All In Together: The Hunting Park - East Tioga Neighborhood Plan

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ALL IN TOG E THER T HE

Hunt ing ParkE a s t T iog a N ei ghborhood Plan

PREPA RED FO R

N o r t h 1 0 Ph ilad elp h ia BY In te r fac e Stud io LLC and L amar Wils o n A s s o c iate s 2021


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

Acknowledgments STEERING COMMITTEE Aliya Bradley, Principal of Bethune Elementary School Amelia Price, Corridor Manager for Broad, Germantown & Erie at Called to Serve CDC Andy Kim, Pastor, 8th Street Community Church Arletha Pickens, Resident Charnika Simpson, Resident Dajha Graham, Former local student Ebony DeBrest, Doula Heather Haywood, Principal of Vocatio Career Prep High School Howard Foreman, Business Owner, Caribbean Feast Jamil Scurry, Business Owner, La’vanter

Jeremiah Berry, Hunting Park United Martin Strom, Block Captain Mary Beth Hayes, Temple University Nes Espinoza, Associate Regional Director, Young Life Rebecca Bixby, Director of Primary Care, FPCN Rob Warner, Program Manager, Philadelphia Ceasefire Robert Whitmire, Lead Pastor, Grace & Peace Community Fellowship Shirley Moy, Executive Director, North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative at Temple University Stacy Stewart, Resident and Parent

BROAD, GERMANTOWN & ERIE COLLABORATIVE (BGEC) Josh Klaris, Executive Director, North10 Philadelphia Latesha Sims Beasley, Chief of Staff, North10 Cynthia Barnes, Chair, The Nicetown Tioga Improvement Team (NTIT) Charmaine Sudler-Milligan, Co-Chair, NTIT Charles Lanier, Executive Director, Hunting Park Community Revitalization Corporation (CRC)

Rev. Jeffrey Harley, Executive Director, Called To Serve CDC Amelia Price, Corridor Manager, Called To Serve CDC Leroy Fisher, President, Hunting Park United Jeremiah Berry, Hunting Park United Majeedah Rashid, Chief Operating Officer, Nicetown CDC

RESIDENT AMBASSADORS

OTHER COMMUNITY PARTNERS

Bianca Bassett, Resident Mitch Brown, Resident Stephanie Gibbons, Resident Tabitha Allen, Resident

Jeanne McNamara, President, Little Flower Catholic High School Jose Ferran Jr., HP Green

COMMUNITY MEMBERS The planning team would also like to extend a sincere thank you to all community members who participated in the planning process, took the community survey, or spoke with us at events in the community. Your words and ideas make up this plan.

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FUNDED BY

CONSULTANT TEAM

North10 Philadelphia, with a grant from the H. Chase Lenfest Foundation

Interface Studio LLC Lamar Wilson Associates Chris DiStasi, Project Manager Lamar Wilson, President Mindy Watts, AICP, PP, Principal Maria Gabriela Gonzalez, Designer


Table of Contents PART 1: INTRODUCTION WHY MAKE A PLAN? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ABOUT THE PLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A neighborhood plan is a road map for organizations and residents to achieve their goals.

The INTRODUCTION summarizes why & how this plan was made, and some important data about the community from sources like the US Census.

How Was the Public Involved? Where Is the Plan Focused? ABOUT THE COMMUNITY . . . . . . . . . . . 8 What Does the Data Say?

PART 2: THE PLAN

Next, the plan presents a VISION FOR THE FUTURE & NINE GOALS. The Vision summarizes what community members have said they hope the future will look like for Hunting Park - East Tioga. The nine goals are more concrete statements of what the community wants to achieve.

VISION & GOALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

9 GOAL SECTIONS SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EACH OF THE NINE GOALS has its own section with:

TRASH & DUMPING . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

• • • •

YOUNG PEOPLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 HOMES & BLOCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Existing Conditions, Public Input, Current Efforts, and The Plan, which includes a broad summary of STRATEGIES for achieving the sections’ goal.

PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES . . 36 COMMUNITY HEALTH . . . . . . . . . . 40 GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE . . . . . . 44 IMPLEMENTING THIS PLAN . . . . . 48

APPENDIX DETAILED STRATEGIES & ACTIONS for each goal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

If you are interested in the highest level of detail, the appendix includes a deep dive into each of the STRATEGIES and ACTIONS that specific organizations, City agencies, elected officials, and others will need to take, including DETAILS on how to make it work, funding, and partners.

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PART 1: INTRODUCTION

WHY MAKE A PLAN? Many people who call this neighborhood home care deeply about the community, but there are steep barriers to residents’ success. The community is working together to overcome them.

>

This plan is one way.

The Unity Garden at Marvine and Venango Streets, a projetc of the NicetownT- ioag Improvement Team and CosaCosa.

Walking down 10th Street or Russell Street or countless other blocks in Hunting Park - East Tioga, it is clear that residents care deeply about their homes and neighborhood. Decorations, landscaping, creative paint jobs - sometimes coordinated with neighbors - adorn comfortably sized single family homes.

It is also clear that residents run up against countless barriers. Some of those barriers are clearly visible: trash and dumping, streets without shade in the summer heat, hollowed out buildings. Some barriers are harder to see: families that struggle to juggle rent, utilities, and putting food on the table; children sent home from out-of-school programs before dark to avoid unsafe streets; a parent who hears gunshots out her window daily and doesn’t know where to look for a new home she can afford. >>>


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But, in Hunting Park - East Tioga, structural inequality is met with sustained, coordinated action. The efforts of passionate residents have secured improvements to Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park, Hunting Park, and - soon - the Bethune School playground. Working together, community organizations (as the Broad, Germantown & Erie Collaborative, or BGEC) have negotiated with developers to get local jobs, affordable housing, and new retail. Every day, teachers and youth program leaders at the Bethune School, Little Flower, the Lenfest Center, and elsewhere uplift and support young people. This plan is an opportunity for the community to chart a course of action together - and gather resources to make it happen. The process that led to this document was a year-long effort, designed to figure out what the community wants and how to achieve it. It is a plan written for and with the people who call this neighborhood home today, and it is made up of priorities and ideas contributed by people who live and work here. It is designed to help the community work together to achieve its goals: to coordinate action, raise new funds, draw new attention, and spur progress.

(Left) Residents on 10th Street coordinate landscaping and decorations. (Right) An artist’s rendering of North10’s Be A Gem Crossing, which will bring affordable housing and a health clinic to the site of the former Liberty Motel, a notorious spot for drug dealing and prostitution. Photo Source: North10 Philadelphia

Many of the issues residents face are the result of sustained disinvestment and structural inequality. Nationwide, centuries of discriminatory policies and racism have prevented Black communities from accumulating wealth.1 Data from the federal government shows that a typical Black family has about one eighth the wealth or net worth - of the typical white family, and the typical Latine family has about one fifth.2 Locally, that means wealthier, whiter neighborhoods get greater access to resources, while places like Hunting Park - East Tioga have struggled to deal with things like poor access affordable and nourishing food, constant gun violence, and summer heat that can be up 20 degrees hotter than other neighborhoods.

1 Liz Mineo, “Racial wealth gap may be a key to other inequities,” The Harvard Gazette, 2021 June 3. 2 Ana Hernandez Kent, Lowell Ricketts, “Has Wealth Inequality in America Changed over Time? Here Are Key Statistics,” The Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis, 2020 December 2.

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ABOUT THE PLAN The yearlong process leading to this plan engaged a broad range of local leaders and residents. Community voices make up the heart of this plan.

How Was the Public Involved? The community was involved in producing this plan from start to finish. This section describes how residents and local leaders lent their voices. Neighborhood survey To gather input from as many residents as possible, the planning team distributed a survey online and on paper, in English and Spanish. Flyers and social media posts advertised the survey over a two month period, and drop boxes were set up around the neighborhood to collect paper surveys. Over 1,000 paper surveys were distributed. About 150 were completed online and on paper. In-person Events

The planning team on a neighborhood tour in April 2021

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The planning team attended two outdoor neighborhood events: Family Fun and Fitness Day in Hunting Park on August 14, 2021, and the Bethune Back-to-School Block Party on August 30, 2021. The team brought information about the plan, a planning game for kids, and surveys for adults - with prizes including houseplants. The team collected about 50 surveys (and talked to many more people) at these events. Focus groups To refine the plan’s draft strategies, the planning team hosted online focus groups with Steering Committee members, BGEC members, residents, and business owners. Four groups focused on topics including youth, parks, housing, and businesses and all the groups discussed safety. About 20 people came to the Focus Groups, including several local youth.

2021 Project Timeline


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Community member interviews

The Steering Committee

At the start of the process, the planning team interviewed about 20 community members to learn what they love about Hunting Park - East Tioga - and what needs to change. These community members included longtime residents, business owners, leaders of local schools and community organizations, and more

This group was composed of community leaders, residents, and local organizations. They met with the project team throughout the planning process to check the team’s work and give feedback. About 20 people participated in Steering Committee, though membership fluctuated throughout the project.

Resident Advisors

BGEC

Leading a neighborhood planning process during the COVID-19 pandemic made it hard to engage a large number of residents. To make sure the planning team got input from residents frequently, the team hired a group of Resident Advisors. These local residents were paid to give their feedback on the planning team’s work throughout the process. The Resident Advisor position was advertised publicly for anyone who wanted to apply. Four residents participated in the entire program.

The Broad, Germantown & Erie Collaborative is comprised of North10 Philadelphia, Called To Serve CDC, Hunting Park Community Revitalization Corporation (CRC), the Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team (NTIT), Hunting Park United, and Nicetown CDC. As the core collaborative group of organizations in the neighborhood, the planning team met with them throughout the process, and BGEC has committed to overseeing the plan’s implementation.

The planning team brought information, activities, and prizes to Family, Fun & Fitness Day in Hunting Park on August 14, 2021.

Who Took the Neighborhood Survey?

147 people

took the community survey.

84% said they

live in the area, and

15%

work or spend time here

64% identified as

Black or African American

27% identified as

Hispanic or Latine

About half have kids

80% were women

They included people of

many ages. 23-34 35-44 45-54 56-64 65+

No response

11% 16% 12% 10% 12% 39%

They included people who had

lived in the area for many different lengths of time. 1 to 9 years 10 to 19 20 to 29 30 to 39 40 to 49 50 or more No response

15% 9% 10% 11% 12% 9% 15%

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Where Is the Plan Focused? The area included in this plan extends from Sedgley Avenue in the south to Hunting Park in the north, and from Broad Street in the west to 9th Street in the east.

The P l a n Area

Homes

This area is the Bethune Elementary School catchment, or the area in which students are assigned to attend the Bethune School. The plan focuses here because of the strong collaboration between community organizations that work in the area. Some of these organizations make up the Broad, Germantown & Erie Collaborative, which includes: ▸ North10 Philadelphia ▸ The Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team (NTIT) ▸ Hunting Park Community Revitalization Corporation (CRC), ▸ Hunting Park United ▸ Called To Serve Community Development Corporation (CDC) ▸ Nicetown CDC Additionally, the neighborhoods next door to this area are currently served by other strong community groups that have their own neighborhood plans. These groups include HACE to the south, Esperanza to the east, and others.

Quick Stats ▸ The area is about 1/2 mile wide and 1 mile long. ▸ There are almost 2,500 singlefamily homes, and about 330 multi-family buildings. ▸ About 6,300 people live here. ▸ Approximately 60 percent of residents identify as Black or African American, and about 36 percent identify at Latine.

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The map above shows the area that this plan focuses on, outlined in blue. In yellow, the map highlights sections of the project area that are made up of homes. Elsewhere in the project area, there are many businesses, warehouses, and industrial properties.


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This plan was funded by North10 Philadelphia with a grant from the H. Chase Lenfest Foundation. North10 is the parent organization of the Lenfest Center, located at 10th and Pike Streets. Created in 2018 to serve the Hunting Park East Tioga neighborhood, North10 works with the community on revitalization and service initiatives that foster economic growth, increase housing options, enhance learning opportunities, and promote wellness. Learn more at north10phl.org. North10 Philadelphia is located in the Lenfest Center at 3890 N 10th Street, at the corner of N 10th and Pike Streets. Photo source: Architectural Concepts, PC

New interest in BGE and North Philly Station can be an opportunity or a risk. Major projects are slated for Broad, Germantown & Erie (BGE) and the North Philadelphia Amtrak Station. Mayor Kenney has said that BGE is a major priority for his administration. This new attention carries risks: some residents say they are already feeling the effects of development pressure. But there are also opportunities: BGEC has succeeded in negotiating multiple agreements with developers to secure benefits for the community, including local hiring, affordable housing, and new retail and services. To make sure new development benefits local residents and does not endanger them, the community needs to speak together and act together.

An artist’s rendering of “The Residences at the Beury,” Shift Capital’s upcoming development at Broad Street and Butler Street. Photo Source: Shift Capital

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ABOUT THE COMMUNITY This section provides a broad overview of data related to the neighborhood. More detailed information can be found in each of the nine sections that focus on the plan’s goals.

What Does the Data Say? Unless otherwise noted, all data about the current state of the neighborhood is from the US Census 2019 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates by Census Block Group, and 2010 data is from the US Census 2010 Decennial Counts and ACS 5-year estimates, by Census Block Group. All data was accessed via Social Explorer. See page 13 for more details on the source of the data and the geographies that it represents.

The community is mostly home to residents who identify as Black and Latine. More Latine residents are moving in. ▸ The number of Black residents has decreased since 2010, while the Latine community has grown. This area has been home to a Black community for a long time. The Latine community is expanding citywide, and the heart of the Latine community sits just east of Hunting Park East Tioga. As the Latine community continues to grow, it is likely that the neighborhood will welcome more Latine families. ▸ There may be an increase in the number of children and adults with limited English skills in the community.3 Teachers and out-of-school program staff report an increase in English-as-a-second-language (ESL) students. ▸ Some residents say the two communities tend to stay separate; some streets are informal “dividing lines” between the communities, and the communities tend to use different sections of Hunting Park.

Race & Ethnicity Population Density Map

The P l a n Area

US Census ACS 2019 5-year Estimates

The view from the second story of the Lenfest Center, at 10th and Pike Streets.

Black

BROAD

>>>

Latine

MARKET

White Asian Other This map shows where residents of various races and ethnicities live in Philadelphia. Hunting Park - East Tioga sits in one of the spots where Philadelphia’s Black community and its Latine community intersect.

3 This observation is anecdotal. US Census Data reports that, in the four Census Tracts that intersect the neighborhood (an area about twice the size of the neighborhood), from 2010 to 2019 the number of residents who speak Spanish at home increased by 6 percent. This data is not available at the Census Block Group level for this area.


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The neighborhood is one of the least expensive in Philadelphia, but many residents struggle - and it is getting worse.

Young people make up a significant portion of residents, and most of them are being raised by single mothers.

▸ It costs less to rent or buy a home here than in most of Philadelphia: the typical cost to rent a property in the neighborhood is less than the typical rent in 90 percent of Philadelphia Census tracts, and the typical home value is less than in 93 percent of city tracts.4

▸ About 1 in every 4 residents in the neighborhood is under 18, and about a third of homes have children in them.

▸ But housing costs are increasing. Home values have increased in the neighborhood faster than they have in the city as a whole.

▸ Two-thirds of homes with children are led by a single parent - mostly mothers. Citywide, the rate is lower though still very high - at 57 percent. Hunting Park

▸ And residents are struggling. More than half of households are “housing cost burdened,” meaning they pay more than 30 percent of their income towards housing costs. About 4 in every 10 residents live below the poverty line, and the median household income is about $20,000.

Lenfest Center

▸ Additionally, residents’ economic situations have gotten worse. While the median household income citywide went up 8 percent from 2010 to 2019, in Hunting Park - East Tioga, it went down by more than 25 percent - about $7,000.5 The number of rental households who are “housing cost burdened” nearly doubled.

The community consists mostly of single family homes. Many are in clear need of maintenance to extend their life. ▸ There are over 2,400 single-family homes in the neighborhood - and about 180 multi-family buildings. ▸ About 180 (5%) of residential properties are vacant, and more than half of those are in very poor condition.6

Temple Hospital Bethune School

▸ Many homes are clearly cared for and decorated but even those often show signs of deterioration: issues like cracked foundations, slouching porches, worn out roofs and siding, and more.

Map of Physical Dividing Lines and Residential Pockets The neighborhood is split into multiple, distinct pockets of residences by large roads, railroads, and industrial property.

4

“Typical” refers to the median. For the neighborhood, the data point includes data from all neighborhood block groups combined. The combined neighborhood figures were compared to figures from all Philadelphia Census Tracts. 5 2010 median income was adjusted for inflation to 2019 dollars. 6 Data collected by Interface Studio

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The neighborhood has seen a steady increase in the number of shootings over the past two years. The number has increased faster than in the city as a whole. For more complete data, see the Safety section on page 16.

▸ Nearly every block in the community has seen at least one shooting since 2015, and several blocks in the neighborhood rank among the worst in the city. An Inquirer analysis found that the area is home to five blocks that have seen over 10 shootings since 2015.7

▸ In the neighborhood, 2021 has been the worst year on record. There were more shootings in 2021 than in any year since 2015, the first year that data is available. ▸ Since 2015, there have been over 225 people shot in the neighborhood. Almost 40 people have died.

People Shot, 2015-2021 Philadelphia Police Dept via OpenDataPhilly Highest Density Lowest Density

These maps show the areas in the neighborhood and the city where the most people have been shot since 2015. The neighborhood has some of the highest levels of gun violence citywide. The P l a n Area

BROAD

MARKET

7 Fifty-seven blocks in Philadelphia have seen over 10 shootings each since 2015, and five of those blocks are in or immediately adjacent to Hunting Park - East Tioga. This information is from a report in the Philadelphia Inquirer by Chris Palmer, Dylan Purcell, Anna Orso, John Duchneskie, and Jessica Griffin, “Intersections of Injustice,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 16 September 2021; see the interactive map at <https://www.inquirer.com/news/a/philadelphia-shootings-homicides-redlining-kensington-20210916.html>.

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Undeveloped land makes up more than 1 out of every 10 lots in the neighborhood. Most of it is cared for, but a significant amount is in rough shape.

Broad, Germantown & Erie (BGE_ is a lively commercial corridor, but vacancy is high and some buildings are deteriorating. Elsewhere, most businesses are auto shops.

▸ About 16 football fields worth of land in the neighborhood is undeveloped.

▸ In early 2020, about a quarter of storefronts were empty or closed on the Germantown Avenue / BGE corridor. Some of those have reopened as COVID-19 business restrictions have lifted, but vacancy at BGE is still very high for a commercial street. In 2003, citywide data on all commercial corridors showed vacancy rates between 0 and 44 percent of parcels, with a median of 14 percent; on Broad, Germantown & Erie, that number was 21 percent.8

▸ Most undeveloped lots - about 78 percent - are cared for: as yards (69 of them), by organizations like the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS_ (about 221), or by others as open space (about 129). ▸ But a substantial amount (about 117 lots) are in rough shape - unmaintained, overgrown, or trashstrewn. ▸ The City owns about 70 undeveloped parcels in the neighborhood. About 460 are privately owned. ▸ About 100 privately-owned undeveloped properties may be eligible for sheriff sale at any time, due to the amount they owe in taxes, the time they have been delinquent, and the lack of a payment plan, among other criteria.

There is land that doesn’t belong to the community. ...Who do those lots belong to? That’s undeveloped land. … We need to help the community reclaim land that could be used.

▸ About a third of buildings in the BGE district have vacant upper floors (44 out of 134), many of them in deteriorated condition. ▸ Out of 93 active storefronts on the corridor, nearly half are retail or consumer services (about 59). Fifteen percent (about 19) sell food - mostly take-out. ▸ Elsewhere in the neighborhood, most businesses are automobile service or sales - 37 across the neighborhood. There are also a significant number of take-out, retail, and corner stores. ▸ Less than 10 percent of stores in the neighborhood have a high supply of produce, according to City data.9 There is no supermarket within walking distance of residents.

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

A maintained lot.

An unmaintained lot. (Photo Source: Google Maps)

Why “undeveloped land”? There’s no easy way to refer to land without buildings on it in Philadelphia. Not all of it is “vacant,” and - if it is in use - the people who are using it may not formally own the property. This document refers to land as “undeveloped” if there is no permanent structure on it and it is not a park. This includes empty lots (fenced and unfenced), yards, and gardens.

8 Data from the City of Philadelphia “Commercial Corridors” dataset, accessed via OpenDataPhilly in November 2021. 9 “Neighborhood Food Retail in Philadelphia,” City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 2019 September, <https://www.phila.gov/ documents/neighborhood-food-retail-in-philadelphia>. For interactive maps related to the report, visit http://foodfitphilly.org/neighborhoodfoodretail.

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Census Data Tables Neighborhood 2019

Change since 2010

Citywide 2019

Change since 2010

1,579,075

+5%

Resident Data Total Population

6,738 (0.4%)

-501 -7%

Under 18 Years 18 to 34 Years 35 to 54 Years 55 to 74 Years 75 Years+

1,822 1,753 1,491 1,192 480

(27%) (26%) (22%) (18%) (7%)

-146 253 -759 -79 230

+0 pct. points +5 pct. points -9 pct. points +0 pct. points +4 pct. points

22% 29% 24% 19% 6%

-1 pct. points +0 pct. points -2 pct. points +3 pct. points +0 pct. points

Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Asian White All Other Categories

3,949 2,450 154 136 49

(59%) (36%) (2%) (2%) (1%)

-818 468 88 -244 5

-7 pct. points +9 pct. points +1 pct. points -3 pct. points +0 pct. points

41% 15% 7% 35% 3%

-2 pct. points +3 pct. points +1 pct. points -3 pct. points +1 pct. points

Population 25 Years and Over: Less than High School High School Graduate or GED Some College Bachelor's Degree or Higher

4,081 1,039 1,850 812 380

(26%) (45%) (20%) (9%)

-512 -572 -322 201 181

-11% -10 pct. points -2 pct. points +7 pct. points +5 pct. points

15% 33% 22% 30%

+11% -5 pct. points -3 pct. points +1 pct. points +8 pct. points

14,061 7,926 (56%) 5,642 (40%) 493 (4%)

1,196 487 318 391

+9% +7% +6% +383%

77% 11% 13%

+5% +2% +13% +19%

601,337

+5%

Age

Race & Ethnicity

Educational Attainment for Population 25 Years and Over

Language Spoken At Home For The Population 5 Years And Over Data on language spoken at home is comprised of US Census Tract data, not block group data Total Pop. 5 Years And Over Speak Only English Speak Spanish Speak Something Else

Household Data Households

2,404

-66 -3%

Homes With Young People / Family Types Households with People Under 18 Married-Couple Family Single-Parent Households Single Father / Male Single Mother / Female Other Family Types ("Non-Family Households"

784 (33%)

27%

263 521 57 464

42% 57% 11% 47%

(34%) (66%) (7%) (59%)

0 (0%)

1%

Income

Median Household Income (In 2019 Dollars

$20,611

-$7,154 -26%

+8%

All data in the tables on this page and the following page is from the US Census 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates and the US Census 2010 Decennial Counts & American Community Survey 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer. Unless otherwise noted, all neighborhood data was calculated using the Census Block Groups depicted in the map on the following page. Some data was calculated using Census Tracts, also depicted in the map.

