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© Instant  coffees,  2011 Edition  and  production:  Instant  coffees Researcher:  Alejandro  Acín Designer  and  layout:  María  Carolina  Sandoval Photography  cover:  Maria  Gruzdeva On-line  publish:  www.issue.com instantcoffees.wordpress.com All  rights  reserved.


On-line catalogue

Session 5 September  2011


Instant coffees Editorial                                                

Following the  slightly  altered  format  of  last  session,  which  we  think  worked  really  well,  we   had  only  7  individual  photographer  slideshows  this  time,  with  the  added  bonus  of    a  presentation  by  photographer  Jamie  Carstairs  in  which  he  described  to  us  the  project  on  which   he  has  been  working  for  the  last  five  years  entitled  “Picturing  China”.  This  collection  of  pre   1950s  photographs  of  China  held  some  fascinating  images  and  for  those  whose  appetites   were  whetted  there  are  plenty  more  on  the  project  website.  We  also  had  some  stark,  location  specific  black  and  white  documentary  images  as  well  as  glimpses  at  Albania,  Mexico,   Yakutia  in  Siberia,  Bangladesh  and  Lebanon.  Our  discussion  covered  issues  relating  to  the   representation  of  violence  and  loss  and  the  relative  merits  of  more  or  less  explicit  methods   of  doing  so.  In  all  a  very  powerful  and  quite  emotional  session. It  doesn’t  seem  like  ten  months  ago  when  we  fired  up  the  projector  for  the  first  session  of   Instant  coffees.  In  that  time,  we’ve  seen  excellent  work  from  fifty  two  photographers  of  all   styles   from   intimate   personal   portraiture   to   large   scale   documentary   and   landscapes   and   pretty  much  everything  inbetween.  Much  of  the  work  has  been  marked  not  only  by  its  technical  and  compositional  quality  but  also  by  its  emotional  resonance  and  depth.  There  have   been  intense  family  portraits  from  Deanna  Dikeman  with  “Leaving  and  Waving”,  Briony  Campbell  with  “The  Dad  Project”  and  Alicja  Dobrucka  with  “I  like  you,  I  like  you  a  lot”.  There   has  been  the  fantastic  documentary  work  of  Ian  Teh’s  “Dark  Clouds”,  the  wonderful,  vibrant   pigeons  and  their  owners  of  Ricardo  Cases’  “Paloma  al  aire”,  the  luminous  glimpses  into  the   lives  of  illegal  Hispanics  in  the  USA  afforded  by  Seba  Kurtis’  “700  Miles”  and  the  dreamlike   black  and  white  fragments  of  Mikel  Ibarrola  “Pasos”.  


The singling  out  of  these  artists  is  by  no  means  an  attempt  to  select  a  ‘best  of’  but  simply   to  stress  the  breadth  of  work  we  have  been  lucky  enough  to  experience  since  we  began  this   journey. We  have  also  spread  our  wings  from  our  home  in  Bristol  and  travelled  to  Spain  for  a  Special  screening  at  Zaragoza  Photo  2011  and  held  a  well  received  Special  edition  at  the  Roof   Unit  studio  space  in  Bethnal  Green  as  part  of  Photomonth  East  London.  Also  we  have  been   invited  by  Emergent  Lleida  Photo-Festival  to  choose  one  of  their  finalist  to  produce  a  multimedia  piece,  During  the  course  of  the  year  we  have  met  some  wonderful  people,  with  whom   we  have  had  stimulating  and  enlightening  discussions  about  the  theory  and  practice  of  photography  and  most  of  all  we’ve  been  invigorated  and  inspired  by  the  amount  of  interest  and   enthusiasm  all  round.  With  this  in  mind  we  are  extremely  positive  for  the  future  of  Instant   coffees  and  are  looking  forward  to  discovering  and  being  surprised  by  more  personal  works   in  the  coming  months.  Thanks  everyone!


JAMIE CARSTAIRS VISUALISING  CHINA  


Picturing China This   exhibition,   organised   by   the   Chinese   Maritime   Customs   project,   and   funded   by   the   AHRC   with   sponsorship   from   John   Swire   &   Sons   Ltd.,   showcased  photographs  of   life   in   China  before  1950  in  the  possession  of  families  or  descendants  of  Chinese  and  British  men   and  women  who  formerly  lived  there.  Lodged  away  in  attics  and  cupboards,  these  images   include  snapshots  of  expatriate  social  life,  scenes  of  everyday  Chinese  life,  and  records  of   momentous  political  events.  Altogether  they  form  a  unique  virtual  archive  for  China,  where   wars  and  revolutions  inflicted  great  damage  on  the  sites  and  ways  of  life  recorded,  and  destroyed  much  of  the  stock  of  historic  visual  and  other  records. The  ‘Historical  Photographs  of  China’  team  at  the  University  of  Bristol  has  been  sourcing  and   digitising  such  archives  of  images,  and  placing  them  online  as  a  public  resource  at  the  Historical  Photographs  of  China  project  website.  Taken  together  the  photographs  provide  many   glimpses  of  the  lost  Chinese  past,  and  telling  evidence  of  the  complex  intimacy  of  British   relations  with  China  before  1950. WEBSITE:  http://visualisingchina.net/


