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© Instant coffees, 2011 Edition and production: Instant coffees Researcher: Alejandro Acín Designer and layout: María Carolina Sandoval Photography cover: Mikel Ibarrola On-line publish: www.issue.com www.instantcoffees.wordpress.com All rights reserved.


On-line catalogue

Session 2 March 2011


Instant coffees Editorial by Jack Bradbury

I have been surrounded by photographs ever since I can remember. My dad is a photographer, so I got used to the camera always being around, photographs hanging on the walls and plenty of photography on the living room bookshelves. I got a camera put into my hands and got the chance to look through the viewfinder and press the button, sealing that moment forever in a chemically impregnated sheet of paper. One of those pictures still hangs in the bathroom in my parent’s house. The photographs that fill that cottage tell my story and that of my family in their own way, disjointed, non-linear, at once prosaic and fantastic. This extension of the photograph from the prevalence of a single important picture to a series of images that convey emotion, engaging their audience and communicating a point of view, is what Instant coffees is all about. We want it to be a forum for local and international photographers to show their work and tell their stories. Already in our first two sessions we have shown projections from Belgium, Argentina, the USA, Canada and Spain as well as the UK and we really want this international flavour to continue. But we intend Instant coffees events to be not only a place where artists bring their finished works but where open discussion can occur and new ideas and collaborations can emerge. To that end we want to invite everyone who is thinking of showing their work here to come along and talk to us all about your methods, your projects and your point of view. At the second session we were lucky to have two of our participants talk to us a little bit about their work and answer some questions from everyone. The first was Will Hartley, whose projection ´Lawrence Hill´ looked at the lives of people living on the edge of society struggling to survive with the help of various drugs, nature and each other. He described


how the project came about, having initially tried to document prostitutes at work and how his subjects came to fill his life quite intensely at times for several months. Our second participant speaker was Michael Reeves, elaborating on his project ‘Fragments’ and the method behind it, which was integral to its creation. Michael told us about the Holga camera and its imperfections, which lead many people to appreciate the individual nature of the images produced by its plastic lens. He also described how the results from the Holga dictate his shooting with it, finding images of decay and pathos that compliment the dreamy photographs the camera creates. The question was also raised as to how much the increased interest in the Holga and other old and unusual film cameras from Russia and China, exemplified by the Lomographic movement, represents a real resurgence in the use of film and appreciation of its unique advantages faced with the recent prevalence of digital photography. So to sum up, we all enjoyed ourselves and we’re really looking forward to next time.


Andrew Jackson The hidden landscape


Š Andrew Jackson


Š Andrew Jackson


Š Andrew Jackson


Andrew Jackson studied photography as an undergraduate at Wolverhampton University and as postgraduate on the MA Documentary photography programme at the European Centre for Photographic Research at Newport (University of Wales). He has had solo exhibitions at the Focal Point Gallery, Unit 2 Gallery, the Midland Art Centre and the New Art Gallery Walsall. Photographs from the series All that it was... All that it is were purchased for the Garman Ryan permanent collection of the New Art Gallery, Walsall. Increasingly his practice is expanding to incorporate the use of text and video. An example of this can be seen in his recent commission by the London School of Economics and Political Science that explored economic migration in a work entitled The Golden Road.

The hidden landscape These images were produced in Handsworth, Birmingham in Britain’s second largest city; and yet at its heart is a story of young people who feel forgotten in a city they feel is not theirs and of a young man of eighteen called ‘Fire’. Already in his short life, ‘Fire’ (he refuses to use his ‘government name’) has been homeless, a gang member and now a father to a son who he hopes will not live a life like his.