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Neighborhood 2019

Citywide

Change since 2010

2019

Change since 2010

Household Data (Continued Poverty Population for Whom Poverty Status Is Determined: Residents Living Below the Poverty Line

6,738

-491

2,966 (44%)

229 +8%

24%

+2%

1,001 (42%) 1,403 (58%)

-482 -33% 416 +42%

53% 47%

0% +10%

Housing Tenure Owner Occupied Renter Occupied

Home Value

Median House Value for All Owner-Occupied Housing Units

$62,859

+$10,469 +20%

+3%

Households Paying 30%+ of Income for Housing Costs Homeowners Paying 30%+ of Income for Ownership Costs Residents Paying 30%+ of Income on Rent

471 (47%)

-72 +10 pct. points

40%

+7 pct. points

912 (65%)

418 +15 pct. points

50%

-1 pct. points

51 +4 pct. points -117 -3 pct. points

30% 70%

-4 pct. points +3 pct. points

Vehicles Available (By Household No Vehicle Available One or More Vehicle(s Available

1,262 (53%) 1,142 (48%)

US Census Block Groups and Tracts included in Data on the Neighborhood Census Tracts

E

Hunting Park

T

D RK ROA O L D YO

GE RM

Census Block Groups

R

S OO

L VE

AN WN BROAD

S RI

Temple Hospital

Bethune School S

G ED

LE

IN

G

SU

N

5th

Most Census data presented in this report refers to the combined area of Census Block Groups 198.1, 198.2, 199.3, 199.4, 200.1, 200.2, and 203.1, shown in dark purple in the map to the right.

9th

TO

Lenfest Center

ERIE The US Census provides the most detailed data available on communities across the country; however Census only provides data for pre-drawn areas. As a result, the data in this plan refers to a slightly larger area than the focus area of the plan.

LUZERNE

Y

Data on language spoken at home refers to a larger area of Census Tracts 198, 199, 200, and 203, also depicted in the map in a pale purple color outlined by dotted lines.

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PART 2: THE PLAN

VISION AND GOALS

Our Vision For the Future We envision a bright future for Hunting Park - East Tioga, from the comfortable single-family homes and small parks that knit the neighborhood together, to the big streets and places - like Hunting Park and Broad, Germantown & Erie - that anchor and define the community.

The community will get the resources and attention that it needs and deserves. It will feel safe, calm, and welcoming for the Black, Latine,

and other communities that currently call it home. Fall brings change to Hunting Park

It will look clean, green, and shaded in

>>>

the hot summer months. It will have activities and support for youth and families,

affordable healthcare and mental health services, and nourishing food for anyone who needs it. We want the people who call this neighborhood home to know:

there is a strong network of residents and organizations working together to make it a better place to live for the people who call this home today, and there are resources available to help you

live easier and set down roots here. We want every member of the community to feel like they can make a difference. But they won’t be working alone. We are all in, together.


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Our Goals

What has the community said? The community is hungry for investment and change. The project’s neighborhood survey presented 13 ideas for improving the community and asked what is most important. Nearly half of neighborhood survey respondents selected 10 or more ideas. Safety and cleanliness came up more than anything when residents were asked their vision for the future. Too much violence, too much dumping! - COMMUNITY MEMBER

It’s not clean and too much violence. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Young people are the heart of the community, residents said. They want the area to be friendlier to youth and families. Many residents imagined a greener, more beautiful neighborhood when asked about their vision for the future. I wish we all can come out and clean the streets like old times. ... I wish my kid can play outside and not worry about any crime near her. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

More than half of survey takers said they are concerned about gentrification - or that change in the area will push out long-term residents. The community wants to see more unity and more working together. We would like to stay in the community and bring back the “neighbor” in “neighborhood.”

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

These goals are each covered in the following nine sections of this plan. Each section includes information and data on the topic, public input, information about what the community is already doing to confront the issue, and the plan for confronting the issue in the coming years. 1. IMPROVE SAFETY: Residents feel safe walking down neighborhood streets any time of day, and they know that community organizations, the City, and law enforcement are working together to make sure it stays safe. 2. CLEAN UP TRASH AND DUMPING: Streets and undeveloped lots are free of trash and dumping, and residents know who to call when there is an issue. 3. SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE: Young people feel optimistic about their futures, and they feel supported at school and in fun, enriching out-of-school programs. 4. HELP RESIDENTS INVEST IN THEIR HOMES & BLOCKS: Homeowners and renters feel empowered to care for their homes and blocks, invest in them, and set down roots without fear of being displaced. 5. MAKE SURE THE COMMUNITY BENEFITS FROM NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS: All major employers and large developments contribute to the goals outlined in this plan, and the community continues to develop or preserve permanent affordable housing. 6. ENSURE HIGH QUALITY PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES: Residents find their public spaces make the neighborhood a more enjoyable, safer, and healthier place to live. 7. IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH: Residents know how to get quality healthcare, mental health services, and nourishing food locally whenever they need it, and the overall summer temperature of the neighborhood is lower than the City average. 8. IMPROVE GERMANTOWN AVENUE & BGE: Small businesses feel supported, and residents are excited about the shopping, experiences, and other benefits that businesses and commercial streets contribute to the community. 9. MAKE SURE THE COMMUNITY CAN IMPLEMENT THE PLAN: Residents of all backgrounds know their community is actively working together to make this a better place to live for them - and they have the power to help shape the future. 15


We will

Improve safety In a community at the heart of Philadelphia’s gun violence epidemic, what the community wants - more than anything - is safety.

Existing Conditions The community is at the heart of Philly’s gun violence epidemic.

Key streets between homes, schools, parks, and public transportation are unsafe and unwelcoming.

The community is one of the most dangerous in Philadelphia. A Philadelphia Inquirer study found that 57 blocks in Philadelphia have seen over 10 shootings each since 2015, and five of those blocks are in or immediately adjacent to Hunting Park - East Tioga.10

The fastest way to get to important neighborhood destinations is on foot - especially for the 53 percent of residents who do not have a car.11 But walking down key streets means dealing with fast traffic; sidewalks that are blocked, broken, and unlit; and things like drug dealing, prostitution, public drinking, and gambling.

Total People Shot in Hunting Park - East Tioga by Year There is a lot of shooting in the area. Drugs are being dealt on the corners. … Children are fighting … This would be considered a toxic environment for any family. … Change needs to happen for the better. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Data from the City of Philadelphia via OpenDataPhilly, November 2021 TOTAL FATAL NON-FATAL CITYWIDE TOTAL

2015 30 3 27

2016 37 6 31

2017 27 7 20

2018 30 4 26

2019 25 6 19

2020 2021* 32 45 5 6 27 39

1,258 1,299 1,234 1,441 1,473 2,238 1,898

*2021 data only includes January 1 to October 31. At the current rate, the number of shootings citywide in 2021 will be similar to the citywide number in 2020, while the neighborhood has already exceeded its 2020 numbers.

Percent Change In the Number Of People Shot The mural “Frequencies” by Benjamin Volta on Old York Road between Butler and Pike. Photo Source: Google Maps

Hunting Park - East Tioga Philadelphia

>>>

2016

2017

2018

2019

+50% More Shootings Than Previous Year +40% +30% +23% +20% +17% +2% +10% -5% 0% +3% +11% -10% -20% -17% -30% -27%

2020

+52%

Jan-Oct 2021

+41%

+28%

-15%

Fewer

10 Palmer, Chris; Dylan Purcell; Anna Orso; John Duchneskie; and Jessica Griffin, “Intersections of Injustice,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 16 September 2021; from the interactive map found at <www.inquirer.com/news/a/philadelphia-shootings-homicidesredlining-kensington-20210916.html>. 11 US Census ACS 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer.


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What has the community said? Some businesses accommodate illegal activity. The corner stores are ... a nuisance because the drug dealers stand in front and in the stores. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Community members say it is common at some businesses to see drug dealing, gambling, drinking, public urination, and more - especially on Germantown Avenue and near the Bethune School. They report that most shootings on Germantown have been associated with a small number of businesses.

Auto and industrial businesses make some places feel less safe, too. Many automobile service and industrial businesses in the neighborhood are located next door to residences and schools. Residents say those businesses can make the neighborhood feel dangerous or unhealthy - especially for kids walking to and from school. They sometimes block the sidewalk with vehicles, garbage, or tires, forcing walkers into the street; and others let off significant exhaust fumes.

Safety is the number one issue community members raised in this planning process.

8 in every 10 survey takers said

safety is a top priority

for improving the neighborhood, tied for first with addressing trash & dumping. When asked how satisfied they are living in the community,

half of survey takers brought up issues with

safety, violence, crime, or drugs. Do community members

feel safe walking... ...in the neighborhood?

77% during the day 29% at night (Top) Deteriorated sidewalk on the southern edge of Hunting Park, on Lycoming Street. (Bottom) Auto service businesses block streets with cars and materials.

...on Germantown Avenue?

60% during the day 28% at night When asked what would make the neighborhood safer,

about 4 in 10

community members brought up Walking is horrible, not to mention if you are using a wheelchair or have a baby stroller.

more or better policing -

more than any other idea.

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

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Current Efforts

The Plan

The community and the City are working together to confront violence and crime.

The community has risen up in the past to confront threats to local safety.

In March 2021, Called To Serve CDC convened a broad coalition to discuss and strategize around improving safety in the community. The group gathered in the wake of a tragic double homicide on the Germantown Avenue commercial corridor. Invitees included representatives from community organizations, the Mayor’s administration, City agencies, City Council, State elected officials, and local businesses. Focusing especially along the Broad, Germantown & Erie corridor, which Called To Serve manages, the group coordinated to increase police presence in the area, among other things. The collaboration was an important step to ensuring the neighborhood gets the attention and resources it needs.

In 2018, the community succeeded in shutting down the Liberty Motel after years of advocacy and action. The Motel was a hotbed for illegal activity, including drug dealing and prostitution - and it was located directly across the street from Bethune Elementary School. Today, the former motel site is slated for redevelopment by North10 as Be A Gem Crossing - an affordable rental property that will also house a new health clinic.

Called To Serve’s work bringing partners together builds off of a history of similar coalitions in the Hunting Park - East Tioga Community. Little Flower High School’s 1000W Coalition has brought together a similar group to confront safety issues at the northern end of the community, and Hunting Park United - prior to the COVID-19 pandemic also convened partners to coordinate on safety issues.

An article in the Philadelphia Inquirer describes how North10 purchased the Liberty Motel after years of community activism to shut it down.

Improving safety will require a holistic approach and coordination between the entire community. This section is a part of the puzzle, but the full picture is much broader, including every section of this plan. A complete strategy to improve safety in the community should include - but must not be limited to law enforcement, many community members seem to agree. A significant number of community members asked for more law enforcement when asked what would make them feel safer in Hunting Park - East Tioga. But that’s only half the story. The community says it needs more resources and attention of every kind. And research shows what many residents know: all of the strategies residents support are key to creating a safer community - from cleaner streets and home improvements to youth programs and job training and (yes) better law enforcement.12 The goal of this section is to present a holistic strategy for increasing safety in Hunting Park - East Tioga. Nonetheless, the strategy represented here is only part of the puzzle. Every section of this plan will contribute to making the community safer, and it is key for community organizations and residents to recognize that.

12 For an excellent review of research on a range of strategies for improving safety, see: “Reducing Violence Without Police: A Review of Research Evidence,” The John Jay College Research Advisory Group on Preventing and Reducing Community Violence, 2020 November, accessed 2021 November 11 2021, <https://johnjayrec.nyc/2020/11/09/av2020/>.

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WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

[We need] more police presence and elected officials working closely with local leaders on a regular basis, not just election time. Let this become the norm. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

Coordinate & collaborate continually

Continue convening a broad group of organizations & agencies

(Recommendation 1)

(1.1)

Work with law enforcement

Designate a lead organization

(Recommendation 2)

I do not want the police riding around slowly. … They got to show themselves friendly.

(2.1)

(2.2)

Maintain a visible police presence in key locations, especially with foot patrols

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

(2.3)

Having a officer now posted on Germantown & Erie Ave has made it such a big and wonderful difference on the Ave. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

What does improving streets and sidewalks have to do with safety? Projects to improve sidewalks, lighting, trees, and other things, can have the dual effect of disrupting unsafe activities (by pushing them out for construction) and creating an environment that is no longer welcoming to those activities. Studies have shown that improvements like better lighting are promising ways to reduce property crime.13 By implementing community-driven improvements that make residents feel welcome, a step can be taken towards making unsafe behavior feel unwelcome.

Increase outreach on the street

Formalize on-thestreet outreach to offer alternatives to law enforcement

(Recommendation 3)

(3.1)

Improve streets

for pedestrian safety (Recommendation 4)

Invite a welcoming police presence at community events, when appropriate

Help business owners install security cameras (2.4)

Key Locations: • Lycoming, between Old York Road and 9th St (4.1) • Old York Road, between Lycoming and Erie (4.2) • Intersection of Germantown, Old York Road, Ontario & Rising Sun Ave (4.3) • Germantown Ave (4.4) • Intersection of 11th, Ontario & Goodman (4.5) • Erie Ave (4.6)

Reduce impact of unsafe businesses

Shut down or reduce impact of businesses that support illicit or illegal activities

Work with industrial and auto businesses to reduce negative impacts

(Recommendation 5)

(5.1)

(5.2)

Support youth

Grow a rich array of youth programs to broaden kids’ horizons

(Recommendation 6)

(6.1) 13 “Practice Profile: Improved Street Lighting,” National Institutes of Justice Crime Solutions, accessed 2021 Nov 11, <https://crimesolutions. ojp.gov/ratedpractices/38#mao>.

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN. 19


We will

CLEAN UP TRASH & DUMPING The community says trash & dumping are out of control. Small strategies have not moved the needle. A broad, coordinated effort is needed.

Existing Conditions Trash and dumping show up in every corner of the neighborhood. The southern and northern ends of the neighborhood are among the worst areas in Philadelphia for litter, according to the City of Philadelphia’s Litter Index, a 2018 survey of litter conditions across the city.14 For residents, trash and dumping are daily sights throughout the

community. Some highly trafficked sections of Erie Avenue and Old York Road are known for the constant presence of large piles of trash. Other corners of the neighborhood - more industrial and out-of-the-way sections - are almost permanently mired in refuse.

Amount of Trash & Litter By Block

LY C

according to the City of Philadelphia Litter Index

9TH

10TH

BROAD

VENANGO

WN

People pull up and dump trash from trucks like it is the law. It is happening all over our community. It saddens me to see what ... has become a norm.

PIKE BUTLER

TO

The City of Philadelphia Litter Index was collected by the City in 2018. Evaluators judged the amount of litter on City blocks using a simple scale. The data is used by City agencies to inform their programs and policies.

Lenfest Center

AN

>

Likely requires heavy machinery to remove

LUZERNE

RM

Will require a large team effort

ERIE

NG

GE

Dumping on Erie Ave, beside the mural A“ frican Landscape” by Henry Bermudez

May require a group cleaning effort

OMI

11TH

A small amount

13TH

Very little or no trash & litter

ROA D O L D YO R K

City of Philadelphia via OpenDataPhilly, 2018

Hunting Park

Temple Hospital

WESTMOREL AND ALLEGHENY

RI

SI

NG

SU

N

TIOGA ONTARIO

Bethune School

SE

L DG

EY

CLEARFIELD

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

14 For information on this dataset, see “City Releases Updated Litter Index,” City of Philadelphia, 2019 July 10, <https://www.phila.gov/2019-07-10-city-releases-updatedlitter-index>.


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What has the community said? Most land in the community is cared for, but a significant portion of undeveloped land is a collecting place for trash. Seventy-eight percent of undeveloped lots are cared for by neighbors, owners, or community organizations - totaling about 419 lots. A minority of lots in the community -- 22 percent, about 117 lots -- are uncared for and in poor condition. Nonetheless, lots that are uncared for have a major negative effect on the community and often cause problems for adjacent residents’ properties, including attracting rodents, bug infestations, and creating unsafe conditions for young people.

Trash & Dumping tied with safety for the most pressing issue residents want to address.

Among community members who took the neighborhood survey…

About

8 out of every 10 said

trash & dumping is a top priority

for improving the neighborhood.

When asked to describe how they hope the neighborhood will be in the future,

almost half said they

want a cleaner neighborhood. (Above) Some undeveloped land is a collecting place for trash. (Below) Other lots are well cared for. This one is part of the City’s LandCare program.

7 in 10 said they

would visit parks more often if they were cleaner. Pienso que en el futuro si todos ponemos de nuestra parte tendremos una comunidad totalmente limpia. I think that in the future if we all do our part we will have a totally clean community. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

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Current Efforts About 40 percent of all undeveloped lots - about 221 out of 545 - are managed by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) and other organizations. The Philadelphia LandCare Program, administered locally through the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) with funding from the City of Philadelphia, tended more land than any other organization - approximately 195 lots in the community in 2021.

Called To Serve CDC provides corridor cleaning services for Germantown Avenue and Broad, Germantown & Erie (BGE) through the City’s commercial corridor management and cleaning program, which is administered by the Commerce Department.

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Hunting Park is cleaned by staff and volunteers. The Department of Parks & Recreation (PPR) picks up trash in neighborhood parks and provides daily pickup in Hunting Park. In addition, volunteers - including Hunting Park United, which acts as the park’s friends group - also do periodic cleanups of the park.

Block captains are an important part of the community, helping to keep their blocks clean. Block Captains organize regular cleanups of their blocks and provide important information to residents. The Block Captain program is organized through the Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee (PMBC), which is housed at the City of Philadelphia Department of Streets.

HP Green, a project of local resident Jose Ferran, works to clean and green the neighborhood, with an emphasis on empowering young people to create change and lead. The organization provides young people with a paid service learning experience, in which they pursue projects to steward public space. The program emphasizes providing social support for young people in light of adverse childhood experiences. In addition, projects always emphasize engaging local residents and seeking to draw them into the work of improving the community. (Left) People dump on both nonresidential streets like Ontario between 9th & 10th, as well as (Middle) residential streets like this spot at 13th & Venango. (Right) Young people with HP Green help clean the area and improve it with public art. Photo Source: HP Green


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The Plan The scale of the trash and dumping issue in Hunting Park - East Tioga can feel daunting. Cleaning up the neighborhood will require a broad, coordinated effort that shows up in every aspect of community organizations’ work. To respond to dumping issues, the community should coordinate multiple strategies, including locally-led cleaning teams, support for resident-led cleaning, and improved communication with the City about problem areas, among other things. To prevent future problems, residents and organizations should work to both educate the public and enforce penalties for littering and dumping.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Encourage people not to litter & dump

Implement a marketing campaign that reaches every corner of the community

(Recommendation 7)

(7.1)

Track dumping issues

Make it easier for residents to report dumping issues

(Recommendation 8)

The benefits to the community will extend beyond just making streets more beautiful. Research also shows that cleaning and greening undeveloped lots can reduce crime nearby.15 And cleaning & greening programs can do even more; Philadelphia’s PowerCorps program trains young or returning adults in marketable skills while serving local communities16 and Philadelphia LandCare’s Roots to Re-entry project provides job training for formerly incarcerated residents while cleaning and greening.17

(8.1)

Clean up trash & dumping

Expand the BGE corridor cleaning area and make it easier for CTS to manage it

(Recommendation 9)

(9.1 and 9.2)

Fund cleaning & greening programs with added benefits, like job training and youth engagement (9.3)

Catalog undeveloped lots for maintenance by the LandCare program

Contact property owners and request they clean properties that have trash

(9.4)

(9.5)

Marketing and communications related to cleaning up the neighborhood should be a part of every event, meeting, and flyer that local groups put together. Enlisting residents to reinforce the message will be key. The community should know that keeping our streets clean is a point of local pride. Meanwhile, residents should be empowered to report dumping, and facilities at Hunting Park should require that users clean up after themselves.

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

Utilize relationships with the City to elevate residents’ dumping reports (9.6)

Help residents clean up (Recommendation 10)

Provide materials & support for residentled block cleanups (10.1)

Host a “trash amnesty” event where people can get rid of anything (10.2)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN.

15 A study by the Penn Institute for Urban Research (Penn IUR) found that lots maintained by the Philly LandCare program saw a nearby drop in shootings (8% fewer), assaults with guns (4.5% fewer), and nuisance crimes like public drinking and illegal dumping (7% fewer). Nearby neighbors also report feeling safer. John M. MacDonald and Charles C. Branas, “Reducing Crime by Changing Places: Assessing the Benefits of Abating Vacant and Abandoned Land in Urban Spaces,” Penn IUR Working Paper, 2019 October. 16 For more on PowerCorps, see their website at www.powercorpsphl.org. 17 For more on Roots to Re-entry and PHS’ other workforce development programs, visit www.phsonline.org.

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We will

SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE “Kids here sometimes don’t get to be kids,” one community member said. Young people need more safe and supportive places to learn and have fun, residents and organizations agree. We must start with the little people, … they matter, they are worth it. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Existing Conditions Young people make up a significant portion of residents, and their households are often led by single parents. Youth make up one out of every four people who live in the community, according to the US Census in 2019.18 33 percent of all households include a child, and two-thirds of those households are led by a single parent - almost all of them mothers.

We need more funding for programs for our youth.

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

Schools serve hundreds of students who live in the area or who flow in and out of the neighborhood every day. In 2020-2021, Bethune Elementary School educated about 532 children from 5 to 15 years old, at the heart of the Hunting Park - East Tioga community. 19 About two-thirds (358) of those students live within the project area -- nearly every one within a fifteen minute walk of the school. In addition, other nearby schools, such as Little Flower High School, draw students from across the city, who often must walk from public transit stops to their schools. I see this community with more programs for children and safe environments. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

(Below and following page) North10 offers after-school and summer programs for local young people. These photos show the 2021 summer camp that North10 held.

