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JANUARY 17

S A C R A M E N T O ' S P R E M I E R F R E E C I T Y M O N T H LY

THE GRID

By Jose DiGregorio

THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & CULTURE IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL


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DiGregorio is a Sacramento artist and muralist whose work has shown all over the country. Visit

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THE GRID S A C R A M E N T O ' S P R E M I E R F R E E C I T Y M O N T H LY

By Jose DiGregorio

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END OF AN ERA

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CHOWDER IN ALL ITS GLORY

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TALENT RINK

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GOLD IN A GLASS

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EYING THE WATCHDOG

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NOD TO THE PAST

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TO DO THIS MONTH'S CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

40 Years of Singable Songs Raffi in Concert Saturday, Jan. 28, at 1 p.m. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St. 877-987-6487, ticketfly.com If you sang along to “Baby Beluga” (or sang it to your own little one), you probably have a special spot in your heart for beloved singer/songwriter Raffi. This exciting tour marks the 40th anniversary of the release of Raffi’s first (and still best-selling) album, “Singable Songs for the Very Young.” “It’s great fun singing for children and families,” Raffi says. “As well as singing many of my fans’ favorites, I look forward to sharing a song or two from my ‘Love Bug’ album and my new one, ‘Owl Singalong’—and to the sounds of all of us singing old favorites from my very first album!” In 2010, Raffi founded The Centre for Child Honouring on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. With the motto “Respecting Earth & Child,” the center is at the heart of a global movement that views honoring children as the best way to create sustainable, peacemaking societies. Proceeds from the Jan. 28 concert will benefit the center. For more information, go to childhonouring.org.

jL By Jessica Laskey Raffi will perform at Crest Theatre on Saturday, Jan. 28

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All Hail Horvitz “Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection” Jan. 22 through May 7 Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St. 808-1182, crockerart.org Early this year, the Crocker Art Museum will unveil three beautiful exhibitions focusing on Japanese and Japanese American art and culture. The first of these, “Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection,” highlights the diversity, creativity and technical virtuosity of 20th- and 21st-century ceramic artists working in Japan. Forty artists, including many of Japan’s greatest living ceramicists, will be represented by 75 works that range from tea vessels, biomorphic shapes, geometric design and sculptural forms that explore juxtaposed themes such as form and functionality, traditional and modern, national and international.

Double the Fun

This piece by Ogata Kamio is part of the exhibition of Japanese ceramics at Crocker. Photo courtesy of Randy Batista.

“Silk & Steel,” new works by Shirley Hazlett and William Ishmael Jan. 6 through Feb. 16 Opening reception on Friday, Jan. 6, from 6 to 9 p.m. Beatnik Studios, 723 S St. 400-4281, beatnik-studios.com Sacramento artists Shirley Hazlett and William Ishmael have cooked up something special for Beatnik Studios this month. Inspired by a recent collaboration this past fall for “William Ishmael and Friends” at Archival Gallery, Hazlett and Ishmael are building a new installation entitled “Silk & Steel,” which will feature Hazlett’s luxurious acrylic-on-silk paintings and Ishmael’s luminous steel panels.

If It Ain’t Baroque … Classical concert featuring Christina Mok and Miles Graber Sunday, Jan. 8 at 3 p.m. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St. 808-1182, crockerart.org Listen as the history of the European Baroque period comes to life through virtuoso violinist Christina Mok and pianist Miles Graber. The dynamic duo will present a program of complex and beautiful works by French, Italian and German composers who worked from 1600-1750. Known for her elegant phrasing and careful study of historic periods, Mok joins sought-after accompanist Graber for an afternoon of musical delights with works by JeanMarie Leclair, Arcangelo Corelli, and Johann Sebastian Bach. Space is limited and advance registration is recommended.

Bowie and Vivaldi Pop and classical concerts presented by the Sacramento Philharmonic and Opera “The Music of David Bowie: A Rock Symphony” Saturday, Jan. 14, at 8 p.m. Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” Saturday, Jan. 21, at 8 p.m. Community Center Theater, 1301 L St. 808-2000, sacphilopera.org Though David Bowie and Antonio Vivaldi might not exactly seem like two peas in a pod, the Sacramento Philharmonic and Opera is bringing these two music masters from different centuries to local audiences for two very fun, and very different, concerts. “The Music of David Bowie: A Rock Symphony” on Jan. 14 will be conducted by Brent Havens and will feature some of the late legend’s masterpieces. On Jan. 21, Andrés Cárdenes will both conduct and play violin for a program that includes Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” as well as Gioachino Rossini’s “Italiana in Algeri Overture” and Franz Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 101, “The Clock.”

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Enjoy the sounds of Sacramento Youth Symphony in concert this month

Baby, It’s Cold Outside “Artist Time Machine,” a Winter Camp for kids ages 6-9 Jan. 3-6, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St. crockerart.org It might be wintertime, but that doesn’t mean the fun has to stop until the warm weather returns. The Crocker’s Winter Camp will have kids time traveling through the galleries on a mission to investigate how artists have used shapes, colors and styles throughout history. Campers will learn new skills, create experimental works and imagine new art for the future with tons of tactile experience and games galore. The camp is $200 for members and $240 for nonmembers. Space is limited, so register now!

Young art lovers are sure to enjoy an art camp at Crocker

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Young and Talented Winter concerto concert presented by the Premier Orchestra of the Sacramento Youth Symphony Saturday, Jan. 28 at 7:30 p.m. Sacramento City College Performing Arts Center, 3835 Freeport Blvd. sacramentoyouthsymphony.org Curious what the future of music sounds like? Lend an ear when the winners of the Sacramento Youth Symphony’s annual concerto competition perform with the SYS Premier Orchestra under the direction of Michael Neumann. Winning violinist Rena Wang and winning clarinetist Omar Wahby will present works including Carl Maria von Weber’s “Concertino for Clarinet” and “Jubilee Overture,” Pablo de Sarasate’s “Zigeunerweisen,” Franz von Suppe’s “Light Cavalry Overture” and the finale from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s “Fourth Symphony.” The Sacramento Youth Symphony is proud to be celebrating 61 years of musical excellence by young musicians from the Sacramento region.

The Doctor Is In “Becoming Dr. Ruth,” a play by Mark St. Germain presented by the B Street Theatre Jan. 14 through Feb. 26 B Street Theatre, 2711 B St. 443-5300, bstreettheatre.org Everyone knows Dr. Ruth Westheimer from her career as a pioneering radio and television sex therapist. Few, however, know the incredible journey that preceded it. From fleeing the Nazis in the Kindertransport and joining the Haganah in Jerusalem as a sniper to her struggle to succeed as a single mother newly arrived in America, playwright St. Germain deftly illuminates this remarkable woman’s untold story. “Becoming Dr. Ruth” is filled with the humor, honesty and life-affirming spirit of Karola Ruth Siegel, the girl who became “Dr. Ruth,” America’s most famous sex therapist.

Shirley Hazlett is one of the artists featured at Beatnik Studios

An Affair to Remember “Betrayal,” a play by Harold Pinter presented by Capital Stage Jan. 25 through Feb. 26 Capital Stage Company, 2215 J St. 995-5464, capstage.org Emma and Jerry, former lovers, meet at a cafe in the present. Emma’s marriage to Jerry’s best friend, Robert, is falling apart and she seeks out Jerry’s consolation. From there, the play (which won playwright Pinter a Laurence Olivier Award) travels backward through time—from the end of Emma and Jerry’s affair to its beginning—and unearths the little lies and oblique remarks that reveal more than direct statements or overt actions ever could. Sacramento favorite Janis Stevens directs this fraught and intriguing drama. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com n Christina Mok will play at Crocker classical concert

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Trusting the Media

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he surprising election results last November proved that our country’s media seriously misjudged the political mood of the country. While this is hardly the first time that Americans were subject to inaccurate or misleading reporting and polling, it certainly seemed to be the most stunning example. Almost all the major newspapers, regardless of their political slant, endorsed the losing presidential candidate and confidentially predicted her win. The media is a huge basket that holds television, radio, print and social media, but my business interests tend to focus specifically on print and newspapers. Actor Denzel Washington recently slammed the media and repeated this quote from Mark Twain: “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you read the newspaper, you’re mis-informed.” A June 2016 study showed that only 20 percent of Americans are

SINKING AMERICAN CONFIDENCE IN NEWSPAPERS

CH By Cecily Hastings Publisher

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With our own focus on community news, featuring the most interesting people, places and events in our neighborhood, we strive to offer a local news source that is positive and fair.