STUART MATTHEWS CHANGING  TIDES:  AN  UNCERTAIN  FUTURE


© STUART  MATTHEWS


© STUART  MATTHEWS


© STUART  MATTHEWS


Stuart Matthews  (b.1984,  England)  graduated  from  Plymouth  University  in  2007  after  being   selected  a  finalist  of  the  Ilford  Student  Photographer  of  the  Year.  During  his  final  year  he   travelled  to  China  to  document  this  new  and  evolving  super  power  of  the  21st  century,  Stuart   covered   Kosovo’s   independence   in   2008   and   later   that   year   interned   at   NOOR   Images.   Since  then,  he  has  made  various  trips  to  document  the  impact  of  Climate  Change  in  Bangladesh  and  the  effect  that  this  is  having  on  communities  living  on  the  frontline.  He  was  funded   as  part  of  the  IdeasTap  /  Magnum  Photos  Photographic  Award  2010  to  continue  his  work   there.  Stuart  Matthews  is  represented  by  INVISION  Images  and  is  based  in  United  Kingdom. Changing  Tides:  An  Uncertain  Future Bangladesh  lies   at   the   forefront  of   Climate  Change.  Its  vulnerable  low-lying  landscape  is   susceptible  to  Cyclones  and  destructive  river  erosion  created  by  the  acceleration  of  Glacier   melting  from  the  Himalayas  and  the  seasonal  Monsoon  rains.  In  May  2009  Cyclone  Aila  tore   across  the  south-western  coast  of  Bangladesh  destroying  more  than  700km  (434  miles)   of  coastal  embankments  and  wiping  out  thousands  of  homes,  leaving  over  40,000  people   marooned  on  the  embankments  and  forced  to  take  refuge  in  shelters. 18  months  on  since  Cyclone  Aila  struck,  the  people  of  Koyra  have  continued  to  develop  their   land  to  protect  themselves  against  these  ever  threatening  changes  in  climate.  The  completion  of  the  Shikaribari  Ring  Dam  in  January  2010  has  allowed  the  majority  of  the  community   to  return  to  their  homes  and  begin  to  rebuild  their  lives.  Still,  around  875  people  remain  in   temporary  shelters  along  the  embankments  as  their  land  is  still  inaccessible  due  to  flooding. The  unpredictable  weather  shifts  pose  a  severe  threat  and  uncertain  future  for  the  people  living  on  the  frontline  of  climate  change.  Many  still  keep  their  belongings  packed  as  they  know   how  quickly  the  weather  and  landscape  can  change,  forcing  them  to  seek  refuge  once  again. WEBSITE:  www.stuartmatthews.eu


DAVID HORNILLOS PRINCIPE  PIO


© DAVID  HORNILLOS


© DAVID  HORNILLOS


© DAVID  HORNILLOS


David Hornillos  (Madrid,  1974).  He  has  graduated  in  Law,  he  was  studying  documentary   photography  in  Blank  Paper  School  in  Madrid.  His  work  has  been  exhibited  in  Peer2Peer   Gallery  in  Madrid,  Blank  Paper  Space,  Museo  de  Bellas  Artes  of  Castellón,  grupal  exhibition   called  Mapping  -  Flaneur  in  Londres.

Principe Pio Principe  Pio  is  a  project  about  the  necessity  of  taking  pictures  around  a  specific  and  delimited  territory.  Principe  Pio,  a  train  station  in  Madrid  (Spain),  is  the  scenery  where  the  author   was  exploring  around  to  propose  a  personal  and  emotional  portrait  of  the  place  and  people. WEBSITE:  www.davidhornillos.es


