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JULIET HASS: SACRAMENTO PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH

POCKET • GREENHAVEN • SOUTH POCKET • LITTLE POCKET • RIVERLAKE • DELTA SHORES EAST SACRAMENTO • McKINLEY PARK • RIVER PARK • ELMHURST • TAHOE PARK • CAMPUS COMMONS ARDEN

ARCADE

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DEL PASO MANOR

CARMICHAEL

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693 Clipper Way - $570,000 RIVERFRONT LOT ON THE SACRAMENTO RIVER. 3 bed 2 bath, 1645 sf home meticulously maintained by current owner. Remodeled kitchen, whole house fan, dual pane windows. Gorgeous yard. MONA GERGEN 916-247-9555 DRE-01270375

SOLD

7316 Willow Lake Way - $429,000 ORIGINAL OWNER SOUTH LAND PARK HILLS. Wonderfully cared for 3 bed 2 bath single story. Separate living room and family room, kitchen corian counters. CONNIE LANDSBERG 916-761-0411 DRE-00850625

PENDING

1230 Noonan Drive - $799,500 SOUTH LAND PARK TERRACE. 4 bed 2 bath 2268 sf. One-of-a-kind contemporary with Fab kitchen, cherry cabinets, big island, stainless steel appliances, great master. DAVID KIRRENE 916-531-7495 DRE-01115041

SOLD

7628 West Vista Way - $920,000 AMAZING ARCHITECTURE AND QUALITY. Original owners designed this home off a Frank Lloyd Wright Prairie Style home. Spectacular curb appeal, gorgeous grounds MONA GERGEN 916-247-9555 DRE-01270375

4100 South Land Park Drive - $799,000 SOUTH LAND PARK TERRACE 4 bed 3 bath 3300 sf. With Two 2-car garages and pool. Split level home with huge living room and tree top view upstairs and 2nd kitchen downstatirs PAULA SWAYNE 916-425-9715 DRE-01188158

PENDING

7621 Chappelle Way - $495,000 ELK GROVE HOME BUILT IN 2015. 5 beds / 3 baths, exceptionally maintained Featuring upstairs loft, beautiful laminate floors, landscaped backyard. JULIANNE PARK 916-541-8403 DRE-01999740

PENDING

2169 – 65th Avenue - $265,000 GOLF COURSE VILLAGE 3 bed / 2 bath 1239 sf home in established neighborhood. Easy flow plan with living room fireplace. Easy freeway access. LISA McCAULEY 916-601-5474 DRE-00933026

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3117 Freeport Blvd - $498,000 TWO FANTASTIC HOUSES ON ONE LOT IN LAND PARK. Large private beautifully landscaped yard. One bedroom and Two bedroom houses, extensively remodeled over the last 10 years MONA GERGEN 916-247-9555 DRE-01270375

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EVERY DAY IS A GOOD DAY TO MAKE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD A BET TER PL ACE. APRIL 2020

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PATRICIA PRENDERGAST JESSICA MARKSBURY: SACRAMENTO PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH

ANIKO KIEZEL: SACRAMENTO PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH

EAST SACRAMENTO • McKINLEY PARK • RIVER PARK • ELMHURST • TAHOE PARK • CAMPUS COMMONS

ARDEN • ARCADE • SIERRA OAKS • WILHAGGIN • DEL PASO MANOR • CARMICHAEL

LAND PARK • CURTIS PARK • HOLLYWOOD PARK • SOUTH LAND PARK • THE GRID • OAK PARK

POCKET • GREENHAVEN • SOUTH POCKET • LITTLE POCKET • RIVERLAKE • DELTA SHORES

ARDEN

EAST SACRAMENTO • McKINLEY PARK • RIVER PARK • ELMHURST • TAHOE PARK • CAMPUS COMMONS

EAST SACRAMENTO • McKINLEY PARK • RIVER PARK • ELMHURST • TAHOE PARK • CAMPUS COMMONS

EAST SACRAMENTO • McKINLEY PARK • RIVER PARK • ELMHURST • TAHOE PARK • CAMPUS COMMONS

JESSICA PENA: SACRAMENTO PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH

ARCADE

SIERRA OAKS

WILHAGGIN

DEL PASO MANOR

CARMICHAEL

JULIET HASS: SACRAMENTO PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH

LAND PARK • CURTIS PARK • HOLLYWOOD PARK • SOUTH LAND PARK • THE GRID • OAK PARK

LAND PARK • CURTIS PARK • HOLLYWOOD PARK • SOUTH LAND PARK • THE GRID • OAK PARK

ARDEN

POCKET • GREENHAVEN •

POCKET • GREENHAVEN • SOUTH POCKET • LITTLE POCKET • RIVERLAKE • DELTA SHORES

POCKET • GREENHAVEN • SOUTH POCKET • LITTLE POCKET • RIVERLAKE • DELTA SHORES

SOUTH POCKET • LITTLE POCKET • RIVERLAKE • DELTA SHORES

ARCADE

SIERRA OAKS

WILHAGGIN

DEL PASO MANOR

CARMICHAEL

ARDEN

ARCADE

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3104 O ST. #120 • SACRAMENTO, CA 95816

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3104 O ST. #120 • SACRAMENTO, CA 95816

3104 O ST. #120 • SACRAMENTO, CA 95816

THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES, NEWS & OPINION IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES, NEWS & OPINION IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES, NEWS & OPINION IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES, NEWS & OPINION IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE:

INSIDESACRAMENTO.COM

VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE: INSIDESACRAMENTO.COM

COVER ARTIST

3104 O St. #120, Sac. CA 95816 (Mail Only)

info@insidepublications.com PUBLISHER Cecily Hastings EDITOR Cathryn Rakich editor@insidepublications.com PRODUCTION M.J. McFarland

Julia Hass: “Relics,” photograph PHOTOGRAPHY MONTH(S) SACRAMENTO MOVES FORWARD The creative sector knows how to adapt quickly, so it’s no surprise that the monthlong and highly anticipated April event has been renamed Photography Month(s) Sacramento. Rather than one month of photographic activities, planning is underway to reschedule some of the exhibits and events into the coming months. Exhibit and event updates will be posted at photomonthsac.org, under the "Events.” Please check back regularly for updates.

DESIGN Cindy Fuller PHOTOGRAPHY Linda Smolek, Aniko Kiezel AD COORDINATION Michele Mazzera, Julie Foster DISTRIBUTION Sue Pane Sue@insidepublications.com ACCOUNTING Daniel Nardinelli, COO daniel@insidepublications.com

Lauren Stenvick accounts@insidepublications.com 916.443.5087 ACCOUNT Sally Giancanelli 916.335.6503 SG@insidepublications.com SERVICE TEAM Lauren Mugnaini 916.956.0540 LM@insidepublications.com Lauren Stenvick 916.524.0336 LS@insidepublications.com Victoria Viebrock 916.662.2631 V V@insidepublications.com EDITORIAL POLICY Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Inside Publications. Inside Publications is delivered for free to more than 80,000 households in Sacramento. Printing and distribution costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. Inside Publications welcomes readers’ comments. Letters to the Editor should be submitted via email to editor@insidepublications.com. Please include name, address and phone number. Letters may be published as space permits and edited for brevity. No portion may be reproduced mechanically or electronically without written permission of the publisher. All ad designs & editorial—©

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Submit editorial contributions to editor@insidepublications.com. Submit cover art to publisher@insidepublications.com.

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APRIL 2020 VOL. 7 • ISSUE 3 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 28 30 32 36 38 40 42 44

Publisher's Desk Pocket Life Pocket Beat They Asked For It Building Our Future City Beat Giving Back Gone Not Forgotten Inside Downtown Open House Farm To Fork Spirit Matters Garden Jabber Sports Authority Open Studio Restaurant Insider Pets & Their People Speaking Of Eagles


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Selland’s Market-Cafe in East Sacramento

Payback Time LOCAL BUSINESSES NEED US MORE THAN EVER

P

ublishing a monthly magazine isn’t optimal when information about the coronavirus changes hourly. So most of what you see this month in Inside Sacramento will ideally serve as a welcome and necessary contrast to media approaches that prize speed over accuracy and are intended to generate extreme emotions. Here we love our neighborhoods because their scale is small. Our relationships tend to be more intimate than what a big city or rural community might offer. Leopold Kohr, an Austrian economist and political scientist famed for his opposition to the “cult of bigness” in social organization, said, “Wherever something is wrong, something is too big.” When a virus from China spreads around the world in a matter of weeks, it’s easy to see the downside of globalism.

CH By Cecily Hastings Publisher’s Desk

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So let’s think small. “After all, quarantines and social distancing are all attempts to take systems that are too big and divide them into groups and sizes that we can handle. If you can’t stop an epidemic—your country, state, region, city, town, village, is definitely too big,” wrote Kohr, who died in 1994. The lifeblood of our communities is found in our neighborhoods. They are filled with locally owned businesses and include shops, service providers and food establishments. Our national leaders must recognize that while global players in the travel, hospitality and entertainment industries are suffering huge losses, the little guy has it much worse. Many small businesses in Sacramento operate with low margins and high overheads. Their employees— wait staff, bartenders, cooks or anyone who depends on tips—are being laid off. They don’t have corporate reserves to fall back on. Please follow the medically recommended precautions as we navigate this crisis. But whenever possible, use your dollars to support a local business. Without our collective help, they will be history. Many small restaurants were struggling even in the prosperous years after the Great Recession. If they are trying to survive by providing takeout

food, purchase some every day—it’s a great way to help our neighbors stay open while avoiding crowds and staying safe. If you can buy gift cards to save for when times get better, buy them. Our country has faced worse crises. Those of us who have lived long enough have perspective on our country’s ability to recover. The big question is whether we can muster the strength to fight back when the muscle-memories of sacrifice have atrophied in many of us. I met a mother who recently drove a good distance to visit her young adult children. They refused to touch or hug her. She left after a short while because she was so saddened by their narcissism, drama and hysteria. Other reports show young folks violating rules and acting wildly irresponsible. The mature among us must do our part to keep others calm and steady, even when they don’t always want to hear it. Avoid social media unless it uplifts your spirits and the hopes of others. We have surplus time for ourselves now. Make sure to read broadly and carefully. Read history that shows our human resilience. Listen attentively to reliable sources. Look for ways to help people less fortunate. Go outside. Tip greater than normal. Don’t hoard. Be

conservative in everything you use. But never stifle a generous impulse. We must also repay good faith with good faith. When others disagree, make an effort to hear them out. We are in the midst of grave societal and economic challenges that will hopefully make partisan bickering trivial and ideological purity irrelevant. Please support the fine establishments listed below. They are local businesses. Over the years they supported us with advertising, which helped pay the costs to bring you Inside Sacramento every month. Now they need us to step up and show how much we value them—not simply as businesses that provide wonderful service, but as our friends and neighbors who are hurting. One Speed, 4818 Folsom Blvd., (916) 706-1748, onespeedpizza.com, takeout available. Allora, 5215 Folsom Blvd., (916) 5386434, allorasacramento.com, delivery and takeout available. Selland’s Market-Café, 5340 H St., (916) 736-3333, 915 Broadway, (916) 732-3390, sellands.com, delivery and takeout available. OBO’ Italian Table & Bar, 3145 Folsom Blvd., (916) 822-8720, oboitalian.com, delivery and takeout available.


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www.djkitchen.com 916.925.2577 Hawks Provisions + Public House, 1525 Alhambra Blvd., (916) 588-4440, hawkspublichouse.com, delivery and takeout available. Evan’s Kitchen, 855 57th St., (916) 452-3896, chefevan.com, delivery and takeout available. Bella Bru Café, 5038 Fair Oaks Blvd., (916) 485-2883, bellabrucafe.com, takeout available. Pita Kitchen, 2989 Arden Way, (916) 480-0560, pitakitchenplus.com, takeout available. Wenelli’s Pizza, 4215 Arden Way, (916) 482-1008, wenellispizza.com, delivery and takeout available. Urban Roots Brewery & Smokehouse, 1322 V St., (916) 7063741, urbanrootsbrewing.com, takeout available. Thai: House of Authentic Ingredients, 4701 H St., (916) 942-9008, thaiatsac. com, takeout available. Flaming Grill Café, 2380 Watt Ave., (916) 285-5540, flaminggrillcafe.com, takeout available. Ettore’s Bakery & Café, 2376 Fair Oaks Blvd., (916) 482-0708, ettores.com, takeout and delivery available. Lemon Grass Restaurant, 601 Munroe St., (916) 486-4891, lemongrassrestaurant.com, takeout available.