The Lenfest Center offers a number of out-of-school programs for local young people.

>>> 18 US Census ACS 2019 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer. 19 2020-2021 School Year, according to the School District of Philadelphia District Performance Office, <https://www.philasd.org/performance/programsservices/open-data/ school-information>.


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What has the community said? Partial List of Out-of-School-Time (OST) Programs located in Hunting Park - East Tioga Program / PROVIDER

After Summer Ages / Type School Grades

Hunting Park Rec Center North10 / Lenfest Center LEAP After School Program at the Free Library, Nicetown-Tioga Branch To Our Children’s Future With Health, Inc., at the Bethune School SteppingStone Scholars at the Bethune School North Philly Aztecs and related teams SquashSmarts at the Lenfest Center As I Plant This Seed HP Green

(See page 22 for details)

X X

X

X X

Ages General 6-12 Grades General K-12 K-12

X

X X X X

X

X

X

General

Grades General K-5 Grade K-8 Ages 5-14 Grades 6-12 Grades 5-12 Ages 14+

Academic Athletic Athletic Mentorship/ Service Mentorship/ Service

(Left and right) The North Philadelphia Aztecs football program and its related cheerleading and basketball programs serve over 400 young people each year. The Aztecs are a nationally-recognized program that has served the community for over 25 years. Photo Source: Aztec Nation (Facebook page)

Parents, local youth, school leaders, and out-of-school time staff say young people in the area face tremendous obstacles, and it is essential for the community to focus on providing them with more support and opportunities.

Some community members expressed frustration that local students often have to walk past people engaged in drug dealing, prostitution, public drinking, gambling, and other things - either at businesses that allow them to do so or on nonresidential streets. Some community members say out-of-school programs are especially important for youth who face difficult situations at home. Programs and their staff can provide a sense of stability, dedication, and love that kids need. Out-of-school program staff note that youth are more likely to connect with programs when they are young - and then they keep coming back as they get older. It can be harder to engage older youth for the first time. School and program staff also say that there are an increasing number of students and parents for whom English is a second language, and it must be a priority to provide adequate and helpful services to those residents.

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Current Efforts The neighborhood is home to multiple institutions and organizations for whom uplifting youth is a part of their core mission. The previous page includes partial list of youth out-of-school programs that run in the neighborhood. In addition to those programs, there are: ▸ Multiple schools, including Bethune Elementary School, Little Flower High School, and others. ▸ Hunting Park United, which acts as the friends group for Hunting Park. ▸ The Nicetown - Tioga Improvement Team, along with its partner the arts organization CosaCosa. ▸ Called To Serve CDC, which has adopted the Bethune School to provide food, educational programs, and parent engagement. ▸ Many other community groups, houses of worship, block captains and countless residents, whose efforts have made it clear that supporting youth must be central to this plan.

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In 2018, the community succeeded in permanently closing the Liberty Motel, a notorious hub of drugs and prostitution that sat across the street from Bethune Elementary. Residents tell stories of youth having to walk past the site to get to school, witnessing dangerous and traumatic scenes. Shutting down the site immediately improved the area. For more on the new project slated for the site, see the “New Development & Major Employers” section.

I see a hardworking, thriving, Black and Hispanic community, where families who have been here for generations continue to choose to raise their children, sending them to school here proud of the community. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Bethune Elementary School Photo Source: Google Maps


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The Plan This plan aims to ensure positive experiences for young people from the time they wake up until they go to sleep, in summer and during the school year, through organized activities and with safe, welcoming spaces. Their walk to and from school: The community has experience fighting for safer streets near its schools: closing the Liberty Motel - across the street from Bethune Elementary School - was a demonstration of local commitment to young people. But there are still many unsafe locations that young people pass every day. It is essential to keep pushing for safer routes between young peoples’ homes, schools, out-of-school programs, and other destinations. Their time out of school: Other strategies in this plan focus on improving out-of-school programs. Several organizations in the neighborhood are devoted to providing high quality programs for youth. Organizations need to make sure that residents know these programs are available. And, to improve their service, organizations should seek ways to engage more youth in a wider array of activities that interest them especially as they get older. Many youth face tough situations at home, and out-of-school programs need to provide a safe, loving place for them to explore - all while supporting their needs. Support at school: This plan also seeks ways to better support young peoples’ educations. The Bethune School is in need of a strong parents organization that can focus on advocating for youth and coordinating neighborhood efforts .

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Expand programs & activities (Recommendation 11)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Fill gaps in programming for young people to provide a rich array of activities (11.1)

Make sure program staff are prepared to help with young peoples’ life situations (11.2)

Make sure parents know what programs are available (11.3)

Support Bethune School (Recommendation 12)

Start a strong, permanent parents’ organization that emphasizes social justice & equity (12.1)

Start a walking school bus to reduce truancy and improve safe routes to school (12.2)

Complete the Bethune School playground and garden (12.3)

More safe, fun places to hang out

Transform all neighborhood parks (Cross-reference: 18.1)

(Recommendation 13)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN.

What Is A “Walking School Bus”? Walking School Buses make the commute to school safer and can help increase attendance. Each “bus” is an organized group that walks along a set route with one or more adults leading it, picking children up at designated stops along a predetermined route and walking them to school. A walking school bus leads children of many ages. Photo Source: Healthy Siouxland

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We will help residents invest in their

Existing Conditions

HOMES & BLOCKS

The community is composed mostly of single-family homes - many with porches and some with yards.

Many in the neighborhood love its comfortable singlefamily homes, and some blocks show their pride visibly.

The community is proud of the beautiful and historic single-family homes that make up the majority of the neighborhood, and some blocks demonstrate their pride with landscaping, and coordinated decorations. These are the sorts of details that show people they are part of more than just a neighborhood they are part of a community.

But, in one of the city’s most impoverished communities, a web of barriers prevents many from setting down roots.

(Above) In the fall, one block placed wreathes on all of their utility poles, and homes coordinated decorations. A sign says there is a Junior Block Captain on the block. (Below) On another block, several homes feature landscaping with cacti and flowers.


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What has the community said? Aging homes present a challenge for lowincome residents. In Hunting Park - East Tioga, more than half of homes were built before 1940 - about 1,287 properties, according to the US Census; almost none have been built in the last 20 years.20 Aging homes present a range of issues for residents - not all of them physical. Homeowners and renters in the neighborhood have raised a number of concerns: ▸ Deteriorating roofs or foundations, ▸ Crumbling porches, ▸ Aging utility systems, ▸ Unpruned trees, ▸ Unpaid property taxes or utility bills,

Residents face barriers to securing ownership of property that they want to care for - or already do care for. Residents may not know how - or may not think it is important - to secure ownership of undeveloped land that they already use as yards. And those who do want to secure ownership of decrepit land or buildings often struggle to navigate convoluted City processes. While Land Bank programs theoretically allow for the purchase or transfer of vacant or abandoned properties to residents, the process is confusing and slow, and therefore often not truly accessible to interested residents.

▸ Tangled titles that make establishing ownership difficult, ▸ And more. Confronting these issues would make residents’ housing situations more secure, but many residents struggle to do so. The median income in the neighborhood is just $20,611, and 58 percent of neighborhood residents are “housing cost burdened” (meaning housing costs take up more than 30 percent of their paycheck), leaving them little spare income to invest in housing repairs and improvements.

Residents are looking for help with their housing needs, whether they own or rent.

Among community members who took the neighborhood survey…

71%

said that

paying rent, mortgage, bills, or utilities has either been a

long-term issue or has gotten worse in the past year. 66%

said they are

interested in programs to help with things like

weatherization and lowering their utility bills. 20% said they have already utilized programs that provide these supports. [We need to be] repairing and weatherizing long term residents’ homes first. Most seniors are on fixed incomes and can not afford repairs. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

Most homes are in pretty good shape, but some have issues (such as sagging porch roofs) that could lead to major problems over time. 20 US Census 2019 ACS 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer.

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A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

Current Efforts For many housing issues, help is available from community organizations like Hunting Park Community Revitalization Corporation (CRC), formerly called Hunting Park NAC.

Residents on a number of blocks have come together to beautify the area with landscaping, coordinated decorations, and more.

Hunting Park CRC offers a range of housing services. Residents can get help repairing their utility systems, paying for utility bills or rent, managing their finances, and more. The organization has an open-door policy for residents seeking help. See more in the box below.

On 10th Street, residents have coordinated planters and decorations along the street (See photo on page 3). Several other blocks have also coordinated decorations and home improvements. These grassroots efforts add beauty and a sense of community to the neighborhood.

Services Offered by Hunting Park CRC Located at Delhi & Butler Streets (3760 N Delhi Street), residents can call ahead or walk in during business hours.

Blocks With At Least One Building In Very Poor or Uninhabitable Condition Data collected and analysis performed by Interface Studio, 2021

LY C

GENERAL SERVICES

OMI

NG

LUZERNE 9TH

Lenfest Center

PIKE BUTLER

BROAD

10TH

11TH

ERIE

ROA D O L D YO R K

13TH

WN

• Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) & LIHEAP Crisis • Utility Emergency Services Fund (UESF) • Basic Systems Repair Program (BSRP) • Adaptive Modifications Program (AMP) • Other weatherization programs, utility system repairs

TO

HOME REPAIRS / IMPROVEMENTS

AN

• Rental assistance / rebates • Mortgage foreclosure assistance

RM

HOUSING COST ASSISTANCE

GE

• Housing counseling & referrals • Food distribution

Hunting Park

RI

Temple Hospital

N SI

G

S

UN

VENANGO TIOGA ONTARIO

Bethune School

WESTMOREL AND ALLEGHENY

SE

Hunting Park CRC headquarters, at Delhi & Butler Streets.

30

DG

Y LE

Block with at least one building in very poor or uninhabitable condition Homes


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

The Plan The strategies here aim to ensure current residents, who are primarily Black and Latine, can - and want to - set down roots in the area, by helping them to secure property, invest in their homes, and make their blocks beautiful. Helping residents to improve their homes and deal with common housing issues will help them stick around in the neighborhood. Simple fixes can drastically extend the life of a home - but that isn’t the only reason to invest in fixes. A recent study of Philadelphia’s Basic Systems Repair Program showed that helping low-income residents fix their homes can reduce crime: repairs through the program to a single home led to more than a 20 percent drop in crime on that block; multiple repaired homes led to even greater improvement.21 Educational services like housing and financial counseling can help residents to plan for the future, to ensure they will be able to remain in their homes long term. Property ownership will help residents to build wealth and set down even deeper roots. As many as 100 undeveloped properties in the community could be eligible for sheriff sale at any time, due to the amount and duration of their tax delinquency, according to analysis done for this plan. Moreover, the US Census shows that home values have risen in the area faster than they have citywide, and the share of homes that are rental properties has increased.22 Although home values are still very low, helping local residents acquire homes in the near future will ensure they benefit from future increases.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Help residents invest in homes & blocks (Recommendation 14)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Establish a unified strategy across organizations to provide housing support (14.1) Connect residents to financial education & counseling programs (14.3)

Help residents tackle common housing legal issues (14.2)

Encourage & celebrate residents who improve homes, blocks, & the community (14.4)

Implement a porch light program to give free solar powered lights to residents (14.5)

Help residents gain ownership of property (Recommendation 15)

Help residents acquire land through the Land Bank (15.1)

Help residents navigate the Land Bank’s side yard program (15.2)

Monitor properties going to Sheriff Sale and protect local uses (15.3)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN.

More recommendations related to affordable housing appear in the following section, on “New Development and Major Employers.” 21 For the full study, see: Eugenia C. South, MD, John MacDonald, PhD, Vincent Reina, PhD, “Association Between Structural Housing Repairs for Low-Income Homeowners and Neighborhood Crime” JAMA Netw Open, 2021 July 21. For a summary of the study, see: Michael Tenenbaum, “Philly’s gun violence epidemic and the power of fixing up neighborhoods block by block,” The Philly Voice, 2021 August 4. 22 For more details, see the “About the Community” section earlier in this document. Data from the US Census 2019 ACS 5-year Estimates and the US Census 2010 Decennial Count, accessed via Social Explorer.

31


We will make sure the community benef its from

NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS Large new developments and major institutions can benefit the community, but they can also fuel displacement.

Existing Conditions In one of Philadelphia’s least expensive neighborhoods, many residents are just holding on. Now, new development pressure is making some worried. Many residents in Hunting Park - East Tioga struggle to pay rent, mortgages, or other housing costs. More than half of residents spend at least a third of their income on housing costs, and the community has one of the highest poverty rates in the city.23

Artist’s rendering of Shift Capital’s developments at the Beury Building. Photo Source: Shift Capital

In recent years, projects by the City and private developers have increased fears about gentrification and displacement, and some residents report that real estate pressure has come to their blocks.

>>>

Local organizations are taking action that the community should celebrate - and expand.

These residents are just holding on in one of the least expensive neighborhoods in the City. The typical rent for a property in the neighborhood is less than the typical rent in 90 percent of Philadelphia Census tracts, and the median home value here is less than in 93 percent of the city’s tracts - it was just $62,859 in 2019, according to the US Census.24

Major developments are already in progress at some of the largest sites in the community. Shift Capital is working on two major projects: one at the former Checker’s at Broad Street & Butler Street, set to include market rate and affordable housing and retail,25 and another at the Beury Building, which is said will include a Marriott-branded hotel.26 Meanwhile, at the North Philadelphia Amtrak Station, the City hopes to attract developers for a major project. The 2018 North District Plan featured the site as one of its “focus areas,” noting: “The area surrounding the North Philadelphia Station has approximately 25 acres of [vacancy]. ... There are numerous opportunities for infill and redevelopment near excellent transit options ... .”27

Major institutions and employers in the area include some who are deeply engaged in the community - and others who are not. A few of the most prominent employers include: ▸ Temple Hospital ▸ Temple Medical School ▸ Shriner’s Hospital ▸ Pegasus Home Fashions ▸ American Box & Recycling ▸ The School District of Philadelphia ▸ Little Flower High School

23 For more details, see the “About the Community” section earlier in this document. 24 “Typical” refers to the median. For the neighborhood, the data point includes data from all neighborhood block groups combined. The combined neighborhood figures were compared to figures from all Philadelphia Census Tracts. Data is from the US Census 2019 ACS 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer. 25 Taylor Allen, “Promised jobs, North Philly community backs Beury redevelopment on N. Broad,” WHYY, 2021 July 21. 26 Sandy Smith, “Say Bye-Bye to the Boner 4Ever Building,” Philadelphia Magazine, 2020 February 15. 27 See the City’s 2018 North District Plan at www.phila2035.org/north.


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What has the community said?

TO WN

ERIE

The Residences at Beury (See next page for details) The Beury Building

3

Be A Gem Crossing (See next page)

4

North Philly Amtrak Station

5

Zion Baptist Church Annex

5 BROAD

2

Pegasus 9th

1

Little Flower School American Box

10th

Large Developments

1 2

D RK ROA O L D YO

AN

Labeled in blue

RM

Major Employers

Hunting Park

GE

Large Development Projects & Major Employers

Shriner’s Hospital R

Temple Hospital & Med School

I IS

NG

SU

N

Bethune School

3 SE

L DG

EY

INDIANA

4 4

An artist’s rendering of a proposal for North Philly Station from HFZ Capital. The current state of this proposal is unclear; nonetheless, it is notable for its size, which - like the Shift developments - is much bigger than any other recent developments in the area. Photo Source: HFZ Capital

Residents say they are feeling new development pressure, and they do not feel major local employers are always on the community’s side. There is a fear that the community will be pushed out by new development. Among residents who took the survey,

77% are

concerned about gentrification,

or that changes to the neighborhood will force out long term residents. The wolves are already smelling blood. Residents who live nearby are getting letters from buyers every day. As a collective, we need to come together and head that off. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

When they talk about major employers in the area, residents often express a deep sense of pain and frustration, built over years in which they say they’ve struggled to get the respect the community deserves from huge institutions like Temple Hospital, the Medical School, and other major employers. While some community groups have strong relationships with committed, community-minded partners at Temple, Shriner’s, and elsewhere, most community members feel these major employers have been - at best - unresponsive, and - at worst actively harmful. 33


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

Current Efforts A coalition of community organizations has shown they can bring home benefits when developers come to the neighborhood - and developers can make it work. The Hunting Park - East Tioga community has demonstrated that - even in a high poverty area - major development can be win-win for developers and the community. In 2020, BGEC negotiated Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) for both Be A Gem Crossing and the Shift Capital developments at Broad, Germantown & Erie, securing local jobs, affordable housing units, and more in exchange for community support. With these deals, BGEC demonstrated that the numbers do pan out - it is possible for developers to meet their goals and for the community to secure meaningful benefits.

[This is] a community like many others that’s in danger of gentrification - but that is working on coming together with residents and local organizations to fight for what we deserve. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

At Shift Capital’s “Residences at the Beury,” nearly half of the residential units will be affordable housing, and the developer will provide $150,000 for local job training.

34

The community has made significant progress towards increasing the local supply of affordable housing. Through its CBAs at BGE and with North10’s Be A Gem Crossing project, the community has significantly increased the supply of affordable housing nearby. The projects will include: ▸ Be A Gem Crossing (North10) will include 41 units of affordable housing for low-income families and 13,400 square feet of ground floor commercial space. North10 hopes to attract a new health clinic to occupy part of this space. ▸ Residences at the Beury (Shift Capital) will include 50 affordable and 63 market-rate residences, shared community spaces, and 13,750 square feet of commercial space. The CBA with Shift Capital also secured $150,000 for local workforce development. It would be nice if the city cared for these neighborhoods before gentrification. [We need] new affordable housing for new people moving in the neighborhood. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

North10’s Be A Gem crossing will include 41 units of affordable housing and a new healthcare clinic.


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

The Plan Local community organizations are a powerful force for implementing this plan, but they can’t do it alone. Developers and major employers must contribute time and resources to help uplift the community they call home. Contributing to local priorities is a winwin situation for developers and major employers. Investing in the community can tie into employers’ core business and demonstrate a human side to their organization. And many of the issues this plan addresses - safety, cleanliness, beautiful public spaces, and a vibrant business corridor - are things that can directly benefit developers and employers. Working together with the community can help ensure employers, developers, and the community all accomplish their goals seamlessly. The community knows that developers can accomplish their goals and provide major local benefits. BGEC’s experience negotiating CBAs at Be A Gem Crossing and with Shift Capital demonstrate that community support for new projects should hinge on whether developers or employers are willing to commit resources to strategies outlined in this plan. Ensuring there is enough affordable housing built in the neighborhood for current residents must be a cornerstone of this strategy. Affordable housing should be a priority for any organization that engages in place-based strategies for community development, no matter what their core focus. The stakes are high: if the neighborhood becomes less affordable, the very people that community organizations serve - the people for whom organizations have made major capital and programmatic investments - will be pushed out. This plan takes a balanced approach to new affordable development, aiming to create both affordable single-family homeownership opportunities and higherdensity affordable rentals.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES? Increase amount of

affordable housing

(Recommendation 16)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Partner to develop affordable rental projects of about 35-40 units

Explore the establishment of a Community Land Trust for permanent affordable properties

(16.1)

(16.2)

Explore partnerships to renovate or build for affordable homeownership (16.3)

Make sure new development & major employers

contribute to local priorities (Recommendation 17)

Ensure major developments include at least 10 percent affordable units (16.4)

Secure CBAs or other agreements with developers to support local priorities

Secure agreements with major employers to support community priorities

(17.1)

(17.2)

Clarify & centralize community relations functions at major local employers (17.3)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN.

Moreover, major funding streams are beginning to align for affordable housing work, and the community will benefit if it is ready to propose projects. ▸ The City’s Neighborhood Preservation Initiative, passed in 2020, includes $113 million for affordable housing development, $64.6 million for affordable housing preservation, $38 million for home repairs, and more - totaling $400 million in investments coming to Philadelphia neighborhoods. ▸ Guaranteed funding for the City’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund is assured after nearly 70 percent of Philadelphia voters said “yes” to Ballot Question 4 in November 2021. The City will now be required to set aside 0.5% of its annual budget - about $25 million per year - for the development and preservation of safe, stable, and affordable housing.

35


We will ensure high quality

PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES Major projects are turning the tide for the community’s parks.

Conditions & Current Efforts Virtually everyone in the neighborhood lives within a 10 minute walk of a park, but not all parks are equal. 1 Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park: formerly called 11th & Venango

Park, this park was rededicated in 2021, when the first phase of its renovation was completed with support from The Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation, Council President Darrell Clarke, and the law firm of Morris Wilson Knepp Jacquette P.C., among others. The second phase will be completed by the Water Department in 2022.

Residents say they will go more often if they feel safe & clean.

The opening day of Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park. Photo Source: Phila. Inquirer

2 The Bethune School Playground is currently a vast expanse of concrete

without shade, but the school - in partnership with North10, the School District of Philadelphia, and the Trust for Public Land - is working to redesign the space as a high quality, publicly accessible playground. The design of the new playground will be driven by students at the school. The football field at Hunting Park was improved in 2019 with help from former Eagles u Q arterback Michael Vick .

> The Bethune School play area in its current condition.

3 Fish Park at Broad, Germantown & Butler was improved in 2021 as part

of the City’s extensive work on the BGE corridor. For more details, see this plan’s section on Germantown Ave & BGE on page 44.


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

What has the community said? Some neighborhood parks have the potential to benefit the community, but they aren’t used much - or known at all.

D RK ROA O L D YO

WN

BROAD

Temple Hospital

1 7

RI

N SI

Bethune School

2

5

SE

Among community members who took the neighborhood survey…

9th

TO

(Top) Butler Playground (Bottom) Daly Park

8

AN

not aware that this space is a park, since it appears to be no more than an empty traffic triangle; however, in terms of square footage, it is similar to Butler Playground and it is located in an area with few open space options.

4

ERIE RM

5 Daly Park: Most residents are

3

Safety and cleanliness keep residents away from their local parks, they say. Some even travel elsewhere in the city for parks.

Lenfest Center 10th

4 Butler

GE

Playground: This park has not seen significant investment in many years. Comprised of a unshaded expanse of concrete and a deteriorating playground, residents say it does not feel safe or clean.