confident in newspapers as a U.S. institution. This is an all-time low, marking the 10th consecutive year that more Americans express little or no, rather than high, confidence in the institution. The percentage of Americans expressing “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in newspapers has been dwindling since 2000, and the percentage expressing “very little” or “none” finally eclipsed it in 2007. One in five adults now says they have a great deal or quite a lot of confidence in newspapers—the all-time low for newspapers in Gallup’s polling dating back to 1973. An additional 42 percent of adults say they have “some” confidence, meaning that the institution still sparks at least a measure of confidence in a majority of Americans. Confidence in newspapers among both left- and right-leaning groups has also fallen over the past 16 years. Historically, Gallup found that Democrats are more likely than Republicans to have a significantly better view of newspapers. I would conclude that this is most likely because the majority of major newspapers slant left editorially. This is the first year, however, that Democrats’ confidence is no longer net positive: 27 percent have little or no confidence in newspapers, slightly exceeding the 25 percent saying they have a great deal or quite a lot of

confidence. By contrast, Republicans’ views toward the institution have been tilting negative since 2004. Surprisingly, young adults aged 18 to 34 have consistently been the most positive of all age groups about newspapers as an institution. My guess is that the younger folks who have grown up with the internet as a news source may see the benefit from a serious, even if traditional, news filter to the exploding amount of information available on the internet. But to be fair, the decline in public confidence in newspapers since 2000 is also part of a larger pattern of decline in Americans’ confidence in all U.S. institutions. The public tends to place the most confidence in the military, small business, the police and organized religion, which rank in the top 4. Of the 15 institutions Gallup tracks, television news ranks 13th, while newspapers are 14th. The only ones that rank worse are big business and Congress. However, since 2000, confidence in newspapers has fallen more steeply than the average of 15 institutions Gallup has tracked annually since 1993. While average confidence across all 15 institutions fell from 40 percent in 2000 to 32 percent the past two years, confidence in newspapers fell from 37 percent to 20 percent over the same period. The public’s mood over the past 16 years has been something of a

whirlpool, pulling newspapers down across the country at alarming rates. The rise of digital media could be a factor in the declining trust we place in a traditional print medium such as newspapers. But perhaps more importantly, newspapers are suffering from the broader decline Gallup sees in Americans’ trust in the mass media in general. With the ever increasingly rapid news cycle, there seems to be the need to be first over the need for accuracy or truth. When a terrible situation occurs, I make myself say a prayer for those involved, then wait some time before reading what is usually more accurate reporting about it. I gave up a long time ago on television as a serious news source. Given my love of the printed word, I get most of my news from reading newspapers, either online with The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, or in print with The Sacramento Bee. (My husband’s daily crossword ensures we never stop our print subscription.) I am constantly reminded, reading about the same issue in these three different newspapers, how differently the reporting of stories is slanted politically. So with trust in the media at an all-time low, is it any wonder we retreat to news sources that reflect our values? With our own focus on community news, featuring the most interesting

people, places and events in our neighborhood, we strive to offer a local news source that is positive and fair. Only a few of our columnists are tasked to analyze controversial topics each month. And we are always open to alternative views voicing other opinions. I do hear occasional grumbling, mostly from elected officials, and we always ask them to respond in writing. But they rarely follow through. Will the media in our country ever recover its status? I’m sad to say I don’t hold out a great deal of hope. All we can do is something my mother used to tell me about gossip: Consider the source.

PET RESCUE ANGEL Congratulations to Kim PaciniHauch, who stepped up big time late last year to generously underwrite the cost of all pet adoptions from the city’s Front Street Animal Shelter during December. The response was overwhelming and the donation was thoughtful and inspiring. Kim can start the new year knowing she has brought joy to hundreds and hundreds of appreciative families with her kind gesture. Bless you, Kim! Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidepublications.com n

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R Street is a vibrant part of the central city

Alan Honda opened Megami Bento-Ya in 1983

End of an Era MEGAMI’S CLOSURE A SIGN OF A CHANGING DOWNTOWN

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ith exciting restaurants popping up all over Sacramento’s grid, it’s easy to miss when a small restaurant closes its doors. So you may not have heard the news that Megami Bento-Ya on 10th Street is set to close sometime soon. By some estimates, more than 30 new restaurants will open in the downtown area over the next year. That’s on top of recently opened restaurants in Midtown, East Sac, along R Street and throughout the city. These restaurants have unique concepts, cuisines and styles. They often bank on Sacramento’s farm-tofork movement but definitely strive for the sort of sophistication seen in major cities. They want to serve a

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growing residential crowd and lure suburbanites back to the city core. Until the last decade or so, Sacramento was pretty much a government town. Some downtown restaurants served the political elite who dined and drank while making deals in smoky backrooms. Other restaurants, like Megami, served mostly government workers who had only an hour for lunch and wanted good food, good prices and fast service. Alan Honda opened Megami BentoYa in 1983. (His parents opened the original Megami on Florin Road in 1976.) Honda’s mom and his wife, Judy, are integral to the restaurant’s operations and success. Megami is a family affair. Its customers have always been treated as family, too.

The small restaurant serves Japanese food buffet style. Honda learned his craft from his parents and from working at House of Genji in San Jose and later at a hofbrau. Judy comes in to help, although she has a full-time job with the post office. Honda’s 87-year-old mother also helps out. “Mom is a tough woman and comes in to whip us into shape,” DOWNTOWN page 16

SC By Scot Crocker


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LAUGHINGLY, HONDA SAYS HE’S TIRED AND NEEDS TO SLOW DOWN. FOR HIM, THAT MEANS A MANAGEABLE EIGHT-HOUR DAY.

DOWNTOWN FROM page 14 Honda says. “And Judy is a hard worker, often working a full shift at the restaurant and another eight hours at the post office.” “We’ve had a lot of good customers who became good friends over the years,” says the 61-year-old Honda. “But I think it’s time for something new. I work almost 70 hours a week.” Honda is a modest man who jokingly says he is a lousy businessperson. But he’s been on the cutting edge, whether he knows it or not. He developed his own sauces for comfort foods like sesame chicken and teriyaki. He offers ramen bowls at extremely affordable prices. Tucked on the corner of a serving area are bottles of booze for those who want a cocktail. His loyal customers come in droves for lunch and dinner. Honda works behind the counter every day, serving sushi and other Japanese food. While most restaurants thrive on the weekends, Megami is closed, an acknowledgement that its customer base is made up of government workers from City Hall and the State Capitol. Honda has endured some difficult times. He kept the restaurant going in a construction zone when The Citizen Hotel was being built next door. Then

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came the Great Recession, which resulted in furloughed employees and a significant drop in business. “It’s been tough at times,” he says. “We manage to make it, but times are changing. I’d need to make a big investment to remodel the place and keep it going. I’d need to hire more people and be open seven days a week, too.” Honda says customers keep coming in to ask when he’ll close. No date has been set as he works through some issues with his landlord, but he expects to be closed before the end of 2016. His location will likely be taken over by Melissa and Tyler Williams, who own and operate Tank House restaurant and The Jungle Bird tiki bar, both on J Street. The easygoing Honda seems a bit sad at having to close Megami. He recognizes the opportunities for downtown businesses with the arrival of Golden 1 Arena and other developments. But he’s excited about his future. Laughingly, Honda says he’s tired and needs to slow down. For him, that means a manageable eight-hour day. While he says he might retire, that seems doubtful.

“Maybe I’ll drive for Uber,” he says. “I could do that.” Honda has other, more serious ideas. “I’ve been thinking about a food truck and taking my food on the road,” he says. “I’ve also had some people approach me about

bottling and marketing my sauces. That sounds interesting.” Scot Crocker can be reached at scot@crockercrocker.com n


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Chowder in All Its Glory WELL-MADE SOUP SHINES AT RIO CITY AND ELSEWHERE

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n my nearly 40 years of living in Sacramento, the term “riverside dining” has rarely been a signifier of great cuisine. Restaurants have come and gone on the banks of the Sacramento and the American, and few have left a mark on the sandy shores of our city’s aquatic arteries. Sure, there’s the riverside party patio that is Swabbies on the River. It’s known for good bands and decent fish tacos. There’s the seasonal, floating berth-of-fun, Crawdads. They’ve good bloody marys and tasty fried dishes. There were old riverside haunts like The Rusty Duck and Hungry Hunter, beloved more for their hulking presence than the quality of cuisine. A quiet player in the riverside dining arena, though, is Rio City Cafe. A bit dwarfed by its brash next-door neighbor, Joe’s Crab Shack, Rio

GS By Greg Sabin

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My grandfather, who spent many good years of his life working in the restaurant industry in New England, would have recognized every flavor, every texture.