Woodlake Tavern, 1431 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 514-0405, woodlaketavern. com, delivery and takeout available. Frank Fat's, 806 L St., (916) 4427092, franfats.com, delivery and takeout available. Visit InsideSacramento.com for daily updates and to sign up for our e-newsletter.

EVENT CANCELLATIONS Please check with specific event organizations for the latest information on event cancellations. Many events support nonprofit organizations, so please consider a donation to help them stay afloat in desperate times.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE As we went to print, Sacramento News & Review announced it was shutting down its weekly print operations. The paper’s ad revenue has always been highly dependent on food, drink and events. In addition, the biweekly magazine SubMerge, which covers local art, entertainment and nightlife, has suspended its print edition, citing lost advertising revenue due to business closures and event cancellations as a result of COVID-19. Hopefully, SN&R and SubMerge will find a path forward. The more

local news that’s available, the better for our community. But with the Bee’s bankruptcy, Sacramento readers should not take any local news source for granted, including Inside Sacramento.

Books Connect Us

Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidesacramento.com. Visit the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram: @insidesacramento.com. n

SIGN UP NOW FOR ONLINE NEWSLETTER Visit InsideSacramento. com today and sign up for our digital newsletter bringing you the most up-to-date information on breaking local news, activities and events in our community. As Inside Sacramento continues to provide its readers high-quality local journalism, your support is critical. Our goal is to ensure our print publication arrives in your mailbox, free of charge each month, along with our e-newsletter to your inbox. To help keep that goal alive, please also consider a membership today.

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Jane Ingram Allen

AArtt

Meets Earth

STUDENTS HELP BEAUTIFY TRUTH GARDEN

community-driven art. Nine visual and performing artists have been chosen to design community-based art projects in each City Council district. “Allen was specifically chosen for District 7 because her environmental art is so ideally aligned with a community garden,” says Melissa Cirone, arts program coordinator with the city. A celebratory event will be held when Allen’s community garden project is completed. Stay tuned for updates and stop by the garden to see the progress.

EARTH DAY AT 50

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anta Rosa artist Jane Ingram Allen has been working with local residents and students from the School of Engineering and Sciences to create a sculpture for the Sojourner Truth Community Garden adjacent to the Pocket school.

By Corky Mau Pocket Life

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Her piece, an environmental sculpture made of biodegradable paper and wildflower seeds, is a welcome addition to the garden. “I make paper from local plant waste materials and seeds,” she says. “Over time, the paper will dissolve into compost and nourish the soil. The seeds will sprout and eventually produce food and habitat for wildlife in the community garden. I want my art to encourage public awareness about local environmental issues. I’m enjoying working with local community members on this effort.” The Artists-in-Residence program was recently launched by the city. The goal is to enhance open spaces with

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. To commemorate on the local level, volunteers are needed to spruce up our own urban forest in Seymour Park on Florin Road. The event starts at 9 a.m. on Saturday, April 25. Equipment will be provided, but volunteers should wear appropriate clothes and shoes. At last year’s Earth Day, more than 200 people cleaned up the Sacramento River Parkway at Garcia Bend Park. To volunteer, contact Parks Commissioner Devin Lavelle at parks@ devinlavelle.com or (916) 808-7192.

E-WASTE BE GONE The Music Boosters at John F. Kennedy High School will host the

annual Shredding & E-Waste Day on Saturday, April 4, from 8 a.m. to noon. Pack those boxes and bags with old documents and e-waste, and head to the JFK student parking lot. Helpers will unload your car.

LIBRARY SPRINGS INTO ACTION Spring means more special programs at the Robbie Waters Library. View the month’s calendar online at www. saclibrary.org, or stop by the library to pick up a schedule. A few items of interest: • Wild Things—Saturday, April 11, 3 p.m. Attend this free workshop and learn why protecting wildlife matters. Wild Things Inc. leads this animal and habitat education program to introduce nature’s wildlife ambassadors—live birds and reptiles—to the public. • Ikebana—Saturday, April 18, 3 p.m. Here’s a free workshop by Ikebana International in Sacramento. Participants will make floral arrangements to take home. Bring your garden clippers and a hand towel. All other supplies will be provided. Preregister in advance with library staff. • Blood Pressure Drop-In Clinic— Saturday, April 25, 1–2 p.m. Get a free read of your blood pressure. No appointment—just stop by and a nurse will check it for you. Participants will receive Senior


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103 CANDLES Here’s a shout out to longtime Pocket resident Mae Chan, who turns 103 on April 8. In the 1980s, she and her two sisters opened a small restaurant on Riverside Boulevard called Chopsticks Express, across from Elks Lodge No. 6. They sold the place because Chan got tired of working and decided it took time away from mahjong.

5900 Elvas Avenue Sacramento, CA 95819 www.stfrancishs.org/summer

Her secret to a long life? “Playing mahjong seven days a week,” she says. “I’d still be playing if I could see better.” Macular degeneration has impaired her vision, not her humor. Corky Mau can be reached at corky. sue50@gmail.com. Submissions are due six weeks prior to publication month. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Jim Geary (left) and Jim Houpt

Parkway Progress CITY SET TO TAKE LAND FOR LEVEE TRAIL

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he Pocket-Greenhaven community has two citizen-warriors who work hard to keep bureaucrats honest. They are the two Jims—Jim Geary and Jim Houpt. Both lawyers, they love to deploy their expertise to dissect documents, ask tough questions and insist authorities deliver services as promised. The two Jims give special attention to the river and levees that make

RG By R.E. Graswich Pocket Beat

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Pocket and Greenhaven unique. They are serious about parks and recreation. They believe the city must deliver on its 1975 promise to complete the Sacramento River Parkway atop the levee from Freeport to Downtown. The Jims were pleased last year when the Sacramento City Council unanimously agreed to move forward with eminent domain easement acquisitions along the levee, a big step toward finishing the parkway. The acquisitions involve tiny strips of backyard footage claimed by property owners along the levee. For decades, a few homeowners insisted they “owned” the levee, which was ridiculous. The state owns the levee. It controls everything that happens there. While levee ownership is clear, the city believes the property owners

may have some claim to title for land beneath the levee, whatever that means. To avoid a legal rabbit hole, the city agreed to buy small recreational easements from levee property owners. If owners refuse the city’s generosity, easements will be taken through eminent domain for public benefit. The two Jims have had many discussions about the city’s strategy. While they don’t necessarily embrace the city’s theories, they cheer the decision to move ahead. For the Jims, what matters is public access to the river and levee—now, not years down the road. Which is why the Jims have been asking City Hall: What’s happening with eminent domain? The answer: Nothing, yet. While the City Council green-lighted the

acquisition of recreational easements along the levee, the process has been held up by the city’s desire to get other public agencies lined up. It’s a complex exercise, running through all levels of government, federal to local. “The city has budgeted general fund money for the acquisition of the recreational easements, plus the design, permitting and environmental work,” says Dennis Rogers, chief of staff for City Councilmember Rick Jennings, who has led the battle for levee access. “We’re basically making sure everyone is on the same page.” The parkway project involves CalTrans and regional flood agencies. It concerns the Army Corps of Engineers, because the Corps is busily repairing levee sections from Pocket to Downtown. The final paving work


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TRADITIONS FOR THE FUTURE LYON VILLAGE, SACRAMENTO 916.487.7853 for the parkway bike trail can’t be completed until the Corps finishes. Naturally, the two Jims are suspicious of delays. Their suspicions have foundation. A history of excuses and decades of broken promises should make the most optimistic Pocket resident wary. “I’m gratified the city is moving forward even if it’s taking longer than expected,” Houpt says. “We really wouldn’t want the trail paved only to have it torn up by critical work to improve our levee. The city has the luxury of time to make sure it gets everything right.” Geary agrees, but notes the city has ignored his requests for information about eminent domain progress. He says, “A little transparency from the city could go a long way to improving

my opinion of the status of the city’s effort to complete the parkway. Why must we fight for every bit of information?” He’s right. The city’s habit of hiding information about the levee parkway destroys public trust. But the city is determined to acquire easements and build a riverfront bike trail that should have arrived decades ago. It’s nice to know neighbors are ready to yell when progress takes a detour. R.E. Graswich can be reached at regraswich@icloud.com. Previous columns can be read and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

TO AVOID A LEGAL RABBIT HOLE, THE CITY AGREED

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They

Asked For It

MCCLATCHY FAMILY DESERVES NOTHING FROM YOU

L

et’s erase the McClatchy name from Sacramento. Rebrand the high school. Call the park something relevant. As for the little street in Land Park, change it. The name McClatchy means a family best forgotten. Media turned weepy in February when the McClatchy Company declared bankruptcy and ended the family’s 163-year run as the ultimate Sacramento newspaper dynasty. The tears were not deserved. No family made a deeper, longer impact on the city. And no family did more existential harm—using its monopoly to squeeze dollars from local businesses while wrecking labor unions, financing colonial expansions in far-flung markets, minimizing its Sacramento imprint and gutting a vital California media institution. A hedge fund is taking over. It will euthanize the Bee and other McClatchy papers. The family’s destruction of the Bee leaves Sacramento without a daily journalistic powerhouse to protect readers and question politicians. Obese with inherited wealth and anesthetized by profit, the McClatchy family became impotent decades ago. It squandered a legacy of community service and two-fisted journalism in Sacramento. Bankruptcy is a multi-generational, self-inflicted outcome. I worked 35 years for The Sacramento Bee, the McClatchy flagship. When I started, the

RG By R.E. Graswich

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company was still overseen by Eleanor McClatchy and her nephew C.K. From the start, I was indoctrinated with stories about the family’s foresight and generosity— support for local arts, the creation of SMUD, the expansion of UC Davis.

Eleanor sat beside me in the Bee’s third-floor cafeteria at 21st and Q streets. C.K. pedaled his bicycle to work. They were “Sacramento Proud” before pride became a cliché.


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That’s ancient history. By the late 1970s, the beneficence was a façade. Eleanor faded away. C.K. spent more time in San Francisco. The family— known for paying top industry wages— revealed its new priorities by forcing a strike in 1978. The goal was to drive out composing-room workers, modernize and cheapen production. Many people lost their jobs. Ten years later, McClatchy became a publicly traded company. The family maintained control with a dual-class stock scheme that left ordinary stockholders powerless. Profit and expansion were obsessions. The Bee racked up annual profits of 40 percent, driven by extortive ad rates. Local merchants had no alternatives. They had to pay. The family—now the McClatchy Company—returned almost nothing to Sacramento beyond marketing slogans and a Christmas campaign to help needy folks. The campaign was painless for stockholders. Readers paid with donations. The McClatchy arrogance peaked as the internet began to prove its ability to transmit news and information. The family fumbled, unable to respond in a sustained, creative, dynamic way.

3001 P St. Sacramento, CA

At a Bee employee meeting around 2002, I asked senior management about Craigslist, which was expanding with free online classified ads. “What percentage of our profit comes from classified?” I asked. The response was “about 48 percent.” Feeling the floor disappear, I asked, “How do we compete with free?” The answer: We’re the Bee. Craigslist isn’t our competition. Within four years, classified profits were gone. Reporters were being laid off. Around 2004, I asked a senior executive why we didn’t digitize and index our stories from 1857 onward and market a searchable Sacramento website. The answer: We thought about that, but it would cost $250,000. Too expensive. Meantime, bonuses for McClatchy executives were $250,000 at the low end. One day in 2006, 10 months before I quit, McClatchy CEO Gary Pruitt told me the company was buying the Knight Ridder newspaper chain. Pruitt was pleased with himself. I asked if he was worried that nobody else wanted Knight Ridder. He said no, the deal would make McClatchy one of the most powerful newspaper companies in the country. McClatchy paid $6.5 billion. The debt broke the company. Pruitt faced

zero accountability. The family gave him $3.6 million when he quit in 2012, including $3.1 million in deferred compensation. Today, the family is trying to abandon its pension obligations—no surprise. When I joined the Bee, the family owned newspapers in Sacramento, Modesto and Fresno, and TV and radio stations in the Central Valley and Reno. Jobs at the Bee were for life. Pensions were golden. Things should have turned out better. The family could have embraced online search and social media. But search tools were expensive and mysterious. And social media was troublesome, giving readers an independent voice. The company bought more newspapers. Erasing the McClatchy name from Sacramento won’t repair the family’s mistakes. But why should Sacramento honor a dynasty that stopped caring a half-century ago? R.E. Graswich can be reached at regraswich@icloud.com. Previous columns can be read and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Bridge to Perfection CITIES PICK WINNER IN NEW I STREET SPAN

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few months back, Sacramento and West Sacramento announced agreement on design finalists for a new bridge connecting the growing cities. The news was a letdown. Despite extensive community involvement, work from an international design firm and a fair amount of hoopla, it felt as if everyone was trying too hard for something special. The two spans competing to replace the 108-year-old I Street Bridge were thick, bulky and needlessly grandiose. Rather than complement and enhance the surroundings, each finalist loomed over the river like a boisterous, unwelcome hulk.