Hunting Park

6

G

SU

L DG

N

EY

Park Community Space Mural

When asked for the

top reasons they don’t go to parks more, 7 in 10 said: ▸ Trash and litter ▸ Crime & safety

More than 7 in 10 said they

would like to see more of the following in local parks:

▸ Places to sit and relax ▸ Activities and events for kids and families ▸ Spray grounds for kids ▸ Playgrounds ▸ Community gardening / farming I should be able to use my park for recreation … as opposed to going to Kelly Drive or the Schuylkill. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

I wish drug users didn’t use the playground to hang and use their drugs. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

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A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

Hunting Park is beautiful and expansive, offering a range of amenities.

The Unity Garden, a project of NTIT and Cosa Cosa.

Since the publication of the Hunting Park Revitalization Plan in 2009, the park has developed strong advocates and seen major investment. But, ten years out, there’s still a lot to do, and the pace of change has slowed.

Community spaces enrich the neighborhood with art, gardens, and family programs, but their long-term ownership is not always secure.

6 Hunting Park is one of

Philadelphia’s large st recreational spaces. At 87 acres, it is the 12th largest park in Philadelphia, with a recreation center, pool, and a wide range of recreational spaces. Partners including Hunting Park United (which acts as the park’s friends group), the Fairmount Park Conservancy, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation, Councilwoman Maria Quiñones Sánchez, Council President Darrell Clarke, and many others have worked to implement improvements from the park’s plan. Yet, there are still significant issues to tackle. With no active fundraising efforts, there is little momentum to complete the plan’s remaining improvements; and, in the past 10 years, many of the issues facing the park have changed.

38

Since 2009, investments have included: ▸ ▸ ▸ ▸ ▸ ▸ ▸ ▸

A new football field A new baseball field Two new playgrounds Six new tennis courts A bicycle traffic park New pedestrian lighting Over 200 new trees The Hunting Park Community Garden ▸ The Hunting Park Farmer’s Market ▸ A new orchard by the Philadelphia Orchard Project

7 The Healing Garden and 8 The Unity Garden:

Collaborations between the Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team and COSACOSA art at large Inc., the Unity Garden was completed in 2015, and the Healing Garden was completed in 2007 and refurbished in 2013. The sites include murals and gardens created together with community members. Murals: The neighborhood is home to at least nine major murals, mostly projects of Philadelphia’s Mural Arts Program. These large-scale art pieces add life and color to residents’ blocks, and they transform undeveloped land into important community spaces.


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

The Plan Parks and community spaces bring people together - and get them moving. The community has made great strides with its public spaces, but there is work to do to make them welcoming to everyone - and to keep them that way. It is within the community’s reach to make every local park great. Current projects will transform most local smaller parks. Additional projects at Butler Playground and Daly Park can make sure everyone is a short walk from a beautiful public space. Hunting Park is a tremendous asset for the community, but it can do more. The Hunting Park Revitalization Plan is now over ten years old. While it has brought tremendous benefits to the park, significant portions of the plan have not yet been implemented, and community members say some parts of the park are in dire need of attention. The park can benefit from a renewed vision and plan to check the community’s priorities and jumpstart interest in new projects. To keep parks beautiful, there is a need for maintenance, programming, and resident action. Investments in new playgrounds and sports fields are only half of the work. Residents’ concerns about safety and trash in parks underscores that a strong maintenance and management plan for all neighborhood public spaces is essential. Moreover, community groups need to actively invite residents back into their parks with regular programming and events. And organizations can help cultivate a grassroots community that takes ownership of local parks by supporting passionate residents particularly those who might want to start a park “friends group.”

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Improve & maintain smaller parks (Recommendation 18)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Make transformative investments in all public neighborhood parks (18.1)

Make sure parks help cool the community in summer (18.2)

Support the growth of “friends” groups to support smaller parks (Cross-reference: 32.3)

Improve & maintain Hunting Park (Recommendation 19)

Improve community spaces

Renew the strategic vision and plan for Hunting Park (19.1)

Secure ownership of community spaces (20.1)

(Recommendation 20)

Employ local artists to create works around the community (20.2)

Highlight history with signage and markers at significant locations (20.3)

Increase family-friendly programs

Increase familyfriendly programs and events that happen in parks

(Recommendation 21)

(21.1)

Expand and promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market (Cross-reference: 22.3)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN.

Community spaces may be at risk. Murals and the lots that sit next to them are often owned by the City or by private owners who are tax delinquent. In either case, without community action these properties could be sold. 39


We will

Labeled in blue

H u n ti ng Park

N

Cousin’s

Lenfest Center

ERIE

HUNTING PARK

AN TO

ALLEGHENY

RM ALLEGHENY

WN

Less than 5 minutes

ROOSEVELT

GE

>>>

Walking Time To Nearest Grocery Store

Sav-a-lot

SU

Full Service Grocery Store

In 2021, North10 Philadelphia reopened its Choice Market in a welcoming and dignified new space. In addition, the community organization As I Plant This Seed has established a community refrigerator on 9th Street & Luzerne Street. The fridge is stocked with fresh food and staples for anyone who needs them.

G

Walking Time To Nearest Grocery Store

Within walking distance, food is primarily available from take-out spots and corner stores.

N

Many streets in the neighborhood have few or no trees on them, making the summer temperature up to 20 degrees hotter than shadier areas of the City.

Fewer than 1 out of every 10 stores that sell food in the neighborhood also sell a high supply of fresh produce, according to the City’s 2019 report, “Neighborhood Food Retail in Philadelphia.” 28 Data collected for this plan confirms that many residents do not rely on local stores for their groceries: residents named a variety of grocery stores outside the neighborhood. But only 48 percent of neighborhood residents have access to a car, according to the US Census.29

RK RD O L D YO

A few projects are finally making a difference.

The neighborhood does not have many stores with a wide selection of nourishing food, but community organizations have expanded their efforts to fill some of the gap.

SI

For residents’ day-today health, few issues are as pressing.

FOOD

RI

Nourishing food, high quality healthcare, and protection from overwhelming summer heat: these can all feel like luxuries in Hunting Park - East Tioga.

Existing Conditions

BROAD

IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH

Sav-a-lot

5 - 10 10 - 15 15 - 20 20 - 25

LEHIGH

Sav-a-lot

Sav-a-lot

28 “Neighborhood Food Retail in Philadelphia,” City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 2019 September, accessed 2021 November 11, <https://www.phila.gov/ documents/neighborhood-food-retail-in-philadelphia>. For interactive maps related to the report, visit http://foodfitphilly.org/neighborhoodfoodretail. 29 US Census 2019 ACS 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer.


A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

[There are] too many corner stores. ... They really don’t have what the different cultures need or desire. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

What has the community said? HEALTHCARE & MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Neighborhood residents are more likely to suffer from chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and obesity; and they are less likely to have health insurance than others in Philadelphia. In each of the four Census Tracts that the neighborhood intersects:

(Above) In the neighborhood, groceries are available primarily from corner stores. (Below) North10’s new Choice Market offers a welcoming alternative for low-income residents. Photo Source: North10 Philadelphia

▸ Between 10 and 16 percent of residents do not have health insurance, compared to 8 percent citywide.30 ▸ Between 37 and 42 percent of residents suffer from obesity, compared to 34 percent citywide.31 ▸ Between 14 and 16 percent of residents suffer from diabetes, compared to 12 percent citywide.32 ▸ Between 11 and 13 percent of residents suffer from asthma, compared to 11 percent citywide.33

Plans are in the works to open a new healthcare clinic at Be A Gem Crossing. North10’s affordable housing project will also include a clinic with services for local residents. The outlines of what the clinic will offer are still in the works, but it is sure to be a strong partner in improving local access to healthcare services. 30 31 32 33

US Census 2019 ACS 5-year Estimates, accessed via Social Explorer. PolicyMap & CDC BRFSS, 2018. Ibid. Ibid.

The COVID-19 pandemic made long-term issues worse: many residents struggle with their health and access to nourishing food. The plan’s survey asked community members if a range of issues have been

long term problems for them and their family, or if the issues have gotten worse in the last year... 82% Anxiety, stress, depression, or grief

71% Paying rent, mortgage, bills, utilities

68% Racism or discrimination

66% Getting enough / good quality food

63% Health (theirs or someone they care for)

61% Making enough money

to meet basic needs, or finding enough work

18 out of 35 survey respondents

Among survey takers who are parents/guardians

finding adequate childcare

While the survey is not representative of the entire community, it is striking that so many survey takers say they have struggled with these issues.

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A l l I n To ge t h e r : T h e H u n t i n g P a r k - E a s t T i o g a N e ig h b o r h o o d P l a n

HEAT The Hunting Park - East Tioga neighborhood is one of the hottest in Philadelphia, and there is not much shade to cool it down. Hunting Park is among the hottest neighborhoods in Philadelphia, reaching temperatures up to 22 degrees hotter than other areas of the city, which have more trees to block the sun’s rays, according to 2015 surface temperature data from the City’s 2016 report “Growing Stronger: Toward a Climate-Ready Philadelphia.” Within the next 80 years, Philadelphia could face up to 52 days a year over 95 degrees - and at least 16 days over 100 degrees, the report states. Without intervention, the brunt of that heat will fall on communities like Hunting Park - East Tioga, where less than a quarter of blocks have trees lining them, according to analysis done for this report. Extreme heat can cause serious health issues such as heat stroke, dehydration, and heat exhaustion; and it poses an even greater risk to youth, seniors, and anyone with a pre-existing health condition. But the community can act to halt this crisis.

(Left) The cover of the Beat The Heat Hunting Park plan.

The Hunting Park Beat The Heat program has been working to cool residents’ homes and blocks - and relieve the neighborhood from dangerous levels of summer heat. Beat The Heat was established by the City of Philadelphia Office of Sustainability with a range of local community organizations - including Hunting Park CRC, Hunting Park United, North10, and Esperanza - to address the crisis of heat that affects the Hunting Park area. In 2019, the program released a plan titled Beat The Heat: Hunting Park that contains a comprehensive range of strategies for reducing excessive heat in the community. The program has continued its work through the pandemic with strategies like outdoor cooling stations, sprinklers and water features, installation of new street trees and planters, assistance with residents’ utility bills, air conditioner and fan giveaways, and more.

(Below) This map shows whether every area of the city is hotter or cooler than the average temperature. Hunting Park is significantly hotter. Image source: Beat The Heat Hunting Park

42

B ROA D

MARKE T


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The Plan Current efforts to address heat, healthcare & mental health services, and food access are on the right track. It is key to support and expand these initiatives. Their impact will reach far beyond improving community health.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Improve access to nourishing food (Recommendation 22)

Expand & promote food pantries and/or Choice Markets

Support & promote community refrigerators

(22.1)

(22.2)

Expand & promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market (22.3)

Strategies to reduce heat will also mean reduced energy bills for households running air conditioning, more beautiful landscaping and trees to be proud of, and more fun at parks and recreation centers, with water to relax and play in. Better healthcare and mental health services will reduce the amount of money residents need to spend on emergency care, increase residents’ ability to work wellpaying and fulfilling jobs, and free residents to spend more time on the things they love.

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

Help residents start at-home gardens to grow food (23.5)

Improve access to

healthcare & mental health services (Recommendation 23)

And increasing residents’ access to nourishing food will lift another weight from residents’ wallets, reduce stress on parents who are already stretched thin, and make it easier for kids to learn at school, among other things.

Establish new health clinics, and ensure there is a Federally Qualified Health Center (23.1)

Expand community gardening - especially with the Hunting Park Community Garden and Bethune (23.4) Support the goal of placing a good, affordable supermarket in the neighborhood (22.6)

Expand the role of Community Health Workers locally (23.2)

Promote positive messages about healthy living and mental health

Formalize on-thestreet outreach to people who may benefit from help

(23.3)

(Cross-reference: 3.1)

Ensure youth program staff are prepared to help with young peoples’ life situations (Cross-reference: 11.2)

Cool the neighborhood in summer (Recommendation 24)

Support the Beat The Heat program and implement the recommendations in its plan (24.1)

Increase street trees and shade to cool & beautify the neighborhood (24.2)

Make sure parks help cool down the neighborhood (Cross-reference: 18.2)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN. The Bethune School has planted a significant number of trees around and on its property in partnership with PHS.

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We will

IMPROVE GERMANTOWN Avenue & BGE The Germantown commercial corridor is a key part of the community that the City is committed to improving, but issues with safety and deteriorating properties have kept the corridor from fully serving the local community. Germantown Ave and BGE make up North Philly’s liveliest commercial area.

Existing Conditions Improving Broad, Germantown & Erie is a “top priority” for Mayor Kenney. In comments at the release of a version of plans for the intersection, Mayor Kenny reiterated something he has said before: “Overhauling the intersection at Broad, Germantown and Erie is a top priority for our administration. It is key to revitalizing this section of North Broad Street and the surrounding neighborhoods.”34

The corridor is home to many businesses that are important to the community - some of which have been around for many years. Businesses like King of Pizza and Brothers Shoes have been on the corridor for many years, and they are a part of the community. Newer businesses like Pho Don and La’vanter Boutique have begun to breathe new life into the street.

(Above) Improvements at Fish Park at Broad, Germantown & Butler were completed in late 2021. Photo Source: City of Philadelphia. (Below) It’s hard to find a someone in the neighborhood who doesn’t like King of Pizza. Photo Source: Google Maps

>>>

Out of 93 active storefronts on the corridor, nearly half are retail or consumer services (approximately 59). Fifteen percent (about 19) are food services - mostly take-out. The street is also home to a large community of street vendors. Some business owners have been frustrated by vendors set up in front of their locations and compete with their stores.

34 Michael Tanenbaum, “City unveils redesign plans for public spaces at North Philly intersection,” Philly Voice, 2021 January 2, accessed 2021 Nov 11, <https://www. phillyvoice.com/north-philly-broad-erie-germantown-public-space-renovations-design>.


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What has the community said? Vacancy is high on the corridor, and members of the business community say many landlords are not interested in improving the corridor for small businesses and the local community. In early 2020, about a quarter of storefronts were empty or closed on the Germantown Avenue / BGE corridor. Some of those have reopened, as COVID-19 business restrictions have lifted, but vacancy is still very high for a commercial street. Additionally, many buildings on the corridor display damage or deterioration, especially on upper floors - about a third of which are vacant. Conversations with the business community indicate that some landlords of deteriorating buildings are not interested in fixing up their properties, even while they may push rents higher on struggling business owners.

Some sections of Germantown Avenue have seen many shootings. At the beginning of this plan, a tragic double homicide spurred action. On Germantown Avenue between Erie Avenue and Ontario, there have been 22 people shot since 2015. Five of these incidents were fatal.35 In March 2021, Called To Serve CDC convened a broad coalition to discuss and strategize around improving safety in the community. Driven to action by a tragic double homicide on the corridor, attendees coordinated to increase police presence in the area, among other things. The presence of such a wide array of community representatives in one place was an important step to ensuring the neighborhood gets the attention and resources it needs. “When people try to lease from these landlords, they are doubling or tripling the rent on them. … As a community, we need to come together to hold their feet to the fire. … Most of them are smart, they pay their taxes but they won’t fix the building. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

We need more businesses in the community from people who represent the community.

Residents and business owners expressed that there is work to do, to make Germantown Ave a point of local pride and a greater attraction. Among community members who took the neighborhood survey…

4 in 10 said they

would come to the corridor more... ▸ If there were more businesses they wanted to shop at ▸ If it felt safer

3 in 10 said they

would come more if there were... ▸ More family-friendly businesses/activities ▸ More sit-down restaurants ▸ More events, like street fairs or farmer’s markets When asked how often they visit the corridor…

Only 20 percent

4 in 10

said they visit

rarely or every week. never. said they visit

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

35 Data from OpenDataPhilly “Shooting Victims” Database, 2015 - 2021 Nov 1, <https:// www.opendataphilly.org/dataset/shooting-victims>.

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Current Efforts The City is investing in major improvements to Broad, Germantown & Erie. In 2021, the City began Phase 1 of its improvements to streets and public spaces at BGE, including upgrades to “Fish Park” at the triangle of Broad, Butler, and Germantown. Other Phase 1 projects will include improvements to: the triangle at Erie, Broad, and Germantown; the Erie Avenue station on the Broad Street Line; Erie Avenue, including protected bike lanes, new bus stops, bus lanes, and removal of old trolley tracks; and several intersections, to make them safer for pedestrians.

The Plan Called To Serve CDC continues to manage the corridor, provide cleaning services, and push for a safer, more familyfriendly environment. Called To Serve works tirelessly to make the corridor more welcoming to the community. See the “Existing Conditions” section on the previous page for details about how Called To Serve has convened a broad coalition to improve safety on and around Broad, Germantown & Erie.

In addition to public space projects, the City is partnering with businesses to improve their properties. Both Tops Beauty Supply and Caribbean Feast have received matching grants from the City to complete facade improvement projects that will beautify and repair their exteriors.

Germantown Avenue and BGE should anchor the community with stores, restaurants, and experiences that residents are excited to be a part of. These strategies are focused on building a stronger connection between the community and its commercial center. This plan is not intended to provide a comprehensive set of strategies for the future of the Broad, Germantown & Erie area. Nonetheless, Germantown Avenue and BGE are a central part of the Hunting Park - East Tioga community. Improving them must mean forging a stronger connection between the corridor and the community that lives next door. The corridor will only be a true success when the people who live and work nearby consider it an indispensable amenity - a place they are excited to visit and proud to call theirs. To forge a stronger connection between the community and BGE, strategies should focus - first and foremost - on ensuring the corridor is safe. But the rate of crime alone will not persuade residents to change their perceptions of the area. Strategies must also aim to establish the corridor as a family-friendly community hub, where residents and workers of all backgrounds feel welcome and excited to spend their time. >>>

Caribbean Feast - located at Broad Street, Westmoreland Street & Rising Sun Avenue - hosts its “Children & Family Day Festival” with Council President Darrell Clark. The event usually occurs every year; though it has recently been canceled due to COVID-19. Events like this can be a major part of promoting Germantown Avenue. Photo Source: Theresa Johnson, 2017; acquired via Google Maps

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WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

A coordinated approach will focus on public space improvements to make the street safer and more inviting, as well as events, programs, and promotions that draw residents out to the area. Throughout these efforts, community groups should make every effort to ensure the corridor is welcoming to residents of all backgrounds, especially the Black and Latine communities who live nearby. To increase investment in the corridor, community groups should focus on partnering with business and property owners. A partnership with even one community-minded business or property owner to improve buildings or try new business ideas can demonstrate how new ideas and projects can benefit the area. When it comes to the ability of the corridor to support small, local businesses, it is the community’s responsibility to uphold its values. Property owners who allow their buildings to deteriorate and avoid any investment to improve the area should be held accountable however possible. And, in the long term, community organizations should seek new, innovative ways to support locally-grown small businesses and entrepreneurs, to make sure the corridor reflects the community’s values into the future.

Push investment in commercial properties (Recommendation 25)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Hold property owners accountable for the condition of their buildings (25.1)

Propose and support facade improvement grant applications (25.2)

Explore partnerships and ownership structures that support small businesses & community values (25.3)

Encourage new small businesses (Recommendation 26)

Work to attract local, family-friendly, Black & Latine businesses (26.1)

Bring “pop-ups” to vacant storefronts owned by innovative landlords (26.2)

Seek alternative locations for street vendors (26.3)

Attract people with

promotions & programs (Recommendation 27)

Expand family-friendly programming and events on the corridor (27.1)

Ensure Black, Latine, and other local communities feel welcome and represented (27.2)

Design promotions that highlight cherished businesses (27.3)

Ensure safety (Recommendation 28)

Maintain a visible police presence, especially with walking patrols (Cross-reference: 2.3)

Update the corridor’s look and feel

Upgrade pedestrian amenities & lighting, and create welcoming gateways

(Recommendation 29)

(Cross-ref: 4.3, 4.4)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN. 47


We will make sure the community can

IMPLEMENT THIS PLAN Hunting Park - East Tioga is home to a strong network of residents and organizations that work together to accomplish local goals. Their collaboration is essential to progress.

Existing Conditions Collaboration has worked well for Hunting Park - East Tioga. Community groups have achieved a lot by working together. Community groups in Hunting Park - East Tioga are enthusiastic about working together to improve the community for the people who call this home. A few of the collaborative efforts that the community has participated in include: ▸ The Broad, Germantown & Erie Collective (BGEC) brings together North10 Philadelphia, The Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team, Hunting Park CRC, Hunting Park United, and Nicetown CDC. BGEC was formed to negotiate Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) with developers and has evolved to become a key body for coordinating community development efforts.

▸ Beat The Heat Hunting Park is a collaboration between the City of Philadelphia Office of Sustainability and community organizations including Hunting Park CRC, Hunting Park United, North10, and Esperanza. The goal is to address the crisis of heat that affects the Hunting Park area. (See the “Community Health” section for more details.) ▸ Called To Serve’s “Safety Strategic Planning Meetings” have brought together an impressively broad coalition of key stakeholders to coordinate around safety issues for the Germantown Avenue corridor and the neighborhood. (See the “Safety” section for more details.)

Community organizations in Hunting Park - East Tioga provided fans and air conditioners to residents in need in 2021. Photo Source: Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

A section of tree-lined street on 10th.

>>>


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What has the community said? Resident efforts have evolved into key community organizations and initiatives. Improvements to Hunting Park, Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park, the Unity Garden, and the Healing Garden were led in part by local residents. The effort to close the Liberty Motel was championed first and foremost by community members and parents of Bethune Elementary School students. Hunting Park United, the Hunting Park Community Garden, and the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market were established by groups of motivated residents looking to make change in their community. And community groups like NTIT, Called To Serve CDC, North10, and Hunting Park CRC all have leadership or key staff who are from the community.

Passionate and motivated residents often lead the charge in Hunting Park - East Tioga, spearheading efforts to improve the neighborhood. When residents have received support from the City and community groups, they have been able to accomplish significant things.

Council President Darrell Clarke speaks at the dedication of Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park, which the community has worked hard to improve. Photo Source: Philadelphia City Council via Flickr

Residents have called out for more unity, more working together, and a stronger sense of community. Many people who took the neighborhood survey mentioned a desire for stronger connections to their neighbors and more efforts that bring the community together. [We need] neighbors working together for the common cause of having a decent place to call home.