City has been a fixture on the Old Sacramento riverbank for more than 20 years. A recent lunch there was cozy and memorable. Tucked away next to a flickering fireplace, with a view of the slowly running winter river, I was enchanted. The food was solid and enjoyable, a better-than-average offering being the brisket tacos, which had southwest flair and smoky punch. The revelation, however, was the clam chowder. I’d forgotten how much I liked clam chowder. It took Rio City’s near-perfect rendition of this commonplace consumable to make me into a bowl-scraping, bread-swiping, spoon-licking fool. Truly it was something special. There are no hip ingredients, no exotic additions. My grandfather, who spent many good years of his life working in the restaurant industry in New England, would have recognized every flavor, every texture (save for the sourdough bread bowl, which is particularly San Franciscan). What makes this chowder so good, then? For me, it’s the balance: neither too thick nor too thin, neither too

creamy nor too briny, neither laden with potatoes and other vegetables nor smooth and uniform. It is a benchmark bowl of chowder. This got me thinking: Who else in town serves a fine bowl of chowder that warms up the soul on a cold winter’s day? Here are a few spots you might want to check out. Rio City Cafe is at 1110 Front St.; 442-8226, riocitycafe.com

ON THE GRID Jamie’s Broadway Grille: Jamie’s chowder almost crosses the line of being too creamy—almost. It’s dairy forward and stuffed with more bacon than clams, which purists might object to, but not strenuously. Served with a half sandwich, it’s a great lunch or dinner. Bonus points for being served in a coffee mug. Jamie’s Broadway Grill is at 427 Broadway; 442-4044; jamiesbroadwaygrille.com Blackbird Kitchen + Beer Gallery: Blackbird’s “Captain’s Chowder” wanders a bit off the

well-trodden chowder path, but it’s still a thing of beauty. Start with smoked cream, salmon and a host of shellfish and you’ve got an interesting, addictively flavorful bowl. The $15 price tag is a bit high, but the $7 happy hour special is right on the money. Blackbird Kitchen + Beer Gallery is at 1015 9th St.; 498-9224; blackbirdkitchen.com

either. Plump whole clams ride along in the chowder with a well-cooked trio of onions, celery and carrots. The seasoning is spot-on, and the flavors are just on the creamy side of briny. All in all, a total and utter treat. Evan’s Kitchen is at 855 57th St.; 452-3896; chefevan.com

Coconut’s Fish Cafe: This new Hawaiian export does things in a distinctly island fashion. The chowder starts with a New England base, then gets brought to the Pacific with the addition of ono, mahi-mahi, clams, garlic and mushrooms. It’s got an intense fish flavor delivered by a boatload of seafood. No skimping on the ocean’s bounty here. Coconut’s Fish Cafe is at 1420 16th St.; 440-0449; coconutsfishcafe.com

Fins Market & Grill: Befitting a fish market, Fins’ chowder is straightforward and classic. Full of fresh, chewy clams and potatoes, this bowl of chowder is as standard as it gets. Fins is also one of the few restaurants in the area to offer Manhattan-style clam chowder, which is neither a chowder nor from Manhattan. But that’s an argument to be had another day. Fins Market & Grill is at 2610 Fair Oaks Blvd.; 488-5200; finsmarket.com (other locations in Roseville and Fair Oaks)

EAST SACRAMENTO Evan’s Kitchen: Served only on Fridays, in the old-school Catholic fashion, Evan’s chowder is thick and satisfying. No chopped clams here,

ARDEN ARCADE

Greg Sabin can be reached at gregsabin@hotmail.com n

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Talent Rink NEW SPACE WILL HOST ‘THE VOICE’-STYLE COMPETITION

JV By Jordan Venema

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I

n 1954, championship roller skater Dorothy “Dotti” Lane purchased Senator Roller Drome at 1031 Del Paso Blvd. in North Sacramento. Its doors would close in 1974, but during those 20 years, Dotti trained many state and national champions, and Senator Roller Drome became one of the largest competitive roller-skating clubs in California. Long vacant, the 90-year-old building has lost some of its luster, but Elk Grove resident and developer Greg Kennedy has been renovating the roller drome into a studio and performance space for musicians that will open in early 2017. The new venture will bring back the old spirit of competition that existed during the Roller Drome’s heyday, but with a new name and twist. The Rink Studios is more than a studio space; Kennedy envisions it as a music incubator for local musicians that will offer a potentially international audience through livestreaming online.

Kennedy admits the idea behind The Rink Studios has broadened in scope since he first began searching for a rehearsal space for his band, The Refurbs, which performs covers of “everything from Billie Holiday to Billy Idol,” he says. “When I was in high school and college, I played in garage bands here or there. When I started getting back into music a few years ago, I decided that I’m too fussy to play in a garage or somebody’s living room,” he explains. Also, Kennedy chuckles, “when my band started playing in my living room, it was annoying to my wife.” In a roundabout way, then, aspiring Sacramento musicians can thank Kennedy’s wife for inspiring him to start the hunt for the building that would become The Rink Studios. The Rink Studios will rent out 15 rehearsal, recording, teaching and “all-purpose” studio spaces. “Even though this isn’t really being advertised except by word of


Developer Greg Kennedy plans on turning Roller Drome into The Rink Studios. Photos courtesy of Jenn Bartell Photography.

mouth, people are already in line,” says Kennedy. The venue will also offer opportunities to educate those interested in nonperforming aspects of music, such as sound engineering, performance and recording production. “We started thinking about things like recording,” he explains. “Hopefully we will be able to generate some decent performance groups from the rehearsal studios by giving them input on how to set up a PA system, or how to work together as a group.” While studio spaces will draw local musicians looking for a place to jam, record or store their instruments, The Rink Studios will also invite music lovers to attend live performances held on the rink’s original floor, which was built in 1926. Kennedy says the venue will accommodate up to 500 standing and 300 seated people. The stage will be open for Tuesdaynight performances for local bands,

and Mondays will be a free movie night open to the community. But the biggest draw at The Rink Studios is a live-performance competition that operates on a similar model to popular reality shows like “American Idol” and “The Voice.” The plan is to have 50 winners a year who will be invited to perform live at The Rink Studios. Using professional audio and video, the performance will be streamed live on The Rink Studio’s website and Facebook page, directly connecting musicians with a national or even international audience while also bridging the gap between the music industry and talent. Submissions will be accepted through The Rink Studio’s website, and winners will be decided by which songs receive the most clicks by an Internet audience. Competitors’ songs will be placed on more than 150 global digital music platforms. The competition will not be limited to Sacramento bands. But the winning

Young Greg Kennedy on the drums

performance will take place at The Rink Studios, with plans underway to build other Rink Studios in Denver, Seattle and potentially other cities. Remodeling of the building is nearly complete, and Kennedy says the tentative opening date is Jan. 18. He is not prepared to announce what the opening night will look like, but it will include live performances. “Oh yeah, it’s going to be a part. We’ll have some performers with draw,” he says. Kennedy knows that whatever shot he had at becoming a famous musician is behind him, but he wants

The Rink Studios to be an avenue to give young musical artists a shot. “The focus really is on the younger musicians,” he says. “Groups like mine, old-fart musicians, we’re beyond the stage where we’re going to make it big. But there are a lot of good musicians around Sacramento. Maybe we can find somebody who has some real talent.” For more information, go to therinkstudios.com Jordan Venema can be reached at jordan.venema@gmail.com n

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GOLD IN A GLASS I MAKING CIDER WITH LOCAL PEARS AND APPLES IS THIS DUO’S PASSION

AK By Angela Knight

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pass slow-rolling tractors and lots of dusty grapevines on my way to Lockeford, a tiny town in San Joaquin County. Behind the old Tuscan Wine Village, business partners Sarah Hemly and Chris Thomson are pressing the freshly picked pears and apples that will go into their next batch of cider. The previous day, they were up doing the same until 1 a.m., probably listening to Journey or Toto—Thomson’s choice in music. Fifteen-hour days are the norm in late fall when the fruit is ripe. They’ll barrel through tons of the stuff before they’re finished with the harvest. Sarah Hemly’s hands and hair are sticky. Juice from the fruit dries as hard as hairspray. She’s wearing a pair of no-nonsense rubber boots. Thomson is sporting a shirt that says, “Pears well with everything.” They look exhausted but seem excited. “We make cider not for the craft of cider

but for the enjoyment of it,” Thomson says. They assure me the long hours are worth it because they know they’re making cider the right way. Hemly Cider is a partnership between Sarah Hemly, Thomson and Greene & Hemly, a sixth-generation organic pear and apple farm. The fruit in Hemly Cider comes from the farm’s trees, some more than a century old, located in Courtland. Matt Hemly, Sarah’s husband, manages the orchard operations. Before it becomes cider, the fruit has to be ground down, pressed and fermented in large stainless steel containers. Just about everything is done by hand. The Hemly Cider website contains a riff (“orchard to bottle”) on the familiar farm-to-fork theme, but there’s time and work packed into that phrase. About 10 years ago, Sarah and Matt Hemly traveled to various places, tasting cider along the way.


She wanted to find the best beverage to showcase the family’s pears. They settled on more of a traditional English-style cider, which is drier he than ciders made in the United States and has a slightly higher alcohol content. When Hemly Cider first launched in late 2015, the partners thought they ast had enough cider to last until the next harvest,, but the phone started ringing a few months ago. They’d run out of product and people wanted more, which is a good problem to have. If you ask Sarah, Hemly Cider really began about the time n gold was discovered in California, when one of Matt’s ancestors purchased land in the Delta and planted pearr trees in the rich soil. Fast-forward many

years later. She and Thomson met through one of her dad’s friends. They connected via Skype and bonded g y and a shared appreciation over rugby cider for cider. Sarah grew up in Fair Oaks and went to school in Berkeley, where she played be rugby before injuries sideline her. While sidelined Thom Thomson is still crazy about the sport, he’s had a few too many injuries as w well and recently sw switched to playing Au Australian football. In the fall, Thomson m makes the long journey fro his home in from H Hobart, Tasmania (of (often referred to as “Tassie,” but he pronounces it “T “Tazzie”), which he sh shares with his wife an young son, to the and Un United States. Back ho home in Hobart, he t head distiller is the FARM page 24

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“WE MAKE CIDER NOT FOR THE CRAFT OF CIDER BUT FOR THE ENJOYMENT OF IT.”