GD By Gary Delsohn Building Our Future

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Part of Sacramento’s charm is that it’s an unpretentious, if ambitious, city. But the plans seemed more concerned with being noticed than with the utilitarian job of efficiently moving vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians over our namesake river, with some panache. To win the competition, the finalists needed to reimagine their plans. The effort paid off when the winner, by T.Y. Lin International Group, was unveiled at a Downtown media event. It felt like a revelation to a pleased audience. As explained by Jeff Harris, Sacramento city councilmember and vice mayor whose district includes the bridge, and Noel Shamble, chief designer from T.Y. Lin, much of the success can be summed up in a word: aluminum. As the lengthy design process unfolded, with more than 3,800 people participating, there was strong sentiment to include ample room on the bridge for cyclists and pedestrians. The winning design has that and more. It can handle buses and light rail. There are generous overlooks and seating

areas on each riverbank to bring people closer to the water. The bridge, projected for completion in 2023, will be about 100 feet longer than the 200-foot span it replaces. (Actually, the old I Street Bridge, just south of where the new bridge will be

located, isn’t going away. It will carry only rail traffic.) Extra length means more weight for the steel deck and support structure. Normally, extra weight requires higher, bulkier towers. But not in Sacramento, thanks to aluminum.


“We worked tirelessly to come up with new material innovations to make that weight less and allow us to really cut those tower dimensions in half,” Shamble said. Now, the $210 million curvilinear bridge is sleek and graceful. It will wind and flow, like the water, with a sweeping line that extends from riverbank to riverbank. The lighter, thinner towers will be turned 90 degrees from the roadway, further evoking the river’s motion, with transparency built into the design. With arches inclined over the roadway, users will experience a cathedral-like effect under the arches, a gateway experience in the approach. At night, the bridge will be tastefully lit, a glowing connection between two cities striving to take greater advantage of their riverfronts. By the time the bridge opens, the area should be well on its way to a major renaissance, with a new soccer stadium, waterfront entertainment and other amenities, development in the Downtown railyards and more. Mayor Darrell Steinberg was not exaggerating when he said the new bridge “will be an instant landmark.” Because it’s arched and designed to rise for river traffic, as the I Street Bridge does, Shamble said the design is unique in the world. At the media event, U.S. Rep. Doris Matsui, who worked to secure federal funds for almost 90 percent of the cost, pulled the cover from a glass-enclosed model to enthusiastic applause. She described the bridge as “a modern, iconic structure that will define our region for the next century.” It can also lead to more, much-needed bridges, City Councilmember Steve Hansen told the crowd.

“What you have today is a gift to the next generation … that will inspire us to do another bridge at Broadway, another bridge over the American River,” Hansen said. Bridges should be more than a way to stay dry while crossing from one shore to another. At their best, they inspire with beauty, such as the Golden Gate Bridge. They celebrate a city’s architectural heritage, as with the Brooklyn Bridge. No one will compare Sacramento’s new bridge, the first built here since the 1960s, with anything so grand. But by listening

to the community, thinking creatively and seeking to fit in rather than dominate, the two cities delivered a blueprint for what could become the region’s most crowning architectural achievement since the Capitol building. It should also be fun to ride, walk, drive or just kill time on. Gary Delsohn can be reached at gdelsohn@gmail.com. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @ insidesacramento. n

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Fenced Into Office

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Katie Valenzuela will represent District 4 on the Sacramento City Council.

HOW RIVER ACCESS BARRIER SANK HANSEN

broken, unwanted levee fence cost Steve Hansen his political career. One year ago, Hansen decided to stop people from walking onto the Sacramento River levee in Little Pocket. He told city park officials to build a black iron fence and gate on Riverside Boulevard near 35th Avenue. The barricade summarized Hansen’s attitude toward public access and recreation. Don’t come here. You’re not welcome. This river is private. People hated Hansen’s barrier. They hated the exclusion it represented. Within weeks, the fence was twisted and bent so people could climb through. And on Election Day, voters in Sacramento’s fourth City Council district showed Hansen what they thought about his policies and priorities. Thousands

RG By R.E. Graswich City Beat

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License# 1035169 rejected the two-term incumbent councilman and voted for his opponent, Katie Valenzuela, who had never run for public office. Valenzuela never trailed in ballot counts and won easily. She defeated an entrenched incumbent who enjoyed support from City Hall and the Downtown establishment, led by Mayor Darrell Steinberg. Under city rules, Hansen serves until mid-December. He’s the Invisible Man, living a slow political death. Until the final weeks of the campaign, Hansen hardly acknowledged Valenzuela. He debated her once in early February at McClatchy High School. His appearance was prompted by the realization that Valenzuela had gained traction with voters as she walked precincts, visited constituents and out-worked Hansen in Midtown, Land Park and Little Pocket. Rising housing costs prompted Valenzuela to run for City Council. She rents her home in Midtown and felt nobody at City Hall cared about people such as her—young, educated, professional, making her way in the nonprofit advocacy universe of Sacramento. She had neither money nor support nor a realistic chance of winning.

But when she started knocking on doors, meeting voters and asking what they wanted from their City Council representative, she heard a common narrative—Hansen ignores us, he’s never here, he doesn’t care. She heard frustrations about high rents and the explosion of homelessness around Broadway. And she heard about Hansen’s efforts to prevent the completion of the Sacramento River Parkway in Little Pocket. He wanted to keep the levee private for the exclusive enjoyment of about 40 riverfront homeowners. “I can’t tell you how many people brought up the levee access issue and showed me copies of your magazine,” Valenzuela told me. “I didn’t know about the issue, but I started reading about it, and realized why people are so upset. I can’t believe he would stop people from accessing the river.” Housing, homelessness and access: those were the issues voters discussed on the campaign trail. Many voters believed Hansen ignored housing and homelessness and was obsessed with river access. His staff spent weeks pushing parks officials to hurry up and build the fence at Riverside and 35th Avenue.

Hansen dredged up discredited arguments made by riverfront property owners in Pocket and Greenhaven— even the absurd claim that they “own” the levee. He scapegoated homeless people, saying they set brush fires, trashed the shoreline and forced the city to build the fence to block residents from enjoying the levee. He falsely blamed the Americans with Disabilities Act for preventing the city from opening stretches of the levee parkway in Little Pocket. When his messages were challenged, Hansen pleaded poverty. He said the city could not afford a 1-mile asphalt bike path atop the levee north of 35th Avenue. His arguments were weak if not false, but Hansen was clever enough to make some voters believe he was on their side and trying his best. He made them believe the dream of a river parkway from Freeport to Downtown, promised by the city in 1975, is just too much to ask. He was wrong. The city is moving ahead with the river parkway in Pocket and Greenhaven. Valenzuela can celebrate her victory by ripping down Hansen’s fence on Riverside. The disgraced barrier is a symbol of Sacramento’s past, not its future.

OTHER CITY ELECTIONS Two City Council elections will be decided with runoffs in November. In District 2, which includes Woodlake, North Sacramento and Del Paso Heights, incumbent Allen Warren faces Sean Loloee. Neither reached a 50.1 percent majority in the primary. In District 8, which includes Meadowview, Mai Vang and Les Simmons will campaign to replace Larry Carr, who retired. Measure G, the Children’s Fund Act, was defeated. The initiative would have given nonprofits about $12 million per year from the city’s general fund, requiring cuts to public safety and parks. The campaign was tainted by scandal when Children’s Fund promoter Derrell Roberts of the Roberts Family Development Center agreed to pay the state $400,000 to settle a lawsuit by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra alleging misuse of public funds. The story was first reported by Inside Sacramento. R.E. Graswich can be reached at regraswich@icloud.com. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento.com. n

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Mary Beth Arjil

Get a Move On

LOCAL WALKS RAISE FUNDS TO FIGHT PARKINSON’S his can be a busy time of year for Mary Beth Arjil. She has helped organize not one, but two fundraising walks to fight Parkinson’s disease—the Annual Robert G. Smith Walk to COP (Cancel Out Parkinson’s) by the Parkinson Association of Northern California, and Moving Day by the Parkinson’s Foundation. These walks raise crucial funds for research and support for people living with Parkinson’s disease. People like Arjil. Seven years ago, Arjil saw her doctor about a persistent resting tremor

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JL By Jessica Laskey Giving Back: Volunteer Profile

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and was diagnosed with young onset Parkinson’s disease at the age of 43. Though the diagnosis was shocking, she wasted no time getting involved with the Parkinson’s Foundation’s annual Moving Day—an event that not only raises money, but also connects patients and their families to others going through similar experiences. Since 2011, more than 130,000 people have participated in Moving Day events across the country, raising more than $27 million to improve care and advance research for a cure.

“When you’re first diagnosed, it’s very confusing and overwhelming,” says Arjil, who sees a neurologist specializing in movement disorders to help manage her symptoms through medication and exercise. “It’s a big help to have somebody you can talk to. That’s what’s so nice about Moving Day—every year I’ve met multiple people who are newly diagnosed and new to the walk who are glad to have somebody who understands what they’re going through. We all help each other.” When Arjil was first diagnosed, the nearest Moving Day was in San Francisco. But three years ago, the organization decided to branch out and hold a walk in Sacramento—and contacted Arjil to help facilitate it. She now serves on the Moving Day committee managing event logistics and has attended the foundation’s national conference to drum up local volunteers. “The people who work for the foundation are some of the best people I’ve ever met,” Arjil says. “They work so hard and are so committed to getting the word out and supporting volunteers, patients and families with a huge amount of resources.” Arjil also wanted to do more to help her local community, so she started a support group in Carmichael for young onset patients like herself through the Parkinson Association of Northern California. The association provides resources such as support groups, respite for families, and seminars and training for fitness and physical therapy professionals on how to properly work with Parkinson’s patients. The group also holds the annual COP walk sponsored by the Sacramento Embarcadero Lions Club. “Everybody probably knows somebody who has Parkinson’s disease,” Arjil says. “But it really hasn’t been at the forefront, so we’re trying get the word out about these much-needed fundraisers to help support patients and fund research. We’re all working toward a common goal.” Editor’s Note: This month’s Robert G. Smith Walk to COP and Moving Day have been canceled due to COVID-19. For more information on Parkinson’s disease and future fundraising events, visit panctoday.org and parkinson.org. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. Previous profiles can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n


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Gone Not Forgotten 33RD STREET BISTRO MADE COMMUNITY HAPPEN

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n March, neighbors in East Sacramento were stunned to learn 33rd Street Bistro was closing, six months before the 25th anniversary of its opening in 1995. The East Sacramento restaurant was forced to shut down after the new landlord opted for another tenant, co-owner Matt Haines says. I feel a special bond with 33rd Street Bistro and its owners, brothers Matt and Fred Haines, who were born and raised in Sacramento. My husband and I started our business that same year. The Haines family has continually advertised with Inside Sacramento since the Bistro opened. They were one of our beloved “lifetime” advertisers. When the Bistro opened, Matt told me the plan was to showcase the flavors of the Pacific Northwest, where Fred got his start as a chef. They chose the location because the corner of 33rd Street and Folsom Boulevard—which was pretty run down—had potential as a destination. At the time, it was the only restaurant in walking distance from our McKinley Park home. But even more important, the brothers wanted to create a space that could be the cornerstone of