ARMANDO RIBEIRO DEPRESSIVE  LANDSCAPES


© ARMANDO  RIBEIRO


© ARMANDO  RIBEIRO


© ARMANDO  RIBEIRO


Armando was  born  in  1976  in  Angola,  but  had  to  flee  with  his  family  soon  after  amidst  rising   tensions  and  civil  war.  His  childhood  was  spent  dreaming  about  travelling  and  discovering   long  lost  ancient  civilisations,  a  passion  that  evolved  into  taking  photographs  of  everything   surrounding  him  -  and  trying  to  portray  the  issues  that  humanity  faces  within  these  modern   societies. His  work  explores  concepts  relating  to  changing  landscape,  global  environment  and  the  human  condition.  He  is  especially  drawn  to  the  ever  mutating  landscape,  be  it  man  made  or   natural  -  the  jarring  juxtaposition  of  countryside  and  urban  environments.  Armando  currently   lives  and  works  in  London. Depressive  Landscapes Depression  is  a  word  that  describes  economical,  social  or  even  personally  states  of  emptiness;  in  this  days,  landscape  stands  as  one  of  the  things  that  has  suffered  more  changes   within  the  human  sphere… Not  just  the  urban  landscape  but  also  the  countryside  are  in  a  constant  process  of  mutation. The  concept  of  no  place  has  been  subject  of  several  sociological  studies  in  order  to  understand  the  changes  on  the  man  relationship  with  the  surrounding  environment,  be  it  urban  or   not  and  how  this  affects  the  way  people  relate  with  their  peers. Often  the  passage  through  “no  mans  land”  takes  us  to  nowhere  but  sometimes  we  find  ourselves  standing  on  a  small  green  patch  between  two  buildings  or  simply  on  a  road  with  a   extraordinary  view  that  makes  us  reflect  about  the  simple  things  in  life… WEBSITE:  www.arribphoto.com


CHIARA TOCCI LIFE  AFTER  ZOG  AND  OTHER  STORIES


© CHIARA  TOCCI


© CHIARA  TOCCI


© CHIARA  TOCCI


Chiara Tocci  is  an  Italian  photographer  living  in  the  UK.  She  gained  her  bachelor’s  degree  in   Media  and  Journalism  in  Florence  and  moved  to  the  UK  to  study  Documentary  Photography   at  the  University  of  Wales,  Newport,  where  she  graduated  in  2010. Chiara  is  the  recipient  of  the  Marco  Pesaresi  award  and  the  winner  of  the  Portrait  Commission  at  the  National  Museum  Wales  and  National  Portrait  Gallery. Life  after  Zog  and  other  stories Early  ninetis.  South  of  Italy.  I  witnessed  streams  of  Albanians  docking  on  the  coast  of  my   hometown,  after  brutal  and  disillusive  journey.  Running  away  from  the  future  they  couldn’t   hope  for,  towards  something  equally  obscure  and  complex,  they  spread  all  over  Europe.   Their  stories,  imagined  and  pressumed,  crowned  my  thoughts:  who  did  they  leave  behind   and  what  were  they  longing  for? After  year  of  fascination  of  this  enigmatic  land  and  its  people  became  a  photography  journey  for  me  in  remotes  areas  of  High  Albania.  For  the  people  of  these  areas  time  almost   stood  still.  “Life  after  Zog”  is  an  exploration  of  an  enchanted  place  inhabited  by  people  who   share  the  land  with  their  ancestors’  ghosts.  A  place  with  no  time.  It  is  like  time  and  history   is  abruptly  stopped,  without  however  forgetting  to  bury  blood  feuds  and  spread  melancholic   desillutions. WEBSITE:  www.chiaratocci.com


EVGENIA ARBUGAEVA TIKSI


© EVGENIA  ARBUGAEVA


© EVGENIA  ARBUGAEVA


© EVGENIA  ARBUGAEVA


Evgenia was  born  in  Siberian  town  Tiksi  in  Russia.  She  received  BA  degree  in  art  management  from  International  University  in  Moscow.  In  2009  graduated  from  International  Center   of  Photography  Photojournalism  and  Documentary  Program.  She  now  works  as  a  freelance   photographer  between  Russia  and  New  York. Tiksi Tiksi  is  a  small  village  located  on  a  shore  of  Arctic  ocean  in  Russia.  It  was  built  in  USSR  by   people  who  believed  in  the  future  of  the  Arctic  who  were  coming  from  all  over  the  country   driven  by  the  romantic  dream  of  far  North:  Scientists,  explorers,  the  military. I  was  born  here  and  after  fall  of  Soviet  Union  my  family,  as  most  of  the  population  left  Tiksi.   But  I  could  never  forget  this  place  with  it’s  tundra  blown  off  with  strong  winds,  so  strong  that   if  you  are  a  little  girl  it  can  easily  pick  you  up  and  bring  to  places.  My  playground  with  stars   above  during  polar  night,  lighthouse  in  a  blizzard… This  year  I  came  back  here  for  the  first  time  in  almost  twenty  years.  It  was  a  journey  to  surreal  childhood  memories. Some  people  say  that  Tiksi  will  be  closed  in  near  future,  because  it  doesn’t  serve  a  purpose  anymore,  before  that  happened  I  wanted  to  capture  this  special  place  “in  the  middle  of   nowhere”. WEBSITE:  www.evgeniaarbugaeva.com