FARM FROM page 23 at Lark Distillery and Forty Spotted Gin. Here, he spends many hours helping Sarah process tons of pears and apples. As you might imagine, Hemly Cider tastes like pears. Apples are tossed in for balance. The result is a light, effervescent and oaky (but not too oaky) cider, which looks like gold in my glass. Even better? It has half the calories of a glass of wine and contains about 5 percent alcohol. I could spend the rest of the afternoon al fresco, sipping cider, listening to Thomson’s Australian accent, a frog making a ruckus somewhere close by, and Sarah’s dry delivery. Then there’s the banter. She fondly refers to Thomson as the “crazy Tasmanian,” while Thomson teases her about the chocolate bunny cereal she offered him for breakfast. They are both looking forward to taking time off tomorrow night when they’ll attend a Kings game. Thomson became a fan a few months ago. After the cider ferments, after Thomson travels back home to Hobart, after driving to the facilities in Lockeford to test the cider every day, after bottling, Sarah Hemly plans to borrow a neighboring business’s labeling machine, and the next batch of Hemly Cider will roll off the line. For more information, visit hemlycider.com Angela Knight can be reached at knight@mcn.org n Sarah Hemly and Chris Thomson

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Eying the Watchdog A CHALLENGE TO CITY HALL CHALLENGERS

A

n open secret at Sacramento City Hall—or any room where elected officials gather to cast votes—is how little weight is given to public comments. From a policy standpoint, those heartfelt remarks made by common citizens each Tuesday night at city council meetings mean nothing. The board listens politely, then ratifies decisions that were predetermined hours if not weeks prior. Councilmembers view public commentary as a necessary evil, required by law and tradition but secondary to the serious business of orchestrating the city’s course. Prominent within the category of public commentators is a group called Eye on Sacramento. For years, the Eye and its members—a group of people who could comfortably fit around a dinner table—have been showing up at City Hall, demanding their two minutes and weighing in on substantive issues under consideration by the council. The Eye’s sweet spot is tax money and the squandering of same. The Eye has discovered significant waste. When I began working at City Hall as special assistant to Mayor Kevin Johnson in 2009, nobody took the Eye seriously. Part of my job was to attend council meetings and text the mayor about what was going on in the gallery. I got to know City Hall

RG By R.E. Graswich

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Sarah Foster, Lisa Garcia, Craig Powell, Greg Thompson and Anna Robertson

regulars, folks who showed up every week. Among them was Craig Powell, the Eye’s indefatigable leader. I enjoyed listening as Powell and his friends respectfully challenged the council on wasteful practices in public works and other departments. Powell was trained as an attorney, and while he doesn’t practice law, he has perfected a soothing, logical delivery worthy of courtroom summations. He’s persuasive and fun to watch. Later, working with the crew at Inside Publications, where Powell writes a column, I got to know him better. While I don’t always agree

with Powell and Eye on Sacramento, I admire the group’s tenacity and purpose. They are a public asset. The Eye rummages through City Hall budgets and staff reports, prepares dissenting arguments and posts conclusions on the web. Whistleblowers are treasured. The Eye sends out press releases to draw attention to itself and keep city staff and councilmembers accountable. In recent years, local TV stations and The Bee began to quote directly from the Eye’s reports. This would not have happened a decade ago, when news organizations had larger

and more robust staffs. Back then, the Eye was a tip sheet at best. These days, it’s easier for shortstaffed media to pick up the Eye’s reports and turn them around as completed stories, using sentences that say, “According to a report from the watchdog group Eye on Sacramento ...” This is bad news for City Hall. Suddenly, city government has a few presumptive, determined citizens who transcend the open-mic atmosphere at Tuesday-night council meetings and vault ahead with credibility certified by traditional media.


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animal companionship The Eye became a real watchdog once local media realized they could beg rides on the group’s legwork and conclusions. Which brings us to City Councilmember Jay Schenirer. This holiday season, Schenirer catapulted the Eye into the major leagues of credibility by threatening to pry open the group’s membership roster and donation ledgers. In an incredibly peevish move (and I happen to like Schenirer), the councilmember argued that since the Eye was nagging City Hall with requests for information, City Hall should do the same to the Eye, only worse. Schenirer thus certified Powell and friends as worthy adversaries of City Hall. With his heavy-handedness, Schenirer encouraged residents across the community to presume the opposite of the councilman’s intent: If a city councilmember is trying to bully these guys, they must be onto something. The Eye ran with Schenirer’s gift. Paul Boylan, a lawyer representing the Eye, fired off a letter bursting

with legal invective and warning Schenirer of dire consequences for harassment. Quickly, the councilmember backed down. He tried to dismiss the matter as an overblown tempest. His fellow council mates abandoned him. “A councilmember’s harassment could have had a chilling effect on our whistleblowers inside City Hall and our fundraising,” Powell says, underscoring how some of the Eye’s juiciest material comes from city staff. Had Schenirer been less sensitive, he might have taken another approach. He could have publicly thanked the Eye, applauded its passion for citizen advocacy and promised to support future Eye reports, if only to make them less subjective or flawed. Flattery can work wonders, even with watchdogs. The real lesson here is something no city councilmember or new mayor should ever forget: Silly as it seems, it pays to listen to the little guy. R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com n

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Nod to the Past

AN EAST SAC HOME GETS A HISTORICALLY SENSITIVE MAKEOVER

C

hris and Amy Cookson spent five years looking for a new house. With a growing family, they knew they would need more space than their home on 47th Street provided. While looking at a house on 44th Street, Chris noticed a For Sale sign on another home down the street, a stately blue Colonial Revival. Cookson knew right away it was the perfect home for his family. Chris

jF By Julie Foster

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and Amy both harbor an affection for older homes and loved their East Sacramento neighborhood. “I really wanted that house,” he says. The couple purchased the house in April 2014, the day Amy found out she was pregnant. “We loved the house right away,” Amy says. “We even kept the blue color. Everyone in the neighborhood knew it as the Blue House.” The 3,700-square-foot house originally had four bedrooms and one bath. The building permit, issued in 1922, estimated the house’s cost at $8,750. According to California Resources Agency records, it was built by William J. Rooney, office manager

for Wright & Kimbrough Company, a notable real estate firm. Because Chris had grown up doing construction, he understood what would be necessary to modernize the house. Though structurally sound, it had never had a complete makeover. Following 14 months of construction, the family moved in in July 2015. During the process, the entire house was taken down to the studs. Major changes included adding a first-floor bathroom and mudroom next to the kitchen. The couple retained the original wood flooring upstairs but replaced worn flooring downstairs. They reconfigured the bedrooms and added three full bathrooms and a laundry room. They replaced the broken panes in the fan-shaped

window over the front door and repainted the exterior shutters. They finished off the basement into a play room for their children and are now working on creating a wine cellar. By taking down the sunroom on the first floor and building up the foundation, they were able to add a bedroom on the second floor. Their backyard was given new life with a design by local landscape architect David Gibson. The kidfriendly yard now sports a saltwater pool with a wall fountain, blue-slate patio and lots of grass for the kids to run on barefoot. When the couple submitted their plans to the city during the permitting process, they got a surprise. The city suggested they submit their home for


WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME PLANNING OUT WHAT WE WANTED AND MADE SURE IT FIT THE HISTORIC STYLE OF THE HOUSE.