CH By Cecily Hastings

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the community they loved. It was a place where friends old and new could gather and enjoy life. The idea of building community was the part I loved most. My husband and I embarked on a publishing venture in 1995 that was designed to strengthen our communities through sharing great stories of people, places and events in East Sacramento—home for the first edition of Inside. Over the years we met people from outside the neighborhood who often identified themselves as fans of 33rd Street Bistro. For 24 years, the Haines brothers leased their building. But in January, the longtime property owner sold to Dowling Properties of Davis. The brothers were soon told Dowling wanted to “go a different direction.” The Bistro’s month-tomonth lease would not be renewed, Matt says. Dowling received several offers from prospective tenants while the building was in escrow. The new owner opted for an upscale Italian-American restaurant. It will open in a few months. At Dowling’s request, the new tenant approached the Haines brothers and discussed a transition process. Offers and counters were made to sell the name, recipes and personnel, but a deal was not reached. Sadly, the story is common. Business owners who lease rather than purchase their properties often end up shut out. Others I know who bought their buildings a decade or more ago are looking at comfortable retirements, even if their businesses close down or are sold. It’s easy to blame the new owner or tenant, especially if you gauge by the angry reaction

Fred and Matt Haines


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on social media. But as much as I love the Haines brothers and their Bistro, property owners have the right to sell and maximize their profit. Anyone lucky enough to own a home within roughly 10 miles of 33rd and Folsom has seen their home values escalate wildly in the past decade. The Haines brothers also own Suzie Burger, Wildwood Kitchen & Bar in Pavilions Shopping Center and Bistro 33 in Davis. A 25th anniversary party was scheduled for Nov. 14. The date now serves as a benchmark for when

the Haines brothers would like to open another 33rd Street Bistro in East Sacramento, Matt says. “We’re devastated. It’s our family and friends, and it is much bigger than a business with us,” he says. “We started from scratch and built a name for ourselves here. It’s our identity.” Running any type of small business is not for the timid. It’s tough, demanding and often unforgiving. And it’s highly risky, especially in the food business. The presence of deeply resourced national chains coming to town to

Cecily Hastings launched her publishing business the same year Matt Haines (pictured) opened 33rd Street Bistro with his brother Fred.

gobble up food and hospitality dollars adds more pressure, as do rising product and labor costs. The incredible local hospitality scene is the primary reason why I published our book, “Inside Sacramento: The Most Interesting Neighborhood Places in America’s Farm-To-Fork Capital,” in 2017 and 2019. I wanted to showcase the best of the locally owned businesses that make Sacramento unique. The first place I considered for the book was 33rd Street Bistro.

The Haines brothers delivered what they set out to create in 1995. While the Bistro reflected the identity of the Haines brothers, it also captured the identity of East Sacramento. I wish them the very best luck in finding a new home. Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidesacramento.com. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

(From left) Cecily Hastings, Kerry Van Dyke and Michael Bolton enjoy 33rd Street Bistro’s private banquet room.

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Robynne Rose-Haymer chats with Wind Youth Services clients.

Young and Alone WIND SERVES YOUTH WITH NOWHERE TO GO

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omeless young people are found in every corner of Sacramento. Some sleep on the streets. Others couch surf with friends or tap into social services scattered around town. One Downtown organization, Wind Youth Services, is dedicated to helping homeless young people. In recent years, the organization has blossomed as a robust provider of programs and services after near insolvency.

SC By Scot Crocker Inside Downtown

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Growing numbers of unsheltered young people have been an inevitable consequence of Sacramento’s homeless crisis. As the problem expands, so does Wind. The organization served 805 young people in 2018 and 1,029 last year. “The problem keeps getting worse,” says Robynne Rose-Haymer, Wind’s executive director. “We have an influx of young people moving here. There’s little affordable housing and services have not been publicized. We certainly have seen a spike in the need in Sacramento.” When many young people near their 18th birthday, they leave home, driven out by family dysfunction. Often they have no place to go, no strategy for long-term stability, and limited skills and education to thrive in the job market. Drugs and alcohol may play a

role, making daily existence even more difficult. “These young people fall off the workforce roles,” Rose-Haymer says. “The home life starts to fall apart and young people know no options. They don’t know how to complete forms, get housing, open a bank account or even manage housing if they found something.” Wind provides options. It runs the only emergency shelter for homeless and runaway kids. While participants may need training in multiple subject areas, the Wind Downtown drop-in shelter staff explains the basics of survival. They offer support networks, food services, limited health care options, classes and programs, laundry, games and more. “We ask our participants to invest in themselves,” Rose-Haymer says.

“They need to be competent in basic life skills. They need the hard skills like budgeting, getting credit and applying for a job. But they also need access to a learning environment and a path forward into adulthood.” The program teaches young people how failure is not an end but a start. The Wind team takes pride in success stories and the growth of young people. “Everyone knows about our housing issues and the lack of affordable housing for low wage jobs,” Rose-Haymer says. “We have to continue to find housing opportunities and we will continue to work with youth so they can have employment and ability to keep their house once they get it.” Wind’s model includes collaboration with other organizations—service providers with systems to help young people with school, health care, housing and other needs. Beyond the Downtown drop-in shelter, Wind operates group homes and has the only homeless street outreach program in Sacramento. The program is designed to help homeless youth on the streets, building trust and encouraging them to access other services. The outreach teams carry food, clothes and basic necessities. “We want homeless youth to know there’s help out there,” Rose-Haymer says. “Wind has the programs and a great staff ready to help. Our board is very active and we have built strong relationships throughout the community. However, we still need to get the word out about us.” Wind provides other support, including life lessons, education and help with housing. And there’s a focus on job development. “With skills, a minimum-wage employee can advance to $20 to $30 per hour,” Rose-Haymer says. “Or they can take a few classes and get a career tech certificate which can add to their paycheck. Many young people don’t know about Social Security cards, identification, time sheets and other basic skills to acquire and keep a job. We get them prepared.” She adds, “Some of our participants even get jobs here at Wind. We all believe in help and making a difference. It’s really heart-to-heart type of work. It takes special people and we have them here at Wind.” Scot Crocker can be reached at scot@ crockerbranding.com. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @ insidesacramento. n


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Master Class CURTIS PARK HOME MAINTAINS ORIGINAL OLD-WORLD CHARM

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ill Harms is an artist and craftsman who studied with a master in Germany. In 1957, Harms migrated to New York with his parents and siblings. A year later, they crossed the country by bus and landed in Sacramento.

CR By Cathryn Rakich Open House

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“We got out on L Street where the Greyhound bus station was,” Harms says. His first impression was a sleepy village. But the family soon found an apartment at 23rd and G streets, and “that’s when we started loving the area.” On practically a handshake, they purchased a quaint two-story English Tudor built in 1925 in Curtis Park. “The owner said he was interested in selling it to us, so we opened the doors and windows, and started painting and texturing,” Harms recalls. More than six decades later, Harms now shares the 2,200-square-foot home with partner Allison Sabraw, who he met as a neighbor. “I lived right across the street,” Sabraw says. “He was always coming over to visit. We’d have wine and talk. We were really good friends, and it’s just evolved over the years.”

Bill Harms and Allison Sabraw


The four-bedroom two-bath home has seen various upgrades over the years. “What we haven’t done is knock out walls,” Sabraw says. When the Harms family bought the house in 1959, they went to work texturing and painting the walls and ceilings. They also added wood beams in the dining room. Today, each room sports a different vibrant wall color, such as ruby red (handmade by Harms) in the dining room, terra-cotta clay paint in the living room and chartreuse in the kitchen. The moldings, baseboards, doublehung windows and a built-in cabinet in the dining room are original. Harm’s brother, who also trained as a craftsman in Germany, replicated another builtin cabinet in the breakfast nook. Also original is the extra-wide, vertical-grain front door with its window and glass doorknob. Harms created an archway between the breakfast nook and kitchen to replace a “pretty ugly” door, he says. Harms and his brother added three more arches throughout the home,

including a curved pine door, distressed to appear aged, that leads to a wine cellar in the basement. The kitchen has been updated with green Italian tile countertops on one side and butcher block, flanking the stove, on the other. Harms’ brother created new kitchen cabinets with solid-pine doors recessed to replicate the original cabinets. “We made sure to copy the old doors exactly,” Harms says. Two layers of old linoleum in the kitchen, pantry and breakfast nook were ripped up and replaced with engineered hardwood to match the original oak floors throughout the rest of the home. The kitchen leads to a family room with a bar, formerly a linen closet, where the couple entertains. The bar, another creation by Harms’ skilled brother, features hand-finished Honduran mahogany countertop and open shelves. A small window and door in the family room were replaced with a new sliding glass door leading to the brick backyard patio where guests can gather. The lush garden is surrounded by apple, pomegranate and birch trees providing shade and privacy. Up the staircase with its original railing is a bedroom where the walls are covered with grass cloth hung by Harms’ father. “I didn’t have the heart to tear it out,” Harms says. “So I painted over it. You have to keep some things to remember your folks by.” Painted knotty-pine panels line the walls and ceiling of another bedroom, which Sabraw calls her retreat. A small window was replaced with a larger version that looks out over the Curtis

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Park neighborhood. “When girlfriends come over, we come up here and hang out,” Sabraw says. The upstairs bathroom underwent a “semi-major” remodel. “It was horrendous looking when we bought the place,” Harms notes. The remodel was twofold over many years, first to expand the footprint and then to refashion the design, which included replacing the old concrete shower. “With old homes there is a constant need to scope things out to upgrade or repair. Bill takes it on as God-given task,” Sabraw says.

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“Some people work with their hands. Some with their brains,” Harms adds. “Mine is with my hands.” The Curtis Park Home & Garden Tour, originally scheduled for April 25, has been canceled. For information on a possible rescheduling, visit sierra2.org. To recommend a home or garden for Open House, contact Cathryn Rakich at crakich@surewest.net. More photography and previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @ insidesacramento. n


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Fido & Farmers KNOW THE RULES BEFORE BRINGING THE POOCH TO MARKET

Pedals rides in her owner's backpack because she is not allowed to walk through the farmers market.

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t’s a brisk Sunday morning and the farmers market at 8th and W streets is already alive with a confluence of characters. Young families with strollers, college students in knitted sweaters and loyal patrons carrying baskets all buzz from booth to booth collecting organic acorn squash, cagefree brown eggs and lightly bruised oranges. A young man and woman meander down the center corridor doting over a heap of broccoli with a wagging corgi in tow on a short leash. Passersby gesture to the sandy-colored dog with giddy chuckles and small gasps of amusement. When a balding gentleman in jeans and a plaid jacket strides up and gently

pushes a piece of paper into the man’s hand, they all smile politely. Holding the dog’s leash, the man looks down at the wrinkled paper and begins to scan the lengthy text. In bold at the top of the page it reads, “No Dogs at Farmers’ Markets.” It shouldn’t come as a surprise that canines are not allowed at “certified” farmers markets. There are often signs visibly posted throughout the aisles. But are pet dogs really a harmful addition to these outdoor affairs? In 2014, California added amendments to its law on "live animals" in the Retail Food Code related to pet dogs in outdoor dining areas. The law states that patrons may bring their

pet dogs to an outdoor dining area if the establishment owner allows it and certain requirements are met. Requirements include an outdoor entrance, and dogs leashed and under control. Employees also must wash their hands if they touch the canines. Then why doesn’t this law apply to farmers markets? The answer lies in California Health and Safety Code 114259.5, which stipulates that, with the exception of service animals, “live animals may not be allowed in a food facility.” Certified farmers markets, although they usually take place outdoors, fall into the category of a “food facility.”


SHOULD DOGS BE ALLOWED AT FARMERS MARKETS?

Courtney Smith Shared Abundance Organic Farm Auburn

Peter Moua Ge Moua Farm Courtland

Miriam Garcia Yanez Farm Sacramento

Jose Gallardo Gallardo’s Organic Farm Salinas

Sunday Farmers Market

Sunday Farmers Market

Midtown Farmers Market

Midtown Farmers Market

“Personally, I’m a total dog lover, and we have dogs running around the farm! But people don’t contend with dogs lifting their legs on stands.”

“I think it’s OK if the dog is helping the person and is obedient, but not if the dog gets aggressive.”

“Some yes, but not all. When the dogs are tall, they smell the produce and some customers don’t like that.”

“I have no problem with dogs. People come and go, and there’s never a problem.”