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

Many residents appreciate the range of community organizations that serve the neighborhood. Multiple survey takers said they appreciate local organizations’ hard work, and they are grateful for their presence in the community. The people here are great, and I love that many people and organizations work together. - COMMUNITY MEMBER [The community is] filled with wonderful people and hopeful organizations. - COMMUNITY MEMBER

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The Plan To ensure progress on the recommendations in this plan, community groups and residents should set up mechanisms designed to make collective action easier, help residents get help when they need it, and hold groups accountable to the commitments they make. Mechanisms to make action easier should focus, in part, on helping organizations work together and coordinate efforts. In Hunting Park East Tioga, community services and programs are split between several co-equal organizations. In order to accomplish the goals of this plan, those organizations must maintain strong working relationships and constant coordination. BGEC is the natural home for this effort, since the group already brings together a wide array of community groups and has a proven record of working together.

Additionally, organizations can make it easier for residents to take grassroots action to improve the community. They can provide education on how to navigate City processes and programs, as well as resources & funding for projects.

To ensure accountability on the commitments made in this plan, organizations should establish strong habits of community outreach, to provide a regular forum in which they can report on actions they have taken and respond to questions from residents.

It is also necessary to improve communication b e t we e n organizations and residents. First, this means making it easier for residents to reach out to community organizations to seek help or contribute information about issues in the community. Second, it means that community organizations need to better share information with residents about what programs and services are available.

Lastly, there will be a need within a decade - for an update to the community’s strategy for the future. A lot can happen in 10 years, and the commitments made in this plan may need to be updated. Revisiting this work is a key part of sustaining momentum for change and showing the community that we are still all in, together.

Service Areas of Select Local Organizations GE WN

NG

9TH

S RI

IN

G

SU

N

5TH

Temple Hospital

Bethune School S 16TH

50

OMI

ERIE

The map also represents key organizations and partners that serve adjacent neighborhoods, including:

Nicetown CDC Tioga United Esperanza HACE

BROAD

TO

North10 The Lenfest Center Hunting Park CRC The Nicetown - Tioga Improvement Team • Hunting Park United • Called To Serve CDC

ROA D O L D YO R K

AN

• • • •

• • • •

LY C

RM

The map to the right shows the 2021 service areas of key organizations that serve the Hunting Park - East Tioga neighborhood, including:

HUNTING PARK

G ED

LE

Y

CLEARFIELD


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WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

What Is A “Civic Action Program”? HACE, a community organization located just south of the Hunting Park - East Tioga community, hosts a civic action program called the “Livability Academy.” Participants join an 8-week training on how to address neighborhood issues, then pursue a local project of their choosing.

Help organizations take action (Recommendation 30)

Empower residents to take action (Recommendation 31)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Establish an “Implementation SubCommittee” within BGEC to coordinate & track this plan (30.1)

Explore setting up a local civic action program to help passionate residents take action (31.1) Support the growth of “friends” groups for neighborhood parks (31.3)

Help residents find help now (Recommendation 32)

Make sure staff at all local orgs know what services each org offers and how to refer residents for help (32.1)

Continue convening a broad coalition to confront safety issues (Cross-reference: 1.1)

Connect residents to the City’s Citizen’s Planning Institute (31.2)

Do an annual campaign to increase participation in the Block Captain program (31.4)

Do regular marketing to reintroduce local organizations & their services to residents (32.2)

Encourage residents to report issues change requires many voices to rise up! (32.3)

We need more conversation about being a team and seeing what needs to be done on a daily basis so we can all feel comfortable in our homes and communities.

Make public engagement a habit (Recommendation 33)

Establish a public outreach strategy across organizations (33.1)

Meet people where they are (33.2)

Engage the Latine community intentionally & meaningfully

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

(33.3)

[People say] “Why are you fighting for these things? “ Why not?! ... These things are owed to the community. - LOCAL ORGANIZATION LEADER

Update this plan (Recommendation 34)

Integrate the plan into organizations’ strategic plans (34.1)

Update the plan within 10 years (34.2)

FOR MORE DETAILS ON EACH STRATEGY AND ACTION, SEE THE APPENDIX OF THIS PLAN. 51



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APPENDIX: DETAILED STRATEGIES & ACTIONS

SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 TRASH & DUMPING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 YOUNG PEOPLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 HOMES & BLOCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 COMMUNITY HEALTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 IMPLEMENTING THIS PLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

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We will

Improve safety In a community at the heart of Philadelphia’s gun violence epidemic, what the community wants - more than anything - is safety.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

Coordinate & collaborate continually

Continue convening a broad group of organizations & agencies

(Recommendation 1)

(1.1)

Work with law enforcement

Designate a lead organization

(Recommendation 2)

(2.1)

(2.2)

Maintain a visible police presence in key locations, especially with foot patrols (2.3)

Increase outreach on the street

Formalize on-thestreet outreach to offer alternatives to law enforcement

(Recommendation 3)

(3.1)

Improve streets

for pedestrian safety (Recommendation 4)

The mural “Frequencies” by Benjamin Volta on Old York Road between Butler and Pike. Photo Source: Google Maps

Invite a welcoming police presence at community events, when appropriate

Help business owners install security cameras (2.4)

>>>

Key Locations: • Lycoming, between Old York Road and 9th St (4.1) • Old York Road, between Lycoming and Erie (4.2) • Intersection of Germantown, Old York Road, Ontario & Rising Sun Ave (4.3) • Germantown Ave (4.4) • Intersection of 11th, Ontario & Goodman (4.5) • Erie Ave (4.6)

Reduce impact of unsafe businesses

Shut down or reduce impact of businesses that support illicit or illegal activities

Work with industrial and auto businesses to reduce negative impacts

(Recommendation 5)

(5.1)

(5.2)

Support youth

Grow a rich array of youth programs to broaden kids’ horizons

(Recommendation 6)

(6.1)


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SAFETY

STRATEGY 1.

Coordinate and collaborate continually. ACTION 1.1.

Continue convening a broad coalition of organizations and agencies for the express purpose of addressing violence and crime in the neighborhood.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, BGEC

PARTNER(S):

Other participants listed in “details” below

DETAILS: • A SINGLE GROUP WITH BROAD AND INCLUSIVE MEMBERSHIP. Multiple organizations in the neighborhood have convened a range of partners to confront safety issues. The community should consolidate these efforts, in order to speak together as one and strengthen its collective call for resources and action. The partners that this group convenes must be broad and inclusive of any and all participants who want to join and actively participate. It should include, at least: • Elected officials, including Councilman Darrell Clarke, Councilmember Cindy Bass, Councilmember Maria Quiñones Sánchez, State Senator Sharif Street, State Representative Danila Burgos, and State Representative Darisha Parker • Administration representatives from the Mayor’s office, including the Chief of Staff, Managing Director’s Office, and Office of Transportation, Infrastructure & Sustainability • Philadelphia Police Department 25th District, 39th District, Temple Police, and SEPTA Police • City agency representatives from the Commerce Department, Department of City Planning, Law Department, and others • Community organizations, institutions, and nonprofits, including all BGEC member organizations, Bethune Elementary School (Principal Aliya Bradley), Little Flower High School (Principal Jeane McNamara), Temple Hospital, Temple Medical School, LISC Philadelphia, PACDC, and others • FOCUS ON THE WHOLE NEIGHBORHOOD and not just the Broad, Germantown & Erie area. The presence of BGE in the community can help to draw attention to broader issues throughout the area; use the City’s focus on BGE as an opportunity to expand the conversation about safety with this group and direct resources and attention to the whole community. • SET CLEAR GOALS and TIMELINES to prevent fatigue and continue momentum. Outlining specific initiatives and tracking progress in a systematic way will ensure that meeting agendas always require the attention of participants, and their attention doesn’t slack. • CELEBRATE SUCCESS: Just as the group confronts grave challenges, make sure to celebrate success.

STRATEGY 2.

Work with law enforcement. ACTION 2.1.

Designate a lead organization.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

PARTNER(S):

PPD 25th District, PPD 39th District, Temple Police, SEPTA Police

DETAILS: • DESIGNATE A LEAD ORGANIZATION or team of leaders from among BGEC to ensure follow-up and progress on this task - and to act as the primary convener for collaborations and discussions.

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 2, CONTINUED

ACTION 2.2.

LEAD ORG(S):

Invite a welcoming police presence at appropriate community events and meetings.

Community organizations

PARTNER(S):

PPD 25th District, PPD 39th District, Temple Police, SEPTA Police

DETAILS: • INVITE POLICE DEPARTMENT PARTICIPATION at community events and meetings, where they will have an opportunity to get to know individual residents and young people - and interact with them in a positive way. • CREATE OPPORTUNITIES TO DISCUSS THE ROLE OF POLICING IN THE COMMUNITY: Some residents have expressed a desire for more conversations about (and possibly with) law enforcement. • PROVIDE UPDATES to residents on collaborations with the police district as often as possible.

ACTION 2.3.

Work with the police to maintain a visible and approachable police presence at key locations, intersections, and corridors.

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw visits North10’s youth out-of-school program. Image Source: North10 Philadelphia

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, North10

PARTNER(S):

PPD 25th District, PPD 39th District, Temple Police, SEPTA Police

DETAILS: • EMPHASIZE FOOT PATROLS: Community members have communicated that it is important for police to have an approachable presence in the community. Many community members specifically mentioned the importance of foot patrols - as well as negative feelings about police car patrols, which can feel hostile and unapproachable. • EMPHASIZE BGE, BUT DON’T NEGLECT THE REST: BGE requires larger-scale strategies than elsewhere, but residential blocks are equally important. The community identified a range of streets and intersections that feel unsafe. Emphasize patrols in these areas, and reassess where residents feel unsafe regularly. • MOBILE POLICE UNIT: As a corridor, BGE is significant enough to call for a police mini-station or mobile police station - a visible, local home base out of which police can maintain a local presence. • WORK WITH PPD, TEMPLE POLICE, AND SEPTA POLICE: Improving safety will require participation from a wide range of partners. PPD, Temple, and SEPTA should contribute to patrols - especially along Germantown Avenue, so that the area will always have eyes on the street.

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 2, CONTINUED

ACTION 2.4.

Help business owners to install security cameras in and outside their properties - and register them with the Philadelphia Police Department SafeCam program.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

Commerce Department, PPD 25th District, PPD 39th District

DETAILS: • GUIDE INTERESTED BUSINESS AND PROPERTY OWNERS through the process of planning for purchase and installation, obtaining partial funding from the Commerce Department, and registering cameras with the PPD’s SafeCam Program. • COMMERCE DEPARTMENT’S BUSINESS SECURITY CAMERA GRANT PROGRAM: To obtain 50 percent of total eligible costs, up to $3,000 for a single commercial property, business or property owners will need to show photographs of the location where they will install the cameras, obtain a contractor estimate for installation, (if they are a renter) obtain a letter of approval from the property owner, and commit to registering the camera(s) with PPD’s SafeCam Program. • PPD’S SAFECAM PROGRAM lets the Police Department know that they can view camera footage if a crime occurs in the vicinity.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 32.3. Encourage a culture of reporting issues among residents, to draw resources to the community and help build a case for action on persistent issues. (See page 103)

STRATEGY 3.

Increase on-the-street outreach to people who may benefit from assistance, as an alternative to law enforcement. ACTION 3.1.

Coordinate providers of healthcare, workforce development programs, and other services to formalize on-the-street outreach efforts, targeting people who may benefit from connection to various programs and services.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park CRC

PARTNER(S):

Center for Urban Bioethics (CUB), North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative, local clinics and healthcare providers

DETAILS: • OFFER AN ALTERNATIVE TO LAW ENFORCEMENT by aiming outreach to groups and individuals who might otherwise be targeted by the criminal justice system. This might include individuals engaged in public drinking or drug use, gambling, or prostitution, among other things. • ROBUST, INTENTIONAL, AND REGULAR: Services of this sort are more effective when outreach workers are able to develop relationships with the people they see out on the street over and over. Some staff at local organizations already engage in informal outreach and relationship-building with folks on the street. Formalizing these activities and explicitly connecting these community members to health and employment programs could take efforts to the next level.

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SAFETY

See the map on the following page

STRATEGY 4.

Upgrade streetscapes to improve pedestrian safety. ACTION 4.1.

Connect planned improvements to the north side of Lycoming Street with improved pedestrian infrastructure, to create a safe and welcoming edge to Hunting Park.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park United

PARTNER(S):

Water Department, Department of Parks & Recreation, City Council members

DETAILS:

See location 1

• FINISH HUNTING PARK’S EDGE: Lycoming runs along the entire southern edge of Hunting Park, and it does not create a welcoming entry point for neighbors approaching the park.

Map on page 59

• REPAIR SIDEWALKS: On the northern side of the street along the park, the sidewalk is severely deteriorated, so that - in some places - it is just rubble. • ADD PEDESTRIAN SCALE LIGHTING: Street lights can be blocked by trees; pedestrian scale lighting will improve the sense of safety. • ADD TRASH CANS: Trash cans within the park can be emptied by PPR. Along the edge of the park, they can help prevent littering by passersby. • FILL THE GAPS between improvements that are slated for implementation by the Water Department.

The sidewalk on the north side of Lycoming Street along Hunting Park is almost entirely gone.

How Can The Water Department Help - and How Can’t It? The City of Philadelphia has an EPA-mandated goal to reduce the amount of polluted stormwater overflows that occur in the city. To meet this goal, the Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) is tasked with implementing green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) projects that absorb stormwater before it enters Philadelphia’s sewer system. These GSI projects often provide additional community benefits, such as improved sidewalks, street trees, and gardens; however, there are limits to what PWD can do. Project funding is limited to stormwater infrastructure, so PWD investments are often not able to address other needed upgrades or comprehensive improvements at a site. West Lycoming Street is one example of this situation: PWD is designing tree trenches along the north side of W Lycoming Street, along the southern edge of Hunting Park, providing new sidewalk where these stormwater systems can be constructed. However, there will be gaps between these tree trench footprints. Additional funding is needed to complete the sidewalk improvements.

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 4, CONTINUED LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 4.2.

Improve the pedestrian experience of Old York Road between Erie and Lycoming, to connect the community to its park and improve safety.

PARTNER(S):

North10, Called Streets Department, Department To Serve CDC of Commerce, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • CONNECT THE COMMUNITY TO ITS PARK: Old York Road is an important path between the Broad, Germantown & Erie and Hunting Park, but it is not welcoming or safe. Trash is common, and the eastern sidewalk is - in some spots - completely disintegrated. Meanwhile, heavy traffic can feel unsafe, and there is virtually no shade. The community deserves a better connection to its park. • REPAIR SIDEWALKS that are deteriorating or - in some places - completely gone, leaving dangerous holes in the ground that fill with trash. • PLANT STREET TREES to increase shade. • RE-PAINT FADED CROSSWALKS along Old York Road, and assess the need to paint new mid-block crossings. This may also be an opportunity to include public art in the streetscape. • INSTALL PEDESTRIAN-SCALE LIGHTING to ensure there are no dark spots - and that trees do not block light from hitting the sidewalk. • INSTALL BOLLARDS to prevent parking on sidewalks. • ASSESS THE NEED FOR SPEED HUMPS to slow down speeding traffic. Public art interventions, such as sidewalk painting or artistic crosswalks, can also help decrease car speed.

See location 2

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Lenfest Center

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The sidewalk on the east side of Old York Road ends in a sudden drop, which is often filled with trash.

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Strategy 4 See the recommendation text beginning on page 58 for details on each location.

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Hunting Park

D RK ROA O L D YO

Map on page 59

Locations of Recommended Streetscape Upgrades

EY

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STRATEGY 4, CONTINUED

ACTION 4.3.

Improve the intersection of Germantown, Ontario, Old York Road and Rising Sun to create a welcoming, pedestrianfriendly gateway to Germantown Avenue and the Bethune School. DETAILS: • MAKE A WELCOMING GATEWAY with public art and placemaking strategies that will make the site distinctive and exciting.

Map on page 59

G SIN

NTO WN

60

- COMMUNITY MEMBER

MA

• BUILD OFF OF CURRENT IMPROVEMENTS: The City is currently pursuing improvements to the central triangle at this site; those improvements should be matched by additional improvements throughout the intersection.

Children almost get hit every day [at Germantown, Ontario, Old York Road, and Rising Sun].

See location 3

• SLOW TRAFFIC AND MAKE IT EASIER FOR PEDESTRIANS. Wide streets and insufficient pedestrian infrastructure make this intersection confusing and dangerous to navigate on foot - especially for young students who walk to Bethune Elementary School every day. • ADD WALKING SIGNALS AND CROSSWALKS: First and foremost, install walking signals at all crosswalks, repaint crosswalks, and add traffic lights and crosswalks to sections of the triangle that lack them. • SLOW TRAFFIC with bump outs, wider sidewalks, and speed humps. Public art interventions, such as sidewalk painting or artistic crosswalks, can also help decrease car speed. • REPAIR SIDEWALKS that are cracked and deteriorating. • INSTALL BOLLARDS to prevent parking on sidewalks. • INSTALL PEDESTRIAN-SCALE LIGHTING and potentially extend lighting up Germantown Avenue - especially because many students leave Bethune on foot after dark.

Streets Department, Department of Commerce, Councilman Darrell Clarke, Temple Hospital and Temple Medical School, PENNDOT, OTIS, PHS

GER

• PLANT STREET TREES to create a park-like atmosphere, in partnership with PHS. • ADD INTERESETING LIGHTING OR PUBLIC ART: This could become an iconic location in the community with a bit of art and lighting: something as simple as colorful hanging lights from the triangle’s trees - or a more permanent artistic installation.

Called To Serve CDC, North10, Bethune Elementary School

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SAFETY

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Bethune School

WESTMOR

Colorfull lights can turn trees into a piece of art. Photo Source: Philly Voice

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 4, CONTINUED

ACTION 4.4.

Upgrade pedestrian amenities on Germantown Avenue between Ontario and Broad to increase safety and make the corridor feel more inviting.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Called To Serve CDC, North10

Streets Department, Department of Commerce, Councilman Darrell Clarke, Temple Hospital and Temple Medical School

DETAILS: • INSTALL PEDESTRIAN-SCALE LIGHTING that won’t be blocked by street trees, as streetlights often are. • FIX BUCKLED SIDEWALKS and remove street trees that are overgrown or problematic. • PLANT STREET TREES that will grow compactly and will not buckle sidewalks.

See location 4

Map on page 59

• NEW TRASH CANS: See Strategy 7.4 “Reduce pileup of trash on the Germantown Avenue corridor” for more details.

ACTION 4.5.

Ensure safer pathways to Bethune Elementary School by upgrading the intersection of N 11th Street, W Ontario Street, and Goodman Street.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Called To Serve CDC, North10, Bethune Elementary School

Water Department, Streets Department, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS:

See location 5

GO

• NARROW THE STREET to slow traffic and expand sidewalks.

Map on page 59 O N TA R IO

OD MA

• PLANT STREET TREES.

N

• CONSIDER INSTALLING A TRAFFIC TRIANGLE in the center of the intersection.

^ N

11th

• REQUEST PWD AND STREETS DEPARTMENT to investigate GSI opportunities to align with these goals.

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 4, CONTINUED

ACTION 4.6.

Complete the City’s planned improvements to Erie Avenue and continue to assess how safe and welcome residents feel on the street - and whether residents feel comfortable crossing the street to reach community their destination.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

Department of City Planning

DETAILS: • FINISH BGE IMPROVEMENTS outlined by the City for Erie Avenue. These improvements will slow traffic and improve the pedestrian experience significantly. • ASSESS PEDESTRIAN COMFORT and report back to the City on the success of the project do residents feel more comfortable crossing Erie to access neighborhood amenities?

See location 6

Map on page 59

• KEEP IT CLEAN: Investments won’t significantly improve the pedestrian experience if they become overrun with trash. Explore expanding the Called To Serve corridor cleaning program along Erie Avenue (see the section on Cleanliness for more).

ACTION 4.7.

Assess the need for further streetscape improvements on residential streets and on key pedestrian pathways to make streets feel safer and more welcoming.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • CONSIDER ESPECIALLY improvements such as pedestrian-scale lighting, repairs to deteriorating sidewalks, and speed humps to slow speeding traffic, public art by local artists, and historic markets noting key locations that are significant to the local community.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 14.5. Implement a Porch Light Program to provide low or no-cost solar-powered porch lights to neighborhood residents. (See page 76)

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SAFETY

STRATEGY 5.

Reduce some businesses’ unsafe or unhealthy effects on the community. ACTION 5.1.

Organize and advocate to shut down or reduce the impact of businesses that support illegal and illicit activities, especially in close proximity to Bethune Elementary School.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, Bethune School

PARTNER(S):

Department of Licenses & Inspections, PPD 25th District, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • COLLECT REPORTS over time to build a case against these businesses with sustained community pressure and publicity. • ORGANIZE RESIDENTS WITH COLLECTIVE ACTION such as a petition or anything else that can demonstrate to the City the importance of these issues to the community. • COORDINATE WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AND LICENSES & INSPECTIONS to put pressure on these businesses to reform or relocate. • STREETSCAPE PROJECTS can disrupt bad behavior in public and “reset” an area, by displacing negative behaviors and changing the look and feel of the block.

ACTION 5.2.

Work with local industrial or auto-related businesses that are located near schools or residential blocks to mitigate their negative effects on the area, and discourage new industrial or auto-related businesses from locating too close to those locations.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Called To Serve Department of Licenses & CDC, Bethune Inspections, Department of City School, North10 Planning, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • REACH OUT AND START A CONVERSATION: Many of these businesses are locally-owned and lawabiding; nonetheless, the materials involved in their work and their storage practices (i.e. blocking sidewalks with cars or tires) pose a health and safety risk, especially to young people coming and going from Bethune Elementary School. It may be possible to find solutions that residents and business owners can both get behind. • ADVOCATE FOR CHANGES TO THE ZONING CODE that will make it so that new industrial and autorelated businesses cannot locate in close proximity to schools or residences.

STRATEGY 6.

Support neighborhood youth and young adults. From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 11.1. Fill gaps in local programming for young people to provide a rich array of activities, led by people that local kids can relate to, that provide many types of activities; teach social, emotional, and life skills; and broaden kids’ horizons. (See page 71) 63


We will

CLEAN UP TRASH & DUMPING The community says trash & dumping are out of control. Small strategies have not moved the needle. A broad, coordinated effort is needed.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

Encourage people not to litter & dump

Implement a marketing campaign that reaches every corner of the community

(Recommendation 7)

(7.1)

Track dumping issues

Make it easier for residents to report dumping issues

(Recommendation 8)

(8.1)

Clean up trash & dumping

Expand the BGE corridor cleaning area and make it easier for CTS to manage it

(Recommendation 9)

(9.1 and 9.2)

Fund cleaning & greening programs with added benefits, like job training and youth engagement (9.3)

Catalog undeveloped lots for maintenance by the LandCare program

Contact property owners and request they clean properties that have trash

(9.4)

(9.5)

Utilize relationships with the City to elevate residents’ dumping reports

Dumping on Erie Avenue, beside the mural “African Landscape” by Henry Bermudez

(9.6)

>

Help residents clean up (Recommendation 10)

Provide materials & support for residentled block cleanups (10.1)

Host a “trash amnesty” event where people can get rid of anything (10.2)


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TRASH & DUMPING

STRATEGY 7.