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inclusion on the Sacramento Register of Historic and Cultural Resources. Working with the city was positive experience. The resources provided by the city staff ensured the couple was not overwhelmed during the process. “The city was really good,” Chris says. “They wanted to keep it as a historic structure, but they also realized that a family would be living here.” One reason the couple loved the house so much was the amount of light provided by floor-to-ceiling windows in most of the rooms. The couple kept all the old windows and had them refurbished so they functioned properly. When they approached craftsmen in town, all declined, saying the job required too much work and time. They ended up getting much-needed help from a family member: Chris’ father, Larry Riggs, who is retired from the construction business. “My dad, I can’t leave him out of this,” Chris explains. “He drove down every couple of weeks, took out the windows and redid all the weights and roping. He found old, wavy glass to replace broken panes. It was very time consuming. We couldn’t have done it without him.” The Cooksons expressed nothing but praise for their construction and design team: Martha Lewis of Lewis Custom Classics and designer Chris Merenda-Axtell. Amy stressed the importance of research and planning when considering the remodel of an older home. “We spent a lot of time planning out what we wanted and made sure it fit the historic style of the house,” she explains. “ It’s best to go into a project loving the house before the construction begins. By picking a style of home you like, there will be fewer changes required.” If you know of a home that you think should be featured in Inside Publications, contact Julie Foster at foster.julie91@yahoo.com n

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BRINGING T HE A RT S C O M M UNITY TOGETHER

Ed Goldman and William Ishmael Y

o ou’ve heard that it takes a v village—to raise a child, to make a community great—and that’s m never more true than at Blue Line Arts, th the nonprofit arts group that was founde more than 50 years ago in founded Rosevi Roseville and has grown over the past few ye years into one of the most respected organ organizations in Northern California for show showcasing the work of regional and natio national artists. “I accepted the presidency of the b board of Blue Line in 2015 on prov provision that the group start to mar market itself as the regional gallery it re really is,” explains Ed Goldman, who served on the board of Blue Line

for four years and just stepped down after two back-to-back terms as its board president. (You may know him as a columnist for Sacramento Business Journal. He’s also—full disclosure—this writer’s dad.) “The gallery is not just Roseville-centric—we exhibit artists from all over the world.” This will be the third year in a row that Blue Line has hosted the Crocker-Kingsley Art Competition, a biennial national juried art show started in 1940. The organization further cemented its role in the arts community when it acquired Arts & Business Council of the Sacramento Region in 2015, a move that allowed certain programs to continue as a division of Blue Line. O One such program is

Ed Goldman

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William Ishm a

el


Prelude to the Season, which bestows awards recognizing local leadership in categories like arts journalism, arts philanthropy, arts management and arts/business partnerships. Though the event took a two-year hiatus after Blue Line acquired the council, it will return this year on Jan. 25 as Interlude ART. “Because the event won’t take place in September (like it used to), we decided to call it an interlude instead of a prelude,” Goldman explains. Held in the ballroom at Sacramento State University, Interlude ART will bring together members of the business community, arts organizations and artists from the counties of El Dorado, Placer,

of William Ishmael. William has been the most instrumental in expanding the base of nominees and adding new, more relevant categories for awards and organizing and meeting with the selection panel. He’s been pretty tireless.” Ishmael, a longtime member of the Blue Line board, is an artist best known for his watercolor landscapes and large abstracts using natural elements. “We (at Blue Line) are becoming a truly regional organization, but we’re very sensitive to and aware of our deep and wide support in Placer County,” says Ishmael. “It truly does take a village. Ed Goldman and Tony Natsoulas have been huge in making all the new initiatives

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“THE GALLERY IS NOT JUST ROSEVILLE-CENTRIC—WE EXHIBIT ARTISTS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD.” Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo and Yuba in an intimate cocktail setting. “The nice thing about Interlude this year is that we’ve actively invited nominations from the sixcounty region,” says Goldman, who has served as the president of the board of Arts & Business Council and Sacramento Theatre Company and as a member of the board of Capital Stage, Discovery Museum, the Sacramento Philharmonic and WEAVE, among others. “That’s always been the goal of the event, but it’s never been as clear as it is this year—and that’s thanks to the work

happen. Ed initiated and facilitated the acquisition of the Arts & Business Council and served as president for the last two transitional and newly formative years. Tony used his wide network to bring in artists from not only the region but throughout the nation to exhibit. And Dani Whitmore, our new executive director, is the person for our time. Blue Line’s time is now!” Interlude ART takes place on Wednesday, Jan. 25, at Sacramento State University. For tickets and more information, visit bluelinearts.org n

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Filling the Seats NEW WAY OF SELLING TICKETS COULD SOLVE THE EMPTY-THEATER PROBLEM

T

he guardians of Sacramento’s cultural universe are ready to speak loudly with your tax dollars. City officials will soon begin to shovel $83.4 million toward a remodeled Community Center Theater. Another $16.4 million will go toward upgrades at Memorial Auditorium. To help pay for it all, the city hopes to clear $20 million in a naming rights deal that has yet to materialize. The plan will turn a public cultural center into a billboard. If history predicts outcome, Sacramento’s grand theatrical ambitions around 14th and J streets may fall short. The city will spend massive amounts of money on an expanded convention center and improved theater and auditorium but nothing much will change. The problem is the execution.

RG By R.E. Graswich

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For years, scarce bookings have been a way of life for Memorial Auditorium and the Community Center Theater. The buildings are dark far too many evenings. People in the local arts community have various opinions on why the city’s performance centers perform so poorly. Some note lousy acoustics in both the auditorium and theater— uneven sound qualities that make promoters and artists avoid booking the stages. Others cite the city’s strict labor mandates: Services such as staging and janitorial must be filled by unionized help, raising a promoter’s costs. But there’s another explanation for the city’s inability to book heavy calendars at downtown stages. It involves the city’s passive approach to chasing after theatrical attractions and coaxing them to Sacramento. Basically, Sacramento doesn’t chase anyone. We make our presence known and wait for

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14 California Craft Beers 60 Tequilas 20 Vodkas promoters to call and inquire about stage availability. When promoters call, the city offers them a price sheet for rent, security, janitorial, stagehands and other services. And when promoters don’t call, oh well. The stages stay dark. The alternative to the city’s passive strategy is something called the “presenter” model. This is where a promoter obtains booking rights for the city’s theatrical inventory. The presenter becomes a booking agent, signing acts, marketing shows and selling tickets. If audiences respond and fill seats, the presenter makes money. If not, the presenter has only the mirror to blame. Given that an empty theater means zero income for a presenter, people in the industry tend to devote significant energies toward making sure theaters get filled. There are many examples of the presenter model at work around Sacramento. At Golden 1 Center, the Kings serve as presenters with Live Nation, a global promoter with connections to hundreds of performers, including many of the biggest names in show business. They keep the arena busy. A smaller example is Ace of Spades entertainment hall on R Street. Live

Nation fills the place with acts not mainstream enough for an arena. Sacramento authorities are finally ready to explore the presenter model, but only at Memorial Auditorium. After years of watching promoters take shows to regional halls such as UC Davis’ Mondavi Center or the smaller Harris Center at Folsom Lake College, the city will ask presenters to bid on promotional rights at the circa-1926 auditorium, which will be upgraded for the 2019 season. The city hopes the presenter model will help cover the $16.2 million rehab at Memorial. Even then, Sacramento will need the $20 million naming rights deal to make the entire convention center and Community Center Theater project pencil out. While nothing has happened yet, city officials say the presenter model could include the rehabbed theater at 13th and L streets. A naming rights partner may insist on it. “We haven’t proposed any changes for operation of the CCT and there haven’t been any discussions to date. That doesn’t preclude future consideration of that idea,” says Fran Halbakken, project chief for the city. The presenter model might seem like an obvious fix for Sacramento’s problem of dark nights at Memorial

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Auditorium and the Community Center Theater. But it’s not obvious to everyone. Richard Lewis, CEO of California Musical Theatre, which presents the Music Circus and Broadway Sacramento series, is OK with testing the presenter model at the auditorium, but he doesn’t believe it’s good for the theater. Lewis spends about $800,000 each year renting the theater for his six-show Broadway series. He likes things as they are. “It introduces a profit motive into the process, and that’s something the city has to be very careful about getting involved with in a publicly owned building,” Lewis says. “City staff is great to work with, and they’ve done an excellent job operating the theater.” To pay for a new arts and convention center, the city will enter a new world—a racket filled with showbiz promoters. It won’t fly without a naming rights deal and a strategy to fill those seats.

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Rock Star Organist

HE’S BEEN COMPARED TO JIMI HENDRIX

BY PETER ANDERSON

D

avid Link, the longtime organist and choir director at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Midtown, was once called the Jimi Hendrix of pipe organs. At 61, he looks about as much like Jimi

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Hendrix as a pipe organ resembles an electric guitar. When asked how he earned that unlikely nickname, he laughs and says, “Believe me, it didn’t come from me! A few years ago, after I played an especially rousing and bombastic piece on the organ during the Easter Vigil (‘Pim’s Toccata’ by

Englishman Alan Wilson), a very enthused teenage boy rushed up to me and exclaimed, ‘Wow, dude! You must be the Jimi Hendrix of pipe organs!’ ” Link, who has been at Trinity Cathedral since 1984, is the longest tenured employee of the church and one of the most highly regarded. Says

Lynell Walker, a canon pastor who has worked with the organist for 22 years, “I can’t speak much about the Jimi Hendrix comment—my mother was a highly professional flautist in Los Angeles, and we didn’t listen to pop or rock music. But I can tell you this about David: When he plays, it


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Looking Cool and Seeing Well Optometry Clinic specializing in family eye care including infants and children

706 56th St. #100 (Near H & 56th)