The Sunday Farmers Market under the freeway is a certified farmers market. Courtney Smith with Shared Abundance Organic Farm in Auburn cheerfully greets customers from behind a booth at the Sunday market. Smith says although she personally loves dogs, a farmers market with fresh produce and crowds may not be the place for them. “People don’t contend with dogs lifting their legs on stands,” she says. “And sometimes dog hair clings to the lettuce.” Smith mentions that not all markets have the same policy on dogs— or perhaps there are just no signs posted to remind patrons of the law. The Midtown Farmers Market is managed by a Northern Californiabased events marketing agency called Unseen Heroes and hosted by the Midtown Business Association. The market is certified by the Sacramento County Agricultural Commissioner, which allows both “certified” and “uncertified” producers to sell their agricultural products provided all produce meets certain minimum quality standards. At the Midtown Farmers Market, dogs are allowed to walk through the market, but not in the immediate market stalls (service animals are

allowed in all areas). “We periodically set up our 4-footed-favorite mobile PopUp Dog Park adjacent to the market,” says John Adair, director of bid services and communications for the Midtown market. “Many of the surrounding restaurants offer brunch on the patios that are dog-friendly, such as LowBrau and the MARRS building.” Jose Gallardo of Gallardo’s Organic Farm has a booth at the Midtown Farmers Market with a bounty of red, green and rainbow Swiss chard and other fresh produce. Gallardo says he has no problem with dogs, and with patrons walking in and out so quickly it doesn’t seem to cause any issues. Shopping at farmers markets directly supports the farmers and helps preserve California’s farmland. Two year-round markets in Sacramento are the Sunday Farmers Market under the freeway at 8th and W streets, and Saturday’s Midtown Farmers Market on 20th Street between J and K streets. Many other markets will pop up throughout the city as springtime approaches. Tessa Marguerite Outland can be reached at tessa.m.outland@gmail.com. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Saying ‘Thank You’ WHEN GRATITUDE HAS A DEEPER MEANING

t was an icy morning when I trudged the uphill sidewalk that skirts the University of Nevada campus. Behind me, I heard the huffing of a fellow student approaching on his bicycle and I moved to my right to yield for faster traffic. However, I unwittingly detoured the bicyclist already approaching my right and sent him onto a muddy knoll. He managed to stay upright as he passed me. Then, with his tires spitting mud and his voice dripping sarcasm, he yelled, “Thank you SO much!” Unlike the rider, our thanks will often have some basis in sincerity. Yet most of the time, we express it in an automatic manner as a throw-away nicety. We use the polite “thank you”

I

NB By Norris Burkes Spirit Matters

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for people who hold a door open, serve our food or give us a printed program. Occasionally, beyond this level of mannerly gratitude, we venture deeper by offering a thankful tone for the mindful effort someone makes specifically on our behalf. For instance, before I run in a local 10K, I thank race organizers and volunteers. During the race, I will break from my runner’s mental zone to yell, “Thank you, Sacramento PD,” or I’ll give a running applause to the roadside musical entertainers. I do this because I am sympathizing with the laborious effort they’re making to help my cause. Their sheepish, smiling response often tells me they are humbled that I’ve interrupted my runner’s focus to salute their work. But “thank you” goes deeper when the person receiving the thanks echoes your remark. By returning your expression they are acknowledging your effort to be present with their life difficulties. I was visiting a hospice patient when I was blessed with this deeper

expression of gratitude. I arrived at the man’s house to find him better dressed than on recent visits. He wasn’t wearing the typical attire of hospice patients, which is often pajamas, sweatpants or blue jeans. My new friend was sporting slacks, a collared shirt and loafers. “You are looking dapper today,” I told the 90-year-old. “Thank you,” he said. “I told my family that I wanted to look nice today because my chaplain was coming for a visit.” “Ah, thank you,” I said, gushing sincerity. My gratitude centered around two things. First, the nonagenarian paid me a high compliment through his words, “my chaplain.” He is well respected in the religious community for his humanitarian efforts, so he’s likely had many “pastors.” But that day, he singled me out as “my chaplain.” But more than that, I was thanking him because he knew that I knew the honor of being invited into the home of a dying person. He was reflecting that honor by dressing in the attire that

made him feel most like the person he remembered himself to be. Through our mutual recognition of gratitude, he found a safe place to express himself. In the next hour, we shared some laughs, tears, heartaches and celebrations. As I left, he thanked me for coming. Gratefully, his last expression was nothing like I’d heard from the cyclist. You’re likely wondering how I responded to the two-wheeled weaver. Well, in a tone that matched the morning frost, I simply shouted, “You’re welcome!” It’s unlikely the guy will ever come to know me as “my chaplain.” Norris Burkes can be reached at comment@thechaplain.net. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. Burkes is available for public speaking at civic organizations, places of worship, veterans groups and more. For details and fees, visit thechaplain.net. n


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All You Need Is Love

Prior P Pri Pr rio ior to ior to vigorous vig igor o ou ouss pruning, prun pr un nin ing, g, A Anita nit ni ita ta C Clevenger’s leve leve le veng ngger e ’s ’s son and so son an nd daughter-in-law daugght daug da h er-i -in inn-laaw we were m were married arri ried ied iin n th the he Historic Hist Hi stor oriic ic Rose Ros o e Garden. Gardden Ga e . Phot Ph Photo oto to co ccourtesy our urtte tesy tesy s of of Lukin Luuki kinn Photography. Phot Phot Ph otog tog ogra raph ra phy. ph hy. y

VOLUNTEERS BRING LIFE BACK TO HISTORIC ROSE GARDEN he renaissance of the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery is a remarkable volunteer success story. In the words of the Cemetery Master Plan, the cemetery was “barren and lifeless” until volunteers transformed a “neglected burial ground to a vibrant historic cemetery that is a horticultural attraction.” The plan states a vision for the historic cemetery, recognizing three major areas devoted to gardens: Historic Rose Garden, Hamilton Square Perennial Garden and California Native Plant Demonstration Garden. When I started volunteering in the rose garden 18 years ago, the cemetery was full of life. Not only did volunteers work in the three gardens, they cared for hundreds of other adopted plots. Volunteers welcomed and assisted visitors, and conducted an active

T

AC By Anita Clevenger Garden Jabber

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POC APR n 20

program of history and garden tours, classes and events. Founded in 1992, the rose garden is a collection of more than 500 roses from historic sites throughout California that are allowed to grow large in the style of 19th century pioneer plot cemeteries. Old roses and Victorian funerary statuary and monuments are a perfect combination. The rose garden was one of the most inspiring, beautiful and romantic spots I had ever known. Climbing roses clambered up trees, extended over arbors, wrapped around tripods and fountained over supports. A team of volunteers continuously tended the garden, working to preserve its living library of roses, educate the public about them and add beauty to the cemetery. The garden received two international awards for this outstanding effort. One of its many foreign visitors, the president of the United Kingdom’s Royal National Rose Society, said it well: “I feel surrounded by love.” My son and daughter-in-law were married beneath their favorite cemetery rose arbor last April. Many wedding guests expected a somber, funereal

atmosphere. Instead, they were stunned by the beauty of the setting. Most of the wedding guests didn’t realize that city staff had directed the removal of all supports and climbing plants from the cemetery several years earlier, and set requirements to move, remove or cut back many other plants. Their rationale was questioned during heated statements to the Preservation Commission. Rose lovers throughout the world pleaded for the roses to be saved. Staff agreed to a moratorium until revised horticultural guidelines were developed cooperatively. The good news is that a muchimproved set of guidelines was finally approved a year ago. The bad news is they were never implemented. This past winter, staff brought in an outside rosarian who vigorously pruned all of the roses in the collection. The climbing roses within the cemetery were cut back severely, and most of their supports were removed. Roses are tough. They will grow back, some stronger than ever. However, the amount of bloom will be significantly less this spring, and the beauty and romance of the garden may never be the same.

The wedding guests also didn’t realize that cemetery volunteers were under siege, with staff demanding that volunteers sign a very restrictive agreement that included a gag order. I could not bring myself to sign it, and was dismissed as a volunteer the day before the wedding. Other garden volunteers throughout the cemetery chose to leave, feeling that their efforts were neither appreciated nor supported. Staff got the control they wanted, but at a steep cost. A few rose garden volunteers proved they are as tough as the roses. They signed the agreement and continued to work in the garden, hoping to preserve the roses and beauty of this unique garden, develop a cooperative relationship with staff and rebuild a volunteer team. I and others supported them behind the scenes, advising and helping to plan and conduct tours and events sponsored by our parent nonprofit, the Old City Cemetery Committee. We’ve propagated some of the best roses from the collection for the annual Open Gardens and Rose Sale, scheduled for April 18–19. Every year, people line up excitedly waiting for the sale to begin. Even though its gardens are diminished, the cemetery is still a beautiful and historic place. It can have a renaissance once again if staff embraces history, horticulture and volunteers in accordance with the Master Plan. Roses can regrow. New and better supports can be installed. Volunteers can be encouraged once again. All you need is love. The Open Gardens and Rose Sale will be Saturday, April 18, from 9:30 a.m.–2 pm, and Sunday, April 19, from 11 a.m.–2 p.m. at the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery at 1000 Broadway. For a catalog of plants for sale and schedule of events, visit cemeteryrose.org or the Facebook page. The next UC Master Gardener Open Garden will be Wednesday, April 15, from 9 a.m.–noon at the Fair Oaks Horticulture Center at 11549 Fair Oaks Blvd. in Fair Oaks. Anita Clevenger is a platinum Sacramento County Master Gardener. For answers to gardening questions, contact the UC Master Gardeners at (916) 876-5338 or mgsacramento@ ucanr.edu, or visit sacmg.ucanr.edu. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n


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NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SALES Sales Closed February 12 - March 17

95608

4819 MARLBOROUGH WAY $805,000 2749 GUNN RD $395,000 6113 RANGER $365,000 2404 FALLWATER LN $365,000 6314 MADISON AVE $325,000 76 FOOTBRIDGE PL $517,500 5190 FINLANDIA WAY $765,000 5633 ANGELINA AVE $430,000 4912 BROOKGLEN WAY $426,000 6137 STANLEY AVE $599,500 4934 PALOMA AVE $650,000 3705 MACKENZIE LN $644,000 1470 GARY WAY $672,900 4824 ALEXON WAY $460,000 5137 WHISPER OAKS LN $450,000 3521 AUTUMN POINT LN $1,540,000 2845 ROYAL PALM WAY $630,000 6441 MILES LN $375,000 6418 BELGROVE WAY $321,000 5784 HASKELL AVE $465,000 2528 MIDLAND WAY $369,000 4362 VIRGUSELL CIR $465,000 4931 MARLBOROUGH WAY $765,000 6121 WINDING WAY $500,000 6100 STANLEY AVE $549,000 5316 ROBERTSON AVE $375,000 5259 MARIONE DR $1,009,000 6450 WINDING WAY $500,000 6036 ELLERSLEE DR $314,000 4008 REGGIE WAY $379,000 2620 FOOTHILL DR $350,000 5920 COYLE AVE $325,000 4523 JAN DR $475,000 2025 CLAREMONT RD $850,000 5947 RIVER OAK WAY $1,275,000 4016 EASTWOOD VILLAGE LN $385,000 2230 HILLCREST WAY $799,000 4182 SCRANTON CIR $425,000 6307 MADISON AVE $330,000 4117 SHARWOOD WAY $447,000 6028 SUTTER AVE $425,000 6838 GRANT $250,000 3110 JOELLEN CT $465,000 6707 STEELE OAK LN $869,000 4045 POPPLETON WAY $915,000 5337 HALSTED AVE $505,000

95811

1623 20TH ST

95815

523 SOUTHGATE RD 574 BLACKWOOD ST 162 BAXTER AVE

$548,888 $610,000 $574,000 $205,000

95816

1128 DOLORES WAY $535,000 414 22ND ST $662,500 2230 H ST $640,000 3162 MCKINLEY VILLAGE WAY $755,000 2416 D ST $930,000 3243 DULLANTY WAY $1,085,000

1640 36TH ST 2816 G ST 3005 F ST 3555 D ST

95817

3544 1ST AVE 4220 11TH AVE 3020 MARSHALL WAY 3109 39TH ST 5624 V ST 2738 60TH STREET 3879 8TH AVE 2025 30TH ST 19 MIDWAY CT 4111 8TH AVE