Encourage people not to litter and dump in the community. ACTION 7.1.

Implement a communications and marketing campaign that can become a part of every organization’s activities, all public spaces, storefront displays, and residents’ homes.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, North10

DETAILS: • BRAND IT with a standard graphic style, logo, and name for the initiative. • GET IT OUT THERE on stickers, flyers, signage in parks and on streets, tee-shirts, hats, reusable tote bags, and on various giveaways (e.g. trash cans, outdoor planters, wind chimes, etc.). • SAY IT as often as possible, at meetings and in interactions with residents. • BRING ON RESIDENT AMBASSADORS who are passionate about this issue to spread the word and strategize about how to market the initiative. • INVOLVE YOUTH in the creation and implementation of the neighborhood campaign by developing it as a creative arts project. • TELL RESIDENTS WHAT THEY CAN DO by tying other strategies in this section into the campaign. • FOLLOW-UP with progress and developments, so residents don’t view this as a static marketing campaign - but rather as an active and ongoing effort.

“Litter Free Bella Vista” advertising campaign by the Bella Vista Neighbors Association in Philadelphia. Photo Source: Bella Vista Neighbors Association

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TRASH & DUMPING

STRATEGY 8.

Improve reporting and tracking of dumping issues. ACTION 8.1.

Create ways for residents to report dumping issues to local organizations, possibly including a dedicated phone number and/or website.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, North10

PARTNER(S):

Streets Department, Philly311

DETAILS: • MAKE IT SIMPLE TO REPORT ISSUES with a single phone number and/or a standardized web form that can appear on multiple local organizations’ websites, with a clear and prominent link on their front pages. Advertise this resource widely.

See next page for precedent

• ELEVATE REPORTS TO WHERE THEY NEED TO GO according to local organizations’ overarching plan for managing dumping - whether that means contacting someone at the City, directing the report of one of the local community groups, or sending out a locally-run cleaning and greening workforce team, as recommended below. • INTEGRATE INTO MARKETING CAMPAIGN to spread the word about how residents can help.

STRATEGY 9.

Increase regular cleaning of dumping and trash on streets and undeveloped lots. ACTION 9.1.

Expand the BGE cleaning area to include all City investments in BGE and key paths between the corridor and major destinations.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

Department of Commerce

DETAILS: • EVALUATE AREAS OF EXPANSION such as... • Erie Avenue between BGE and 10th Street: The City has demonstrated that this stretch of Erie is a key part of the Broad, Germantown & Erie area with planned streetscape improvements. Capital investments on Erie will only succeed if they are maintained. • Old York Road between Erie and Luzerne, which is a key path from the commercial corridor to Hunting Park and lacks a dedicated steward. • Any additional areas that will help to maintain the City’s investments in BGE

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TRASH & DUMPING

STRATEGY 9, CONTINUED LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 9.2.

Help Called To Serve CDC keep BGE clean with better trashcans and more frequent City sanitation pickup.

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

Streets Department, Department of Commerce

DETAILS: There are several options that could accomplish this goal: • REPLACE OR SUPPLEMENT BIG BELLY TRASH CANS with attractive trash cans that can be managed by the local corridor cleaning team. Big Belly trash compactors can only be emptied by City sanitation crews, and they only come once a week; so trash tends to pile up next to these cans when they become full. • INCREASE FREQUENCY OF CITY SANITATION CREW PICKUPS on the Avenue, so that Big Belly compactors don’t become full before the next pickup.

ING LUZERNE

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Current CTS Cleaning Area

VENANGO Temple Hospital

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Expansion Area for Consideration

Hunting OM P a r k

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Action 9.1

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The Riverfront North Partnership posts signage directing residents to a website where they can report dumping issues in the Bridesburg neighborhood of Philadelphia. Photo Source: Riverfront North Partnership

Current Called To Serve CDC Corridor Cleaning Area and Possible Expansion

ALLEGHENY Y LE G D SE

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TRASH & DUMPING

STRATEGY 9, CONTINUED

ACTION 9.3.

Fund cleaning and greening programs for areas beyond BGE - especially programs with added community benefits, such as workforce development or youth engagement.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park CRC, Hunting Park United

PARTNER(S):

Department of Commerce

DETAILS: • ESTABLISH A NEW CLEAN & GREEN WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. There are a few different options for funding and management, for example: • Establish a new commercial corridor cleaning program; • Organize a fund paid for by major local employers, such as Temple University, industrial and commercial businesses; and/or • Build the program into a CBA or similar agreement. • DEEPEN PARTNERSHIPS WITH EXISTING TEAMS that are already deeply experienced with block and lot cleanups, such as HP Green, which provides a paid youth service experience that prioritizes leadership development and community engagement. • IMPLEMENT PROACTIVE NEIGHBORHOOD DRIVE-ABOUTS to locate issues. Document and track where dumping occurs over time, to help develop a strategy for managing issues. Elevate reports to where they need to go.

ACTION 9.4.

Catalog undeveloped lots in need of maintenance, and coordinate with the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) to ensure that all eligible undeveloped land in the community is cleaned and managed.

LEAD ORG(S): North10

PARTNER(S):

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS)

DETAILS: • COORDINATE WITH PHS throughout the year to check their lists of properties against lists maintained by local organizations.

ACTION 9.5.

Proactively contact property owners whose properties are sites of disorder or dumping, and ask them to clean up.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, NTIT, Called To Serve CDC, Hunting Park CRC

DETAILS: • REACH OUT TO PROPERTY OWNERS when residents report issues with trash and dumping, or when local organizations see an issue develop.

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TRASH & DUMPING

STRATEGY 9, CONTINUED

ACTION 9.6.

Utilize relationships with City officials and agencies to elevate local dumping reports to individuals who can ensure issues are dealt with promptly.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, BGEC

PARTNER(S):

Streets Department, Philly311

DETAILS: Strong relationships with local elected officials and City agency representatives can help ensure that issues like dumping are dealt with properly. • ESTABLISH HABIT OF REPORTING this sort of issue to a standard contact with the City - possibly setting up a regular meeting to discuss this and other topics or integrating dumping into another regular meeting.

STRATEGY 10.

Support resident clean-up activities. ACTION 10.1.

Provide materials, meeting space, food, incentives or other support for blocks to lead their own clean-ups.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park CRC, North10

PARTNER(S):

Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee (PMBC) Block Captain network, HP Green

DETAILS: • FORMALIZE PROCEDURES for assisting in local clean-ups, including a standard package of materials and support - and a clearly communicated step-by-step process for obtaining them. It would be especially helpful to offer support in excess of the support offered by the Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee (PMBC) Block Captain network. • CONSIDER PARTNERING WITH AN EXISTING LOCAL TEAM that has experience and capacity to complete block and lot clean-up, such as HP Green. • SPREAD THE WORD, especially to local Block Captains.

ACTION 10.2.

Host a “trash amnesty” event where people can bring anything to get rid of.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park CRC, North10, NTIT

PARTNER(S):

Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • ORGANIZE AND PROMOTE an event for residents to drop off any amount of trash, large and small. • FIND A SPONSOR to cover costs of electronics recycling, shredding, dumpsters, etc. • INTEGRATE WITH MARKETING CAMPAIGN to reduce trash and dumping.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 31.4. Do an annual campaign to increase block participation in the City’s Block Captain program. (See page 101) 69


We will

SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE “Kids here sometimes don’t get to be kids,” one community member said. Young people need more safe and supportive places to learn and have fun, residents and organizations agree.

The Lenfest Center offers a number of out-of-school programs for local young people .

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Expand programs & activities (Recommendation 11)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Fill gaps in programming for young people to provide a rich array of activities (11.1)

Make sure program staff are prepared to help with young peoples’ life situations (11.2)

Make sure parents know what programs are available (11.3)

Support Bethune School (Recommendation 12)

Start a strong, permanent parents’ organization that emphasizes social justice & equity (12.1) Complete the Bethune School playground and garden (12.3)

More safe, fun places to hang out (Recommendation 13)

Transform all neighborhood parks (Cross-reference: 18.1)

Start a walking school bus to reduce truancy and improve safe routes to school (12.2)

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YOUNG PEOPLE

STRATEGY 11.

Expand programs and activities for youth, young adults, and families after school and over the summer. ACTION 11.1.

Fill gaps in local programming for young people to provide a rich array of activities, led by people that local kids can relate to, that provide many types of activities; teach social, emotional, and life skills; and broaden kids’ horizons.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, Hunting Park Rec Center, Hunting Park United, As I Plant This Seed, Called To Serve CDC, Vocatio Career Prep School, Bethune Elementary School, other youth program providers

PARTNER(S):

PPR, PHS, Hunting Park Community Garden, SquashSmarts, other youth program providers

DETAILS: • ACTIVITIES, EVENTS, AND PROGRAMS: Residents called for more family-friendly programs of all kinds, including one-off events and programs that extend over a longer period of time. • GET THEM STARTED YOUNG: Program staff say the young people who start at out-of-school programs young are more likely to continue coming back through their adolescence. • BROADEN HORIZONS AT HOME AND ELSEWHERE: Close to home, get kids involved in their community - show them that they can make a difference with local, youth-led projects. Away from home, find ways to show kids new places that they’ve never been to, whether with day-trips or weekend vacations. Broaden young peoples’ horizons - it’s a big world out there. • BRING COMMUNITIES TOGETHER: Make sure youth from the Black and Latine communities can see their culture in out-of-school programs, and support strong relationships between kids of all backgrounds. • GET PARENTS INVOLVED: Design programs and events that bring parents and young people together, to provide a safe and supportive space where they can spend time together - and have fun. • IF APPROPRIATE, INVOLVE POLICE OFFICERS: In a safe space, bringing in a welcoming police presence to engage with young people in positive activities can help build stronger relationships.

IDEA: Boost Play Streets

IDEA: Establish Garden Programs

Boost Play Streets with fun activities and materials - especially ones that keep kids cool. In the Summer, supporting the City’s Play Streets program is a great, simple way to create more safe opportunities for kids to have fun. Play Streets can be identified with publicly available City data, and blocks can apply to join the program via the Department of Parks & Recreation. Support could include staff time, supplies & materials, and funding.

Establish community garden programs for young people in the neighborhood, through partnerships with the Hunting Park Community Garden and the future Bethune School community garden. Formalize relationships between community gardens, schools, and community organizations, to ensure programs don’t end when one teacher or staff member departs.

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YOUNG PEOPLE

STRATEGY 11, CONTINUED

ACTION 11.2.

Make sure out-of-school program staff are equipped to help (or refer to help) young people and their families with more complex issues, such as emotional trauma, economic hardship, or limited English proficiency.

LEAD ORG(S): North 10, Bethune Elementary School

PARTNER(S):

Center for Urban Bioethics, other out-of-school program providers in the community

DETAILS: • PREPARE TO HELP: Many young people and their families face difficult situations at home. Out-ofschool program staff need resources and support so they are prepared to support youth and their families. That could mean creating protocols for how to respond to particular situations, educating staff all types of services that are available in the community, or even hiring a social worker to provide services on site. • ESL SERVICES AND OUTREACH: Continue to provide ESL classes, and reach out to members of the Latine community to figure out the best way to structure those classes, the best times to host them, and how to get out the word to the people who need them. Some members of the Latine community may not feel welcome at out-of-school program locations. It is key to change any negative perceptions that prevent people from using helpful services.

ACTION 11.3.

LEAD ORG(S):

Communicate to parents what youth programs North10, other youth program providers and activities are available in the community. See STRATEGY 32. Help residents connect to assistance on issues they need help with now. (Page 102)

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 21.1. Increase the range and frequency of programs and events that are held in parks ... (See page 85)

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YOUNG PEOPLE

STRATEGY 12.

Support Bethune School and its local families. ACTION 12.1.

Facilitate the creation of a strong and permanent parents’ organization to advocate for the Bethune School and its young people, emphasizing social justice and equity.

LEAD ORG(S): Bethune Elementary School

PARTNER(S):

North10, BGEC

DETAILS: • THE GOAL IS TO establish a sustained movement of parents to advocate for continual progress at the Bethune School and in the surrounding area, emphasizing social justice and equity for the community’s young people. • FIND PASSIONATE PARENTS at community and school-related events, and ask if they would like to be involved in an effort to organize school parents. FACILITATE A CONVERSATION between parents who want to be more deeply involved, and organize follow-up discussions, with the goal of identifying and supporting parents who would like to take charge of an effort. FORMALIZE A PARENTS GROUP when and if there is enough interest, with formal organizational rules and structures.

ACTION 12.2.

Implement a walking school bus in partnership with local parents to address truancy and safety concerns.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Bethune Office of Transportation, Elementary Infrastructure & Sustainability School, North10

DETAILS: • IDENTIFY INTERESTED PARENTS who might want to participate or lead the process. • COORDINATE between parents, the Bethune School, the City, and any community organizations that may be able to provide support. • MAKE A PLAN based on the City of Philadelphia’s resources for how to set up a walking school bus.

ACTION 12.3.

Complete the Bethune School Playground and Garden, and invite the community to be a part of their management and programming.

LEAD ORG(S):

Bethune Elementary School, North10

See STRATEGY 18. Implement and maintain improvements to all neighborhood parks. (See page 83)

STRATEGY 13.

Increase the supply of safe, fun places to hang out in the neighborhood. From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 18.1. Make transformative investments in every public neighborhood park ... (See page 83) 73


We will help residents invest in their

HOMES & BLOCKS

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Help residents invest in homes & blocks (Recommendation 14)

Establish a unified strategy across organizations to provide housing support (14.1) Connect residents to financial education & counseling programs

Many in the neighborhood love its comfortable singlefamily homes, and some blocks show their pride visibly. But, in one of the city’s most impoverished communities, a web of barriers blocks many from setting down roots.

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY?

(14.3)

Help residents tackle common housing legal issues (14.2)

Encourage & celebrate residents who improve homes, blocks, & the community (14.4)

Implement a porch light program to give free solar powered lights to residents (14.5)

Help residents gain ownership of property (Recommendation 15)

Help residents acquire land through the Land Bank (15.1)

Monitor properties going to Sheriff Sale and protect local uses (15.3)

Help residents navigate the Land Bank’s side yard program (15.2)


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HOMES & BLOCKS

STRATEGY 14.

Connect residents with resources to invest in their homes and blocks. ACTION 14.1.

Establish a unified strategy across local organizations to provide residents with support for their housing needs, and make them aware about what resources are available.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park CRC, BGEC

FUNDING:

City of Phila’s Neighborhood Preservation Initiative (NPI) and Restore, Repair, Renew program

DETAILS: • GET AHEAD OF THE GAME: Funding is coming down the line through the City’s Neighborhood Preservation Initiative and Restore, Repair Renew program. Having a plan for how the community could use this funding will help Hunting Park - East Tioga secure what it needs. Additionally, helping as many residents as possible sign up for City programs with significant back-logs (such as the Basic Systems Repair Program) could help ensure they get assistance sooner. • ENHANCE COMMUNICATIONS: Many residents don’t know what housing services are available, or they don’t know what “jargon” related to housing programs means. It is important to enhance marketing and communications to help residents understand what they qualify for. See the section “Help residents connect to assistance...” for more details. • CONTINUE PROVIDING SERVICES THROUGH HUNTING PARK CRC (NAC): The local NAC is an indispensable resource for residents, and its leadership has demonstrated a deep commitment to helping residents, advocating for resources, and tracking resource commitments their impact. It is essential that this organization continues and grows its work, especially in the following areas: • Housing counseling and referrals • Rental assistance / rebates • Mortgage foreclosure prevention assistance • Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and LIHEAP Crisis • Utility Emergency Services Fund (UESF) • Basic Systems Repair Program (BSRP) • Adaptive Modifications Program (AMP) • Other weatherization programs and utility system repairs

ACTION 14.2.

Establish strong relationships with groups that can help residents tackle common legal issues related to housing, and host regular workshops in the community.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park CRC, NTIT, North10

PARTNER(S):

Community Legal Services (CLS)

DETAILS: • PARTNER with an organization such as Community Legal Services to connect neighbors with pro bono counsel. • HOST WORKSHOPS at a convenient location in the community and/or online. • ADDRESS ISSUES such as tangled titles, estate planning, payment plans for back-owed taxes, tenant rights, eviction prevention, and other legal issues related to housing.

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HOMES & BLOCKS

STRATEGY 14, CONTINUED LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 14.3.

Create or support financial education and counseling programs to help residents navigate issues like credit card debt, homebuying, and general financial management.

Hunting Park CRC, North10

DETAILS: • PARTNER with an experienced organization to provide workshops and counseling.

LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 14.4.

Create programs and activities that encourage (and celebrate) residents who improve their homes, blocks, and community. This could include micro-grants for block improvements, “best porch” competitions, and more.

Hunting Park CRC, North10, NTIT, BGEC

PARTNER(S): BGEC

DETAILS: The following is a list of a few select ideas: • STREET FRONTAGE IMPROVEMENT GRANT PROGRAM: Set up a program to offer micro-grants, matching grants, or percentage grants for groups of neighbors with an idea for beautifying their sidewalks and street frontages. Nothing is too small - simple planters, lights, or art can go a long way! • BEST PORCH COMPETITIONS during the holidays or when the seasons change

The Bridesburg neighborhood of Philly has held a Patriotic House Decorating Contest. Photo Source: Riverfront North Partnership

• PORCH PLANT GIVE-AWAYS in partnership with local community gardens, to beautify the neighborhood and teach residents how to care for new plants

ACTION 14.5.

Implement a Porch Light Program to provide low or no-cost solar-powered porch lights to neighborhood residents.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park CRC

DETAILS: • IMPROVE LIGHTING WITHOUT MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS: Porch lights can illuminate the sidewalk and improve safety, especially if every house on a street has them. • BATCH ORDER SOLAR POWERED LIGHTS and provide them to residents along with installation services.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 31.1. Explore how to set up a local civic action program that helps residents ... implement real projects in the community. (See page 100) 76


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HOMES & BLOCKS

STRATEGY 15.

Help residents to gain ownership of property in the community. ACTION 15.1.

Teach residents who want to acquire property through Sheriff Sale or the Land Bank to navigate the process and make a plan for the property.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park CRC, North10

DETAILS: • ESTABLISH EXPERTISE in-house on navigating City processes regarding land acquisition. • COMMUNICATE THIS SERVICE to residents via marketing efforts. • HELP RESIDENTS PLAN for accessing resources and improving the property.

ACTION 15.2.

Help homeowners navigate the Land Bank’s side-yard program to buy Cityowned lots adjacent to their homes.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park CRC, North10

• IMPROVE AND ADD VALUE: Many of these lots are already in use as yards; securing their ownership for the adjacent property owner will improve the chances these lots are maintained, protect them from purchase by an outside buyer, and add value to local residents’ homes. • IDENTIFY POTENTIAL ELIGIBLE PROPERTIES by locating city-owned properties in use as yards • CANVAS PROPERTY USERS by identifying which property is using the lot as a yard and approaching them with information on the City’s sideyard program • ESTABLISH EXPERTISE in-house on navigating City processes regarding land acquisition • COMMUNICATE THIS SERVICE to residents via marketing efforts

ACTION 15.3.

Monitor the list of properties going to Sheriff Sale, and act either to prevent sale or to direct the acquisition of properties that are locally important or in use by neighbors.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park CRC, North10

PARTNER(S):

Philadelphia Land Bank, Revenue Department, Community Legal Services

• ESTABLISH RELATIONSHIPS with the Land Bank and Revenue Department, who would be able to provide a stay of sale for a property that is on the Sheriff Sale list • COORDINATE with an organization such as Community Legal Services, who could help to push for a stay of sale, if necessary • IDENTIFY FRIENDLY BUYERS among local or Citywide community organizations who are willing to bid on and hold locally important properties, if they go to sale.

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We will make sure the community benef its from

NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS Large new developments and major institutions can benefit the community, but they can also fuel displacement. Local organizations are taking action that the community should celebrate - and expand.

Artist’s rendering of Shift Capital’s developments at the Beury Building . Photo Source: Shift Capital

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES? Increase amount of

affordable housing

(Recommendation 16)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Partner to develop affordable rental projects of about 35-40 units

Explore the establishment of a Community Land Trust for permanent affordable properties

(16.1)

(16.2)

Explore partnerships to renovate or build for affordable homeownership (16.3)

Make sure

new development & major employers

contribute to local priorities (Recommendation 17)

Ensure major developments include at least 10 percent affordable units (16.4)

Secure CBAs or other agreements with developers to support local priorities

Secure agreements with major employers to support community priorities

(17.1)

(17.2)

Clarify & centralize community relations functions at major local employers (17.3)

>


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NEW DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR EMPLOYERS

STRATEGY 16.

Increase the supply of permanent affordable housing. ACTION 16.1.

Seek partnerships with local affordable housing developers and the City to assemble lots and develop projects that yield about 35-40 units.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park CRC

PARTNER(S): BGEC

FUNDING: NPI

DETAILS: • SEEK NEW PARTNERS: There are a number of qualified affordable housing developers located in the city who are not focused on a particular neighborhood. Local organizations should reach out to some of these groups to assess their interest in pursuing projects in the Hunting Park-East Tioga community. • LIHTC DEVELOPMENT: The 35-40 unit range is generally the point at which Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) projects become feasible.

ACTION 16.2.

Explore the establishment or expansion of a Community Land Trust to preserve affordable homes and commercial properties forever.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park CRC, Called To Serve

PARTNER(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • LEARN MORE: Contact an expert in the field to present a broad overview of the options and possibilities. Discuss the logistics, benefits, and drawbacks of a Community Land Trust. • SEEK NEW PARTNERS: There are existing community land trusts in Philadelphia that are either adjacent to this community or that are not place-specific; there may be an opportunity to expand those trusts into the Hunting Park - East Tioga area. • COMMISSION A STUDY to assess the feasibility of establishing a land trust in the neighborhood. Contract a firm with expertise in the field to explore potential organizational structures, costs and funding streams, and the available housing stock and parcels of land, among other things.

ACTION 16.3.

