboration through a PLC and group work?

Resources


Time

Format

Content

What you see in this photo can be seen in Gibraltar? You can see the plane going along the runway and the vehicles waiting to cross on the road. Yes, it's true! In Gibraltar, the vehicles must cross the Airport runway to drive from Gibraltar to Spain. In other words, It is the only airport in the world which has runway crossing the express Highway. Gibraltar Airport (also known as North Front Airport): British Gibraltar has very little area, so that the airport runway takes up a major portion of land. The vehicles must cross the runway, to drive from Gibraltar to Spain. Every time planes are due to land or take off, traffic stops for an incomparable show with roaring sound effects and special barriers on two sides. The picture shows you what happens in Gibraltar where pedestrians and vehicles share the space with aircraft on the tarmac. It's no surprise that, Gibraltar Airport is ranked as the fifth most dangerous airport in the world and the most dangerous in Europe. Summarize with the circles as a closure. Resources Getting Ready for the Common Core Handbook Series: Navigating Assessment and Collaboration with the Common Core Standards www.curriculum21.com Dr. Heidi Hayes Jacobs and Dr. Ann Johnson

Resources


Time

Format

Content www.polleverywhere.com Critical Thinking Consortium: http://www.tc2.ca/wp/ Evaluation Feedback can be sent to elizabeth_m_rogovoy@mcpsmd.org

Resources

Leading the way: preparation strategies for common core  

Leading the way: preparation strategies for common core by Elizabeth Rogovoy

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