316.5772 •articleconsignment.com Mon 12 - 6; Tues/Wed 9 - 6; Thurs/Fri 9 - 7; Sat 10 - 6 sets your heart in motion. You realize instantly that the person making the music is someone of great faith. “What he has is a profound gift— not a technical or keyboard skill, but a very special gift that springs from the soul. This is a man on a very active spiritual journey. He often leads us in prayer during staff meetings, those tedious hours when our minds get in the way, when you can’t think your way to God. In his music and in his words, David is sacramental and sensual, and he cuts a path straight from your soul to God’s ears.” The musical program at Trinity has always been dear to the parishioners’ hearts. It is a happily singing congregation. Parish administrator and operations manager Jerry Pare says, “Trinity worshippers are absolutely passionate about their singing, and they find David wonderful to work with. He oversees the Children’s Choir, the Celebration Choir and the Cathedral Choir. I think David’s success stems from the fact that he avoids the political realm of church business. His work and

3315 Folsom Blvd

246-8111 EyesOfEastSac.com

happy with the niche he has carved for himself. “It’s uncanny,” he says, “the chemistry that the people have

I CAN TELL YOU THIS ABOUT

created with me. When I play, the people instinctually know when to

DAVID: WHEN HE PLAYS, IT SETS

join in, unlike many congregations that experience awkward start-and-

YOUR HEART IN MOTION. YOU

stop interplays with the organist. Something about Trinity: It’s just

REALIZE INSTANTLY THAT THE

mad for singing as a way to reach God. “

PERSON MAKING THE MUSIC IS

Church volunteer Susan Bush, who’s been answering phones for 10

SOMEONE OF GREAT FAITH.

years, loves the fact that Link allows regular parishioners like her to join in during choir practice. “It creates such a great feeling of community,” she says, “to just stop what you’re doing in the office and participate

leadership cut straight to the heart of why people worship: They want to feel good in their faith, and singing robustly and freely with his uplifting musical ability gets them out of their heads and into their souls. David is a very upbeat guy. He balances his hard work with his two avocations, biking

and wilderness camping, both of which refresh his musical ministry.”

with more polished choir members in

Link views his position at Trinity

are a parish alive with music, thanks

these wonderfully upbeat hymns. We

as the perfect culmination of a

to David Link.”

lifetime of organ playing throughout Sacramento. He used to play at First Christian Church, St. John’s Lutheran Church and Holy Spirit Catholic Church, and he is extremely

Trinity Episcopal Cathedral is at 2620 Capitol Ave. For more information, go to trinitycathedral. org n

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37


Soul Providers PROMOTING WELL-BEING WITH AERIAL YOGA AND AERIAL SILKS

Y

ou’ve certainly heard the adage that “exercise is the best medicine,” but Dr. Thomas Revesz and his wife, Eva, have taken that notion one step further in their new business, Carmichael Med+Fit, located on Fair Oaks Boulevard just before Marconi Avenue. “The whole idea is about approaching the whole person: mind, body and medical wellness,” explains Eva Revesz, who retired from a busy career as a social worker and full-time lecturer at California State University, Sacramento, to help her husband manage his primary care practice. “We offer a holistic approach to fitness and well-being. “People really need to move, so we’re not just a gym and we’re not just a studio. We’re good for the soul.” Carmichael Med+Fit, which has offered classes since September as part of its soft opening phase, will officially open to the public on Jan. 28. To introduce its unique blend of services, instructors and advanced students will perform demonstrations of Carmichael Med+Fit’s primary components, aerial yoga and aerial silks. “Aerial is a beautiful tool,” says Ivy Grace, the business’s director of healing arts, operations coordinator and aerial yoga instructor. “There’s something for everybody, whether you’re completely new to yoga or really experienced. You can do very easy poses or very challenging ones. “I specialize in making yoga accessible and it’s very individualized. Whatever you need in that moment on that day is what I help you achieve.” Grace’s background is a fascinating mixture of politics (the Florida native studied international politics and By Jessica Laskey neurolinguistics in preparation to Shoptalk become a foreign service officer and she worked in Washington,

JL

38

THE GRID JAN n 17

D.C., when Hilary Clinton was secratary of state) as well as all kinds of yoga, including rehabilitative and trauma-informed yoga for patients recovering from injury—whether physical or emotional. “I guide people to connect with themselves and experience the world around them through mindfulness,” Grace says. “I work with people to build strength you can use in day-to-day life. For example, if I work with an older woman who can’t get out of her chair, we’re going to work on strengthening the muscles that will help her do that more easily. “I want people to be as safe as possible, which is why combining the ‘aerial’ part (a hammock that supports your weight as you complete yoga poses) is so helpful when people come in with joint issues. The hammock takes the pressure off your wrists and being off the ground helps decompress the joints.” Grace’s whole-body approach to yoga fit in perfectly with the Reveszes’ mission to provide both traditional medicine (Thomas Revesz operates a satellite practice out of the building and it was his daughter, a certified Pilates and aerial yoga instructor who convinced him to start the business) and a more holistic practice to encourage movement and well-being. “We wanted to start slowly and find the right people to work with us,” says Eva Revesz, who moved from Montreal to Sacramento in 1994 when her husband bought a primary care practice in town to escape the Canadian winters. “It’s easy to hire someone who just teaches class and leaves, but


“I WANT PEOPLE TO BE AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE, WHICH IS WHY COMBINING THE ‘AERIAL’ PART IS SO HELPFUL WHEN PEOPLE COME IN WITH JOINT ISSUES. THE HAMMOCK TAKES THE PRESSURE OFF YOUR WRISTS AND BEING OFF THE GROUND HELPS DECOMPRESS THE JOINTS.”

Don’t miss the opening celebration on Jan. 28. For more information and class schedules, visit carmichaelmedfit.com. Carmichael Med+Fit is at 6240 Fair Oaks Blvd. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com n

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we want people who are invested in our vision and deal with people on a personal level. That’s why we were so lucky to find Ivy—she’s very committed, she has a lot of knowledge and she’s excellent at meeting people where they are—and Kat Boston (Med+Fit’s director of aerial arts), who’s a former firefighter and a certified EMT and very safety conscious. She helps people go slowly when they first start on the silks. “It’s not about performance, it’s about improving your strength and discovering that you can push yourself to a limit that you never thought you could.” This focus on personal achievement means that no matter what your level of fitness, you can find something exhilarating at Carmichael Med+Fit. “When Tom and his daughter first had the idea for the business, aerial silks seemed like a natural extension of aerial yoga,” Grace explains. “You have to use sheer strength and your own body weight to manipulate the silks, so if you’re not strong enough yet, you can use yoga to train to the point where you’re strong enough for silks. “But it goes both ways: Someone who’s already into fitness but isn’t particularly flexible can get so much out of yoga. That’s why community is huge in our classes. The students are very supportive of each other and their goals, which is what we all wanted to begin with: to cultivate a place of healing.” Sounds like Carmichael Med+Fit is just what the doctor ordered.

5379 H Street #B • 813-5758 • instagram/panache_on_hst

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39


Driven to Succeed REAL ESTATE AGENT BY DAY, PAINTER BY NIGHT

F

or Tim Collom, it’s all or nothing—whether in his job as one of the top real estate agents in town or as an in-demand painter. “If I love something, it becomes an obsession,” the 39 year-old says. “Real estate is my job—and I love it—but painting is my passion. It’s not a hobby, but it’s also not just a talent. It takes practicing over and over again. I don’t need to be the best, but I am driven to get better.” “Driven” doesn’t even begin to describe Collom, who was something of a wunderkind in real estate when he passed the licensing exam when he was only 21 at the behest of one of his strength and conditioning clients. At the time, Collom was training the Sacramento State tennis team after growing up around trainers who worked with greats like Jerry Rice. (Collom is a Bay Area native.) His interest in art was sparked early on by his computer programmer father, who would sketch and paint in the evenings to relax after a long day at companies like Oracle and Apple. But Collom didn’t give his artistic tendencies free rein until about 10 years ago. “I showed interest in art in high school, but I was more interested in being a teenager,” Collom says. “It

was also seen as somewhat unnatural to be interested in art as a male, so I pursued sports training instead.” After following a roommate from Long Beach State to Sac State to finish his degree, Collom found himself face-to-face with local art luminaries like Wayne Thiebaud (whose late son Paul was a close friend) and Gregory Kondos. “I couldn’t help but be influenced by them because I was around them a lot,” Collom recalls. “I would watch and see what they did. I even played tennis with Wayne a few times.” But Collom’s rekindled creative instincts took a back seat to a real estate career that started to skyrocket fairly soon after he received his license. The clever businessman knocked on doors and introduced himself to neighbors to get his name out there at the start of his career—a

move he credits for his success as a real estate agent and as an artist. “I knocked on 8,000 doors a year as an agent, so I did the same thing with galleries as an artist,” Collom says. “I’m not afraid of rejection. In fact, it drives me more.”

His perseverance clearly paid off, considering he routinely sells his colorful paintings depicting vibrant California landscapes and other relatable scenes for $2,000 and beyond here in Sacramento and in Carmel.

jL By Jessica Laskey lom

Realtor and painter Tim Col

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THE GRID JAN n 17


Tim Collom Gallery, the industrial gallery space he runs on 20th Street, was originally intended as a place to exhibit his own art when he bought it four years ago. But when his pieces flew off the walls (he sold 28 of 30 paintings at his most recent show), he decided to offer the space to fellow artists to help them find success as well. “I always wanted a gallery of my own, but I’m certainly not following traditional gallery rules,” says Collom, who paints after work until 2 a.m. and gets back up at 9 a.m. to sell houses. “My job as a gallery director is to market [other artists] and market myself. I fully believe that success is not just about earning money from your art. Money is the easy part. Creating is the difficult, more important part.”