DALIA KHAMISSY LEBANON´S  MISSING


© DALIA  KHAMISSY


© DALIA  KHAMISSY


© DALIA  KHAMISSY


Born in  Beirut,  Dalia  Khamissy  receives  a  diploma  in  photography  from  the  Universite  SaintEsprit  Kaslik  in  1999.  Her  work  revolves  mostly  around  the  social  and  socio-political  stories   in  the  Mid-East  region.  In  2005  she  works  as  a  photo  editor  for  the  Associated  Press  in   Beirut  for  nearly  2  years  before  quitting  end  of  2006  after  the  Israeli  offensive  on  Lebanon   and  its  aftermath.  Since  then  she  is  back  to  documenting  mostly  the  aftermath  of  Lebanon’s   wars  and  social  issues,  especially  those  concerning  women  rights Khamissy’s   pictures   have   been   exhibited   widely   in   Europe,   South   America,   US   and   the   MENA  region  and  are  regularly  published  in  the  international  press.  She  is  represented  by   the  Empty  Quarter  Gallery,  Dubai.  Her  photographs  are  in  the  permanent  collection  of  the   Institut  du  Monde  Arabe. Lebanon’s  missing I  was  seven  years  old  when  my  father  was  kidnapped  in  1981;  three  days  later  he  was  set   free. Many  years  later,  I  understood  he  was  luckier  than  the  others.  17,000  people  remain  officially  missing  in  Lebanon  while  their  families  still  await  their  return. They  all  disappeared  during  the  Lebanese  civil  war  in  1975-90;  they  were  abducted  or  killed   at  the  hands  of  different  Lebanese  militias,  Syria,  or  Israel  and  their  allies.  The  kidnapped   were  from  diverse  creeds,  gender,  ages  and  political  persuasions. My  project  to  date  has  focused  on  documenting  the  story  of  the  ‘missing’  in  all  its  aspects.   I  visited  few  families  of  the  kidnapped,  documented  their  lives  and  their  ongoing  struggle,   took  pictures  of  the  preserved  belongings  of  their  missing.  


I also  documented  a  few  locations  of  mass  graves  that  were  stated  in  some  reports  or  admitted  by  ex-militants  who  told  their  stories.  Landscapes  in  the  mountain,  the  capital,  the   cities  and  the  surrounding  villages  -  even  the  Mediterranean  Sea  was  used  as  a  silent  mass   grave.  People  keep  saying,  ‘the  whole  Lebanese  soil  is  planted  with  mass  graves’. WEBSITE:  www.daliakhamissy.com


FERNANDO BRITO YOUR  STEPS  WERE  LOST  IN  THE  LANDSCAPE


© FERNANDO  BRITO


© FERNANDO  BRITO


© FERNANDO  BRITO


Fernando Brito  was  born  in  Culiacán,  Sinaloa,  Mexico,  and  studied  marketing  at  the  Universidad  de  Occidente  Culiacán.  Since  2004,  he  has  been  photography  editor  of  the  newspaper  El  Debate  de  Culiacán.  Among  his  honors  are  acknowledgments  at  the  12th  Biennial   of  Visual  Arts  Northwest  in  2009,  and  the  Biennial  of  the  Image  Center  in  2010.  Brito  was   selected  for  the  Mexican  Expo  Foto  Periodismo  in  2010  and  2011,  General  News  3rd  Prize   Stories  in  the  World  Press  Photo,  Descubrimientos  PhotoEspaña  2011. Your  steps  were  lost  in  the  landscape The  series  reflect  on  how  in  these  times,  when  violence  has  become  part  of  everyday  life,   death  becomes  just  another  spectacle.  Leaving  conscience  and  values  behind,  it  invades  the   streets  and  bursts  into  people’s  conversations,  as  if  its  presence  was  something  normal.  In   this  time  when  death  is  so  ordinary  that  it  becomes  part  of  the  landscape  and  words  don’t   become  deeds,  Brito  took  pictures  of  executed  corpses  abandoned  outside  the  city.  In  this   context,  so  different  from  today’s  image  of  violence,  he  portrays  these  lifeless  bodies  in  their   quest  for  the  solitude  of  death.  Fernado  Brito  tries  to  create  awareness  about  how  harsh  this   reality  actually  is,  and  about  the  enormous  impact  it  has  on  society.  His  images  do  not  get   carried  away  by  the  end  of  the  scene,  not  wallow  in  the  sleaze  of  the  murdered  body.  The   really  disturbing  point  of  his  pictures  is  the  clean,  quiet  and  distant  treatment.


Many thanks  for  everyone  who  have  collaborated  with  Instant  coffees.  You   also  can  follow  us  on  the  blog  instantcoffees.wordpress.com  and  facebook.

Instant Coffees. Session 5  
Instant Coffees. Session 5  

This is the result of the 5th edition. The photographers featured are Armando Ribeiro, Evgenia Arbugaeva, Fernando Brito, Dalia Khamissy, Da...

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