95818

2572 20TH ST 2340 MARSHALL WAY 3265 CROCKER DR 2709 10TH AVE 3610 24TH ST 2916 REGINA WAY 3481 22ND ST 2301 2ND AVE 3154 16TH ST 2356 MARSHALL WAY 2455 CASTRO WAY 2212 PORTOLA WAY 2340 RIVER CATS ALY 2549 10TH AVENUE 1316 BURNETT WAY 3281 CROCKER DR 2029 4TH ST 1803 CASTRO WAY 573 SWANSTON DR 2333 CASTRO WAY 2014 4TH AVE 2114 9TH ST 2681 MONTGOMERY WAY

95819

724 44TH ST 5333 SPILMAN AVE 5109 DOVER AVE 1311 57TH ST 521 PICO WAY 1318 44TH ST 4533 T ST 4911 D ST 511 LOVELLA WAY 4633 P ST 324 41ST ST 5040 MODDISON AVE 5908 CAMELLIA AVE 5329 L ST 936 47TH ST

95820

3415 53RD ST 5400 PRISCILLA LN 6860 BENDER CT

$460,000 $803,000 $566,000 $499,000 $330,000 $170,000 $515,000 $345,000 $400,000 $417,500 $369,000 $354,000 $510,000 $360,000 $558,000 $610,000 $669,999 $680,000 $651,000 $1,100,000 $565,000 $560,000 $610,024 $510,000 $610,000 $593,000 $564,000 $721,000 $555,000 $657,000 $301,000 $585,000 $1,100,000 $759,900 $650,000 $525,000 $770,000 $1,695,000 $660,000 $662,000 $880,000 $1,440,000 $1,500,000 $560,000 $575,000 $515,000 $736,000 $1,075,000 $505,000 $465,000 $740,000 $700,000 $422,200 $290,000 $281,000

3335 64TH ST $489,000 4857 11TH AVE $396,500 4424 11TH AVE $285,000 4631 DEL NORTE BLVD $223,900 3962 44TH ST $199,000 3527 20TH AVE $270,000 4816 36TH ST $240,000 5825 7TH AVE $530,000 7411 25TH AVE $280,000 3620 22ND AVE $262,500 4840 PRISCILLA LN $310,000 3351 58TH ST $445,000 5213 CABOT CIR $333,000 5639 SIERRA VIEW WAY $409,900 4700 14TH AVE $250,000 3701 52ND ST $405,000 4731 16TH AVE $227,500 4311 48TH ST $258,000 4830 76TH ST $230,000 6600 SAN JOAQUIN ST $435,000 4417 W NICHOLS AVE $330,000 5409 8TH AVE $430,000 5404 62ND STREET $275,000 4900 CONCORD RD $280,000 5007 ARGO WAY $307,500 4134 SOLEDAD AVE $300,000 5808 21ST AVE $317,000 3856 38TH ST $290,000 3829 FRANKLIN BLVD $338,000 5081 MENDOCINO $190,000 3904 22ND AVE $168,000 5571 ONTARIO ST $200,000 4731 7TH AVE $425,000 5201 MORENA WAY $260,000 4900 CABRILLO WAY $225,000 3404 22ND AVE $151,000 4537 BRENT CT $283,000 3632 52ND ST $460,000 4840 SE TRINITY CT $238,000 5330 PRISCILLA LN $300,000 3811 35TH ST $255,000 5410 MENDOCINO BLVD $232,000 4941 9TH AVE $337,000 3808 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR BLVD $285,000

95821

3159 BERTIS DR 3631 W COUNTRY CLUB LN 3624 SEAN DR 2831 CARSON WAY 3624 CHADSWORTH WAY 3907 PLAINSFIELD WAY 3015 CREST HAVEN DR 4211 SILVER CREST AVE 2562 CHARLOTTE LN 3968 BRULE CT 3261 WHITNEY AVE 3231 BACK CIR 2916 TIOGA WAY 3261 MORSE AVE 4527 WOODSON AVE 3725 FRENCH AVE

$477,000 $335,000 $329,000 $440,000 $419,000 $415,500 $558,000 $421,000 $333,000 $399,000 $415,000 $223,000 $480,000 $570,000 $425,000 $320,000

3310 POTTER LN 3816 FRENCH AVE 2391 TYROLEAN WAY 3738 EASTERN AVE 2528 MORETTI WAY 4624 MCDONALD DR 3133 WOODMARK CT 2001 EDISON AVE 2651 BELL ST 4260 ALVA CT 3642 BAUSELL ST 3710 SUNNYVALE AVE 4160 DE COSTA AVE 4119 GISELLE CT 4331 ROBERTSON AVE 4012 FULLER WAY 4111 SILVER CREST AVE

95822

2314 HOOKE WAY 1825 65TH AVE 2124 56TH AVE 7465 HITHER WAY 2441 FERNANDEZ DR 2015 MEER WAY 2161 FRUITRIDGE RD 3074 66TH AVE 2111 AARON WAY 1924 65TH AVE 2625 51 AVE 4684 CABANA WAY 7560 MEADOWAIR WAY 11 PARK TREE CT 2348 25TH AVENUE 2220 51ST AVE 4640 ATTAWA AVE 2160 20TH AVE 7399 15TH ST 7577 EDDYLEE WAY 4605 ATTAWA AVE 840 SKIPPER CIR 6224 25TH ST 2171 55TH AVE 2187 63RD AVE 1539 WAKEFIELD WAY 6006 BELLEAU WOOD LN 7542 TWILIGHT DR 7572 19TH ST 1935 NIANTIC WAY 7596 SAN FELICE CIR 5517 HELEN WAY 7031 TAMOSHANTER WAY 6130 MCLAREN AVE 1149 GLENN HOLLY WAY 4821 MONTEREY WAY 2001 68TH AVE

95825

608 COMMONS DR 3208 MERRYWOOD DR 2924 MERRYWOOD DR 237 HARTNELL PL 2133 WINAFRED

$290,000 $389,000 $370,000 $400,000 $280,000 $365,000 $591,400 $325,000 $363,000 $326,000 $539,000 $475,000 $425,000 $541,500 $362,000 $290,000 $615,000 $375,000 $249,000 $220,000 $354,000 $350,000 $406,000 $385,000 $269,000 $299,000 $305,000 $259,888 $740,000 $325,000 $642,888 $355,000 $295,000 $445,000 $174,000 $251,250 $325,000 $308,173 $679,000 $300,000 $295,000 $300,000 $250,000 $262,000 $249,978 $300,000 $300,000 $276,000 $511,000 $250,000 $295,000 $505,000 $651,200 $321,000 $650,000 $307,000 $410,000 $495,000 $290,000

2003 KEITH WAY 2824 MERRYWOOD DR 1820 RICHMOND ST 305 DUNBARTON CIR 3001 EL PRADO WAY 2120 BELL ST 531 HARTNELL PL 611 E RANCH RD 2248 SIERRA BLVD. 2116 MADERA RD 518 HARTNELL PL

95831

6936 S LAND PARK DR 7429 DURFEE WAY 6690 S LAND PARK DR 8 BINGHAM CIR 1309 LYNETTE WAY 6 BIG RIVER CT 689 CLIPPER WAY 10 CACHE RIVER CIR 90 GREENWAY CIR 6637 GLORIA DR 30 SPRINGMIST CT 60 RIO VIALE CT 18 RIVERSTAR CIR 23 OCEANFRONT CT 7316 WILLOW LAKE WAY 6 FLEET CT 9 WINDUBEY CIR

95864

4230 NORTH RIVER WAY 2213 IONE ST 4516 JUNO WAY 3723 LYNWOOD WAY 3644 LUSK DR 862 LA SIERRA DR 821 SAVERIEN DRIVE 2413 AVALON DR 2630 SIERRA BLVD 4401 CLYTIE WAY 2213 EASTERN AVE 4541 JUNO WAY 3236 WINDSOR DR 311 ROSS WAY 1020 MORSE AVE 3116 HURLEY WAY 1840 NEPTUNE WAY 3571 LOS ALAMOS WAY 1237 FITCH WAY 4329 VALMONTE DR 1108 SINGINGWOOD RD 2116 EDITH ST 4235 STOWE WAY 3108 KADEMA DR 2308 SAINT MARKS WAY 3121 BAKULA WAY 917 HAMPTON RD 4345 VULCAN DR 120 CLUNIE DR 4227 LUSK DR 4608 THOR WAY

$305,000 $373,000 $425,000 $435,000 $315,000 $302,500 $635,000 $465,000 $570,000 $322,500 $400,000 $560,500 $400,000 $500,000 $469,000 $487,000 $529,000 $657,000 $394,500 $500,000 $479,000 $455,000 $474,000 $590,500 $435,000 $437,500 $396,000 $355,000 $620,000 $328,300 $419,400 $453,000 $393,000 $575,000 $680,000 $292,000 $750,000 $479,900 $464,000 $465,000 $307,000 $615,000 $665,000 $208,000 $300,000 $594,500 $825,000 $465,000 $315,000 $514,000 $820,000 $850,000 $310,000 $370,000 $315,000 $430,000 $850,000 $530,000 $585,000

February 2020 sees new monthly high for median sales price February closed with 1,014 sales, up 7.4% from the 944 sales in January. Compared to one year ago (1,015), the current Àgure nearly unchanged. Of the 1,014 sales this month, 144 (14.2%) used cash Ànancing, 613 (60.5%) used conventional, 172 (17%) used FHA, 51 (5%) used VA and 34 (3.4%) used Other† types of Ànancing. The median sales price increased 6.1% for the month from $375,000 to $397,750. This Àgure is up 10.5% from Feb. 2019 ($360,000).

34

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Want to Bet? STATE READY TO DIVE INTO SPORTS WAGERING

N

othing bonds sports fans better than a friendly wager. Maybe $20. Or $100. No matter the dollar amount, betting on sports quickens the pulse, heightens the intensity and pulls the fan into the action. When you’ve got money riding on the game, the final score really matters.

RG By R.E. Graswich Sports Authority

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Unfortunately, California sports fans transform themselves into criminals when they make a sports bet. Sports wagering is illegal in the state, whether online or between two neighbors. The only way to stay within the boundaries of California law is to make your wager in Nevada. But the game is changing. Earlier this year, the California Legislature began to examine the benefits of licensed sports betting. Gambling industry experts predict the California sports betting market could be worth $2.5 billion to bookmakers lucky enough to get a license. Sacramento has a rich history of sports betting. Legendary figures Sid

Tenner and Greg Tomita paid their rent servicing sports fans and satisfying the human hunger for action. Tenner and Tomita, both long dead, were old-school bookies. Bettors would call Tenner at Georgian’s card room at 19th and J streets and bark out wagers. Tomita worked the bars, walking from Simon’s to Joe Marty’s and every saloon in between, collecting bets and paying winners. Naturally, those illicit transactions weren’t taxed. If California legalizes sports betting, fees from the billions wagered on sports will be diverted into city, county and state budgets—money that now goes untapped in the sports gambling marketplace.

Sports betting can include absurd propositions and numbingly complex possibilities. Las Vegas sports books offered 18 separate wagers on this year’s two Super Bowl quarterbacks, plus wagers on how long it would take Demi Lovato to sing the national anthem. But the fundamental issues faced by California legislators are simple. There are two big questions the state’s political leaders must answer to unlock the door to sports betting: Where should sports bookies physically locate? And how should online betting schemes operate? California already has a mature gambling infrastructure and culture. The state could accommodate physical sports bets tomorrow. More than 70 card rooms operate in communities as diverse as Sacramento, Fresno, San Luis Obispo, Merced, Santa Clara, Bakersfield, San Diego and Los Angeles. Each could instantly create space to handle sports bets. Moreover, the state has 14 horse racing tracks, from Ferndale to Del Mar, all of which accept racing wagers and could accommodate sports bets within hours if laws were changed. Finally, 69 tribal casinos operate in California, including 16 resorts. With a little remodeling, each could create a lavish sports betting atmosphere. Online betting would add another dimension to California’s plunge. Online wagering means exactly what the name suggests—bettors establish an account with an offshore website, make a deposit with a credit card, bank transfer or bitcoin (offshore gambling sites generally welcome cryptocurrency), check the odds and start betting. Like any website that requires credit cards, online gambling sites have the potential to scam sports bettors. But several have operated for decades, making honest profits from the commissions paid by bettors on each wager. California would probably choose an experienced vendor to handle its online sports action. Just because the choices are simple doesn’t mean California will get sports betting right. The state’s lurch into regulated cannabis has already failed on many levels. Too bad Tenner and Tomita aren’t around to tell legislators how to cash in on a sure thing. R.E. Graswich can be reached at regraswich@icloud.com. Previous columns can be read and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram: @insidesacramento. n


READERS NEAR & FAR 1. Tony Cabral and family in Atlantis, Bahamas. 2. Art Zimmerman, Dr Kari Zimmerman and Leo Holcomb at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Our Lady of Aparecida in Brasília, Brazil. 3. Louanne Steiger Nourse in Sydney, Nova Scotia. 4. Dennis and Karen Loheit at the Snowking Castle in Yellowknife, Canada. 5. Kim and Taylor Garrett visiting the Palace of Versailles, France. 6. Nina Obaldia and Vivian Hernández at the Manuel Antonio National Park in Costa Rica, Central America.