Collom uses social media to market his real estate and his art. “The internet is both your best and worst friend,” he says. “You can post a picture of a piece and sell it immediately, which is great until you run out of pieces, since there’s more demand than supply right now. But you’re also letting people in on the process. They can see your evolution.” Collom has evolved a great deal over his past 17 years in real estate, decade of painting and four years as a gallery director. But you can chalk it all up to his enviable drive and, ultimately, his desire to make the world a little bit brighter. “Why do I paint?” he says. “I want people to smile.” Tim Collom Gallery is at 915 20th St. For more information, go to timcollomgallery.com n

“IF I LOVE SOMETHING, IT BECOMES AN OBSESSION. REAL ESTATE IS MY JOB—AND I LOVE IT—BUT PAINTING IS MY PASSION.”

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41


The Wheelman

HE CYCLES LIKE HIS LIFE DEPENDS ON IT

I

f you plan to live a long, vibrant life and survive to 91, it’s important to find the right sport. Fortunately, a group called the Sacramento Wheelmen makes the sports part easy. The Wheelmen are a bicycle club, among the biggest and most enthusiastic in California. There are around 400 members. They cover a wide spectrum of age and twowheel core competency. Some Wheelmen ride hundreds of miles each week around the Sacramento region. Some travel to places like France, Italy and Spain, where they ride more miles. Other Wheelmen meet at Discovery Park, ride to a nice place for breakfast, pedal home and call it a day. Tom Goodwin represents the infinite possibilities of membership with the Wheelmen. He has cycled across Europe. And he’s cycled across town for breakfast. He happens to be 91, making him the club’s senior member, which he doesn’t consider a praiseworthy accomplishment. “I’m only 91,” he says. He emphasizes the word “only.” While cycling at 91 is impressive despite Goodwin’s modesty, our elder Wheelman is more interested in other numbers. For example, there’s the number 100, which represents the mileage he tries to cover each week on his bike. And there’s 6,000, the annual mileage goal he sets for himself. “I try to ride three or four days a week, 45 or 50 miles,” he says. “I went 66 miles yesterday, and that put me over 6,000 miles for 2016.” Apart from his longevity, Goodwin is a fairly average representative of the Wheelmen.

RG By R.E. Graswich Tom Goodwin rode more than 6,000 miles during last year

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THE GRID JAN n 17


Farm-To-Chopsticks F SINCE 1939

About half the roster is filled with retired women and men, a status that affords such Wheelmen the flexibility to enjoy rides during the week. Other members, still toiling away at day jobs, must wait for the weekend before clipping their bike shoes into their pedals and heading off on adventurous group rides. Wheelmen journeys tend to fall into two categories: breakfast rides and exercise rides. Goodwin enjoys both types. As amateur athletes, some cyclists summon a competitive spirit that rivals the world’s top pros. The Wheelmen have riders who push themselves to earthly limits and thrive in an exhilarating environment of speed and utter exhaustion. Other Wheelmen prefer a more modest pace. They prioritize conviviality and social experience over the thrill of arriving first. That would be Goodwin, taking his time. “Oh, we enjoy the competitive riders,” he says. “They just ride a little faster.” Fast or slow, every cyclist knows the hazards associated with the sport. Cars can present serious problems. So can potholes and gravel and even other riders. Given enough time on a bicycle, every rider eventually tumbles. Goodwin, who takes a philosophical approach to cycling’s dangers, believes the rewards outweigh the risks. “People have been killed while cycling,” he says. “That’s an unfortunate fact. But it hasn’t happened to me yet. I fall off every once in a while, but I’m still alive.” There aren’t many sports in which a 91-year-old can participate at a level comparable to people decades younger. For all of his good health and spiritual bounty, Goodwin does make concessions to age.

“My balance,” he says when asked if any skills have diminished. “Balance is the one thing I’ve lost. It’s not like it used to be when I was 86. That year, I rode 8,222 miles. But other than that, I have just as much enthusiasm today as I did 20 years ago.” Goodwin, who shared ownership and management responsibilities at the iconic Sacramento canvas awning, shading and tent company GoodwinCole before retirement, joined the Wheelmen about 15 years ago. His enthusiasm for the bike group led him into leadership roles. He served as president before stepping down at the end of 2016. “It wasn’t a hard job,” he says. “Basically, I chaired the meetings and made sure they stayed organized. That’s about all I had to do.” Wheelmen membership has allowed Goodwin to make new friends and ride to breakfast locations around the world. He’s joined Wheelmen sojourns to Europe eight or nine times. And he’s made numerous overnight trips to locations around California, places such as San Francisco and Santa Cruz. He packs his bicycle into a vehicle and drives to the starting point. In Guerneville not long ago, his bike was stolen. He says, “It was inside my car in the parking lot, and they took it right out of the car. That’s the way the ball bounces sometimes.” Goodwin replaced the stolen bike with a high-end, carbon-fiber-frame Giant. But bicycle pedigree doesn’t matter to the Wheelmen. “We encourage anyone who can ride to come out and join us,” Goodwin says. “We like anyone who rides a bicycle.”

806 L Street Sacramento • Convenient to the Golden 1 Center frankfats.com

R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com n

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43


Art Preview

GALLERY ART SHOWS IN JANUARY

Patris Studio and Art Gallery will feature a group show through end of January. Shown below: “Donuts.” an oil by Patris. 3460 2nd Ave. patris-studio.com

ARTHOUSE on R presents “Sacrifice Zones”, featuring the work of Leisel Whitlock.. Shown above is a painting by Whitlock. 1021 R Street; arthouseonr.com

Artistic Edge will feature works by Don Tackett, Phyllis Eymann and William Miller. Shown above: “Magic in the Air,” a watercolor by Phyllis Eymann. 1880 Fulton Ave. artisticedgeframing.com

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THE GRID JAN n 17

The KVIE Gallery features the work of Gary Dinnen with ”Wall Dogs and Rabbits” through Jan. 18. KVIE Gallery is at 2030 West El Camino Ave.

Sparrow Gallery presents the work of Mary Kercher and Sara Post through end of January. Shown above: “Small Gem 2,” a mixed media by Sara Post. 2418 K St., sparrowgallerysacramento.com


INSIDE’S

THE HANDLE The Rind 1801 L Street #40 441-7463 L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Cheese-centric menu paired with select wine and beer • therindsacramento.com

Sacramento

Zocolo 1801 Capitol Ave. 441-0303

DOWNTOWN Cafeteria 15L 116 15th Street 551-1559 L D $$ Classic American lunch counter with a millennial vibe • cafeteria15l.com

DeVere’s Pub 1521 L Street L D Full Bar $$ Family-run authentic Irish pub with a classic menu to match • deverespub.com

Downtown & Vine 1200 K Street #8 228-4518 Educational tasting experience of wines by the taste, flight or glass • downtownandvine.com

Ella Dining Room & Bar

Rio City Cafe L D Wine/Beer $$ Bistro favorites with a distinctively Sacramento feeling in a riverfront setting • riocitycafe.com

1112 Second St. 442-4772

2801 Capitol Ave. 455-2422 L D $$$ Full Bar Upscale Northern Italian cuisine

L D $$$ Full Bar Global and California cuisine in an upscale historic Old Sac setting • Firehouseoldsac.com

Café Bernardo

1022 Second St. 441-2211 L D Wine/Beer $$ American bistro favorites with a modern twist in a casual, Old Sac setting • ten22oldsac.com

L D $ Great burgers and more. • williesburgers.com

R STREET Café Bernardo

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Upscale American fare served in an elegant setting • Paragarys.com

1431 R St. 930-9191 B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Casual California cuisine with counter service

Firestone Public House

806 L St. 442-7092 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Chinese favorites in an elegant setting • Fatsrestaurants.com

Ma Jong’s

Grange

Fish Face Poke Bar 1104 R Street Suite 100 L D $$ Humble Hawaiian poke breaks free • fishfacepokebar.com

Hock Farm Craft & Provision

1116 15th Street L D $-$$ Full Bar Gastro-pub cuisine in a stylish industrial setting • ironhorsetavern.net

Old Soul & Pullman Bar 12th & R Streets B L D $ Full-service cafe with artisan coffee roasts, bakery goods and sandwiches • oldsoulco.com

Magpie Cafe

1110 Front Street

442.8226 | riocitycafe.com

Hot Italian

Tapa The World

L D Full Bar $$ Authentic hand-crafted pizzas with inventive ingredients, Gelato• hotitalian.net

2115 J St. 442-4353 L D $-$$ Wine/Beer/Sangria Spanish/world cuisine in a casual authentic atmosphere, live flamenco music - tapathewworld.com