Explore partnerships to renovate or build homes for affordable homeownership.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, Hunting Park CRC

DETAILS: • SEEK NEW PARTNERS, such as Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia and/or Rebuilding Together Philadelphia, to tour the community and discuss options - possibly together with a Land Trust strategy.

ACTION 16.4.

Ensure that major new residential developments always include at least 20 percent affordable units.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

See STRATEGY 17. Make sure that new developments and major employers contribute ... (Page 80) 79


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DEVELOPMENT & EMPLOYERS

STRATEGY 17.

Make sure that new developments and major employers contribute to community priorities. ACTION 17.1.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC Secure Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and other partnerships in connection to major new development projects, to advance the strategies and goals outlined in this plan.

DETAILS: • INSIST ON LOCAL BENEFITS: In negotiating CBAs for Be A Gem Crossing and the Shift Capital developments at BGE, the Hunting Park - East Tioga community has demonstrated that major development can be win-win for developers and the community. BGEC should stand by the lessons learned in those CBA processes and insist on real benefits from any new developments. Priority areas for new agreements include: • Safety and security • Trash and dumping • Affordable housing • Local hiring • Retail business tenant types

ACTION 17.2.

• Greening • Community events and programming • Vacant land management • Community/public space management and improvement

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, Major local employers Secure agreements from major local employers for local employment, procurement, assistance with public improvements and safety initiatives, and other priorities.

DETAILS: • MAJOR EMPLOYERS in the area include some who are deeply engaged in the community - and others who are not. There is an opportunity to draw major employers closer to the community and secure benefits that will boost those employers’ standing and enhance their reputation. Some major employers in the area include but are not limited to: • Temple Hospital • Temple Medical School • Shriner’s Hospital • Pegasus Home Fashions

• American Box & Recycling • Little Flower High School • The School District of Philadelphia

• TOPICS: Collaboration with major employers should focus on issues such as: • Local Employment: Establish target minimum numbers of employees who live in the area • Procurement: Help employers establish relationships with local small businesses for food and other goods and services • Public improvements: Public realm enhancements, including pedestrian-scale lighting and other streetscape amenities, near the employer’s locations • Safety: Assistance with safety initiatives outlined in this plan • Trash and Dumping: Contributions to efforts to reduce and manage trash and dumping • INCREASE ATTENDANCE AT NTIT / RCO MEETINGS each month, to increase local employers’ interaction with residents and give residents and easy point of contact.

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DEVELOPMENT & EMPLOYERS ACTION 17.3.

STRATEGY 17, CONTINUED

Clarify or centralize community relations functions at major local employers, including Temple Hospital, Temple Medical School, Shriner’s Hospital, and others.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Temple Hospital, BGEC Temple Medical School, Shriner’s Hospital, other major employers

DETAILS: • BUILD ON EXISTING RELATIONSHIPS, WHERE THEY EXIST: Some local community organizations have strong relationships with certain major employers; for example, the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University holds weekly meetings with local organizations, and Shriner’s Hospital has partnered with organizations including Called To Serve CDC. Other organizations, including Temple Hospital, have historically had less consistent relationships with the community. • A CLEAR POINT OF CONTACT: Regardless of the quality of organizations’ relationships with the community, there is little clarity around who at these organizations has the ultimate authority around issues related to the nearby community, according to residents, business owners, and community groups. A single community relations role at major employers like Temple Hospital, Temple Medical School, Shriner’s, and others, would help to streamline and simplify the community’s interactions with them - and prevent the compounding frustration that occurs when community members feel they either can’t find the right person to talk to or that person doesn’t exist. • STANDARD PROTOCOLS FOR PLANNING TOGETHER: Currently, there is often a sense that community members hear by chance about plans and projects by Temple and others - further contributing to an impression that these organizations are not concerned with community perspectives. A single community relations role could help establish protocols for communicating about institutional plans and projects with the community. • INCREASE ATTENDANCE AT NTIT / RCO MEETINGS each month, to increase local employers’ interaction with residents and give residents and easy point of contact.

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We will ensure high quality

PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES Major projects are turning the tide for the community’s parks. Residents say they will go more often if they feel safe & clean.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Improve & maintain smaller parks (Recommendation 18)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Make transformative investments in all public neighborhood parks (18.1)

Make sure parks help cool the community in summer (18.2)

Support the growth of “friends” groups to support smaller parks (Cross-reference: 32.3)

Improve & maintain Hunting Park (Recommendation 19)

Improve community spaces

Renew the strategic vision and plan for Hunting Park (19.1)

Secure ownership of community spaces (20.1)

(Recommendation 20)

Employ local artists to create works around the community (20.2)

Highlight history with signage and markers at significant locations (20.3)

The football field at Hunting Park was improved with help from Eagles u Q arterback Michael Vick .

>

Increase family-friendly programs

Increase familyfriendly programs and events that happen in parks

(Recommendation 21)

(21.1)

Expand and promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market (Cross-reference: 22.3)


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PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES

STRATEGY 18.

Implement and maintain improvements to all neighborhood parks. ACTION 18.1.

Make transformative investments in every public neighborhood park, and plan for their maintenance, to expand the amount of safe, public, high-quality recreational space in the community.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park United, NTIT

PARTNER(S): Department of Parks & Recreation, Water Department, Councilman Darrell Clarke

FUNDING:

Work with Philadelphia School District to apply for a Stormwater Grant through PWD, or investigate greening improvements to be eligible for Stormwater Credits.

DETAILS: • ADVANCE IDEAS FOR BUTLER PLAYGROUND AND DALY PARK: These are the only two neighborhood parks that have seen no recent investment. Work with City partners too transform these smaller spaces into high quality active and passive recreational spaces. • COMPLETE PROJECTS at Williams Reed Moore Memorial Park (formerly 11th & Venango Park) and at the Bethune School Playground, which will become the largest public neighborhood park in the community (excluding Hunting Park). • CONSIDER THE COMMUNITY’S PRIORITIES whenever there is space to customize designs.

ACTION 18.2.

Make sure parks contribute to cooling the community during the summer.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park United, NTIT

PARTNER(S):

Department of Parks & Recreation, Hunting Park Rec Center, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • PRIORITIZE investment in park amenities that cool residents down in the summer, such as shade trees and a splash pad somewhere in the community. • MAKE SURE THE HUNTING PARK POOL OPENS by strategizing around lifeguard recruitment and funding repairs.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 31.3. Support the growth of “friends” groups or similar stewardship bodies for public spaces in the neighborhood. (See page 101)

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PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES STRATEGY 19.

Continue to improve Hunting Park with updated capital projects and management strategies. ACTION 19.1.

Renew the strategic vision and plan for Hunting Park.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park United, North10, Department of Parks & Recreation, Fairmount Park Conservancy

DETAILS: • 10 YEARS SINCE THE PARK’S PLAN: The Hunting Park Revitalization Plan is now over ten years old - it was published in 2009 - and the benefits it has helped bring to the park have been significant. Hunting Park United and others treat the plan as a living document - updating priorities and pursuing projects as opportunities arise. But a decade is a long time, and it may be time to formally reassess community priorities - and drum up interest in new projects. • THE PACE OF CHANGE HAS SLOWED, and there is currently no active fundraising for capital improvements in the park. Meanwhile, significant portions of the previous plan have not yet been implemented, and community members say some parts of the park are in dire need of attention. While this plan did not set out to formally assess community priorities for park improvements and programming, it is clear from public input that it is time to renew the community’s vision and plan for the park. • CAPITAL PLAN UPDATE: One option is to complete an abbreviated planning process - a plan update to assess progress on the plan and chart a course for what needs to happen next. • MAINTENANCE PLAN: Trash is the most common complaint residents make about Hunting Park. Yet park maintenance crews are not slacking off - far from it. The crews who clean the park do a fantastic job, but they can’t keep up with the pace that trash and litter accumulate. The community should not accept that there is no remedy. A formal strategy is needed to ensure the park stays clean. Some strategies can be found in the “Trash & Dumping” section of this plan; however, more specific discussions are needed, focused on Hunting Park.

STRATEGY 20.

Secure and improve community open spaces and significant locations. ACTION 20.1.

Secure ownership of local community spaces.

LEAD ORG(S): NTIT

PARTNER(S):

BGEC, Councilman Darrell Clarke, Philadelphia Land Bank, Revenue Department, PHS, Neighborhood Gardens Trust (NGT)

DETAILS: • CATALOG existing community spaces and their ownership situations, including gardens, lots fronting murals, and otherwise important undeveloped land. • TALK with the individuals or organizations that manage those spaces about possible strategies to secure ownership. • ENLIST the support of elected officials, local community organizations, and Citywide organizations. • ACT to secure ownership of these spaces with a local organization or a supportive Citywide organization.

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PARKS & COMMUNITY SPACES ACTION 20.2.

Employ local artists to create public art to celebrate the area and its residents especially its multi-cultural make-up.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

NTIT, North10, Hunting Park BGEC United, Called To Serve CDC, other community groups

DETAILS: • MURALS AND MORE: The community is home to a significant number of large, beautiful murals, as well as a few pieces of public art. Engage local artists to continue adding to the collection of locallysignificant art in public spaces. • WORK WITH RESIDENTS - especially young people - to paint and build new pieces.

ACTION 20.3.

Highlight the history of the community at key locations with signage, memorials, murals, local art, and other treatments.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

NTIT, North10, Hunting Park BGEC United, Called To Serve CDC, other community groups

DETAILS: • A PHYSICAL MANIFESTATION OF LOCAL PRIDE: Historical signage shows that the community has roots here - and an intention to stick around. • KEY LOCATIONS could include Germantown Avenue, Daly Park, Carmen skating rink, and anywhere else with a local story and community significance.

STRATEGY 21.

Increase family-friendly programming in parks. ACTION 21.1.

Increase the range and frequency of programs and events that are held in parks throughout the community, including events for kids and families, holiday events, and other community celebrations.

LEAD ORG(S): Hunting Park United, NTIT, North10

PARTNER(S):

Department of Parks & Recreation

• ESTABLISH ANNUAL EVENTS in parks throughout the community, that residents can know to expect. • MARKET EVENTS widely and early • SEASONAL OFFERINGS can draw the community in: • Winter Holiday Festival • Halloween Trunk-or-treat or other festival • Summer Movie Nights • Fourth of July BBQ • Juneteenth Celebration

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 22.3. Expand and promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market ... (See page 88)

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We will

IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH Nourishing food, high quality healthcare, and protection from overwhelming summer heat: these can all feel like luxuries in Hunting Park - East Tioga. For residents’ day-today health, few issues are as pressing.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Improve access to nourishing food (Recommendation 22)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Expand & promote food pantries and/or Choice Markets

Support & promote community refrigerators

(22.1)

(22.2)

Expand & promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market (22.3)

Help residents start at-home gardens to grow food (23.5)

Improve access to

healthcare & mental health services (Recommendation 23)

A few projects are finally making a difference.

Establish new health clinics, and ensure there is a Federally Qualified Health Center (23.1)

Expand community gardening - especially with the Hunting Park Community Garden and Bethune (23.4) Support the goal of placing a good, affordable supermarket in the neighborhood (22.6)

Expand the role of Community Health Workers locally (23.2)

Promote positive messages about healthy living and mental health

Formalize on-thestreet outreach to people who may benefit from help

(23.3)

(Cross-reference: 3.1)

Ensure youth program staff are prepared to help with young peoples’ life situations

Many streets in the neighborhood have few or no trees on them, making the summer temperature up to 20 degrees hotter than shadier areas of the City .

(Cross-reference: 11.2)

>

Cool the neighborhood in summer (Recommendation 24)

Support the Beat The Heat program and implement the recommendations in its plan (24.1) Make sure parks help cool down the neighborhood (Cross-reference: 18.2)

Increase street trees and shade to cool & beautify the neighborhood (24.2)


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COMMUNITY HEALTH

STRATEGY 22.

Improve access to nourishing and affordable (or free) food. LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 22.1.

Expand food pantries or Choice Markets, and promote them with clear information about who can use them, to make sure residents feel welcome.

North10, Called To Serve CDC, Hunting Park CRC

DETAILS: • ESTABLISH A PANTRY OR CHOICE MARKET SOUTH OF ERIE: With North10’s existing Choice Market located at the Lenfest Center north of Erie, many families south of Erie may not feel they can easily access a similar resource. Residents say that they rarely cross the wide street for services or neighborhood amenities. Explore establishing a new food pantry or Choice Market at a location south of Erie, to ensure that residents south of Erie have easy access to food distribution. • MAKE A MARKETING PUSH annually or twice-yearly, extending beyond North10’s geography into the reasonable geography that users of new or existing resources might come from. • SIMPLE, WELCOMING SIGNAGE outside locations that makes residents feel welcome, clearly communicates the location of the market or pantry, who is allowed to use it, and when it is open. • CONDUCT AN ANNUAL SURVEY of users to improve the service.

ACTION 22.2.

LEAD ORG(S):

Support and promote the community fridge managed by As I Plant This Seed at 9th Street & Luzerne Street.

As I Plant This Seed, other community organizations

DETAILS:

`

• SPREAD THE WORD about what is available in the fridge to residents via social media - potentially via dedicated fridge account and website. • MAKE SURE THE FRIDGE IS FULL with the types of food residents need and solicit donations of specific types of items that residents want and need. • WORK TOGETHER to make sure this vital community resource stays active.

The South Philly Community Fridge has its own website and Instagram, where volunteers provide updates, request particular types of food, and solicit support from the community.

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COMMUNITY HEALTH

STRATEGY 22, CONTINUED

ACTION 22.3.

Expand and promote the Hunting Park Farmer’s Market as a healthy affordable source of food for residents, and work to ensure the long-term feasibility of the market.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

Hunting Park The Food Trust Farmer’s Market, Hunting Park Community Garden, Hunting Park United, BGEC

DETAILS: • EXPAND THE MARKET’S OFFERINGS to include non-food vendors - especially local entrepreneurs. • MAKE SPACE FOR BLACK AND LATINE VENDORS who can represent local communities and cultures. • AFFORDABLE VENDING OPTIONS: Discuss lower-cost vending options for local vendors. • CROSS-PROMOTE with advertising from multiple local organizations (See the section “Help residents connect to assistance...”)

ACTION 22.4.

Expand community gardening and farming in the neighborhood to provide food, build community, and educate young people.

LEAD ORG(S):

Hunting Park Community Garden, North10, Bethune Elementary School

PARTNER(S): PHS, NGT, Department of Parks & Recreation

DETAILS: • WORK TOGETHER WITH THE HUNTING PARK COMMUNITY GARDEN to help secure funding for needed repairs, promote the garden to residents who may be interested in joining, and to expand community programming for young people and adults. The garden is a tremendous resource led by a passionate and knowledgeable group of residents, but they have experienced significant setbacks due to vandalism. Local organizations should establish deeper relationships with the garden to institutionalize collaborations and expand local membership. The space has the potential to teach residents how to grow, create a space for sharing and nurturing residents’ cultures and heritage, and to inspire the young people in the community. • BUILD A GARDEN AT THE BETHUNE SCHOOL: Establish a community garden or farm at the Bethune School, in collaboration between the school and other community partners, such as PHS. Gardens on school grounds can offer young people the chance to learn and connect with the culture through connections with food and the earth. • ON UNDEVELOPED LOTS: Support community gardening on undeveloped lots by providing materials and resources to residents who are interested in starting them. If community members are interested in establishing a garden on City-owned land, North10 or another qualified organization should consider holding the lease for the garden. The City provides more options for leasing and ownership of land to formal organizations than they do to unincorporated groups. • GET TO KNOW LOCAL AG LEADERS: Develop a relationship with Philly urban agriculture organizations. These relationships can help expand urban agriculture in this area - bringing more nourishing, affordable food into the community. • COORDINATE WITH THE CITY’S URBAN AG PLAN: In discussion with the City team (at the Department of Parks & Recreation) behind Philadelphia’s first urban agriculture plan, “Growing From The Root,” seek ways to bring benefits to the local community in line with the plan.

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COMMUNITY HEALTH

STRATEGY 22, CONTINUED

ACTION 22.5.

Help residents start at-home gardens as a way to supplement their food supply. Create opportunities for residents to learn about growing and acquire materials to do so.

LEAD ORG(S):

PARTNER(S):

NTIT, North10, Hunting Park CRC, PHS Hunting Park United, Hunting Park Community Garden

DETAILS: • WORKSHOPS: Collaborate with the Hunting Park Community Garden or, if they are not available, other urban agriculture organizations to host workshops on at-home gardening. • CHEAP OR FREE MATERIALS: Give away or sell affordable home gardening kits, and promote container gardening.

ACTION 22.6.

Support the long-term goal of locating a good, affordable supermarket nearby.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • KEEP THE CONVERSATION ALIVE: Market conditions are always changing. It is important to keep the conversation alive about the feasibility of a grocery store in the community - especially a more urbanstyle location at or near Broad, Germantown & Erie.

STRATEGY 23.

Increase access to and utilization of high quality healthcare and mental health services. ACTION 23.1.

Place new health clinics at Be A Gem Crossing and elsewhere in the community, and work to ensure that a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) is among them.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, BGEC, new clinics

PARTNER(S):

Temple Hospital

DETAILS: • SERVE LOCAL RESIDENTS with healthcare and mental health services that fit their needs. • SPREAD THE WORD with communications introducing new providers, in collaboration with local community organizations. Aim to raise the profile of new clinics, attract residents to their services, and promote healthy living. • NOT ALL CLINICS ARE FQHC’s; ENSURE A FQHC IS AMONG ANY NEW CLINICS: Federally Qualified Health Centers play a key role in providing healthcare to at-risk and underserved populations. They ensure that all residents will have access to healthcare regardless of their ability to pay. Not all clinics are FQHC’s. FQHCs qualify for certain dedicated federal funding streams; however, there are stringent criteria that a health center must meet to achieve FQHC status. • ASSESS WHY THE PREVIOUS FQHC CLOSED to determine if there are issues that would need to be addressed for a new FQHC to open.

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COMMUNITY HEALTH

STRATEGY 23, CONTINUED

ACTION 23.2.

LEAD ORG(S):

Expand the role of Community Health Workers North10, local clinics, Temple Hospital in the community, potentially in partnership with Temple or another organization. DETAILS: • LOCAL HEALTH ADVOCATES: Community Health Workers are paid members of the community who work with local healthcare providers as an intermediary between community members and the healthcare system, to increase residents’ access to and utilization of services and to ensure healthcare is provided in a way that works for the local community. Community Health Workers might help with things such as translation, culturally-appropriate education, assistance accessing healthcare services, and some basic health screenings, among other things. These workers can be the front-line effort to increase healthy living and healthcare utilization in underserved communities. • COLLABORATE WITH PROVIDERS to determine how and where Community Health Workers could best integrate into the local healthcare environment.

ACTION 23.3.

Promote positive messages about healthy living, healthcare, mental health, and mental health services - as well as where residents can get those services in the community.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, Hunting Park United, BGEC

PARTNER(S):

Local clinics, Temple Hospital

DETAILS: • INTEGRATE INTO REGULAR COMMUNICATIONS: Build health-related messages into organizations’ regular communications via social media, at public events, and elsewhere (See “Help residents connect to assistance...” for more). • DISRUPT NEGATIVE STIGMA around mental health services and encourage residents to engage in conversations about mental health topics. • COLLABORATE WITH LOCAL PROVIDERS, such as new clinics and Temple Hospital, to craft messages that work. • PARTNER ON PROGRAMS: Invite new clinics and Temple Hospital and/or Medical School to participate in existing community programs and events, and collaborate with community groups and health providers to develop new health-focused programs and events.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 3.1. Coordinate providers of healthcare, workforce development programs, and other services to formalize on-the-street outreach efforts, targeting people who may benefit from connection to various programs and services. (See page 57) From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 11.2. Make sure out-of-school program staff are equipped to help (or refer to help) young people and their families with more complex issues, such as emotional trauma, economic hardship, or limited English proficiency. (See page 72) 90


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COMMUNITY HEALTH

STRATEGY 24.

Cool down the neighborhood in the summer to protect residents’ health. ACTION 24.1.

Support the continued work of the Beat The Heat program and implement the recommendations of the Beat The Heat: Hunting Park plan.

LEAD ORG(S):

Beat The Heat, BGEC

FUNDING:

William Penn Foundation

DETAILS: • A DEDICATED PROGRAM FOR THIS COMMUNITY: The Beat The Heat program is at the forefront of battling heat in this community; local organizations, community leaders, elected officials, and foundations should continue to fund this important work into the coming years.

ACTION 24.2.

Increase the number of street trees, rain gardens, and other pervious surfaces throughout the neighborhood to provide shade, cool the neighborhood, and beautify streets.

LEAD ORG(S): Beat The Heat, North10, PHS, Temple University

PARTNER(S): TreePhilly, PWD

FUNDING:

For maintaining GSI, apply for funds through PWD’s Soak It Up Adoption Program

DETAILS: • ENLIST RESIDENTS AS TREE TENDERS: Recruit residents to participate in the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) Tree Tenders Program, which trains local citizens to act as ambassadors for tree planting and care in their communities. PHS provides education and resources; local organizations can help by recruiting residents to participate and promoting the importance of street trees. • MAKE IT EASY FOR RESIDENTS TO GET TREES for their own properties or sidewalks. Partner with TreePhilly to host free tree give-aways in the community, and distribute information (especially during the hottest part of the year) on how residents can get a new street tree in front of their home from the City - and why they should. • SET AN EXAMPLE by requesting street trees in front of local institutions and community organizations. Bethune School has set a great example with its collaboration with PHS, which has resulted in the planting of trees on streets surrounding the school and on school property. • WORK WITH CITY PARTNERS TO INSTALL AND CARE FOR GREEN STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE (GSI). PWD has installed a significant amount of GSI in the neighborhood, replacing pavement with green. Continue to work with PWD to implement additional projects, and consider applying for funds through the Soak It Up Adoption Program to care for and maintain GSI projects.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 18.2. Make sure parks contribute to cooling the community during the summer. (See page 83)

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We will

IMPROVE GERMANTOWN Avenue & BGE The Germantown commercial corridor is a key part of the community that the City is committed to improving, but issues with safety and deteriorating properties have kept the corridor from fully serving the local community. Germantown Ave and BGE make up North Philly’s liveliest commercial area.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Push investment in commercial properties (Recommendation 25)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Hold property owners accountable for the condition of their buildings (25.1)

Propose and support facade improvement grant applications (25.2)

Explore partnerships and ownership structures that support small businesses & community values (25.3)

Encourage new small businesses (Recommendation 26)

Work to attract local, family-friendly, Black & Latine businesses (26.1)

Bring “pop-ups” to vacant storefronts owned by innovative landlords (26.2)

Seek alternative locations for street vendors (26.3)

Attract people with

promotions & programs (Recommendation 27)

Expand family-friendly programming and events on the corridor (27.1)

>

Design promotions that highlight cherished businesses (27.3)

Ensure safety (Recommendation 28)

Maintain a visible police presence, especially with walking patrols (Cross-reference: 2.3)

Update the corridor’s look and feel

Upgrade pedestrian amenities & lighting, and create welcoming gateways

(Recommendation 29)

(Cross-ref: 4.3, 4.4)

Ensure Black, Latine, and other local communities feel welcome and represented (27.2)


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GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE

STRATEGY 25.