Visit our new website at InsideSacramento.com, under “Near & Far,” for a map with past readers' photos! You can also submit photos directly from our website. It's never been so easy!

Take a picture with Inside and email a high-resolution copy to travel@insidepublications.com or submit directly from our website at InsideSacramento. com. Due to volume of submissions, we cannot guarantee all photos will be printed or posted. Find us on Facebook and Instagram: InsidePublications.

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W

Bryan Valenzuela

Pushing Boundaries CELEBRATED MURAL PAINTER STILL CALLS SACRAMENTO HOME

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hen I catch up with artist Bryan Valenzuela on the phone, he asks if it’s OK that he’s talking to me on a headset while he paints. In San Francisco. On the side of a building. Three stories up. Valenzuela is hard at work on a 48-foot mural in the courtyard of a renovated hotel. What should have taken only a couple of weeks is taking far longer due to unseasonal rains that halt his progress for days at a time. Valenzuela says he doesn’t mind the pauses, but he does worry that he has other projects to attend to and, more importantly, “the faster I get it done, the sooner I can see my dog.” The Orange County native isn’t complaining about the work—in fact, he’s immensely grateful that he’s gotten to a point in his career where all he does is make art. Although, painting wasn’t his first love—he started as a writer, which isn’t surprising when you consider how much text is featured in his artwork. Valenzuela has become known for his unique and utterly arresting style that involves, as he puts it, “the atomization of the figure by carving out shape and light with handwritten text. Though virtually unnoticeable from afar, once the viewer steps closer to each work, they are engulfed in a barrage of words intermingled with other mixed media elements, such as needle and thread, acrylic paint and collage.” After going to high school in the foothills, Valenzuela attended Sacramento State, where he was “lured” into the art department. He graduated in 2003 with his bachelor’s degree in art studio, and has worked and exhibited steadily since then. But the Boulevard Park resident says the moment his career really took off was when he was commissioned by the city of Sacramento and Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission to

JL By Jessica Laskey Open Studio


create the public art installation “Multitudes Converge” at the newly completed Golden 1 Center in 2016. Valenzuela’s hanging sculpture is made up of approximately 400 blownglass spheres in shades of blue and turquoise with hints of gold. “After that commission, I was swept out to sea on a current I didn’t expect,” Valenzuela says. “Golden 1 made it so I could be an artist fulltime. I feel really lucky that I’ve been able to bounce from one project to

a good home base. It’s like a small town that’s also a city—a real hidden gem. It has an amazing, supportive, talented art community and a great pace of life. When you go to other cities like New York, you get off the subway and there’s this ‘whoosh’ of activity. I like the burst of energy, but it’s nice to have a break when I come back.” another, but it’s definitely been a That break will probably be whirlwind.” short-lived if the current demand Since Golden 1, Valenzuela for his talents is any indication. has completed projects all over After completing the mural in San California—including “Kumbaya Francisco, Valenzuela is off to Malibu Moment” for Sacramento’s Wide for another project, then back to Open Walls mural festival in 2017—as Sacramento for a commission with well as in Chicago, New York, New the 1810 Gallery, followed by a solo Orleans and Brooklyn. But no matter show at Beatnik Studios in April and where he travels, he’s always happy to potentially another mural for Wide come home. Open Walls. “Sacramento has been really When he has time in between, he’s good to me,” Valenzuela says. “It’s composing, performing, recording

and touring with the band Exquisite Corps—music is another one of his creative outlets—or walking his dog to his favorite Midtown haunts. Life is a whirlwind right now to be sure, but Valenzuela wouldn’t have it any other way. “I keep challenging myself to do more and more ambitious work and keep pushing the boundaries,” Valenzuela says. “I keep challenging myself to do better.” For more information, visit bryanvalenzuela.com. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. Previous profiles can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Staying on Track LOCAL BREWERY EXPANDS WITH EAST SAC RESTAURANT

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n the early 2000s, local breweries began popping up where no food or drink establishments dared to open before. Light industrial areas, warehouse districts and other commercial spots where rent was cheap and square footage plentiful became destinations for a new generation of brewer. One of Sacramento’s first such breweries was Track 7 Brewing Company, which opened in 2011. The award-winning beer-maker set up shop in a “roll-up door” strip of industrial shops near the train tracks adjacent to Sacramento City College. This out-of-the-way spot turned out to be a popular destination for local beer enthusiasts and set up Track 7 as a standard bearer for Sacramento’s new brewing boom. The Curtis Park-area brewery and taproom expanded, and a second Natomas brewery and taproom opened. Last year, the popular brewery expanded even further, opening The Other Side, an East Sacramento restaurant. This new enterprise brought the ethos of Track 7’s low-frills, industrial pedigree right to the middle of one of Sacramento’s poshest neighborhoods and most bustling restaurant rows. Nestled on the corner of 51st Street and

GS By Greg Sabin Restaurant Insider

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Folsom Boulevard, The Other Side finds itself just blocks away from some of the city’s best casual dining at One Speed and Origami, steps from neighborhood favorites like The Shack and Three Sisters, and a stone’s throw from what is possibly Sacramento’s best fine dining at Allora. What, then, would The Other Side bring to the neighborhood? Sass. That’s what. Pairing simple food and creative beer is no mean feat, and The Other Side has got it nailed. Starting with a menu focused on rotisserie cooking and impeccable execution, The Other Side does things right in almost every way. From brunch to dinner, wings to poutine, this place is hitting the beer snacks and gastro pub vibe right in the kisser. Let’s start with brunch, because I don’t want the rather insanely perfect execution in this otherwise underwhelming category to go unnoticed. Let me put this simply: The Other Side serves the best brunch I’ve had in quite a while. The Monte Cristo sandwich is an item frequently attempted, but rarely perfected. I’d go as far as to say that The Other Side serves a perfect Monte Cristo. Is it iconic? Probably not. Is it traditional? Not quite. But the ham and cheese sandwich brunched up with orange marmalade, berry consommé and powdered sugar, then deep fried in tempura batter, is one of the few things that my wife has refused to share with me in the decade we’ve been together. It’s the best MC I’ve had in my eating years.

However, if the brunch sandwich isn’t your thing, then the fried chicken on a biscuit and gravy is so ridiculously good that you’ll quickly forget how unbelievably indulgent it is. The sunnyside egg topped on the expertly fried chicken topped on the gorgeously gravysoaked biscuit is simply phenomenal. I couldn’t get enough of it. Being a brewery, The Other Side serves my favorite brunch drink as well, the Beer-mosa. A lovely tulip of Belgian ale with a splash of orange juice. This treat is what makes Sunday mornings happy. The regular menu aims for more sharable plates and simple deliciousness. A rotisserie plate of chicken, pork or cauliflower gets served with spot-on pita and sauces. Add on a couple of sides like golden beets and jalapeno slaw, and you’ve really got something. The more indulgent parts of the menu usually include the indulgently indulgent (did I mention indulgent) beer cheese. Man, it’s good. Dip your pretzels in it. Spread it on your fries. Make mac and cheese with it. Slather it on your meats. It doesn’t matter where you put it, the beer cheese will make anything better. Oh, and let’s not forget the burger. The Other Side serves what I like to call the dirty American burger. A thin patty with iceberg, thousand island, tomato and bacon add up to a perfect combo of American eating. They call it the T7B Classic. I call it delicious. This is a light-service, order-atthe-counter kind of place. Seating is communal for the most part with

ample outdoor tables and a convivial atmosphere. There’s beer and wine and soft drinks. There’s plenty of room for the kiddos and adults to enjoy themselves shoulder to shoulder. I’m personally happy to see a well-regarded brewery expand into an impressive dining experience. The Other Side has a bright future and killer menu that will make it a neighborhood favorite for years to come. If nothing else, you owe it to yourself to show up for weekend brunch and devour that Monte Cristo! The Other Side by Track 7 is at 5090 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 475-1875; track7brewing.com. Greg Sabin can be reached at gregsabin@hotmail.com. Our Inside Sacramento Restaurant Guide and previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento. com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Kelly Cunningham and Sadie

Power to the Pets SACRAMENTO RENTERS FACE LACK OF AFFORDABLE ANIMAL-FRIENDLY HOUSING

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hen the owner of a Tahoe Park rental home abruptly sold the house, Kelly Cunningham and her 37-pound Australian shepherd mix, Sadie, found themselves unexpectedly searching for a new place to live. “I started looking for housing and was completely dismayed,” Cunningham says. “There was a

CR By Cathryn Rakich Pets and Their People

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scarcity in rentals that would take pets, specifically a 37-pound dog.” Cunningham learned of a petfriendly rental house near Tahoe Park, complete with a dedicated dog area in the backyard. “I arrived after work during the open house and the agent told me I would have had to arrive at the start. She was already buried in applications and my likelihood of getting the place was next to nothing.” Cunningham inquired about other possibilities. “The agent said, ‘We have no other pet-friendly homes in our system’”—a system with approximately 200 dwellings for rent. “The lack of pet-friendly rentals is a problem,” says David Dickinson,

director of the Sacramento County Animal Shelter on Bradshaw. “Responsible owners need options for rentals.” A search on the real estate database Zillow finds 1,260 available rental homes, condos, townhouses and apartments in Sacramento County. Of those, 499 allow cats, 524 small dogs and 173 large dogs (the definition of small and large dogs varies by rental property). In the 994 square miles that make up Sacramento County, approximately 14 percent of rentals allow large dogs. “I don’t consider 37 pounds a very large dog,” Cunningham says. “But so many draw the line with a small dog or one pet only.”

Available housing options show landlords and management agencies tend to be more amiable to felines and small canines. “Cats can be easily litter box trained and typically do not do damage to dwellings,” Dickinson says. “Dogs are also easily house trained.” After about two months of “worrying and searching,” Cunningham finally landed a duplex in River Park. “At first the landlord said no to dogs.” However, to a strong referral from a friend who rents the other half of the duplex, the landlord agreed to an interview. Renters have to become animal advocates, Cunningham says. Start by suggesting a pet interview. “Make


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an appointment and bring the dog. If you have a certificate of behavior training, bring it.” Cunningham also recommends a letter of referral from past landlords. “If you lapsed on training with your dog, get back to basics,” with commands like sit, down and stay. “Make sure your dog is ready for the interview,” she says. Also, offer to add a statement to the lease agreement that the renter will pay for damages caused by the animal. “If something happens in a house you’re renting, be honest and up front and repair that damage with the landlord’s permission,” Cunningham says. “Be a good renter. A good dog citizen. A good dog advocate.” As the dog foster coordinator for the East Sacramento-based rescue group Happy Tails Pet Sanctuary, Cunningham has firsthand experience with pet owners facing a lack of affordable housing. Requests to surrender animals to Happy Tails has increased over the last two years, she says. “There were a lot of requests in 2019. People having to move. People in tears who

cannot find housing they can afford that allows animals. That’s been a conversation I’ve had over and over again,” she says. “If you think you have to part ways with your animal, you need to plan ahead,” she adds. “Contact rescue groups or make an appointment at the SPCA right away.” The Sacramento SPCA, which mainly accepts owner-surrendered pets, tracks the reasons why people give up their companion animals. In 2019, 255 cats (19 percent of total feline surrenders) and 468 dogs (24 percent of canine surrenders) were given up due to housing-related issues, including foreclosures, homelessness, inadequate houses or yards, landlord rules and moving. “Sacramento is rated as one of the most dog-friendly cities in the nation, yet housing is still one of the top reasons why animals are surrendered by their owners,” says SSPCA CEO Kenn Altine. “As Gov. Newsom boldly pushes to end euthanasia of adoptable or treatable pets in California’s shelters, we must address the reasons

why they are entering shelters, including housing-related issues.” Newsom’s inclusion of $50 million in his 2020-21 budget proposal to help California become a “no-kill” state has won praise and skepticism among animal advocates. “If Gov. Newsom’s investment in California becoming a no-kill is going to be successful, then we’ve got to change the way landlords and building owners look at pet ownership. And also help renters understand their rights and obligations,” Cunningham says. “Lack of pet-friendly housing is a major reason for pet abandonment and relinquishment to animal shelters,” according to the No Kill Advocacy Center, which offers model legislation to prohibit housing discrimination against people with animal companions. “As long as reasonable concerns about pets are addressed—such as a deposit against damage—the privilege of living with a dog, cat or other animal should not be reserved to those fortunate enough to own their own home.”