WEBSITE:

www.writtenbylight.com


FREYA NAJADE IF YOU ARE LUCKY YOU GET OLD


© FREYA NAJADE


© FREYA NAJADE


© FREYA NAJADE


I am a photographer living and working in London. In December 2009 I finished my Masters Degree with Distinction in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at the University of the Arts London (London College of Communication). Published Work: Dennis,British Journal of Photojournalism, London, UK. December 2009. Elvis and my Family, ’Spam’ magazine,Barcelona. June 2009. Advertisement,Twisted Knister Concert and Film, Bremen. March 2008. Portrait “Kimono Kops”, ‘Sup’ magazine, New York. June 2008. Advertisement,Lexington Club, San Francisco. July 2007. Cover Photo,Testcard (no 14), Broschur, Berlin. January 2005.

If you are lucky, you get old In the project If you are lucky, you get old I tell stories of the elderly I met and spent time with. To my surprise, the old people were not just proud of their age and the fact that they made it that far in life, they were also still falling in love and breaking up. They were overcoming their lifetime partner’s death, living out their erotic fantasies or dealing with the loss of their sexual desire. Talking to them showed that inner growth is ever lasting and that humans above the age of seventy continue to love, suffer, long, dream and have sexual feelings.

WEBSITE:

www.freyanajade.com


IVÁN SANJUÁN meanwhile


© IVÁN SANJUÁN


© IVÁN SANJUÁN


© IVÁN SANJUÁN


I come in contact with photography at the beginning of 2003 by chance. Currently living in Madrid, Spain. My work documenting everyday moments but eventually try to focus on portrait and landscape.

Meanwhile The images below are part of my recent work, in which I try to document everyday moments concerning to my self, my partner, the city where I am. A kind of diary which is still under construction.

WEBSITE:

www.ivansanjuan.blogspot.com


JIM NAUGHTEN RE-ENACTORS


© JIM NAUGHTEN


© JIM NAUGHTEN


© JIM NAUGHTEN


Jim Naughten (b.1969) was awarded a painting scholarships to Lancing College and later studied photography at the Arts Institute of Bournemouth (both in the UK). He began photography portraits of remote tribes in Namibia and the circuses of India before adopting a more narrative approach in his work. Re-enactors heralds a return to documentary portraiture, this time using post-production techniques to create a powerful with his subjects and composite images mixing landscapes with action scenes. Jim Naughten is an emerging artist with three solo exhibitions already achieved, as well as several group exhibitions. He has been the recipient of several photography awards and received a commendation from The National Portrait Gallery´s Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize.

Re-enactors Every summer thousands of people from all over the world gather in a Kentish field and leave the present firmly behind. The step out of their routine daily live and transform into historically characters fro the First and the Second World Wars, often which such vigour and obsessive attention to detail that it is hard to imagine them in contemporary settings. Taking on a different name, identity and sometimes even a different tongue, the role players re enact battles and drills from a imagine past. It is something more than acting, a collective fantasy played out on a massive scale. WEBSITE:

www.jimnaughten.com


michael reeves fragments


© MICHAEL REEVES


© MICHAEL REEVES


© MICHAEL REEVES


Michael is a Bristol-based fine art photographer. In 2006, he won the Still Life category of the ICI Olmec Student Digital Photographer of the Year Awards, and he completed a BA in Photography at Hereford College of Arts in 2007. His previous exhibitions include the 2007  Rhubarb-Rhubarb International Festival of the Image, the 2010 Plastic Fantastic exhibition at the LightBox Photographic Gallery in Astoria, Oregon, USA, as well as his solo shows Echoes in the 2010 Bristol Festival of Photography and Cameraworks at the Photo Gallery, Bristol, in November 2010. Two of his photographs were selected for the 2011 Royal West of England Academy’s Open Photography 2 exhibition. Michael works largely with medium format film, using both conventional and lo-fi cameras.