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan

Thai Basil Café

L D Full Bar $$$ Modern American cuisine in an upscale historic setting

2431 J St. 442-7690 L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Housemade curries among their authentic Thai specialties Thaibasilrestaurant.com

Red Rabbit L D $$ Full Bar All things local contribute to a

The Waterboy

sophisticated urban menu • theredrabbit.net

2000 Capitol Ave. 498-9891 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Fine South of France and northern Italian cuisine in a chic neighborhood setting • waterboyrestaurant.com

Paragary’s Bar & Oven 1401 28th St. 457-5737

Revolution Wines

OAK PARK La Venadita

2831 S Street

L D $ Bakery treats and seasonal specialities • hellonido.com

1409 R Street Suite 102

2005 11th Street 382-9722

D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine served in a casual historic Old Sac location • Fatsrestaurants.com

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Wood-fired pizzas in an inventive urban alley setting • federalistpublichouse.com

L D $$-$$$ Wine/Beer Seasonal menu using the best local ingredients • magpiecafe.com

South

1001 Front St. 446-6768

2009 N Street

L D $$ Full Bar Fabulous Outdoor Patio, California cuisine with a French touch • Paragarys.com

Nido Bakery

Fat City Bar & Cafe

Federalist Public House

1601 16th Street

L D $$-$$ Full Bar Celebration of the region’s rich history and bountiful terrain • Paragarys.com

OLD SAC

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cooking served in a casual atmosphere • Paragarys.com

2718 J Street

1415 L St. 440-8888

L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Timeless traditional Southern cuisine, counter service • weheartfriedchicken.com

2730 J St. 442-2552

1215 19th St. 441-6022

Iron Horse Tavern

926 J Street • 492-4450 B L D Full Bar $$$ Simple, seasonal, soulful • grangerestaurant.com

Centro Cocina Mexicana

1627 16th Street 444-3000

1431 L Street L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Cuisine from Japan, Thailand, China ad Vietnam. • majongs.com

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Casual California cuisine with counter service

110 K Street

1213 K St. 448-8900

Frank Fat’s

served a la carte • Biba-restaurant.com

2726 Capitol Ave. 443-1180

Ten 22

L D $$$ Full Bar Modern American cuisine served family-style in a chic, upscale space Elladiningroomandbar.com

L D $$ Full Bar Sports bar with a classical american menu• firestonepublichouse.com

MIDTOWN Biba Ristorante

The Firehouse Restaurant

1131 K St. 443-3772

1132 16th Street

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cuisine served in an authentic artistic setting • zocolosacramento.com

1110 Front Street 442-8226

Willie’s Burgers

Esquire Grill

Distinctively

Shoki Ramen House 1201 R Street L D $$ Japanese fine dining using the best local ingredients • sshokiramenhouse.com

L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Urban winery and tasting room with a creative menu using local sources • rwwinery. com

Skool 2315 K Street

3501 Thurd Ave. 4000-4676 L D $$ Full Bar Authentic Mexican cuisine with simple tasty menu in a colorful historic setting • lavenaditasac.com

Oak Park Brewing Company

D $$ Inventive Japansese-inspired seafood dishes • skoolonkstreet.com

3514 Broadway

Suzie Burger

Vibe Health Bar

29th and P. Sts. 455-3300 L D $ Classic burgers, cheesesteaks, shakes, chili dogs, and other tasty treats • suzieburger.com

L D $$ Full Bar Award-winning beers and a creative pub-style menu in an historic setting • opbrewco.com

3515 Broadway B L D $-$$ Clean, lean & healthy snacks. Acai bowls are speciality. Kombucha on tap • vibehealthbar.com n

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45


This Month @ the Market

A LOOK AT WHAT’S IN SEASON AT LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS IN JANUARY

46

DINO KALE

CHICORY

COLLARD GREENS

Also known as Tuscan kale and Lacinato kale, it has dark blue-green leaves and a bumpy, embossed texture. It’s called dinosaur kale because it’s said to resemble dinosaur skin. Eat it: It’s great in soups and pastas.

This plant has a single long, thick root, plus leaves and flowers that can be used in food. In the South, the root is roasted, cut up and steeped to make a coffee substitute. Eat it: The root can be boiled and eaten as a vegetable.

A Southern staple, these loose-leafed greens are related to cabbage, broccoli, kale and spring greens. Collards are a good source of vitamin C and soluble fiber. Eat it: Braise with bacon, onion and crushed red pepper.

MANDARINS

POMEGRANATE

MUSTARD GREENS

These citrus fruits come in numerous varieties, including clementines, satsumas, Fairchild tangerines and Murcotts. They all contain fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants. Eat it: Add to a salad or salsa.

Originally from Persia, this fruit is nutrient dense and rich in antioxidants. A glass of pomegranate juice has more antioxidants than red wine, green tea, blueberries or cranberries. Eat it: Add the jewel-like seeds to salads.

This cruciferous vegetable is super healthy, with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cholesterol-lowering properties. Eat it: Saute and serve with walnuts.

THE GRID JAN n 17


BUY BOOKS

LOCALLY At These Establishments $34.95 Retail insidesacbook.com Chocolate Fish Coffee

The Pink House

4749 Folsom Blvd.

1462 33rd St.

Crocker Art Museum Store

Time Tested Books

216 O Street

1114 21st Street

DISPLAY: California

Underground Books

35th & Broadway

2814 35th St.

Freeport Bakery 2966 Freeport Blvd. Hot Italian

University Art

627 16th St.

1600 Broadway

WE HAVE A NEW HOME! “CLARA” 2420 N Street is the new home of The School of the Sacramento Ballet! Six state of the art ballet studios for our students.

2601 J St.

2016-2017 registration now open Ages 18 months to the Pre-Professional

Avid Reader

For more information: email: SchoolAdmin@sacballet.org call: (916) 732-3660 www.sacballet.org/the-school

Old Soul Co. 1716 L St.

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Call today!

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Dr. Paul Phillips & Dr. Barry Dunn Serving East Sacramento since 1991 1273 32 Street 452-7874

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47


Coldwell Banker LAND PARK CLASSIC RANCH In desirable College Tract on .3ac lot with 4BD/3BA, newer carpet, hdwd flrs & dual pane windows. Bkyd w/pool $1,175,000 TERESA OLSON 494-1452 CaBRE#: 01880615

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

DESIRABLE POCKET LOCATION! Located in River Oaks Ranch this grand home offers 5bd/3ba, over 3000 sq ft, CH&A & 3 car garage. $699,000 MIKE OWNBEY 616-1607 CaBRE#: 01146313

BEAUTIFUL EAST SAC TUDOR! 3bed, 2bath, updated kitchen & baths, hardwood floors and 2 car garage. MIKE OWNBEY 616-1607 CaBRE#: 01146313

PENDING

IMMACULATE SINGLE STORY! 4 bed/3 bath in Sacramento’s Pocket area lives lrg both inside & out featuring a great rm, a park-like back yard and more. $599,900 SABRA SANCHEZ 508-5313 CaBRE#: 01820635

PENDING

EAST SACRAMENTO VINTAGE! This 2 bd hm has been in the same family since 1924. Full bsemnt, wood flrs, dual pane & blt-in hutch in dining area. $449,000 CATHY SCHAROSCH 801-9613 CaBRE#: 00576371

PRIME LOCATION! Open flr plan, 4bds, spacious family. Bkyrd offers a nice wrap around covered patio, pool & grass area to play. $579,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

CLASSIC COLONIAL HOME! This 3bd+bonus room features a great floor plan, wood floors, balcony off 2 upper bedroom, quarter basement. $460,000 STEPH BAKER 775-3447 CaBRE#: 01402254

PENDING

LOVELY LAND PARK! Charming 2BD w/ bonus room. Orig. kitchen, CH&A, dual pane windows, wood flrs, frplc in living rm. $429,000 SUE OLSON 601-8834 CaBRE#: 00784986

L STREET LOFTS PENTHOUSE #801 CORNER PENTHOUSE, most prestigious in city, 3600sf, 3+bds/3ba, sauna, deck. Doorman. 4 car prking. $3,000,000 MICHAEL ONSTEAD 916-601-5699 CABRE#: 01222608

SOLD

L STREET LOFTS West Penthouse: City skyline view, 18’ ceilings, Gourmet kitchen, frplce, loft bdrm, 2BA, soaking tub & deck. $994,000 MICHAEL ONSTEAD 601-5699 CaBRE#: 01222608

SACRAMENTO METRO OFFICE 730 Alhambra Boulevard #150 • 916.447.5900

WONDERFUL RIVER PARK! Hard to find 4/5 beds,2.5 baths. Nearly 2,000sqft, open flr plan, rmd kitch, HW Flrs, & close to American River. $625,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

ColdwellBankerHomes.com

STATELY GOLDMANOR! Unique hm w/open-feel liv rm/ entertaining space & galley-style kitch. 5bd/3.5ba. Finished bsmnt w/1000sf bonus rm. $1,050,000 POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

facebook.com/cbnorcal

©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

The grid jan 2017  
The grid jan 2017