With pet-friendly housing comes an additional monthly rental charge, as well as an often-hefty pet deposit. The Zillow search found prices for petfriendly rentals ranging from $925 a month for a one-bedroom apartment to $5,000 a month for a six-bedroom home. With all the new multi-unit housing being built in Sacramento, Cunningham is hopeful there will be more affordable options for people with companion animals. “Landlords are a huge part of the issue. By saying no to animals, they are ending up in the shelters and rescues. These animals are the unseen victims.” “Landlords have all the power,” Cunningham adds. “They have to recognize pets as family. They are saying no to someone’s emotional support. Money cannot be the sole factor.” Cathryn Rakich can be reached at crakich@surewest.net. Previous columns can be found and shared at the all-new InsideSacramento.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @insidesacramento. n

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Speaking of Eagles LIBRARY TALK EXPLORES THE NATIONAL BIRD IN OUR SUBURBS

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he ongoing—and increasing— presence of bald eagles on the American River is the subject of a Carmichael Library talk on Thursday, April 30. Photographer/ author Susan Maxwell Skinner will present photos and stories of the newcomers’ migration to areas considered closest ever to Sacramento. Maxwell Skinner located an adult female and a sub-adult mate in 2016.

SMS Photos by Susan Maxwell Skinner

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She recorded their courtship and the construction their first nest. Subsequent photography of four sets of eaglets hatched in the eyrie has achieved worldwide circulation. Beyond the first couple, at least two more pairs of bald eagles have since established local territory and the researcher believes the species could be common on the Sacramento and American rivers within a decade. The original parents’ fourth set of chicks recently busted from baseball-size eggs. Dawn-to-dusk hunting by both parents brings nourishing prey and the babies will soon achieve their great adult size. At around 13 weeks, they will spread 7-foot wings and fly. Maxwell Skinner has recorded maiden flights—and the dramas

of fledging day—by the previous chicks. Parental devotion comes with sacrifice, she notes. Exhausted by childcare, mom and pop complete each parenting season with tough love. They escape, leaving juveniles in the care of babysitters. Mom and pop later reclaim their territory and rebuild the nest for next season. A testament to the regeneration of a species threated once with extinction, this American River family’s presence is a joy to flightpath neighborhoods. The birds remain federally protected, and for fans unable to peer inside the eyrie, Maxwell Skinner’s photography is the next best thing to an eagle-cam. Her stories underscore the intelligence, efficiency and resilience of the species.

“They’re also selfless providers, committed to family and to raising independent kids,” she says. “They’re fantastic stewards of nature and we might learn much from them.” Carmichael Library is at 5605 Marconi Ave. The free presentation begins at 6:30 pm. Eagle photo cards and the author’s book on Carmichael will be available for purchase. Note: The nest location is not provided to protect the raptors. Susan Maxwell Skinner’s wildlife observations may be followed on Facebook under Susan Maxwell Skinner—American River Nature Blog. n


LEEKS

Commonly found in Asian dishes, these greens are mildly sweet and buttery. Early in the season, they are tender enough to eat raw. To eat: Use to wrap fish or seafood before cooking.

FAVA GREENS This vegetable, which is related to onions and garlic, is sweet and delicately flavored. Trim the tough green leaves and use the white stalk. To eat: Use to add flavorr to stocks, soups or stews..

MORELS

This mushroom has a strong, nutty, earthy flavor. Its harvest season is short, but stro you can find dried morels year-round. To eat: Saute gently in but butter with chopped shallots, then add cream for a lovely, light sauce.

Monthly Market A LOOK AT WHAT’S IN SEASON AT LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS IN APRIL

STRAWBERRIES

This popular fruit, with its fresh aroma, bright red color and sweetness, po is a sure sign that spring has arrived in Sacramento. To eat: Eat right out of the basket, or serve with whipped cream or ice cream for f dessert.

ENGLISH PEAS

The pods are not edible, so you must shuck the sweet, tender peas before eating them either raw or cooked. To eat: Steam, boil, blanch or sauté them. They are delicious in pasta with a light, lemony mascarpone sauce.

MUSTARD GREENS

The leaves of the mustard plant are highly nutritious and have a peppery flavor. To eat: Add a small amount of raw greens to a salad.

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INSIDE’S

Willie’s Burgers

Sun & Soil Juice Company

A quirky burger joint 110 K Street • 916.444.2006 williesburgers.com

Raw, organic nutrition from local farms 1912 P Street • 916.341.0327 • sunandsoiljuice.com

THE HANDLE

Suzie Burger Burgers, cheesesteaks and other delights 2820 P Street • 916.455.3500 • suzieburger.com

Ginger Elizabeth Chocolates Unmatched sweet sophistication 1801 L Street, #60 • 916.706.1738 gingerelizabeth.com

Tapa the World Traditional Spanish & world cuisine 2115 J Street • 916.442.4353 tapatheworld.com

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan

DOWNTOWN Cafeteria 15L Classic American dishes with millennial flavor 1116 15th Street • 916.492.1960 cafeteria15l.com

Chocolate Fish Coffee Roasters 3rd and Q Sts.• 916.400.4204 Award-winning roasters • chocolatefishcoffee.com

de Vere’s Irish Pub A lively and authentic Irish family pub 1521 L Street • 916.231.9947 deverespub.com

Downtown & Vine Taste and compare the region’s best wines 1200 K Street, #8 • 916.228.4518 downtownandvine.com

Ella Dining Room & Bar New American farm-to-fork cuisine 1131 K Street • 916.443.3772 elladiningroomandbar.com

Estelle Bakery & Pâtisserie Sweet & savory treats in the French tradition 615 David Stern Walk #100 • 916.551.1500 estellebakery.com

Frank Fat’s

Ma Jong Asian Diner A colorful & casual spot for all food Asian 1431 L Street • 916.442.7555 majongs.com

Mayahuel Mexican cuisine with a wide-ranging tequila menu 1200 K Street • 916.441.7200 experiencemayahuel.com

Old Soul Artisan pastries and roasted coffee 555 Capitol Mall • 916.890.1555 oldsoulco.com

Preservation & Company Preserving delicious produce from local farms 1717 19th Street #B • 916.706.1044 preservationandco.com

Public House Downtown Hip and happy sports bar with great food 1132 16th Street • 916.446.0888 firestonepublichouse.com

Solomon’s Delicatessen

The Rind A cheese-centric food and wine bar 1801 L Street # 40 • 916.441.7463 therindsacramento.com

The Firehouse Restaurant The premiere dining destination in historic setting 1112 2nd Street • 916.442.4772 firehouseoldsac.com

Rio City Café California-inspired menu on the riverfront 1110 Front Street • 916.442.8226 riocitycafe.com

Camellia Waldorf School

LAND PARK

MIDTOWN

Chocolate Fish Coffee Roasters

Biba Ristorante Italiano Legendary fine Italian cuisine 2801 Capitol Avenue • 916.455.2422 biba-restaurant.com

Block Butcher Bar

Mexican cuisine in a festive, colorful setting 2730 J Street • 916.442.2552 paragarys.com

Federalist Public House Signature woodfired pizzas and local craft beers 2009 Matsui Alley • 916.661.6134 federalistpublichouse.com

Lowbrau Bierhalle Modern-rustic German beer hall 1050 20th Street • 916.452.7594 lowbrausacramento.com

2940 Freeport Blvd. • 916.346.4731 chocolatefishcoffee.com

Freeport Bakery Award-winning neighborhood bakery 2966 Freeport Blvd. • 916.442.4256 freeportbakery.com

Iron Grill A mecca to hearty eating 2422 13th Street • 916.737.5115 irongrillsacramento.com

Riverside Clubhouse Traditional Amercian classic menu 2633 Riverside Blvd. • 916.448.9988 riversideclubhouse.com

Selland’s Market-Café Family-friendly neighborhood café 915 Broadway • 916. 732.3390 sellands.com

Taylor’s Market & Kitchen

Old Soul at The Weatherstone

A reputation for service & quality 2900 & 2924 Freeport Blvd • 916.443.5154 taylorsmarket.com

Artisan pastries and roasted coffee 812 21st Street • 916.443.6340 oldsoulco.com

Vic’s Ice Cream & Café

Paragary’s

The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar A focus on all things local 2718 J Street • 916.706.2275 • theredrabbit.net

Urban winery and kitchen 2831 S Street • 916.444.7711 • rev.wine

Sac Natural Foods Co-Op Omnivore, vegan, raw, paleo, organic, glutenfree and carnivore sustenance 2820 R Street • 916.455.2667 • sac.coop

POC APR n 20

Classic European with locally sourced ingredients 2000 Capitol Ave. • 916.498.9891 waterboyrestaurant.com

Outstanding dining in a garden setting 2760 Sutterville Rd. • 916.452.2809 casagardenrestaurant.org

Revolution Wines

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The Waterboy

Casa Garden Restaurant

French inspired bistro in chic new environment 1401 28th Street • 916.457.5737 • paragarys.com

Preschool - Kindergarten through 8th grade

Award-winning specialty coffee 2200 K Street • 2829 S Street 1010 9th Street • 4201 H Street 2600 Fair Oaks Boulevard #101 • templecoffee.com

Tastes inspired by the town square of Mexico City 1801 Capitol Avenue • 916.441.0303 zocalosacramento.com

Centro Cocina Mexicana

OLD SAC

Temple Coffee Roasters

Zocolo

South

Grange Restaurant & Bar

Casual Mexican in a lovely park setting 917 9th Street • 916.970.5354 lacosechasacramento.com

Artisan pastries and roasted coffee 1716 L Street (rear alley) • 916.443.7685 oldsoulco.com

Specializing in housemade salumi and cocktails 1050 20th Street • 916.476.6306 blockbutcherbar.com

Fine Chinese dining in an elegant interior 806 L Street • 916.442.7092 frankfats.com

La Cosecha by Mayahuel

Old Soul

A classic delicatessen experience 730 K Street • 916.857.8200 Solomonsdelicatessen.com

Timeless traditions of Southern cooking 2005 11th Street • 916.382.9722 weheartfriedchicken.com

The city’s quintessential dining destination 926 J St. • 916.492.4450 grangesacramento.com

Farm-fresh New American cuisine 1215 19th Street • 916.441.6022 mulvaneysbl.com

Family owned since 1947 3199 Riverside Blvd. • 916.448.0892 vicsicecream.com

Willie’s Burgers A quirky burger joint 2415 16th Street • 916.444.2006 williesburgers.com n


MOVING FORWARD–LITERALLY!

r r

We’ve updated our name: Photography Month(s) Sacramento. Events and exhibits are being rescheduled into summer and early fall. Updates will be posted at: photomonthsac.org under the Events tab. The website will be updated throughout 2020. Please check back regularly over the next 8-to-12 weeks for programming information. Lets keep the celebration moving forward!

PRESENTED BY VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER, THE CITY OF SACRAMENTO AND A HOST OF COMMUNITY PARTNERS

Sacramento’s Most Comprehensive Restaurant Guide is now available @

This APRIL, don’t be a fool for other bread!

InsideSacramento.com OUR BREAD is NEVER A JOKE!

Search More than 80 Local Reviews by Neighborhood and Cuisine!

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Profile for Inside Publications

Inside Pocket April 2020  

Inside Sacramento - Pocket: Edition April 2020

Inside Pocket April 2020  

Inside Sacramento - Pocket: Edition April 2020