Fragments Fragments is an ongoing project using a Holga, a Chinese ‘toy’ camera with a plastic lens that produces images with soft and vignetted corners. The unique characteristics of this low-tech camera help to produce dreamlike images, bringing out the beauty and mystery of overlooked scenes and neglected or abandoned objects, fragments of the world around us that we often do not notice. WEBSITE:

www.michaelreevesphotography.com


sergio caSta単eira lost keys


© SERGIO CASTAÑEIRA


© SERGIO CASTAÑEIRA


© SERGIO CASTAÑEIRA


I started to take photography seriously when I asked myself why do I photograph what I do? Why when I am in the street I have always the same impulses? Does not matter the place where I am or the person I am with, I always try to find myself in the others or in the place I am. No matter where you are or the origin of the people, I always try to find either the state or in space at that time I habit. To me photography is intrinsically linked to personal journey, a journey that know me and know how to act around me about me.  As it happens with Literature, rather than giving answers, I continue to raise issues within the eternal maze in which we live.  Ultimately I seek to unite the pieces of a puzzle that do not even has a meaning, but I try to find that meaning in its construction. All those moments and memories that go through my day-to-day.

Lost Keys I travel mainly to get to know my geography. When I do, I feel a terrible fear. I am more afraid to get to know myself; that’s what panics me, to dive inside my interior, to get lost in the unfathomable void we all carry inside, get to know some day who I really am. The unknown city that opens up before my eyes gives me the feeling of a labyrinth with no way out. More than freezing images of daily life of that place, I try to catch myself, find me in that rectangle I stop in time, connect those lost codes that wander through my desires in oblivion.


Pessoa said that traveling is to loose countries, that when we arrive, everything we had imagined disappears from out memory. I don’t loose countries, perhaps I loose the person I believe I am, the one that really puts on masks and I had only imagined to be.

WEBSITE:

www.sergiocastaneira.blogspot.com


EVI LEMBERGER EIN NICHORT OR THE FAIRY TALE ABOUT THE GALOSHES OF FORTUNE


© EVI LEMERGER


© EVI LEMERGER


© EVI LEMERGER


Evi Lemberger, born in Lam, Germany, did a degree at “London College of Communication” with a short exchange term in Leipzig at the “Academy for Art and Design”. After finishing she was working as a photojournalist in Moscow, doing a commissioned work for “Norfolk Contemporary art society” in Transcarpathia, Ukraine and writing for the online magazine “jetzt“, Munich. She also worked on a photo essay in Hungary about Racism and Antisemitism and went recently with the Transibirian express from Moscow to Vladiwostok. Along side publishing it in magazine such as Foto8, Zeit and Sueddeutsche Zeitung, German she is exhibiting her work in Groupshows such as “Photomonth”, Dray Walk Gallery, London, UK (2008), photo id, Nowich, UK, “Travelling Light”, London, UK (2009), “IHH”, TPTP Gallery, Paris, France (2009), “Bilderwahn”, Gallery Eigenheim, Weimar, UK (2009), “BHVU Open’10”, BHVU Gallery, London, UK (2010) and New York Photography Festival (2010) and has Sloexhibitons such as “Photomonth”, Dray Walk Gallery, London, UK (2008), “Mein Traum”, Kunsthaus Erfurt and ACC Gallery, Weimar, G, photo id, Nowich, UK, “Travelling Light”, London, UK (2009), “IHH”, TPTP Gallery, Paris, France (2009), “Bilderwahn”, Gallery Eigenheim, Weimar, UK (2009), “BHVU Open’10”, BHVU Gallery, London, UK (2010). At the moment she got a scholarship for studying Documentary Photography at the International Center of Photography.

Ein nichtort or the fairy tale about the galoshes of fortune Transcarpathia is a region in the west of Ukraine, which is surrounded by the natural border of the Carpathian mountains and artificial borders of the countries Hungary, Slovakia and Rumania.


Within the 20th century it used to belong to 7 different countries: till 1918 it belonged to Hungary, then for 20 years to Czech Slovakia, for two weeks it became an autonomous country, then, till 1944, it belonged to Hungary, then to Soviet Union and since 1991 to new founded Ukraine. WEBSITE:

www.evilemberger.co.uk/


WILL HARTLEY LAWRENCE HILL


© WILL HARTLEY


© WILL HARTLEY


© WILL HARTLEY


Born in 1986, I went to Newport University in Wales to study documentary photography, graduating in 2008. Since then I have won the ‘shots young photographer of the year 2009’ and ‘Ag magazine Brilliant book awards 2010’, with my project ‘In between dreams’ which followed a group of squatters living in London. The work was exhibited in Candits Arts trust in London with ‘off the real’ as part of a collective, and a print was selected for the Getty images gallery with the Ian parry 2010. I am currently living in Bristol and working on new projects, including ‘Lawrence Hill’ a story following a formerly homeless man.