Push investment in commercial properties to support small businesses and entrepreneurs. ACTION 25.1.

Hold property owners accountable for the condition of their buildings and land.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

BGEC, Department of Licenses & Inspections, Commerce Department, Law Department, Revenue Department

DETAILS: • DEVELOP STANDARD PROTOCOLS for elevating reports of deteriorating building conditions to achieve action. While direct communication with property owners may work in some cases, it is also important to maintain strong relationships with the Department of Licenses & Inspections to seek enforcement of violations.

ACTION 25.2.

Propose and support applications for facade improvement grants by locating interested business owners who either own their properties or are tenants to interested property owners.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

Commerce Department, Department of City Planning, Community Design Collaborative

FUNDING:

The Commerce Dept’s Storefront Improvement Program (SIP), likely to grow through the City’s NPI investments

DETAILS: • INVESTIGATE SUPPLEMENTARY FUNDING: The City will reimburse 50 percent of qualified facade improvement expenses, up to $5,000. Some businesses and property owners may hesitate to invest that sum to improve their facades. Local organizations should help secure funds to defray property owners’ net costs or to pay for certain aspects of the project, such as design services. • CRAFT AN ATTRACTIVE PROPOSAL for business and property owners. Along with incentives for property owners to participate in the program, proposals should also include protections for business owners who rent their properties, to prevent property owners from drastically increasing rents or evicting them following facade improvements. Protections could include an agreement to freeze or cap rent increases for a number of years after improvements, as a condition of receiving funds from local organizations.

Tops Beauty, which sits between Germantown Avenue and Broad, received funds through the Storefront Improvement Program and help from The Merchants Fund, a local philanthropy, to improve the side of its store that faces Broad Street. Photo Source: City of Philadelphia

• SEEK AFFORDABLE DESIGN SERVICES: Seek partners such as The Community Design Collaborative which provides design services that are pro bono or fairly affordable, depending on the client. • ONE IS ENOUGH: It is OK if the majority of landlords and businesses are not interested in this program. Every improvement counts, and one successful agreement of this sort could attract new interest.

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GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE

STRATEGY 25, CONTINUED LEAD ORG(S):

ACTION 25.3.

Explore partnerships and ownership structures that will preserve commercial real estate for the local community and small businesses long-term.

Called To Serve CDC, North10

PARTNER(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • NETWORK AND LEARN from organizations like the Kensington Corridor Trust, which is confronting similar issues to the Germantown Avenue corridor with a highly innovative approach, centering community control and long-term affordability. The Kensington Corridor Trust was established was established, in the organization’s words, “to [move] real estate assets out of the speculative private market ... and transition them to neighborhood control.” While the organization is still young and it has not yet fully implemented its vision, the lessons it has learned - and the vision it embodies - resonate deeply with the community’s hopes and struggles on Germantown Avenue and at BGE. • ENGAGE POTENTIAL PARTNERS who are interested in socialimpact investing on commercial corridors, with the goal of establishing a base of friendly, community-minded property owners. The Kensington Corridor Trust is building a new model for preserving affordability and local control over commercial real estate. Image Source: Next City

STRATEGY 26.

Encourage new small businesses and entrepreneurs and policies that will draw them to the corridor. ACTION 26.1.

Work to attract local, family-friendly, Black and Latine businesses to locate along the Germantown Avenue corridor.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, North10

DETAILS: • BUSINESS ATTRACTION: There are a number of new and long-term businesses on the Germantown Avenue corridor that make it a special place. Attracting new businesses that serve local residents, families, and young people - while upholding local values - will reinforce the corridor’s importance to the local community.

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GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE

STRATEGY 26, CONTINUED

ACTION 26.2.

LEAD ORG(S):

Bring “pop-ups” to vacant storefronts along the corridor. Identify property owners with vacant storefronts who might be interested in offering a short-term lower-cost lease - or “pop-up” - to bring in some income and help market the space to longer-term lessees.

Called To Serve CDC

DETAILS: • RESEARCH successful instances of popup rental programs along other commercial corridors. Contact corridor managers in places this has succeeded, such as the South Street Headhouse District, to learn about how they made it work. • CRAFT A PROPOSAL based on successful arrangements along other commercial corridors and shop it around to potential landlords. The arrangement could be communicated as a “holiday pop-up” to target the highest volume sales season and set clear start and end dates. • IDENTIFY ENTREPRENEURS who would be interested in such a space.

Fall River, MA, implemented a pop-up storefront to reduce vacancy, offer local goods, and create new excitement.

• ONE IS ENOUGH: A single successful pop-up can elevate an entrepreneur to a higher level and show landlords that the pop-up model is a good way to earn rent when permanent tenants are not available. In some cases, pop-ups may even transition to permanent tenants.

ACTION 26.3.

Seek alternative locations for street vendors when there are conflicts between them and the storefronts they are located in front of. Consider a “vendor plaza” on an undeveloped lot.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, Commerce Department, Councilman Darrell Clarke

DETAILS: • ENGAGE VENDORS TO AVOID DIRECT COMPETITION: Vendors sometimes offer goods that directly compete with the stores they are located in front of. Engage vendors in discussions around how the corridor can support them while ensuring they do not impose on other businesses. These discussions should start from a place of mutual respect: street vendors are embedded in the life of the corridor; working together to find a solution that works for everyone will benefit the entire community. • CONSIDER OPTIONS INCLUDING A “VENDOR PLAZA” on an undeveloped City-owned lot. In the short term, seek relocation of vendors to spots in front of non-competing businesses - or to an area of open sidewalk. Vendors may voluntarily relocate if they are involved in planning and a suitable alternative is offered. • COORDINATE WITH THE CITY to ensure vendors are in compliance with regulations - especially related to the hours in which vending is allowed. Some vendors continue to work into the nighttime, and the community may not support such activity.

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GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE STRATEGY 27.

Expand programs and promotions that attract the local community - especially families. ACTION 27.1.

Expand family-friendly programming and events on Germantown Avenue and at BGE, with the goal of establishing an annual calendar of events that draws the community to the street regularly.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC, local businesses and community partners

PARTNER(S): BGEC

• BUILD ON WHAT’S ALREADY WORKING: There are existing events that draw residents to the area, such as Caribbean Feast’s “Children & Family Day Festival,” which usually takes place each June. It could be possible to work with existing events to grow their footprint and draw more residents. • PARTNER WITH OUTSIDE ORGANIZATIONS: Philadelphia is home to a range of arts organizations, flea markets, craft fairs, and farmer’s markets that travel to various locations around the city. It may be possible to partner with an existing organization or market to sponsor a local event on Germantown Avenue. • MARKETS AND STREET FAIRS can draw residents out on their own, or act as part of a larger event. Holiday markets can be especially successful. • CELEBRATE LOCAL CULTURE: Build off local culture and creative communities to draw people out. South Street hosts the Odunde Festival at South Street & Grays Ferry Avenue each June, celebrating African-American culture, art, and food. East Passyunk Avenue hosts its annual Car Show & Street Festival, highlighting a vibrant culture of car collecting. Find local people with a passion and build off it!

ACTION 27.2.

Ensure that the all local communities - including Black residents, the Latine community, and others - feel welcome and represented, visibly and behind the scenes.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S):

Partner organizations to represent local communities

DETAILS: • REPRESENTATION means Black, Latine, and other residents should be able to see their cultures and identities in the corridor, its programs, and its events. That will only be possible if there is real participation from the all local communities in planning and implementation of projects and programs. • COLLABORATE WITH LEADERS from the Black and Latine communities. They can tell you what steps are important to improve residents’ sense of belonging on Germantown Avenue, and they can help represent the their communities when planning events and programs. • SPANISH LANGUAGE: translate signage and business materials such as menus, advertising, and programs. Businesses may need help translating materials and understanding how to best serve residents from cultures other than their own.

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GERMANTOWN AVE & BGE

STRATEGY 27, CONTINUED

ACTION 27.3.

Design a promotion campaign that highlights cherished businesses and family-friendly activities on Germantown Avenue & BGE, aiming to position the corridor as a community hub and family-friendly destination.

LEAD ORG(S):

Called To Serve CDC

PARTNER(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • BUILD FROM THE PLACES RESIDENTS LOVE by promoting cherished icons on the corridor - and promoting new ones. There are a number of new and long-term businesses on the Germantown Avenue corridor that make it a special place. Some of the businesses that residents say are important to them are: • King of Pizza • Caribbean Feast • La’vanter Boutique • Tops Beauty Supply • Pho Don • Brothers Shoes • Rainbow

STRATEGY 28.

Make sure Germantown Avenue feels safe. From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 2.3. Work with the police to maintain a visible and approachable police presence at key locations, intersections, and corridors - especially on Germantown Avenue, at Broad, Germantown & Erie, and at key locations identified by the community. (See page 56) STRATEGY 29.

Upgrade the look and feel of Germantown Avenue to be more welcoming and family-friendly. From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 4.3. Improve the intersection of Germantown, Ontario, Old York Road and Rising Sun to create a welcoming, pedestrian-friendly gateway to Germantown Avenue and the Bethune School. (See page 60) From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 4.4. Upgrade pedestrian amenities on Germantown Avenue between Ontario and Broad to increase safety and make the corridor feel more inviting. (See page 61)

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We will make sure the community can

IMPLEMENT THIS PLAN Hunting Park - East Tioga is home to a strong network of residents and organizations that work together to accomplish local goals. Their collaboration is essential to progress.

WHAT ARE OUR STRATEGIES?

Help organizations take action (Recommendation 30)

Empower residents to take action (Recommendation 31)

WHAT ACTIONS DO WE NEED TO TAKE FOR EACH STRATEGY? Establish an “Implementation SubCommittee” within BGEC to coordinate & track this plan (30.1)

Explore setting up a local civic action program to help passionate residents take action (31.1) Support the growth of “friends” groups for neighborhood parks (31.3)

Help residents find help now (Recommendation 32)

Make sure staff at all local orgs know what services each org offers and how to refer residents for help (32.1)

Continue convening a broad coalition to confront safety issues (Cross-reference: 1.1)

Connect residents to the City’s Citizen’s Planning Institute (31.2)

Do an annual campaign to increase participation in the Block Captain program (31.4)

Do regular marketing to reintroduce local organizations & their services to residents (32.2)

Encourage residents to report issues change requires many voices to rise up! (32.3)

Make public engagement a habit (Recommendation 33)

Establish a public outreach strategy across organizations (33.1)

Meet people where they are (33.2)

Engage the Latine community intentionally & meaningfully

A section of tree-lined street on 10th .

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(33.3)

Update this plan (Recommendation 34)

Integrate the plan into organizations’ strategic plans (34.1)

Update the plan within 10 years (34.2)


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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 30.

Organize community groups and organizations to take action. ACTION 30.1.

Establish an “Implementation SubCommittee” within the Broad, Germantown & Erie Coalition (BGEC) to steward the implementation of this plan.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • BE THE FACE OF THE PLAN to the community. In this neighborhood, multiple organizations share responsibilities that other communities house under a single entity. It is important for all BGEC organizations to represent the plan as their own - and to hold the plan up, together. • DESIGNATE A POINT PERSON or LEAD ORGANIZATION for each piece of the plan, with responsibility for tracking action, updating the group, and coordinating with the organizations and individuals involved in implementation. These point people and organizations can also represent their elements of the plan to residents at public events, to provide follow-up to the community on the commitments made here. • TRACK and REPORT-OUT PROGRESS to the community in a systematic way. Internally, the subcommittee should regularly review particular recommendations and the actions they have taken - and determine next steps to make progress. For efficiency, each meeting could be dedicated to a different topic or topics, with the corresponding point person or lead organization providing a brief written report on progress achieved. • INVITE PARTNERS who are not members of BGEC to participate in relevant meetings, to update the group on their own actions in support of the plan - and to strategize on next steps. • CELEBRATE SUCCESS with each other. Each small step matters, and it’s important to celebrate the hard work the teams puts in.

From elsewhere in the plan: ACTION 1.1. Continue convening a broad coalition of organizations and agencies for the express purpose of addressing violence and crime in the neighborhood. (See page 55)

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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 31.

Empower residents to take action and responsibility. ACTION 31.1.

Explore setting up a local civic action program that helps residents build their capacity for action and implement real projects in the community.

LEAD ORG(S): North10, Hunting Park CRC

DETAILS: • INSPIRE NEW COMMUNITY LEADERS: A civic action program is about awakening residents’ drive to fight for their community - and showing them how they can do it. By guiding residents through a project of their own design and showing them that progress is possible, community organizations can educate residents about the logistics of getting a project done and - maybe more importantly - they can inspire residents to be act for community change, now and in the future. • RESEARCH programs like this that work in other communities, such as HACE’s “Livability Academy.” Determine what kind of staffing and capacity would be needed to host a similar program locally. • TRAINING AND IMPLEMENTATION: A civic action program could include multi-week training and planning programs that culminate in a resident-led project in the community.

ACTION 31.2.

Connect residents to the Philadelphia City Planning Commission’s Citizens Planning Institute.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, NTIT, Hunting Park CRC, Called To Serve CDC, Hunting Park United

DETAILS: • RECRUIT residents who have demonstrated a strong drive to improve the community, and refer them to the Citizens Planning Institute (CPI).

What is the Citizen’s Planning Institute? CPI is a City-run training program for motivated citizens who want to learn how to get things done in their communities. It is an 8-week course led by the Department of City Planning that aims to demystify the government processes and point participants to the resources they need to pursue goals in their neighborhoods. You can find more information at https://citizensplanninginstitute.org/

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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 31, CONTINUED

ACTION 31.3.

Support the growth of “friends” groups or similar stewardship bodies for public spaces in the neighborhood.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • IDENTIFY RESIDENTS who are passionate about each of the neighborhood’s smaller parks. • VISIT OTHER PARKS GROUPS that do good work around the city with a group of local residents, to show them what is possible and how to do it. • CONNECT WITH PPR to determine what steps are necessary to set up a parks group. • PROVIDE RESOURCES AND SUPPORT for new friends groups, with meeting space, materials, and grants (micro-grants, matching grants, or percentage grants) for park projects.

What’s a Park Friends Group? There are over 130 community-led park “friend” groups citywide. Groups that are registered with the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation Park Friends Network receive resources and help to care for and improve their local parks. Many “friend” groups host community clean-up days, fundraise for park improvements, partner with local businesses and organizations, and host events, among other things.

Friends groups can organize cleanups with help from the Department of Parks & Recreation, PPR offers help to set up new groups at www.loveyourpark.org/park-friends-network. like this cleanup advertised for Hunting Park.

ACTION 31.4.

Do an annual campaign to increase block participation in the City’s Block Captain program.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

PARTNER(S): PMBC

DETAILS: • DISTRIBUTE INFORMATION about the program and its goals to residents. • COORDINATE WITH THE CITY and the Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee (PMBC) to determine best steps for expanding the Block Captain network in the area. • ACTIVELY RECRUIT motivated residents to organize their blocks for the program.

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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 32.

Help residents connect to assistance on issues they need help with now. ACTION 32.1.

Make sure staff and leadership at all local organizations know what services each organization offers and how to refer residents for help on common issues.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, community organizations

DETAILS: • FORMULATE A RESIDENT SERVICES ORG CHART for internal planning purposes between local organizations. The goal is to give each organization’s leadership and staff a clear picture of who residents should contact to report and request help on various issues. Some issues may require referral to one or more community organizations; others may involve elevating issues to the City level. • DEVELOP NEW WAYS FOR RESIDENTS TO REPORT ISSUES, such as a online form dedicated to dumping on each organization’s website.

ACTION 32.2.

Implement a cross-organizational communications and marketing campaign to regularly reintroduce local organizations to residents and make sure they know where they can turn for help on various issues.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, North10

DETAILS: • REINTRODUCE ORGANIZATIONS OFTEN in a major marketing push, at least annually and possibly as often as every quarter. Many residents may not know what organizations exist, what they do, and who they are for. Others may have outdated impressions of who each organization serves or what they do. And changing that will not be a one-time effort: it is an ongoing task that local organizations must continually work on. • USE A CONSISTENT GRAPHIC STYLE AND LANGUAGE. Colors, graphic styles, logos, or catchphrases stick in peoples’ memories. Use a simple, attractive style and repetitive language to embed the marketing campaign in community members’ minds. • COMMUNICATE WHERE RESIDENTS CAN TURN FOR HELP ON COMMON ISSUES in simple language. • FLYERS, MAILERS, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND MORE. Get materials to every resident in the community however you can. • REPEAT IT IN PERSON as often as possible, at meetings and in interactions with residents. • USE THE CAMPAIGN TO COMMUNICATE FOLLOW-UP on commitments from the plan, to make sure residents know that local organizations are always working for them, and good things are happening.

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IMPLEMENTATION ACTION 32.3.

STRATEGY 32, CONTINUED

Encourage a culture of reporting issues among residents, to draw resources to the community and help build a case for action on persistent issues.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

DETAILS: • INTEGRATE INTO CROSS-ORGANIZATIONAL MARKETING PLAN: Communications that come out of the previous recommendation should include content encouraging residents to reach out about key issues. • KEEP A RECORD of resident reports over time, and pull out patterns and repeated reports, to strategize about how to tackle larger issues. • ENCOURAGE REDUNDANCY: Residents should report issues to local organizations, as well as to the appropriate City contacts, such as 311. • CHANGE TAKES MANY VOICES RISING UP AGAIN & AGAIN: Emphasize that all reports contribute to the community’s long-term case for more resources and attention. A strong record of issues over time will help make change, even if it is not immediate. • TAKE A CUSTOMER SERVICE APPROACH: Residents often say they don’t know where to turn for help on various issues, and the City may not be helpful. In higher income communities, residents often have more personal resources to find help - and more time to do so. In lower income communities, community organizations need to fill the gap and provide contacts that will help residents figure out how to tackle issues that arise. • THINK ABOUT A BROAD RANGE OF ISSUES: In the course of this project, residents have brought up a range of issues that they do not know exactly how to address, including buildings that need to be boarded up, addressing illegal activities on their blocks, dumping, tree trimming, repairs to porches or home exteriors, finding new housing, and a wide variety of other issues.

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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 33, CONTINUED

STRATEGY 33.

Make public engagement a habit. ACTION 33.1.

Establish a public outreach plan to provide regular in-person or virtual opportunities for residents of all backgrounds to interact with local organizations, hear updates on the commitments made in this plan, and collectively process or celebrate events in the community.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, community organizations

DETAILS: • OUTLINE KEY TOUCH POINTS throughout the year, where BGEC will update the community on what it and its organizations have done. These points can include in-person or virtual meetings, appearances at existing community events, communications blasts (e.g. coordinated flyers, social media, and email), signage outside organizations’ offices, and any other method of spreading the word about recent progress. • LIMITED DEDICATED EVENTS: Especially during the pandemic, it can be hard to get community members out to virtual or in-person community meetings; however these formats are still important especially when tied to a specific community initiative or event, and when a coalition of organizations can collaborate to run and cross-promote the meeting together.

ACTION 33.2.

Take every opportunity to meet residents where they are - to reintroduce community organizations, provide information on local services, and have fun.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, community organizations

DETAILS: • ATTEND EVERY COMMUNITY EVENT POSSIBLE: The best way to reach the most community members is to engage with them where they already are - at parks, public spaces, community events and programs. Make sure organizations have a plan for what they will be doing at community events - and how staff members should engage the community. • MAKE IT FUN AND HAVE A PLAN: Find ways to bring good times to the community, while organizations share information about how they can help. Make sure staff members know the plan for how the organization wants to show up at community events.

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IMPLEMENTATION

STRATEGY 33, CONTINUED

ACTION 33.3.

Engage the Latine community intentionally and meaningfully. Collaborate with Latine community leaders to make sure everyone in the Hunting Park - East Tioga community feels welcome.

LEAD ORG(S):

BGEC, Latine community organizations

DETAILS: • ENGAGE THE LATINE COMMUNITY WHERE THEY ARE: Spread marketing and communications in bodegas and specialty grocery stores, via Latine community organizations, restaurants, daycares attended by Latine/Hispanic residents, and other key locations. • PROVIDE TRANSLATION at all community meetings and of all major community organizations’ materials, in partnership with local Spanish-language organizations. • ASSUME THERE IS A NEED: If translation is not provided and events are not heavily promoted by Latine community leaders, the Spanish-language community likely will not come out, and it may seem like translation services aren’t necessary. Hunting Park - East Tioga has a large and growing Latine community; assume that translation is needed, and then work with Latine community leaders to figure out the best way to bring their communities out. • COLLABORATE WITH LATINE LEADERS fully, to both design and promote engagement in the Spanishspeaking community.

STRATEGY 34.

Update this neighborhood plan within a decade, and keep fleshing it out in the meantime. ACTION 34.1.

Integrate this plan’s recommendations into local organizations’ strategic plans, and detail how to turn ideas into concrete action.

LEAD ORG(S):

North10, NTIT, Hunting Park CRC, Hunting Park United, other community organizations and institutions

DETAILS: • INTEGRATE INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING at local organizations. The recommendations outlined here may require new capacities or organizational structures. Each organization must assess what they will need to implement the commitments made in this plan. To do this in a formal way, organizations may want to engage in an internal strategic planning processes following the publication of this plan. • ADD DETAIL, REVISE AS NEEDED: Breadth is often the enemy of depth. When it comes time to implement many of these recommendations, organizations may find they need to develop more detailed steps - or that the steps outlined here do not match the situation on the ground. This should be considered a living document, to be edited as necessary.

ACTION 34.2.

Plan to revisit and update this plan within 10 years.

LEAD ORG(S): BGEC

• TEN YEARS IS A LONG TIME. A lot will change in that time. Regardless of how much progress has been made, it will be important to update the community’s plan to keep it fresh and relevant.

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