Lawrence Hill This time last year I became interested in the homeless community. One night I was walking along Jamaica Street and a man asked if I had a quid for a drink, so I bought us both a beer and chatted to him. After a while his mate turned up, his mate turned out to be a homeless Man called Ratty. We spoke a lot about homelessness and how he’s coped with living on the streets, and he said “I’ll show you the streets, stay with me for a night”. So I did. Ratty then became a good friend of mine, who after being Homeless for eight years, and meeting his girlfriend Vicky was finally offered a flat by the government, in Lawrence Hill.

WEBSITE:

www.willhartley.blogspot.com


DEANNA DIKEMAN LEAVING AND WAVING


© DEANNA DIKERMAN


© DEANNA DIKERMAN


© DEANNA DIKERMAN


Deanna Dikeman has been an artist-photographer since 1985.Her work is in the permanent collections of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Illinois; The Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri; The Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Arizona; and The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas. She photographs her family in Iowa and Nebraska. She has done a series of photographs of interior details of homes.  Her Wardrobe project includes photographs of old clothes in a thrift store and the Stephens College Historical Costume Collection.  Most recently, she has been photographing ballroom dancers and their clothing in movement. Deanna received the $50,000 United States Artists Booth Fellowship in 2008. In 2006 she was given a Charlotte Street Fellowship.  In 1996 she was awarded the Aaron Siskind Foundation Individual Photographer’s Fellowship. Deanna is represented by Dolphin Gallery in Kansas City, Missouri. Leaving and waving These photographs are part of a body of work I call Relative Moments, which has chronicled the lives of my parents and other relatives since 1986. In 2009, I discovered a subset of accumulated “leaving and waving” photographs. I realized that I had 18 years of photographs that I had taken as I waved good-bye and drove away from my parents at their home in Iowa. I started in 1991 with a snapshot, and I continued taking photographs with each departure. I published some of these images in a book: 27 Good-byes. I never set out to make this series. But now I have a small story to tell about family, love, and the pain of saying good-bye.

WEBSITE:

www.deannadikeman.com


BEN ROBERTS THE GATHERING CLOUDS


© BEN ROBERTS


© BEN ROBERTS


© BEN ROBERTS


Ben is an award winning fine art and documentary photographer. After assisting World Press Award winner Zed Nelson for almost 3 years, Ben went freelance and almost immediately won both the British Journal of Photography’s Project Assistance Award, and LPA Futures Awards. With agency representation in both Paris and London, Ben’s editorial clients include Le Monde, Marie Claire, Neon Magazine and The Fader, while he has shot commercial jobs for HSBC, Deutsche Borse and UEFA. Ben’s personal projects are broad in their scope. he’s photographed gold mining in Australia, ice fishing in Canada, and the indie nightclubbing scene in London. The Gathering Clouds Spain was in what turned out to be the final throes of a huge economic and construction boom. Fuelled by consumer confidence, EU investment and an aggressive tourist industry, Spain’s property developers had changed the physical and social landscape of the countries suburban spaces. I found a landscape imbued with a strange mix of anxiety and tension, where the delineation between nature and city had become ambiguous. “The Gathering Clouds” contemplates Spain’s loss of direction, and my own disorientation in an unfamiliar and sometimes unnerving environment.

WEBSITE:

www.benrobertsphotography.com/


Many thanks for everyone who have collaborated with Instant coffees. You also can follow us on the blog instantcoffees.wordpress.com and facebook.

IC 2nd Session  
IC 2nd Session  

This is the catalogue of the second session of Instant coffees-photography screening.

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